Scottie Miller
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Scottie Miller

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“Scottie Miller has a soulful way of writing and delivering a song that will improve your mood and lighten your load. Thus, the new release
“Elixir For The Soul,” as the name implies, is almost medicinal.
Helping spread the tonic are his Re-Uptake Inhibitors, who “funkify” and soularize” this gumbo of piano driven blues-soul. This record is a snapshot of fine players working through well-crafted tunes and coming up with a sound and style that, in a fairly crowded niche, is all their own.
“Move On” is a relationship tune that, in its medium funk groove, describes the situation where the fork in the road is to either get past the problem or separate and move on. Lines about “forget about the past” mix with searing horn lines from Brian “Zoot Simonds” and a solid guitar solo by David Barry (Janet Jackson), that builds volcanically. It starts the disc on a dynamic note. Miller has a natural feel for gospel music that is not copied or studied but just oozes out on the uplifting “Sweet Babe”.
With the Twin Cites as home base, Miller studied in Boston at the renowned Berklee College of Music where he enjoyed a partial Chick Corea scholarship. He returned to Minnesota to play in a series of blues and R&B bands, including Big John Dickerson and Blue Chamber, and also toured with the late rock ‘n roll pioneer Bo Diddley in 2006.
Currently, he divides his time between playing solo, backing national artists such as Ruthie Foster (Blue Corn Records), and fronting The Re-Uptake Inhibitors.
It’s a complete package: Well-written tunes sung with heart and commitment. A band that can handle everything from gut-bucket blues to funk to dynamic soul to elegant jazz. “Elixir For The Soul” shows over and over how music can be, and often is, the best tonic around.”
By John Ziegler - Duluth News Tribune - August 2008



“Elixir For The Soul” - Scottie Miller & The Re-Uptake Inhibitors
“Though Scottie Miller & The Re-Uptake Inhibitors dig satisfyingly into Southern soul, slow blues, and a bit of Latin/Caribbean jazz on their self-released Elixir For The Soul, the project is dominated by dramatic ballads and greasy funk. Under the fingers of Minneapolis keyboard ace Miller, the welcome retro sounds of clavinet and Fender Rhodes, in addition to piano and Hammond organ, lend varied textures to the Inhibitors’ superbad grooves. Sounds like Dr. John meets The Band at Bruce Springsteen’s house. There’s not a weak cut here; among the best are “Burned by the Man,” with Brian “Zoot” Simonds’ squalling sax break, and the roadhouse soul of “Sweet Babe.” Miller’s always-warm vocals make, rather than break, the songs”.
- Tom Hyslop – Blues Revue Magazine January 2008

Minneapolis-based pianist and singer Scottie Miller submits a solo set of piano-vocal arrangements dedicated to masters such as
Otis Spann. “Livin’ Between The Black ‘n White (self-release) sounds fabulous and full. Understated, soulful vocals are the icing on the cake – Miller plays with power, finesse, and imagination, reworking material as diverse as Amos Milburn’s “Bad Bad Whiskey” and Earl King’s funky “It All Went Down the Drain” and successfully translating material from guitarists Lonnie Johnson and Lowell Fulson to the keyboard. A rollicking “Keep Your Hands Out of My Pocket” and a heartfelt take on Big Maceo’s Worried Life Blues” make up a mid-playlist high point. Three Miller originals hold up admirably to the high standards of his heroes. Highly recommended.
-Tom Hyslop – Blues Revue Magazine - Oct/Nov 2006

“The musical influence or New Orleans rhythm and blues extends far north of the Mason-Dixon Line - in fact, all the way up to Minnesota’s Twin Cities, home base for blues pianist Scottie Miller (a.k.a. Scottie “Bones” Miller, not to be confused with the frontman of the Loud Family). Miller fronts his own eponymous group and has spent time on the road with Bo Diddley and others, and he incorporates a number of the Crescent City’s characteristic trickerations - and what Jelly Roll Morton called “the Spanish tinge” - into his fast-fingered keyboard work, alongside the expected Chicago blues and boogie-woogie influences. Miller is also a capable singer and tunesmith, with a well-paced live show that moves seamlessly through a variety of moods and funky grooves.
Dean Minderman - Riverfront Times - St Louis - December 2006

“Miller’s strong voice is entirely suitable for the material and he has the ability to produce a ‘rasping’ quality when required. A skillful performer on the keyboard, his influences are said to be Pinetop Perkins, Memphis Slim, Professor Longhair, Sunnyland Slim, James Booker, Otis SPann and Ray Charles. An impressive roster indeed, but Miller does not pall in comparison. in fact this CD is a real surprise package. of the nince longish tracks I cannot pick any to feature more highly than the others - I enjoyed them all. So, an impressive, highly enjoyable CD, which is well worth a listen.”
- Paul Harris - Blues & Rhythm - The Gospel Truth - May 2003


…“Miller is willing to stretch his inventive capabilities with his instrument, and his penchant for barrelhouse keeps things rocking.…“Miller also has a strong rhythmic sensibility that makes each song sound different, from the tightly wound “Bad Memory” through softer ballad material such as the title track and “When I’m Gone” to the rollicking “You Rescued Me.” Miller is most fun, however, when he lets loose a little, which he does on “40 Days and 40 Nights” and “P-Trap.” Miller seems determined to go for the long haul. In the meantime, he unquestionably has enough mainstream appeal to attract a broad audience within and outside the blues sphere”. - Genevieve Williams – Blues Revue Magazine - DEC/JAN 2005

“When "The Other Side" was released back in 2002, it received good reviews on both sides of the pond, and marked out Scott Miller and his band as an act worth keeping an eye out for. Eighteen months or so down the line the new album, "Days Of Reckoning," picks up right where "The Other Side" left off…"Days of Reckoning" is a very worthy successor to "The Other Side." Miller demonstrates once more that he is a first rate musician, singer and songwriter, deserving of a much wider audience. The fact that all the songs were recorded live in the studio is testament to the quality of the rest of the band too. "Days of Reckoning" is a very fine album that will be appreciated by all blues aficionados, but particularly those who like blues (a) with piano, and (b) with roots in New Orleans.
Gordon Baxter - Blues On Stage/mnblues.com October 2004


“Days of Reckoning”, released in June 2004, is filled with a huge variety of original Piano based grooves. From New Orleans Funk and R&B, to Latin textured Barrelhouse, slow Chicago Blues, Gospel as well as the Cajun Mandolin/Slide - Guitar driven cover of Sonny Landreth’s “Sugar Cane”.
“As if to prove that he has no intention of standing still, Miller then takes the band into the balladry of the title track. It is a real grower, and sounds like the sort of thing that Van Morrison probably wishes he had written. This leads into the excellent "Circle Of Fate," where Miller switches to mandolin, and the harmony vocals top things off nicely. …“The only cover on the album is "Sugar Cane," a Sonny Landreth tune. Paul Mayasich does a great job on guitar on this one, whilst Miller plays mandolin once again. The band then slow the pace down on the ballad, "When I'm Gone." Another grower, this has shades of Dr John in one of his more reflective moments, and even the late great genius, Ray Charles.” –
Gordon Baxter – Blues on Stage/mnblues.com 2004 - All


Discography

The Other Side - Scott Miller
Days Of Reckoning - Scott Miller
Livin' Between The Black n' White - Scottie Miller
Elixir For The Soul - Scottie Miller & The Re-Uptake Inhibitors

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Bio

SCOTTIE “Bones” MILLER
ELIXIR FOR THE SOUL
This is indeed music for the soul. If there is any question about this singer-songwriter-pianist’s abilities to knock the keys right out of a piano, you may as well put it to rest and go see a show for yourself!
Scottie Miller & The Re-Uptake Inhibitors dig satisfyingly into Southern soul, slow blues and a bit of Latin/Caribbean jazz on their self-released 'Elixir For The Soul', the project is dominated by dramatic ballads and greasy funk. Under the fingers of Minneapolis keyboard ace Miller, the welcome retro sounds of clavinet and Fender Rhodes in addition to piano and Hammond organ, lend varied textures to the Inhibitors' superbad grooves. Sounds like Dr. John meets The Band at Bruce Springsteen's house. - Blues Revue Magazine
“Scottie Miller has a soulful way of writing and delivering a song that will improve your mood and lighten your load. Thus, the new release “Elixir For The Soul,” as the name implies, is almost medicinal.
Helping spread the tonic are his Re-Uptake Inhibitors, who “funkify” and soularize” this gumbo of piano driven blues-soul. This record is a snapshot of fine players working through well-crafted tunes and coming up with a sound and style that, in a fairly crowded niche, is all their own.

“We’ve been playing together since the year 2000, and each of us in the band have seen our share of good and bad times, depression, loss of family and loved one’s, relationship’s gone bad, and to perform and record music that reflects our daily lives is a true blessing. (I’ve also had my experience with seratonin re-uptake inhibitors, hence the name on this release). I believe music is an elixir that can lift you up or cradle you when you’re down,” says Scottie.
“Move On” is a relationship tune that, in its medium funk groove, describes the situation where the fork in the road is to either get past the problem or separate and move on. Lines about “forget about the past” mix with searing horn lines from
Brian “Zoot Simonds” and a solid guitar solo by David Barry (Janet Jackson), that builds volcanically. It starts the disc on a dynamic note.
Miller has a natural feel for gospel music that is not copied or studied but just oozes out on the uplifting “Sweet Babe”, which was nominated as a Top 50 single by City Pages, Minneapolis in 2008. This is quite evident as well on his tunes; “The Other Side” and “Days of Reckoning”.
“I’ve always been drawn to Gospel music. I think Gospel sort of finds me. I just write what I feel and am truly grateful if it relates to other peoples lives in some way”, says Scottie.

With the Twin Cites as home base, Miller studied in Boston at the renowned Berklee College of Music where he enjoyed a partial Chick Corea Scholarship in 1986. He returned to Minnesota to play and record with a series of blues and R&B bands, including Big John Dickerson and Blue Chamber.
In 2005 Scottie was selected to represent The Greater Twin Cities Blues Society at the International Blues Challenge in Memphis where he went on to the Top-5 Finalist category. While on route to Memphis he was fortunate enough to meet John May of BB’s Jazz Blues & Soups in St Louis. After playing there and cultivating an instant batch of new fans, he continues to be invited back to headline shows with The “Inhibitors”. One night during a show at BB’s, legendary pianist Johnnie Johnson came to hear Scottie play. “John May gave me a couple nice cigars and told me to bring them to Johnnie and introduce myself,” Scottie states. “He graciously asked me to sit down and I gave him the cigars, and he was like, alright man, now you’re talkin’!” Scottie and Johnnie sat at the table laughing and reminiscing about Johnnie’s musical past. Johhnie enjoyed Scottie’s set so much he sat in with the band. “He played a version of “Georgia” that had that homogenized-jazz Johnnie Johnson arrangement style I will never forget. It was beautiful. I’ve been playing that song on my gig’s ever since that night,” says Scottie. One month later to the day, Johnnie passed away.
Scottie was then invited to play for Johnnie’s tribute concert at Mississippi Nights, and Jefferson Barracks in St Louis to perform his song “The Other Side”. He was also invited to sit in with Bo Diddley. That started his connection to Bo Diddley, and a year later found himself on the “Bo Diddley & Friends” two-month tour of the USA featuring Alvin Youngblood Hart and Ruthie Foster.” Bo and Scottie shared one evening before a concert on the east coast jamming together; “I was just sitting in one of the green-rooms playing an old upright piano, when Bo came in a started improvising lyrics and singing a bunch of church, chant type stuff. We couldn’t stop, it was such a blast! I think Alvin recorded some of it on his phone. I wish I had that recording,” says Scottie.
Along the way Scottie has met many of his favorite artists; Robert Lockwood Jr, Henry Townsend, Dr. John, Henry Butler,