Scott Nolan

Scott Nolan

BandAmericanaSinger/Songwriter

Armed with a bottomless supply of original material that is at once both new yet familiar. Scott Nolan can fill set after set with smoking barn burners or tender tear jerkers ‘til the cows come home.

Biography

The easygoing nonchalance and weary, but not entirely dissatisfied, vocals of Scott Nolan belie the multitude of miles he’s logged -- either fronting his own band, Leaderhouse or serving as a hired gun for bands like Nathan and the New Meanies. Renouncing the jaded attitude and cocksure stance that’s often replete with veterans like Scott, he instead reveals himself as a laid-back master of steady pacing -- one who knows when it’s time for taste and restraint and when it’s time to take his foot off the brake and let ‘er roll.

Rife with top-notch playing from some of Winnipeg’s best musicians, there’s no better example of Scott Nolan’s instinctive feel for a good song than No Bourbon & Bad Radio, his flawless new debut on Transistor 66 Records. This is one of those rare roots-oriented records that exudes variety, yet remains seamless from start to finish.

Opening with the driving-yet-wistful “Golden,” Scott pours out a timeless take on lost love and regret that quickly spills over into the equally melancholy “Sad Story/Beautiful Song” before moving into the country-calypso of “Daytime Moon.” From there the album takes an even deeper dip into sadness with “Cold Cold Change,” and immediately rebounds, hard and bluesy, with the tough, crisp chord-changes of “Postcards.”

Eventually, ¾ of the way through, when you finally relax into the ebb and flow of the album, perhaps thinking of it as a comfortable blanket for an overcast day, Scott jams his foot down on the accelerator for the gritty telecaster twang of “Right on the Wrong Time.” It’s a serious mood-swing interruption that reappears regularly from there on in, ending No Bourbon & Bad Radio with the raucous title-track and leaving the listener with no doubt: This is not some sad-bastard blues-roots-country record, but a testament to an incredibly well-rounded songwriter with plenty of fodder for a great live show.

Yes, the live show: Let’s not forget about that. If you’re reading this, you may very well be lucky enough to have Scott Nolan visiting your town. And whether you’re witness to the spontaneous, explosive instrumental interchange of his full band, or take a stethoscopic glimpse into the heartbeat of each song during Scott’s solo acoustic sets, you’re in for a treat.

Lyrics

The Heart Goes On

Written By: Scott Nolan

The Heart Goes On

My baby’s love I know I can’t beat it

With all my heart and soul I’ll treat her

That’s just the way

the heart goes on sometimes

She’s got those eyes and she’ so forgiving

I see her smile and feel like singing

That’s just the way

the heart goes on sometimes

Come on roll em j

I’m feeling lucky today

But maybe just for today

We may fall we won’t fall lonely

For my love theirs one and only

That’s just the way

the heart goes on sometimes

We’ve got this place we hide out under

Out of the rain and the thunder

That’s just the way

the heart goes on sometimes

And in my ear she whispers sweetly

I’m yours and yours completely

That’s just the way

the heart goes on sometimes


Discography

Postcards (Independent) -2003
Made in Manitoba (MARIA)- 2004
Guess Who's Home (Transistor 66) - 2005
No Bourbon & Bad Radio (Transistor 66) - 2005

Set List

Scott has more than enough original material to fill a 90 minute show or 3 sets a night. As far as covers go, he'll show up on any given night with everything from Tom Waits to Johnny Cash to Carlos Guitarlos on his set list.

Golden
Sad Story/ Beautiful Song
Daytime Moon
Postcards
Can't Get You
Rosie
Right On The Wrong Time
My Harmony
Bus Station Sadness
This Train
Last Sunday Morning
No Bourbon & Bad Radio
Dark and Lonely
This Time
Famous in Texas
Three Shades of Blue
The Heart Goes On
Corinna Sad Eyes
Angel
Crook Road
Clint Duty
Goin' Home
Leavin Vegas
Girl From West Virginia
Good Luck By the Sea