Shadow Circus
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Shadow Circus

New York City, New York, United States | INDIE

New York City, New York, United States | INDIE
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Aug
25
Shadow Circus @ The June Havoc Theater

NYC, New York, USA

NYC, New York, USA

Jul
14
Shadow Circus @ School of Performing Arts

NYC, New York, USA

NYC, New York, USA

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Progressive Rock is a difficult style to not only get used to, but also to effectively do well enough to build an audience. It has everything: concept, a love for intricate musical parts as well as artists who are usually classically trained. Mix in thought and theatre, some metaphor, and if you’re good, you’ll do…ok. Why? Because it’s a sub-class of rock music generally adored by a just a sliver of music lovers.

Yes, King Crimson, Pink Floyd, Rush, and a few others excelled at this art – and it is art – but aside from these bands named, there are so few that could make a decent living at progressive rock. And yet, the art-form is pursued by many bands striving to achieve a King Crimson-like status in a three-chord world dominated by a punk-pop sound. Shadow Circus from NYC is one of those.

Hailing from NYC doesn’t have anything to do with how good they sound, but it just seems that things get a little heavier conceptually in NYC than anywhere else in the country (US). Musically, Shadow Circus is heavily influenced by Yes, with shades of Starcastle sewn in for good measure. With several layers of keyboards, a vocalist/lyricist trained in Musical Theatre, and classically trained instrumentalists, all of the components are here for seriously good music listenings with a finger poised on the replay button.

Welcome to the Freakroom, the debut disc from this band starts off big and maintains that musical regimen throughout. Musically, “Storm Rider” reminds of Starcastle, and the rest of Welcome to the Freakhouse will certainly remind you of all of their other influences. “Inconvenient Compromise,” tucked in to the middle of the album, is one of the best songs on this album. But it is the ready-to-go “Radio People” that has single written all over it with its memorable sing-along chorus, a feat hard to achieve, especially in the prog-rock genre.

It takes a lot to be taken seriously in the ProgRock genre, and Shadow Circus has all of the skill-sets in place to excel at this style. These guys rock, which leaves me anxious for their second album…already. - MusicTAP


Progressive Rock is a difficult style to not only get used to, but also to effectively do well enough to build an audience. It has everything: concept, a love for intricate musical parts as well as artists who are usually classically trained. Mix in thought and theatre, some metaphor, and if you’re good, you’ll do…ok. Why? Because it’s a sub-class of rock music generally adored by a just a sliver of music lovers.

Yes, King Crimson, Pink Floyd, Rush, and a few others excelled at this art – and it is art – but aside from these bands named, there are so few that could make a decent living at progressive rock. And yet, the art-form is pursued by many bands striving to achieve a King Crimson-like status in a three-chord world dominated by a punk-pop sound. Shadow Circus from NYC is one of those.

Hailing from NYC doesn’t have anything to do with how good they sound, but it just seems that things get a little heavier conceptually in NYC than anywhere else in the country (US). Musically, Shadow Circus is heavily influenced by Yes, with shades of Starcastle sewn in for good measure. With several layers of keyboards, a vocalist/lyricist trained in Musical Theatre, and classically trained instrumentalists, all of the components are here for seriously good music listenings with a finger poised on the replay button.

Welcome to the Freakroom, the debut disc from this band starts off big and maintains that musical regimen throughout. Musically, “Storm Rider” reminds of Starcastle, and the rest of Welcome to the Freakhouse will certainly remind you of all of their other influences. “Inconvenient Compromise,” tucked in to the middle of the album, is one of the best songs on this album. But it is the ready-to-go “Radio People” that has single written all over it with its memorable sing-along chorus, a feat hard to achieve, especially in the prog-rock genre.

It takes a lot to be taken seriously in the ProgRock genre, and Shadow Circus has all of the skill-sets in place to excel at this style. These guys rock, which leaves me anxious for their second album…already. - MusicTAP


Comments: "Step right up!" yells through my speakers and it is followed by an extravagant journey through the sonic landscapes of SHADOW CIRCUS, pasted in dark gloomy colours surrounded by some exquisite flickering bright lights. The music is progressive, surprising and melodic. Rooted deeply in the '80's scene and drenched in the more classic '70's sauce of keyboard pumped classic rock dinosaurs. Shadow Circus covers the entire horizon without lacking a very unique overall sound. Let me quote: "You got to hold on tight for the ride of your life …"

Shadow Circus are without doubt one of the most remarkable new prog acts on the MySpace pages. With the new Welcome to the Freakroom spinning round after round, it reveals more of its outstanding beauty with every play. Prior to labelling the album as another concept album, John Fontana himself made clear that this album contains a collection of songs with a cohesive musical and lyrical background.

"Shadow Circus" can best be considered the overture of the story which starts out with a staccato guitar lick in the vein of Harem Scarem's "Warming a Frozen Rose" lick, to open bluntly with extravagance. The track features music and tunes from the travelling circus' of the old days twisted into form for a rocker with bite. Keys and guitar riff going against the grain and each other, creating enough tension and friction to make a Ferris wheel fly. An opener that needs to nest in your brain and won't leave the headroom afterwards. "Storm Rider" is more in the vein of English classic prog acts like Jadis, Pendragon, and above all: IT BITES. Stubborn and unique with an explosive middle section of high musical craftsmanship.

"Inconvenient Compromise" is rooted deeper into the classic progressive scene with its typical (Wakeman) keyboard patterns and swirls, in combination with the archetypical Moog, mellowtron and Korg noises provided by Zack Tenorio-Miller (keys). Keyboards upfront blended by some nu groove sounds and fine guitar playing in the mid section (for a sec only), the track grooves away like a Led Zep song that got infested by Yes proggies! A fine blend of old and new prog.

"Radio People" again is a corker from the It Bites shelves of prog. Keyboards pumping it to the max and drums boosting ponderous and hard, the song is a protest call against the grey masses following seemingly with all new trends and music. Shadow Circus also added their view on a rock ballad with "In the Wake of a Dancing Flame," starting with fine laid back orchestration and falling into the more classic movements for this type of track. Intimate with David Bobick sounding fragile and at times frustrated at heart. A mid section with fine Gilmour-ish guitar playing over rolling drums and percussion. It is until that moment when the band reveals its finest moment; the epical 11.46 "The Journey of Everyman," divided into here musical journey tickling the senses. "So it Begins" opens the journey with a David Foster reminiscent keyboard and piano section over nicely orchestrated flowing tunes. Especially the orchestrations sound exceptionally vivid thanks to Matt's additional cello sections, creating a more lively feel. Underneath all of this smooth playing Matt Masek kicks and slaps his bass in the best Geddy Lee tradition. Combined with the rolling drums and rhythmic shuffles of Corey Folta (dr.) and the razorsharp clean guitar playing of John Fontana, the musical expression explodes off the edges!

"Find Your Way" is an easygoing melodic rock track with fragile vocals from Bobick that builds up tension towards a cacophonic musical explosion including a firing guitar solo over tons of breaks. "Journey's End" smoothly takes over with a fine tuned guitar/keyboard section, ending this 45-minute rock journey with a grand finale.

Welcome to the Freakroom is an album marking a remarkable debut entrance of a freakshow in prog rock. Shadow Circus combines the classic ingredients of the old days with the newer sounds and influences, much like Frost managed to do on "Million Town". The stubborn and approach of their music and production of the record makes this a unique joyride through an abstract landscape of sound. Highly melodic enjoyable sections are promptly followed by staccato and capricious cacophonic outbursts, creating tension and friction. Once the listener is getting used to the avant gardistic approach, the album tends to reveal more of its beauty with every spin of this silver disc. - Hardrock Haven


Comments: "Step right up!" yells through my speakers and it is followed by an extravagant journey through the sonic landscapes of SHADOW CIRCUS, pasted in dark gloomy colours surrounded by some exquisite flickering bright lights. The music is progressive, surprising and melodic. Rooted deeply in the '80's scene and drenched in the more classic '70's sauce of keyboard pumped classic rock dinosaurs. Shadow Circus covers the entire horizon without lacking a very unique overall sound. Let me quote: "You got to hold on tight for the ride of your life …"

Shadow Circus are without doubt one of the most remarkable new prog acts on the MySpace pages. With the new Welcome to the Freakroom spinning round after round, it reveals more of its outstanding beauty with every play. Prior to labelling the album as another concept album, John Fontana himself made clear that this album contains a collection of songs with a cohesive musical and lyrical background.

"Shadow Circus" can best be considered the overture of the story which starts out with a staccato guitar lick in the vein of Harem Scarem's "Warming a Frozen Rose" lick, to open bluntly with extravagance. The track features music and tunes from the travelling circus' of the old days twisted into form for a rocker with bite. Keys and guitar riff going against the grain and each other, creating enough tension and friction to make a Ferris wheel fly. An opener that needs to nest in your brain and won't leave the headroom afterwards. "Storm Rider" is more in the vein of English classic prog acts like Jadis, Pendragon, and above all: IT BITES. Stubborn and unique with an explosive middle section of high musical craftsmanship.

"Inconvenient Compromise" is rooted deeper into the classic progressive scene with its typical (Wakeman) keyboard patterns and swirls, in combination with the archetypical Moog, mellowtron and Korg noises provided by Zack Tenorio-Miller (keys). Keyboards upfront blended by some nu groove sounds and fine guitar playing in the mid section (for a sec only), the track grooves away like a Led Zep song that got infested by Yes proggies! A fine blend of old and new prog.

"Radio People" again is a corker from the It Bites shelves of prog. Keyboards pumping it to the max and drums boosting ponderous and hard, the song is a protest call against the grey masses following seemingly with all new trends and music. Shadow Circus also added their view on a rock ballad with "In the Wake of a Dancing Flame," starting with fine laid back orchestration and falling into the more classic movements for this type of track. Intimate with David Bobick sounding fragile and at times frustrated at heart. A mid section with fine Gilmour-ish guitar playing over rolling drums and percussion. It is until that moment when the band reveals its finest moment; the epical 11.46 "The Journey of Everyman," divided into here musical journey tickling the senses. "So it Begins" opens the journey with a David Foster reminiscent keyboard and piano section over nicely orchestrated flowing tunes. Especially the orchestrations sound exceptionally vivid thanks to Matt's additional cello sections, creating a more lively feel. Underneath all of this smooth playing Matt Masek kicks and slaps his bass in the best Geddy Lee tradition. Combined with the rolling drums and rhythmic shuffles of Corey Folta (dr.) and the razorsharp clean guitar playing of John Fontana, the musical expression explodes off the edges!

"Find Your Way" is an easygoing melodic rock track with fragile vocals from Bobick that builds up tension towards a cacophonic musical explosion including a firing guitar solo over tons of breaks. "Journey's End" smoothly takes over with a fine tuned guitar/keyboard section, ending this 45-minute rock journey with a grand finale.

Welcome to the Freakroom is an album marking a remarkable debut entrance of a freakshow in prog rock. Shadow Circus combines the classic ingredients of the old days with the newer sounds and influences, much like Frost managed to do on "Million Town". The stubborn and approach of their music and production of the record makes this a unique joyride through an abstract landscape of sound. Highly melodic enjoyable sections are promptly followed by staccato and capricious cacophonic outbursts, creating tension and friction. Once the listener is getting used to the avant gardistic approach, the album tends to reveal more of its beauty with every spin of this silver disc. - Hardrock Haven


Nice debut by American symph prg rockers, Shadow Circus. It's one thing to discover an up and coming prog band, be a bit fascinated by it, but you know in the back of your mind that you won't venture past a disc or two. It's a completely different thing when you're so taken by a disc by an unknown band and know that you are on to something special. You can't wait for the next album!

The disc launches from the gate with swirling keyboards and a soaring intro with the band's namesake song. Excellent solo by guitarist John Fontana about 5 minutes in that reminds me a lot of Tom Scholz of the band Boston. Nice little blend of quirkiness by vocalist David Lawrence Bobick.

One of my favorite tracks is the second entitled "Storm Rider". Starts off with a Kansas feel with nice piano adding a bit of a Springsteen-ish/Roy Bittan quality to it. Again, a true highlight is John's guitar solo about halfway through that blends into a nice harmonious marriage with the synths.

"Inconvenient Compromise" starts off with a sound like Rush's "Dreamline" from Roll The Bones briefly, but suddenly changes moods with a beautiful piano interlude. Very nice how the songs takes on a schyzophrenic personality that's a bit manic, but then takes off with some very nice melodies. Just amazing arrangement on this particular song with about a minute and a half to go--this band really shows of their chops on this tune.

"Radio People" starts off with an almost 80's hair metal anthem, but don't let that turn you off (if 80's hair metal isn't your thing). At about 5 1/2 minutes long, it's a bit tongue-in-cheek and lighthearted, while at the same being a social commentary. Actually makes for a nice break while venturing through the Freakroom--you can't help but tap your feet to this one.

"In The Wake Of A Dancing Flame" rolls in with a nice drum pattern reminiscent of Cozy Powell, accompanied with a nice Hammond Organ; although, the vocals could be delivered in a different way and doesn't quite hold up to the powerful music. What strikes me on this song and on the others is the beautiful piano underlining the music. I hate to use the same Roy Bittan comparison, but both keyboardists create an almost carnival-like atmosphere with their swirling pianos. It's one reason why I appreciate Springsteen's music, and now Shadow Circus. You put this together with an almost sitar esque solo by Fontana, the song simply takes you to another state. Absolutely sublime!

We start to exit the Freakroom with the mini epic, "Journey Of Everyman" to more exquisite piano rising above beautiful orchestration. Until a Van Halen's 1984-like synth catapults us into the stratosphere with a solo that sounds like something right off of a Boston album circa 1977. Once the storm passes, however, the intro slows down to a calming pace. The song suddenly picks up, slows down, but lurches forward again in a manic pace of flying drumsticks and whirling guitars. This band knows how to tell a story with music in a way that's not unlike Transatlantic. It's defintely one of my favorites from the Freakroom.

Shadow Circus and The Puppet Show have been two very positive discoveries in 2007 so far. If I did have one complaint, I only wished they had longer epics that clocked way past the longest track at 11 minutes, 46 seconds (me being the epic junkie that I am). Still, it doesn't detract from a VERY strong debut by a band for whom will be around for a long time to come. 4 very strong stars! - Progarchives


Nice debut by American symph prg rockers, Shadow Circus. It's one thing to discover an up and coming prog band, be a bit fascinated by it, but you know in the back of your mind that you won't venture past a disc or two. It's a completely different thing when you're so taken by a disc by an unknown band and know that you are on to something special. You can't wait for the next album!

The disc launches from the gate with swirling keyboards and a soaring intro with the band's namesake song. Excellent solo by guitarist John Fontana about 5 minutes in that reminds me a lot of Tom Scholz of the band Boston. Nice little blend of quirkiness by vocalist David Lawrence Bobick.

One of my favorite tracks is the second entitled "Storm Rider". Starts off with a Kansas feel with nice piano adding a bit of a Springsteen-ish/Roy Bittan quality to it. Again, a true highlight is John's guitar solo about halfway through that blends into a nice harmonious marriage with the synths.

"Inconvenient Compromise" starts off with a sound like Rush's "Dreamline" from Roll The Bones briefly, but suddenly changes moods with a beautiful piano interlude. Very nice how the songs takes on a schyzophrenic personality that's a bit manic, but then takes off with some very nice melodies. Just amazing arrangement on this particular song with about a minute and a half to go--this band really shows of their chops on this tune.

"Radio People" starts off with an almost 80's hair metal anthem, but don't let that turn you off (if 80's hair metal isn't your thing). At about 5 1/2 minutes long, it's a bit tongue-in-cheek and lighthearted, while at the same being a social commentary. Actually makes for a nice break while venturing through the Freakroom--you can't help but tap your feet to this one.

"In The Wake Of A Dancing Flame" rolls in with a nice drum pattern reminiscent of Cozy Powell, accompanied with a nice Hammond Organ; although, the vocals could be delivered in a different way and doesn't quite hold up to the powerful music. What strikes me on this song and on the others is the beautiful piano underlining the music. I hate to use the same Roy Bittan comparison, but both keyboardists create an almost carnival-like atmosphere with their swirling pianos. It's one reason why I appreciate Springsteen's music, and now Shadow Circus. You put this together with an almost sitar esque solo by Fontana, the song simply takes you to another state. Absolutely sublime!

We start to exit the Freakroom with the mini epic, "Journey Of Everyman" to more exquisite piano rising above beautiful orchestration. Until a Van Halen's 1984-like synth catapults us into the stratosphere with a solo that sounds like something right off of a Boston album circa 1977. Once the storm passes, however, the intro slows down to a calming pace. The song suddenly picks up, slows down, but lurches forward again in a manic pace of flying drumsticks and whirling guitars. This band knows how to tell a story with music in a way that's not unlike Transatlantic. It's defintely one of my favorites from the Freakroom.

Shadow Circus and The Puppet Show have been two very positive discoveries in 2007 so far. If I did have one complaint, I only wished they had longer epics that clocked way past the longest track at 11 minutes, 46 seconds (me being the epic junkie that I am). Still, it doesn't detract from a VERY strong debut by a band for whom will be around for a long time to come. 4 very strong stars! - Progarchives


It’s great to find that despite so many years listening to progressive rock, my capacity of astonishment isn’t lost. I’m still capable to feel that sensation I had when I was 12 years old each time my parents brought me from USA a Yes or a Genesis album and found something almost magical that gave me goosebumps.

As you might guess, Welcome to the Freakroom has really impressed me, because they keep the spirit of the days when prog was young but have the guts to be absolutely unique. They play great symphonic prog and are not afraid to get very close to the borders of neo prog with a touch of hard rock. If I had to choose a word that describes them, it would be original.

Shadow Circus was created by John Fontana (guitar), who after 15 years of musical activity in NYC decided to re-create some prog based in the golden era of symphonic and prepare a demo to send as part of his resume, but his ex band-mate the drummer Corey Folta herd the music encouraged John to form a band, with the help of the vocalist David Bobick who wrote the lyrics and with the addition of the former cello player and now bassist Matt Masek and Zac Tenorio on the keyboards, a band was born.

Their debut album Welcome to the Freakroom opens with “Shadow Circus”, a song that gets the listener in the mood with a typical circus tune that starts to decrease in intensity while a mellotron goes in crescendo introducing to a keyboard explosion that reminds me of Clive Nolan, and directly links to the rhythmic vocals. A well developed song that serves not only as an introduction to the album but also for the band because they manage never to a sarcastic sense of humor, excellent opener.

“Storm Rider” starts with strong keyboards and drums soon followed by the band. The vocals are a bit odd for an average prog band but suit perfectly with the music. Fast and vibrant song with radical changes and an amazing piano and of course as you will expect in a USA band, very strong guitars.

Now it’s time for pompous intro in “Inconvenient Compromise.” The band hits us with everything they have but then have a radical change to section that reminds me of Yes from the Going for the One era, but before we get used another change leads us to a softer and melodic territory, just to change again into a hard rock section leaded by Bobik’s vocals. This is what prog is about, constant changes without ever losing control and Shadow Circus gives us everything. I won’t tell about the finale to avoid ruining the experience….brilliant.

Every album needs a hook, a moiré catchy song and “Radio People” provides it. The organ sounds almost psychedelic but despite some excesses (which I love) we find and interesting hard rock track. Not as complex as the previous but still very good, and the arrangements are perfect.

“In the Wake of a Dancing Flame” starts with an organ solo followed by acoustic guitar and drums that work as an intro for an interesting power ballad with a very psyche oriented sound. The keyboard sounds as coming directly from the late 60’s and there’s an oriental favor very typical of that era and a guitar work that matches perfectly. Very nice track, but a bit repetitive though. If I had to chose the weakest track, I would have to point my finger towards “In the Wake of a Dancing Flame”, but still is a very good song, so we are before a band with high standards.

The last track “Journey of Everyman” is a three-part epic inspired in the novel “The Talisman”. It’s fair to say they reserved the best for the end. Starts with a nice piano solo until the band explodes with a guitar and keyboard section in the limits of symphonic and hard rock. Then you can expect anything - moogs, mellotrons, cellos…well everything that makes prog so great. The changes are always dramatic but the band never lose the continuity. It’s hard to describe everything that happens in more than 11 minutes, but I’m sure this track will satisfy the most demanding progheads.

Shadow Circus is just what we need in this times of easy music and boring mainstream; a bunch of guys willing to take risks creating a very complex and well elaborate album which expresses everything that prog implies.

Highly recommended, I’m sure it won’t disappoint anybody. There’s music for purists and also the harder spectrum of the prog community..

Iván Melgar Morey
- Progressive Ears - Iván Melgar Morey


It’s great to find that despite so many years listening to progressive rock, my capacity of astonishment isn’t lost. I’m still capable to feel that sensation I had when I was 12 years old each time my parents brought me from USA a Yes or a Genesis album and found something almost magical that gave me goosebumps.

As you might guess, Welcome to the Freakroom has really impressed me, because they keep the spirit of the days when prog was young but have the guts to be absolutely unique. They play great symphonic prog and are not afraid to get very close to the borders of neo prog with a touch of hard rock. If I had to choose a word that describes them, it would be original.

Shadow Circus was created by John Fontana (guitar), who after 15 years of musical activity in NYC decided to re-create some prog based in the golden era of symphonic and prepare a demo to send as part of his resume, but his ex band-mate the drummer Corey Folta herd the music encouraged John to form a band, with the help of the vocalist David Bobick who wrote the lyrics and with the addition of the former cello player and now bassist Matt Masek and Zac Tenorio on the keyboards, a band was born.

Their debut album Welcome to the Freakroom opens with “Shadow Circus”, a song that gets the listener in the mood with a typical circus tune that starts to decrease in intensity while a mellotron goes in crescendo introducing to a keyboard explosion that reminds me of Clive Nolan, and directly links to the rhythmic vocals. A well developed song that serves not only as an introduction to the album but also for the band because they manage never to a sarcastic sense of humor, excellent opener.

“Storm Rider” starts with strong keyboards and drums soon followed by the band. The vocals are a bit odd for an average prog band but suit perfectly with the music. Fast and vibrant song with radical changes and an amazing piano and of course as you will expect in a USA band, very strong guitars.

Now it’s time for pompous intro in “Inconvenient Compromise.” The band hits us with everything they have but then have a radical change to section that reminds me of Yes from the Going for the One era, but before we get used another change leads us to a softer and melodic territory, just to change again into a hard rock section leaded by Bobik’s vocals. This is what prog is about, constant changes without ever losing control and Shadow Circus gives us everything. I won’t tell about the finale to avoid ruining the experience….brilliant.

Every album needs a hook, a moiré catchy song and “Radio People” provides it. The organ sounds almost psychedelic but despite some excesses (which I love) we find and interesting hard rock track. Not as complex as the previous but still very good, and the arrangements are perfect.

“In the Wake of a Dancing Flame” starts with an organ solo followed by acoustic guitar and drums that work as an intro for an interesting power ballad with a very psyche oriented sound. The keyboard sounds as coming directly from the late 60’s and there’s an oriental favor very typical of that era and a guitar work that matches perfectly. Very nice track, but a bit repetitive though. If I had to chose the weakest track, I would have to point my finger towards “In the Wake of a Dancing Flame”, but still is a very good song, so we are before a band with high standards.

The last track “Journey of Everyman” is a three-part epic inspired in the novel “The Talisman”. It’s fair to say they reserved the best for the end. Starts with a nice piano solo until the band explodes with a guitar and keyboard section in the limits of symphonic and hard rock. Then you can expect anything - moogs, mellotrons, cellos…well everything that makes prog so great. The changes are always dramatic but the band never lose the continuity. It’s hard to describe everything that happens in more than 11 minutes, but I’m sure this track will satisfy the most demanding progheads.

Shadow Circus is just what we need in this times of easy music and boring mainstream; a bunch of guys willing to take risks creating a very complex and well elaborate album which expresses everything that prog implies.

Highly recommended, I’m sure it won’t disappoint anybody. There’s music for purists and also the harder spectrum of the prog community..

Iván Melgar Morey
- Progressive Ears - Iván Melgar Morey


Discography

Welcome to the Freakroom - LP

Photos

Bio

After 15 years as a guitarist in various hard-edged alternative bands on the NYC music scene, guitarist John Fontana set out to compose music that was more challenging. His original intention was to compose pieces to demo his guitar playing while auditioning for bands. But when the music caught the ear of his friend and vocalist David Bobick, and former band-mate, drummer Corey Folta, they both enthusiastically insisted that the music be fully developed with a band.

David, trained with a degree in Musical Theater, and a variety of rock band credits under his belt, began writing lyrics and vocal melodies. His combination of theatrical training and raw rock-and-roll influence fit perfectly in the context of the music, adding a pop sensibility with his instantly catchy melodies, stage charisma, and a dramatic flair while portraying an array of personalities in the songs – from an insidious Circus M.C. in the title track, to a wise old sage in a three-part-epic inspired by the novel The Talisman.

The lineup became complete with the addition of cellist-turned-bassist Matt Masek and 16-year-old keyboardist Zach Tenorio of the Paul Green School of Rock fame, who at the age of 16 already performed with Jon Anderson of Yes, John Wetton, and Mike Keneally, among dozens of other rock legends

In February of 2007, this lineup completed and published their debut release, Welcome to the Freakroom, a full-length disk showcasing appealing melodic compositions, replete with the sounds of the golden age of prog – awash with Mellotrons, Hammond, Moog, soaring guitars, intricate drumming, melodic bass playing and dramatic, memorable vocals, this release has gained worldwide recognition in the progressive rock community by fans and reviewers alike.