Sheila
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Sheila

Washington, D.C., DC | Established. Jan 01, 2016 | AFTRA

Washington, D.C., DC | AFTRA
Established on Jan, 2016
Band Rock R&B

Calendar

Oct
19
Sheila @ DC Armory

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Jun
07
Sheila @ Slash Run

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

May
19
Sheila @ Dwell DC

Washington, D.C., United States

Washington, D.C., United States

May
11
Sheila @ Cherry Cola's Rock N Rolla Cabaret and Lounge

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Apr
14
Sheila @ Pearl Street Warehouse

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Mar
10
Sheila @ Kor Studios

Lorton, Virginia, United States

Lorton, Virginia, United States

Mar
10
Sheila @ Kor Studios

Fayetteville, North Carolina, United States

Fayetteville, North Carolina, United States

Feb
16
Sheila @ Dangerously Delicious Pies

Washington, D.C., United States

Washington, D.C., United States

Jan
27
Sheila @ Dew Drop Inn

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Jan
18
Sheila @ The Velvet Lounge

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Mar
24
Sheila @ Songbyrd Music House

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Feb
11
Sheila @ The Ottobar

Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Dec
16
Sheila @ Gallery 116th

Fayetteville, North Carolina, United States

Fayetteville, North Carolina, United States

Dec
02
Sheila @ 2028 1st St NW

Washington, Virginia, United States

Washington, Virginia, United States

Jul
30
Sheila @ Wildflower Music Festival

Charlottesville, Virginia, United States

Charlottesville, Virginia, United States

Jul
29
Sheila @ Knitting Factory

Brooklyn, New York, United States

Brooklyn, New York, United States

Jun
16
Sheila @ Bossa Bistro + Bar

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Jun
02
Sheila @ The Pinch

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Apr
06
Sheila @ Tortoise & Hare Bar and Grille

Arlington, Virginia, United States

Arlington, Virginia, United States

Jan
04
Sheila @ Jammin Java

Vienna, Virginia, United States

Vienna, Virginia, United States

Oct
21
Sheila @ The Pinch

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Sep
20
Sheila @ Jammin Java

Vienna, Virginia, United States

Vienna, Virginia, United States

Aug
26
Sheila @ Gallery 116th

Fayetteville, North Carolina, United States

Fayetteville, North Carolina, United States

May
21
Sheila @ Treehouse Lounge

Washington, D. C., Washington, D.C., United States

Washington, D. C., Washington, D.C., United States

Music

Press


Alternative music has always been associated as independent, nonconforming and avant-garde. Over the decades, black musicians have pioneered towards expanding subsets of different genres. The Blues, Rock n’ Roll, and Afropunk are a few to name. Ironically, even with a contribution to so many styles of music, bands that are composed of black members are gems to come across. The time has been long overdue to accentuate a group that finds liberation in performing music that has been deemed “exclusively white”. Meet the band Sheila, a trio composed of black queens taking the stage.

Sha’Air Hawkins (28) is the band’s vocalist and grew up in a lot of places ranging from Belgium, Germany to North Carolina but currently resides in New York. Courtney Tucker (25) plays guitar alongside sister Rhea Tucker (25) who also plays guitar, drums, and bass. They both currently live in Washington DC.



Rhea noted that they all went to George Mason University. They met Sha’Air and said “she was really nice and talked to everybody. We were in a separate band but decided to part ways with the singer. Six months of looking and trying on people to be a singer. We were looking everywhere and it wasn’t looking out.” Courtney later revealed that it was Rhea’s idea to ask Sha’Air to be the singer of the band. Courtney at first thought “there was no way it was going to work out.” Rhea pursued it further by “Facebook messaging Sha’Air by saying hey, we’re in a band looking for a singer. Would you be interested? She messaged the next day and said she would love to but the only thing is I live in North Carolina.” Inquisitive about how that would work, Courtney explained: “ We had our first Facetime rehearsal and it worked out from there.” Sha’Air chimed in to say “there were a lot of times where we had janky wi-fi but then we started having shows together.

According to the all-girl posse, the name Sheila was a random name suggested by Courtney. “We recorded our first album and we still didn’t have a name. We went to the studio and Ben Green (of Blue Room Productions) said we needed a name in the computer. So I said, I don’t know Sheila, it’s a girl name.” The name Sheila may have been picked at random but the band’s music fully intends to defy the odds with an unclassifiable sound. “It has to deal with the type and style that we all listen to. It’s really hard to put a label on it because it doesn’t fit. Rhea added on “Sometimes I don’t like to classify our music. Whatever comes to mind is what we write. If it turns out to be rock then cool.” A plethora of independent artists don’t want to put their music in a certain category and according to Courtney, it’s best to avoid doing so in order to change the sound in a year or so. “People look at you and automatically assume something about you. When we go to shows people see three black girls and have no idea about what’s to come.”

When asked about negative comments or reactions about the band’s appearance it was enheartening to find out “ Since we’ve been around we’ve had a really positive reception. People have really been into it, like oh my god, you’re three black girls doing rock music. That is so cool.” Sha’Air gave insight that “most of the places we performed at are full of white people and white audiences. Even though we’re looking for more black people to perform, it’s interesting that we’re putting ourselves in environments that you wouldn’t see these people on stage. We haven’t had any negative comments at all but the music is good and people feel it so they are looking past what we look like and are actually looking into the music which is amazing.” Sheila is very confident in their abilities. They have a connection on stage that makes it difficult for a male-dominated industry to mask them.



When it comes to being independent, there are pros and cons that every artist faces. “The best part about being independent is having full freedom and control over the music. It’s about writing a song and not having someone say you can’t do that. A con would be not being paid what you’re worth. Some people would say, I’m only going to give you $100 and you have to split it.” When it comes to performances, Sheila has been in venues ranging from a pie shop in DC, a Songbird festival and Afropunk battle of the bands. Sha’Air recollected a time being on stage at a music festival highlighting female bands and local independent artists. “When we were on stage, there were three little girls who were sitting in front listening to our music. It was the most beautiful thing because representation is important. We have a song entitled “We Are” that talks about riding through the night with the breeze in our kinks. It’s cool to highlight our hair in our music and who we really are because of those three curly haired girls dancing to our music.”

The setlist for Sheila consists of originals from their new album “Protect Your Art”. A few covers may come from Kendrick Lamar and Janelle Monae along with a tribute to The Cranberries. “Our music has evolved in content because of the way it was produced. We work for the same person, Ben Green. He did both of our albums. Even then, we’ve grown as musicians and talked about way more issues that are pushed to the side. Our new album sounds like you’re telling a story and it’s very personal.” For Sheila, creativity helps them to balance this lifestyle. Individually, overcoming challenges such as lack of motivation, defeat and even writer’s block helps the band gain insight on how they want to succeed in the future to come. Sheila wishes to remind independent artists and fans that: “The worst that someone could tell you is no so don’t be easily discouraged in the beginning. Keep going and keep pushing. Get quality sound recordings and remember to network with other independent artists. - Kayra Perez - MizFitz Radio


By textbook definition, art means, “the expression or application of human creative skill and imagination.”

For Sheila, art means may things beyond the music. It could mean a visual representation of your creativity, your temple, your life, anything…Sheila constantly talks about being their true selves, life, depression, and all of life’s other woe’s that stack up against them. The things we consider “art” in our life are all things we must protect in order to live the life we want and to be secure in being our truest self.

If you don’t know, Sheila is an all-black, all-female, three-piece trio based in Washington D.C., originally classifying themselves as Alternative (not necessarily writing music to fit a genre but write what comes to heart) at the start of their humble beginnings.

These ladies have shifted direction and allow the listeners to interpret what they hear; sometimes being called rock, hard rock and/or AFROPUNK. Their music draws on the experiences of being young millennials, the intersection of being a black woman in today’s polarizing society, trying to find their musical voice in a mostly male dominated misogynistic industry, and on the overwhelmingly unreported experiences of other marginalized communities.

For Sheila, these women aspire to be the representation so needed in rock. - IndiePulse Music Magazine


Every single day I thank god, the universe or whichever you want to call it for blessing me with a job where I can sit and write about what I love most… and yes, it can be stressful at times, but not when you work with blessed individuals such as girl band “Sheila”. Oh no… au contraire, such talented artists are the reason why I originally fell in love with my job.

This is what unspoiled creativity looks like. It’s fierce, dynamic and bright, capable of creating anything it desires with a touch of magic and finesse.

What I love most about Sheila, is the fact that they are three incredibly talented black women who have come up with a style so distinct that there’s only one way this can go.. and that is to the top!

Their recently released EP “We Gon’ Be Alright” is for sure a diamond in the rough and each song brings something different and unique to the table. Opening up with “Prog (War)” they set the pace to this EP and straight away hit you with the goods. I mean… I was immediately blown away by their raw energy, complemented by youthful and rebellious, yet extremely captivating vocals!

The way they switch up the arrangement from verse to chorus, then bridge then back to the final chorus, is just insane… They display a skill and enthusiasm which is reminiscent of rap-metal kings Linking Park and the more pioneer rock bands such as the Foo Fighters!

“Let It Go” quickly follows the opening track, this time a soulful and smooth instrumental helps you to digest and process everything that “Prog (War)” has done to your emotions. At this point, it’s so important to point out that their style, vision and execution is just second to none.. Jazzy blends meet gentle guitar strokes, live style drums and the silky voice of the band’s lead singer… A song which symbolically speaks of letting go of what no longer serves you, whether it be an attitude or a love… it’s easy to get their drift.

Reconnecting after graduating from the George Mason University, was the best thing that the stand out trio could’ve done. Composed by twins Courtney Tucker and Rhea Tucker, and last but not least Sha’Air, it’s clear that they’re genuine and passionate, which are perhaps the most important attributes a human can have, as they have inspired me to keep going and not to shy away from being myself while shining my light for the world to see. Real talk.

This brilliant EP is given continuity with their third track “What It Used To Be” with powerful lyrics such as “Many days, many nights, many hours spent, watch it fall like a knife, like a splinter.. time… it was ours” – As the group touches upon matters of the heart, in a sombre yet heartfelt manner. An RnB infused, chill rock ballad which is sure to give you warmth and reassurance as the edgy and thunderous “Rage (ft Jebrae Williams)”, the brilliantly melodic and inspiring instrumental song “Chill (ft Andrew Velez)” and the masterful “Makeshift Loner (Kelsi’s Song)”, complete this far sighted, avant guard EP!

My final thoughts are that the “We Gon’ Be Alright” EP and more specifically “Sheila” the band itself have the kind of image, creativity and sound that will stand out and shine brightly no matter where they go. If all the right moves are made and calculated risks are taken, I would be willing to bet my car that they will get noticed and signed by one of the majors. There’s no doubt about that, I feel that what they bring to the table is very marketable and their potential to breakthrough is more than achievable and realistic. They have to be bold and brave as it’s all on them to take advantage of what they’ve been blessed with and run away with it!

These three beautiful goddesses for sure have our back up. That’s on god. - Blatant Misrep


So what better way to kickstart 2017 than by introducing you guys to some great new music and acts coming through? The first up is newcomer alternative rock band “Sheila” and their fantastic new EP release “We Gon’ Be Alright”.

Fusing the group’s different styles and influences individually, the band has come up with a soundscape that is both edgy and thoughtful. Probably not something you can narrow down to a specific genre or confine to a limiting box as their sound is expansive and diverse. From punk rock to soul and everything in between, there is a unique quality to Sheila’s music which is elusive and mysterious.

From a technical point a view, “We Gon’ Be Alright” is exquisite in all the right ways but the only thing that could be ever so slightly improved is how the recording equipment was set up, which is something that might have to do with the studio engineer(s) who supervised their recordings as the lead singer’s voice can sound a bit distant at times from the microphone, this could be due to the mic’s positioning at the time of recording or the type of filter and mic used to record the vocals for this impressive debut EP.

Technicalities aside, the EP perfectly showcases the group’s talent as twins Courtney and Rhea Tucker teamed up with Sha’Air Hawkins to deliver a creative masterclass in terms of songwriting, instrumentalism and originality. If anything, this is an “it” band… there’s a stand out, star quality to the group and we believe they have everything in their favour to become successful, as their sound and image are ready for mainstream crossover.

Each of the song is a potential hit single while their inventiveness, awareness and consistency is kept and maintained effortlessly and ingeniously throughout this dreamy and confident release.
Overall, this is an exceptionally good listen to music lovers of any kind, as 2017 looks set to be a productive, prosperous and potentially a breakthrough year for newcomers Sheila. The ball is on their court, fingers crossed! - Audiosteez


Discography

We Gon' Be Alright

Protect Your Art

Photos

Bio

Sheila is an all-black, all-female, three-piece trio based in Washington D.C., originally classifying themselves as Alternative (not necessarily writing music to fit a genre but write what comes to heart) at the start of their humble beginnings. These ladies have shifted direction and allow the listeners to interpret what they hear; sometimes being called rock, hard rock and/or AFROPUNK. Their music draws on the experiences of being young millennials, the intersection of being a black woman in today’s polarizing society, trying to find their musical voice in a mostly male-dominated misogynistic industry, and on the overwhelmingly unreported experiences of other marginalized communities. For Sheila, these women aspire to be the representation so needed in rock.    

Band Members