Shoot Out The Lights
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Shoot Out The Lights

Cincinnati, Ohio, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2009 | SELF

Cincinnati, Ohio, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2009
Band Americana Rock

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Cincinnati, OH– If you’re looking for an adventurous way to start off your St. Patrick’s weekend, consider getting lost with Shoot Out the Lights as they release their second album, “Let’s Get Lost,” with a free concert on Friday, March 14th at Northside Tavern.

The follow up to their self titled 2011 debut album consists of nine well crafted tunes, showing a tight knit band growing within their own unique sound. They opted for a more early rock sounding record without slick production and even features of few live-in-studio cuts. “Let’s Get Lost” was recorded at All Nighter Studios, engineered and mixed by Tommy Cappel and produced by the band.

Other performers include Alone at 3AM (aloneat3am.com), Wonky Tonk and the Holiday Ramblers (facebook.com/wonkytonktunes) and local songwriter Josh Eagle will be master of ceremonies. Shoot Out the Lights plans to spend the next few months touring the region in support of the release and will return with an Artist in Residency at The Southgate House Revival in June.

After March 14th, “Let’s Get Lost” will be available on-line on: iTunes, Amazon.com, CD Baby (www.cdbaby.com) and from the official Shoot Out the Lights website, www.sotlmusic.com. The CD can also be purchased at Shake It Records and Everybody Records. A free download of the title track is available at www.shootoutthelights.bandcamp.com. - CincyGroove Magazine - By Scott Preston on Tuesday, March 11th, 2014


Shoot Out The Lights, or SOTL, is a rock and roll band formed here in Cincinnati, Ohio circa 2009. Josh Muddiman is on raspy throaty vocals and guitar, Elaina “Laney” McCormick on vocals and keys, Matt “Mook” McCormick is lead guitar, Joshua Howard bass and vocals, and Alan Topolski on drums round out this band that at its simplest form is just Rock and Roll. This is their second album and it was self- produced at All Nighter Studio by Tommy Capel.

SOTL brings soulfulness to their style of Rock and Roll. However as the listener you can truly just get lost in the music. The melodies are crisp and clean while the vocals and lyrics are well formed. Through this album, they bring their styles all to the forefront. These fine folks in SOTL are bringing a refreshing style of Rock and Roll to Cincinnati. They bring you into their space… the place where they formulate and construct straight to the teeth rock songs.

The members of SOTL all share in the songwriting process. Something that Joshua Howard and Josh Muddiman both told me under a night sky about two months ago, “Making this a shared experience in making music with everyone involved. Lightening the load and making this more like a family.” While recording this album, they wanted to switch it up a bit. “Mook” was moved over to lead guitar and Josh Howard over to bass. It was a move by their own account, “that may have brought demise to other bands but instead opened the door for more thunderous and melodic bass grooves and fiery guitar riffs.” By doing this you can hear a band that is coming into their own. The growth of the band is evident on this album.

I was graced with the pleasure of getting an advanced listen of the album. These folks stay true to their roots with the Rock and Roll, but also, have songs that stay true to the jazz, blues, and country roots of Cincinnati, their hometown. I often did find myself getting lost in these songs. Whether it was lyrically, the melodies, or just the combination of the two they melded their roots and styles into about an hour long of nine tracks. The tracks flow just like our river, or with the weather about to warm up. This is an album great for taking on your next road trip.

Some may say rock is dead, but that is just a matter of perspective. With SOTL this is definitely not the case. Their brand of rock brings it home. They amp it up at the live show, and it quite simply is straight up rock and roll. They bring it back where it came from and are showing us where it can go. Rock and Roll is many things, and can be many things, but SOTL has found their own way of doing it. They have found within themselves how they can make it work, and it most certainly does.

Their new album “Let’s Get Lost” is releasing on March 14th with a release party at Northside Tavern here in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Shoot Out The Lights
w/ Alone at 3am
Friday, March 14
Northside Tavern
10p - Cincymusic.com - By Moose Gronholm on Wednesday March 12, 2014


• Excellent rootsy rockers Shoot Out the Lights return to physical and digital record shelves this week with their new album, Let’s Get Lost, the follow-up to the band’s self-titled 2011 debut. This Friday, the group hosts a release party at Northside Tavern (4163 Hamilton Ave., Northside, 513-542-3603, northside-tavern.com). The band will be joined by Alone at 3AM and Wonky Tonk and the Holiday Rambles. The free show kicks off at 9 p.m.

Though there is Roots Rock running through Shoot Out the Lights’ blood, the five-piece should also appeal to fans of heartland rockers like Bruce Springsteen and his disciples (like Gaslight Anthem).

. You can get a sneak peek of Let’s Get Lost at shootoutthelights.bandcamp.com (or by just clicking the player below); the band is offering a free download of the superb title track.

Shoot Out the Lights plans to tour regionally behind the new release and in June the group will be the “Artist in Residency” at Newport’s Southgate House Revival (southgatehouse.com), playing free shows every Wednesday of the month in the venue’s Lounge. (sotlmusic.com) - CityBeat Magazine - Mike Breen


More Local Notes

Saturday at Memorial Hall (on Elm St., next to Music Hall), there will be a special benefit concert for Venice on Vine, the pizza parlor at 13th and Vine streets in Over-the-Rhine run by Power Inspires Progress to provide job training for inner city residents having difficultly finding employment. Longtime local Jazz fave (and current SCPA music teacher) Erwin Stuckey and his trio performs at 7 p.m., followed by headliner Rick DellaRatta, a philanthropic musician whose “Jazz for Peace” performances have raised funds for over 700 different charities in the past decade. The New York-based pianist has performed all over the world (including a concert at the U.N.) with the goal of bringing people together through Jazz. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the event includes dinner, a cash bar and a silent auction. To purchase tickets and read more about the cause, visit www.powerinspiresprogress.com.

Cincy Roots Rock band Shoot Out the Lights celebrates the release of its two-years-in-the-making debut full-length Saturday at the Southgate House’s Parlour. The self-titled release — which should appeal to fans of artists from Gram Parson to Ryan Adams — was recorded with producer Mike Tekulve at Ric Hordinski’s Monastery studio, CAA Studios and at Cincinnati State’s facilities. Opening Saturday’s show are The Western and Josh Eagle and the Harvest City, who are working on their sophomore album with an eye on a summertime release. The $5 cover charge includes a copy of Shoot Out the Lights debut. (www.sotlmusic.com)
- City Beat Magazine


More Local Notes

Cincy Roots Rock band Shoot Out the Lights celebrates the release of its two-years-in-the-making debut full-length Saturday at the Southgate House’s Parlour. The self-titled release — which should appeal to fans of artists from Gram Parson to Ryan Adams — was recorded with producer Mike Tekulve at Ric Hordinski’s Monastery studio, CAA Studios and at Cincinnati State’s facilities. Opening Saturday’s show are The Western and Josh Eagle and the Harvest City, who are working on their sophomore album with an eye on a summertime release. The $5 cover charge includes a copy of Shoot Out the Lights debut. (www.sotlmusic.com) - City Beat Magazine


2011 isn’t quite over just yet, but I’m already set on what I feel are the best albums of the year – at least as far as my top picks go. Rather than attempt to rank albums 1-50 or 1-100 or even 1-25 like you’ll find most everyone else doing, I thought I’d just share some thoughts on my top five.


Album of the Year
Artist: Bon Iver
Album: Bon Iver


In May 2011, a month before its scheduled release, a mishap over at iTunes caused Bon Iver’s second album to leak early. I happened to find the album in my possession soon thereafter, and even upon first listen, I was certain the album would finish the year at #1 on my list.
Having been a fan of Bon Iver pretty much since the beginning, I already knew that this was a band that truly had something special going on. The band’s front man, Justin Vernon (pictured above), is simply a genius in my eyes and does wonders for the ears with his signature falsetto voice. The sound alone will bring you to your knees as you suffer from heartache and rejoice with joy both at the same time, even though you can’t really make out exactly what he is saying or singing about.
Vernon enlisted a stellar cast for the band’s sophomore self-titled effort. In addition to full-time members Mike Noyce, Sean Carey and Matt McCaughan, other contributors to the album are probably unfamiliar to most. Colin Stetson is a world renouned saxphonist that has toured as a member of both Arcade Fire and Bell Orchestre, while pedal steel guitarist Greg Leisz has recorded with numerous musicians from Dave Alvin and Bill Frisell to Bad Religion and the Smashing Pumpkins. And then there’s Jim Schoenecker of Vernon’s side project Volcano Choir, synth player Tom Wincek, arranger Rob Moore, saxophonist Michael Lewis and trumpeteer Carmen Caerieri.
Unlike the band’s 2008 breakthrough debut album For Emma, Forever Ago, which was more or less a collection of melancholic, wintery campfire-inspired acoustic songs, the new album is so intricate and heavily textured that Bon Iver might be the last band you thought you were listening to had these songs been completely instrumental.
Not a single Bon Iver fan could have predicted what was to come after For Emma and even the Blood Bank EP, and now that Vernon and company have gone to extreme new heights, we can only bask in the glory that is this album. The bar has been set so high this time around, one can only wonder just how they will continue to top themselves.
Unlike Vernon who sings in “Holocene” that he is “not magnificent”, I have to say that this album certainly is.
Don’t be surprised at all when you see this album landing near or at the top of pretty much every list for 2011's Best Albums. Afterall, it did peak in the Top 10 of 14 seperate charts from around the world, as well as having earned the band several Grammy nominations for “Record of the Year”, “Song of the Year”, “Best New Artist” and “Best Alternative Album”, in which they were placed alongside My Morning Jacket.
Check out this breathtaking live performance of the album’s closing track, “Beth/Rest”, which also happens to be one of my favorite songs of the year.
Number Two – Best Albums of 2011
Artist: Dawes
Album: Nothing Is Wrong


Two years ago Los Angeles roots rock band Dawes made their mark in the world with their stunning debut North Hills, an album with a sound somewhere between The Band and Jackson Browne. This year they have continued to impress even themselves with Nothing Is Wrong, which I believe is one of the strongest releases of the year both musically and lyrically.
Front man Taylor Goldsmith (who sounds an awfully lot like Browne) is just as much a poet as major Romantic Age players William Blake and Lord Byron. If there’s a general theme to be found on Nothing Is Wrong it would be Goldsmith’s bouts with love and spending much of his time on the road. I know, I know. Typical subject matter for yet another rock band. Hear me out.
Over the course of the album you can see Goldsmith battling the loneliness being on the road brings while coming to terms with and accepting or understanding what matters the most in love.
In the opening song “Time Spent in Los Angeles”, Goldsmith sings “These days my friends don’t seem to know me without my suitcase in my hand, I used to think someone would love me for the places I have been”, while younger brother Griffin sings about how far the band has come in a different song, ironically called “How Far We’ve Come.”
Though the subject matter may be overplayed, the guitar licks and multi-part harmonies (which include Browne on “Fire Away”) make the lyrics all the more better, such as “The only time I am lonely is when others are around” and ”I learned that love is not as simple as I thought.”
While Nothing Is Wrong is basically an extension of the sound on North Hills, the difference here is time and experience. Goldsmith and his counterparts – his brother and drummer Griffin, bassist Wylie Gelber and keyboardist Tay Straitha - brokenmic.com


2011 isn’t quite over just yet, but I’m already set on what I feel are the best albums of the year – at least as far as my top picks go. Rather than attempt to rank albums 1-50 or 1-100 or even 1-25 like you’ll find most everyone else doing, I thought I’d just share some thoughts on my top five.


Album of the Year
Artist: Bon Iver
Album: Bon Iver


In May 2011, a month before its scheduled release, a mishap over at iTunes caused Bon Iver’s second album to leak early. I happened to find the album in my possession soon thereafter, and even upon first listen, I was certain the album would finish the year at #1 on my list.
Having been a fan of Bon Iver pretty much since the beginning, I already knew that this was a band that truly had something special going on. The band’s front man, Justin Vernon (pictured above), is simply a genius in my eyes and does wonders for the ears with his signature falsetto voice. The sound alone will bring you to your knees as you suffer from heartache and rejoice with joy both at the same time, even though you can’t really make out exactly what he is saying or singing about.
Vernon enlisted a stellar cast for the band’s sophomore self-titled effort. In addition to full-time members Mike Noyce, Sean Carey and Matt McCaughan, other contributors to the album are probably unfamiliar to most. Colin Stetson is a world renouned saxphonist that has toured as a member of both Arcade Fire and Bell Orchestre, while pedal steel guitarist Greg Leisz has recorded with numerous musicians from Dave Alvin and Bill Frisell to Bad Religion and the Smashing Pumpkins. And then there’s Jim Schoenecker of Vernon’s side project Volcano Choir, synth player Tom Wincek, arranger Rob Moore, saxophonist Michael Lewis and trumpeteer Carmen Caerieri.
Unlike the band’s 2008 breakthrough debut album For Emma, Forever Ago, which was more or less a collection of melancholic, wintery campfire-inspired acoustic songs, the new album is so intricate and heavily textured that Bon Iver might be the last band you thought you were listening to had these songs been completely instrumental.
Not a single Bon Iver fan could have predicted what was to come after For Emma and even the Blood Bank EP, and now that Vernon and company have gone to extreme new heights, we can only bask in the glory that is this album. The bar has been set so high this time around, one can only wonder just how they will continue to top themselves.
Unlike Vernon who sings in “Holocene” that he is “not magnificent”, I have to say that this album certainly is.
Don’t be surprised at all when you see this album landing near or at the top of pretty much every list for 2011's Best Albums. Afterall, it did peak in the Top 10 of 14 seperate charts from around the world, as well as having earned the band several Grammy nominations for “Record of the Year”, “Song of the Year”, “Best New Artist” and “Best Alternative Album”, in which they were placed alongside My Morning Jacket.
Check out this breathtaking live performance of the album’s closing track, “Beth/Rest”, which also happens to be one of my favorite songs of the year.
Number Two – Best Albums of 2011
Artist: Dawes
Album: Nothing Is Wrong


Two years ago Los Angeles roots rock band Dawes made their mark in the world with their stunning debut North Hills, an album with a sound somewhere between The Band and Jackson Browne. This year they have continued to impress even themselves with Nothing Is Wrong, which I believe is one of the strongest releases of the year both musically and lyrically.
Front man Taylor Goldsmith (who sounds an awfully lot like Browne) is just as much a poet as major Romantic Age players William Blake and Lord Byron. If there’s a general theme to be found on Nothing Is Wrong it would be Goldsmith’s bouts with love and spending much of his time on the road. I know, I know. Typical subject matter for yet another rock band. Hear me out.
Over the course of the album you can see Goldsmith battling the loneliness being on the road brings while coming to terms with and accepting or understanding what matters the most in love.
In the opening song “Time Spent in Los Angeles”, Goldsmith sings “These days my friends don’t seem to know me without my suitcase in my hand, I used to think someone would love me for the places I have been”, while younger brother Griffin sings about how far the band has come in a different song, ironically called “How Far We’ve Come.”
Though the subject matter may be overplayed, the guitar licks and multi-part harmonies (which include Browne on “Fire Away”) make the lyrics all the more better, such as “The only time I am lonely is when others are around” and ”I learned that love is not as simple as I thought.”
While Nothing Is Wrong is basically an extension of the sound on North Hills, the difference here is time and experience. Goldsmith and his counterparts – his brother and drummer Griffin, bassist Wylie Gelber and keyboardist Tay Straitha - brokenmic.com


t was another ridiculously strong year for recordings by artists in Greater Cincinnati, making for another ridiculously hard-to-whittle-down list of the best releases from the past 365 days.
In past years, to prepare for our annual “year in local recordings” round-up, I would create one master list of all new albums (or EPs or singles, if they were good enough) and then start the surgery, carefully removing dozens and dozens of recordings until it was compact enough to fit in the paper without requiring CityBeat to use a font size only slightly larger than a speck of dust.

My master list for 2011 local releases, for the first time, easily reached 100. The fact that there were so many releases coming out of Greater Cincinnati in 2011 speaks to the increased accessibility and affordability of recording technology that has developed over the past few years. The fact that none of them were total garbage speaks to the wealth of talent in our music community.

So here, for the first time, are the Top 100 local releases of the year. In previous years, we would include short blurbs excerpted from CityBeat reviews and articles with each pick, but this time, in order to fit in the whole lot, we could only include detail on the Top 20. The entire list follows.

Use your pal Google (and the CityBeat.com archive) to search for these recordings online, and support local music by purchasing a download or CD and going to the artists’ shows. If you can’t find at least a handful that you really enjoy, then you simply don’t like music.

Eclipse – Around the World

Like a Cincy version of The Roots, Around the World showed Hip Hop/Funk/Rock/Jazz ensemble Eclipse to be a stunning collective of musicians with boundless creative energy and an encyclopedic knowledge of music.

Wussy – Strawberry

One of the more critically acclaimed bands from Cincinnati, Indie Rock quartet Wussy has managed to top itself with each new album. The band’s fourth, Strawberry, is not only the most accomplished record in the Wussy catalog — it’s also the band’s most dynamic, diverse and unforgettable.

The Cincy Brass – Ain’t Nuttin Louder

One of the most unique and entertaining bands on the local scene, this funky, horn-driven crew managed to capture its irresistible party vibe perfectly on its debut.

Ma Crow – Smoky Junction

A collection of covers and traditional old time songs, local Bluegrass great Ma Crow made a much welcome return to the record store bins with the full-length Smoky Junction, an ode to Crow’s friends, family and home.

The Guitars – High Action

High Action, the first “official” release by The Guitars, is an absolute stunner, seven songs’ worth of vintage Pop majesty. It’s glaringly obvious that the four Guitars members are hardcore record-heads and serious students of the classic eras of American Rock, Soul and Pop.

Shiny and the Spoon – Ferris Wheel

Folk Pop duo Shiny and the Spoon became a trio in 2011, but that still doesn’t explain the huge creative growth over just the past year or so. Ferris Wheel was like SATS going from black-and-white to full Technicolor, widescreen 3D.

Valley of the Sun – The Sayings of the Seers

VotS’s dynamic, riff-ridin’ sound could technically be put in the so-called “Stoner Rock” category, but there aren’t many hardcore stoners who could compose and arrange with the sophistication and smarts it so obviously took to make Sayings.

The Chocolate Horse – Beasts

With its dark, hypnotic and emotional allure, dynamic Indie crew The Chocolate Horse’s third (and best) album deservedly received the most attention yet for the band.

The Newport Secret Six – Licking River Rock Steady

Putting its own spin on traditional Ska, the former Duppy a Jamba reemerged as the Newport Secret Six and released this amazing, true-to-tradition long-player.

Kelly Thomas and the Fabulous Pickups – Fly

After numerous releases from her other projects, Thomas finally released the debut LP from her main band after almost a decade. Fly, a beautifully crafted, emotionally stirring Country/Roots effort, was worth the wait.

You, You’re Awesome – Good Point, Whoever Said That

After several EP releases, progressive Electronica duo You, You’re Awesome issued its first long-player, a solid slice of compelling, pleasurable entertainment regardless of your musical tastes.

Skeetones – Retrospektive

Already a regional live favorite, this “live Electronica band” released its first full-length which was a glorious take-home version of the band’s creative mix of various forms of Electro and Dance music and trancelike improv excursions.

The Seedy Seeds – Verb/Noun

The charming Seedys’ national profile continued to rise in 2011, thanks in large part to the impossibly catchy Verb/Noun, one of the best Indie Pop albums of the year.

Buffalo Killers – 3

On the hard-touring Buffalo Killers’ third album, the retro-tinged Psych Pop trio’s songwriting reache - City Beat Magazine


t was another ridiculously strong year for recordings by artists in Greater Cincinnati, making for another ridiculously hard-to-whittle-down list of the best releases from the past 365 days.
In past years, to prepare for our annual “year in local recordings” round-up, I would create one master list of all new albums (or EPs or singles, if they were good enough) and then start the surgery, carefully removing dozens and dozens of recordings until it was compact enough to fit in the paper without requiring CityBeat to use a font size only slightly larger than a speck of dust.

My master list for 2011 local releases, for the first time, easily reached 100. The fact that there were so many releases coming out of Greater Cincinnati in 2011 speaks to the increased accessibility and affordability of recording technology that has developed over the past few years. The fact that none of them were total garbage speaks to the wealth of talent in our music community.

So here, for the first time, are the Top 100 local releases of the year. In previous years, we would include short blurbs excerpted from CityBeat reviews and articles with each pick, but this time, in order to fit in the whole lot, we could only include detail on the Top 20. The entire list follows.

Use your pal Google (and the CityBeat.com archive) to search for these recordings online, and support local music by purchasing a download or CD and going to the artists’ shows. If you can’t find at least a handful that you really enjoy, then you simply don’t like music.

Eclipse – Around the World

Like a Cincy version of The Roots, Around the World showed Hip Hop/Funk/Rock/Jazz ensemble Eclipse to be a stunning collective of musicians with boundless creative energy and an encyclopedic knowledge of music.

Wussy – Strawberry

One of the more critically acclaimed bands from Cincinnati, Indie Rock quartet Wussy has managed to top itself with each new album. The band’s fourth, Strawberry, is not only the most accomplished record in the Wussy catalog — it’s also the band’s most dynamic, diverse and unforgettable.

The Cincy Brass – Ain’t Nuttin Louder

One of the most unique and entertaining bands on the local scene, this funky, horn-driven crew managed to capture its irresistible party vibe perfectly on its debut.

Ma Crow – Smoky Junction

A collection of covers and traditional old time songs, local Bluegrass great Ma Crow made a much welcome return to the record store bins with the full-length Smoky Junction, an ode to Crow’s friends, family and home.

The Guitars – High Action

High Action, the first “official” release by The Guitars, is an absolute stunner, seven songs’ worth of vintage Pop majesty. It’s glaringly obvious that the four Guitars members are hardcore record-heads and serious students of the classic eras of American Rock, Soul and Pop.

Shiny and the Spoon – Ferris Wheel

Folk Pop duo Shiny and the Spoon became a trio in 2011, but that still doesn’t explain the huge creative growth over just the past year or so. Ferris Wheel was like SATS going from black-and-white to full Technicolor, widescreen 3D.

Valley of the Sun – The Sayings of the Seers

VotS’s dynamic, riff-ridin’ sound could technically be put in the so-called “Stoner Rock” category, but there aren’t many hardcore stoners who could compose and arrange with the sophistication and smarts it so obviously took to make Sayings.

The Chocolate Horse – Beasts

With its dark, hypnotic and emotional allure, dynamic Indie crew The Chocolate Horse’s third (and best) album deservedly received the most attention yet for the band.

The Newport Secret Six – Licking River Rock Steady

Putting its own spin on traditional Ska, the former Duppy a Jamba reemerged as the Newport Secret Six and released this amazing, true-to-tradition long-player.

Kelly Thomas and the Fabulous Pickups – Fly

After numerous releases from her other projects, Thomas finally released the debut LP from her main band after almost a decade. Fly, a beautifully crafted, emotionally stirring Country/Roots effort, was worth the wait.

You, You’re Awesome – Good Point, Whoever Said That

After several EP releases, progressive Electronica duo You, You’re Awesome issued its first long-player, a solid slice of compelling, pleasurable entertainment regardless of your musical tastes.

Skeetones – Retrospektive

Already a regional live favorite, this “live Electronica band” released its first full-length which was a glorious take-home version of the band’s creative mix of various forms of Electro and Dance music and trancelike improv excursions.

The Seedy Seeds – Verb/Noun

The charming Seedys’ national profile continued to rise in 2011, thanks in large part to the impossibly catchy Verb/Noun, one of the best Indie Pop albums of the year.

Buffalo Killers – 3

On the hard-touring Buffalo Killers’ third album, the retro-tinged Psych Pop trio’s songwriting reache - City Beat Magazine


On the biggest bar night of the year, over twenty Cincinnati-based bands gave thanks to Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers by celebrating the music the band has given to us over the past thirty-five years. In the true spirit of Thanskgiving, all proceeds from the show went to the Leukemia and Lymphoma societies.
For the most part, bands performing both in the ballroom and parlour were only given enough time to bust out a few songs, while in the lounge, four seperate bands performed as a part of a different show, performing their own material and sprinkling in other covers here and there.
Some of those bands in the lounge included Saturn Batteries, who did a kind of half electric, half unplugged version of Nirvana’s “About A Girl”, while Michael Oliva of the Harlequins acoustically covered the Beatles “Mean Mr. Mustard” and the Beach Boys “God Only Knows.”
With such short and overlapping sets by the bands in both the ballroom and parlour, it was hard to catch every single act.
My night began with the final song from two of the members from the Evans Collective including Andrew Antle, who put a beat and sample-heavy, trippy psychedelic spin on “Time to Move On” which led into the chorus of “Free Fallin.” Downstairs in the ballroom, the Le Whorenettes wrapped up their set with a standard rock version of “You Wreck Me.” As I was watching the band’s lead guitarist, whose name I didn’t catch, I thought to myself that at anytime he could step in for Heartbreaker lead axeman Mike Campbell and no one would really know the difference.
Back upstairs in the parlour, Southgate House bar manager and For Algernon saxophonist Mike Kuntz was wrapping up his set with an acoustic cover of “Square One”, while downstairs in the ballroom, Bang Bang Salon owner Tina Sullivan joined local blues band the Mudpies for “Even the Losers”, “Here Comes My Girl” and “Stop Dragging My Heart Around.”
I spent the next few sets in the ballroom, where State Song had time for just two songs. Both songs unrecognizable to the casual Petty fan, their first cover was “One More Day, One More Night” from the Echo album, while the other song could have easily passed as their own, as they put their own post-punk stamp onto it.
Alt-Country/folk rockers Shoot Out the Lights used their time wisely to perform four songs, which included “Stop Dragging My Heart Around”, “Here Comes My Girl”, “The Waiting”, and my personal favorite of the night, the Traveling Wilburys “Handle Me With Care.”
Both Martin Luther & the Kings and Sweet Ray Laurel made their cover choices their own, with the Kings doing a punkish “Wildflowers” and Sweet Ray adding some reggae-style guitar riffing to “Don’t Come Around Here No More.”
Back upstairs in the parlour Jason Wells channeled his inner Petty, as his band For Algernon, which included sax and trumpet, chose to do the often times forgettable hits “Room at the Top” and “Walls.” Both the Never Setting Suns and Frontier Folk Nebraska put some heavy drumming and guitar soloing into their covers of “Learning to Fly”, “Mary Jane’s Last Dance” and “Rebels.” Frontier Folk actually ended their set with a cover of Neil Young’s “Rockin in the Free World”, which led into the closing segment of Skynyrd’s “Freebird.”
Several bands originally scheduled to perform at the show were unable to make it, including the Dopamines, the Minor Leagues, Wonky Tonk, Shiny & the Spoon and Josh Eagle & the Harvest City, who were performing at Mainstay with Jody Stapleton & the Generals and Pete Dressman & the Soul Unified Nation.

It was great to see so many of the city’s best bands pay tribute and put their own spins into all of the songs heard tonight, but for now, I’m kind of burnt out on Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers. - brokenmic.com


On the biggest bar night of the year, over twenty Cincinnati-based bands gave thanks to Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers by celebrating the music the band has given to us over the past thirty-five years. In the true spirit of Thanskgiving, all proceeds from the show went to the Leukemia and Lymphoma societies.
For the most part, bands performing both in the ballroom and parlour were only given enough time to bust out a few songs, while in the lounge, four seperate bands performed as a part of a different show, performing their own material and sprinkling in other covers here and there.
Some of those bands in the lounge included Saturn Batteries, who did a kind of half electric, half unplugged version of Nirvana’s “About A Girl”, while Michael Oliva of the Harlequins acoustically covered the Beatles “Mean Mr. Mustard” and the Beach Boys “God Only Knows.”
With such short and overlapping sets by the bands in both the ballroom and parlour, it was hard to catch every single act.
My night began with the final song from two of the members from the Evans Collective including Andrew Antle, who put a beat and sample-heavy, trippy psychedelic spin on “Time to Move On” which led into the chorus of “Free Fallin.” Downstairs in the ballroom, the Le Whorenettes wrapped up their set with a standard rock version of “You Wreck Me.” As I was watching the band’s lead guitarist, whose name I didn’t catch, I thought to myself that at anytime he could step in for Heartbreaker lead axeman Mike Campbell and no one would really know the difference.
Back upstairs in the parlour, Southgate House bar manager and For Algernon saxophonist Mike Kuntz was wrapping up his set with an acoustic cover of “Square One”, while downstairs in the ballroom, Bang Bang Salon owner Tina Sullivan joined local blues band the Mudpies for “Even the Losers”, “Here Comes My Girl” and “Stop Dragging My Heart Around.”
I spent the next few sets in the ballroom, where State Song had time for just two songs. Both songs unrecognizable to the casual Petty fan, their first cover was “One More Day, One More Night” from the Echo album, while the other song could have easily passed as their own, as they put their own post-punk stamp onto it.
Alt-Country/folk rockers Shoot Out the Lights used their time wisely to perform four songs, which included “Stop Dragging My Heart Around”, “Here Comes My Girl”, “The Waiting”, and my personal favorite of the night, the Traveling Wilburys “Handle Me With Care.”
Both Martin Luther & the Kings and Sweet Ray Laurel made their cover choices their own, with the Kings doing a punkish “Wildflowers” and Sweet Ray adding some reggae-style guitar riffing to “Don’t Come Around Here No More.”
Back upstairs in the parlour Jason Wells channeled his inner Petty, as his band For Algernon, which included sax and trumpet, chose to do the often times forgettable hits “Room at the Top” and “Walls.” Both the Never Setting Suns and Frontier Folk Nebraska put some heavy drumming and guitar soloing into their covers of “Learning to Fly”, “Mary Jane’s Last Dance” and “Rebels.” Frontier Folk actually ended their set with a cover of Neil Young’s “Rockin in the Free World”, which led into the closing segment of Skynyrd’s “Freebird.”
Several bands originally scheduled to perform at the show were unable to make it, including the Dopamines, the Minor Leagues, Wonky Tonk, Shiny & the Spoon and Josh Eagle & the Harvest City, who were performing at Mainstay with Jody Stapleton & the Generals and Pete Dressman & the Soul Unified Nation.

It was great to see so many of the city’s best bands pay tribute and put their own spins into all of the songs heard tonight, but for now, I’m kind of burnt out on Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers. - brokenmic.com


On the biggest bar night of the year, over twenty Cincinnati-based bands gave thanks to Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers by celebrating the music the band has given to us over the past thirty-five years. In the true spirit of Thanskgiving, all proceeds from the show went to the Leukemia and Lymphoma societies.
For the most part, bands performing both in the ballroom and parlour were only given enough time to bust out a few songs, while in the lounge, four seperate bands performed as a part of a different show, performing their own material and sprinkling in other covers here and there.
Some of those bands in the lounge included Saturn Batteries, who did a kind of half electric, half unplugged version of Nirvana’s “About A Girl”, while Michael Oliva of the Harlequins acoustically covered the Beatles “Mean Mr. Mustard” and the Beach Boys “God Only Knows.”
With such short and overlapping sets by the bands in both the ballroom and parlour, it was hard to catch every single act.
My night began with the final song from two of the members from the Evans Collective including Andrew Antle, who put a beat and sample-heavy, trippy psychedelic spin on “Time to Move On” which led into the chorus of “Free Fallin.” Downstairs in the ballroom, the Le Whorenettes wrapped up their set with a standard rock version of “You Wreck Me.” As I was watching the band’s lead guitarist, whose name I didn’t catch, I thought to myself that at anytime he could step in for Heartbreaker lead axeman Mike Campbell and no one would really know the difference.
Back upstairs in the parlour, Southgate House bar manager and For Algernon saxophonist Mike Kuntz was wrapping up his set with an acoustic cover of “Square One”, while downstairs in the ballroom, Bang Bang Salon owner Tina Sullivan joined local blues band the Mudpies for “Even the Losers”, “Here Comes My Girl” and “Stop Dragging My Heart Around.”
I spent the next few sets in the ballroom, where State Song had time for just two songs. Both songs unrecognizable to the casual Petty fan, their first cover was “One More Day, One More Night” from the Echo album, while the other song could have easily passed as their own, as they put their own post-punk stamp onto it.
Alt-Country/folk rockers Shoot Out the Lights used their time wisely to perform four songs, which included “Stop Dragging My Heart Around”, “Here Comes My Girl”, “The Waiting”, and my personal favorite of the night, the Traveling Wilburys “Handle Me With Care.”
Both Martin Luther & the Kings and Sweet Ray Laurel made their cover choices their own, with the Kings doing a punkish “Wildflowers” and Sweet Ray adding some reggae-style guitar riffing to “Don’t Come Around Here No More.”
Back upstairs in the parlour Jason Wells channeled his inner Petty, as his band For Algernon, which included sax and trumpet, chose to do the often times forgettable hits “Room at the Top” and “Walls.” Both the Never Setting Suns and Frontier Folk Nebraska put some heavy drumming and guitar soloing into their covers of “Learning to Fly”, “Mary Jane’s Last Dance” and “Rebels.” Frontier Folk actually ended their set with a cover of Neil Young’s “Rockin in the Free World”, which led into the closing segment of Skynyrd’s “Freebird.”
Several bands originally scheduled to perform at the show were unable to make it, including the Dopamines, the Minor Leagues, Wonky Tonk, Shiny & the Spoon and Josh Eagle & the Harvest City, who were performing at Mainstay with Jody Stapleton & the Generals and Pete Dressman & the Soul Unified Nation.

It was great to see so many of the city’s best bands pay tribute and put their own spins into all of the songs heard tonight, but for now, I’m kind of burnt out on Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers. - brokenmic.com


On the biggest bar night of the year, over twenty Cincinnati-based bands gave thanks to Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers by celebrating the music the band has given to us over the past thirty-five years. In the true spirit of Thanskgiving, all proceeds from the show went to the Leukemia and Lymphoma societies.
For the most part, bands performing both in the ballroom and parlour were only given enough time to bust out a few songs, while in the lounge, four seperate bands performed as a part of a different show, performing their own material and sprinkling in other covers here and there.
Some of those bands in the lounge included Saturn Batteries, who did a kind of half electric, half unplugged version of Nirvana’s “About A Girl”, while Michael Oliva of the Harlequins acoustically covered the Beatles “Mean Mr. Mustard” and the Beach Boys “God Only Knows.”
With such short and overlapping sets by the bands in both the ballroom and parlour, it was hard to catch every single act.
My night began with the final song from two of the members from the Evans Collective including Andrew Antle, who put a beat and sample-heavy, trippy psychedelic spin on “Time to Move On” which led into the chorus of “Free Fallin.” Downstairs in the ballroom, the Le Whorenettes wrapped up their set with a standard rock version of “You Wreck Me.” As I was watching the band’s lead guitarist, whose name I didn’t catch, I thought to myself that at anytime he could step in for Heartbreaker lead axeman Mike Campbell and no one would really know the difference.
Back upstairs in the parlour, Southgate House bar manager and For Algernon saxophonist Mike Kuntz was wrapping up his set with an acoustic cover of “Square One”, while downstairs in the ballroom, Bang Bang Salon owner Tina Sullivan joined local blues band the Mudpies for “Even the Losers”, “Here Comes My Girl” and “Stop Dragging My Heart Around.”
I spent the next few sets in the ballroom, where State Song had time for just two songs. Both songs unrecognizable to the casual Petty fan, their first cover was “One More Day, One More Night” from the Echo album, while the other song could have easily passed as their own, as they put their own post-punk stamp onto it.
Alt-Country/folk rockers Shoot Out the Lights used their time wisely to perform four songs, which included “Stop Dragging My Heart Around”, “Here Comes My Girl”, “The Waiting”, and my personal favorite of the night, the Traveling Wilburys “Handle Me With Care.”
Both Martin Luther & the Kings and Sweet Ray Laurel made their cover choices their own, with the Kings doing a punkish “Wildflowers” and Sweet Ray adding some reggae-style guitar riffing to “Don’t Come Around Here No More.”
Back upstairs in the parlour Jason Wells channeled his inner Petty, as his band For Algernon, which included sax and trumpet, chose to do the often times forgettable hits “Room at the Top” and “Walls.” Both the Never Setting Suns and Frontier Folk Nebraska put some heavy drumming and guitar soloing into their covers of “Learning to Fly”, “Mary Jane’s Last Dance” and “Rebels.” Frontier Folk actually ended their set with a cover of Neil Young’s “Rockin in the Free World”, which led into the closing segment of Skynyrd’s “Freebird.”
Several bands originally scheduled to perform at the show were unable to make it, including the Dopamines, the Minor Leagues, Wonky Tonk, Shiny & the Spoon and Josh Eagle & the Harvest City, who were performing at Mainstay with Jody Stapleton & the Generals and Pete Dressman & the Soul Unified Nation.

It was great to see so many of the city’s best bands pay tribute and put their own spins into all of the songs heard tonight, but for now, I’m kind of burnt out on Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers. - brokenmic.com


Anthony’s Army will host its 1st Annual Anthony’s Army Bands Together Charity Benefit Concert. 5 Local Bands from all different genres will perform on April 16, 2011 at the Avenue Lounge 411 Madison Ave in Covington, Kentucky. The Event will start at 9:00pm. Ticket price is $10.00. Proceeds raised will go towards The Melodic Connections Non Profit Music Therapy in Cincinnati and Anthony’s Army.

Lead Vocalist Jay Ober is excited about the event. “The Joneses understand the restorative and healing effects that music has on all people we are proud to be soldiers in Anthony’s Army and excited to perform for such a wonderful cause.”

Where: The Avenue Lounge
Phone: 859-261-6120
Address: 411 Madison Ave.
Website: www.theavenuelounge.com - City Beat Magazine


Cincy Roots Rock band Shoot Out the Lights celebrates the release of its two-years-in-the-making debut full-length Saturday at the Southgate House’s Parlour. The self-titled release — which should appeal to fans of artists from Gram Parson to Ryan Adams — was recorded with producer Mike Tekulve at Ric Hordinski’s Monastery studio, CAA Studios and at Cincinnati State’s facilities. Opening Saturday’s show are The Western and Josh Eagle and the Harvest City, who are working on their sophomore album with an eye on a summertime release. The $5 cover charge includes a copy of Shoot Out the Lights debut. (www.sotlmusic.com) - City Beat Magazine


Have some coffee and folk music, get a concert and an album and get your tickets quick for Ra Ra Riot....
By Daniele Pfarr
March 15, 2011

Shoot Out the Lights
Southgate House - 24 E. Third St. - Newport & Levee area
March 19 : 9 p.m. CD Release Party. With Josh Eagle and the Harvest City, and the Western. Doors open 8 p.m.
It’s an album release show for local rock band Shoot Out The Lights. For the price of admission, you get to see it perform live and you get a copy of the new album. Not a bad deal in these tough economic times. The Cincinnati band, funnily enough, was formed between Memphis and Nashville when the members discovered they all lived near Cincinnati. They met up again later, and voila, a band was formed. Now you have a new local band with a new album and a superb release show lineup to go with it. Also scheduled on the bill is The Western and Josh Eagle and the Harvest City. - Cincinnati Metromix


Songs from Daniele's iPod: Southeast Engine and Shoot Out The Lights
By Daniele Cusentino
March 17, 2011

Artist: Shoot Out The Lights
Album: Shoot Out The Lights
Song: "You & Me"
Link: http://www.sotlmusic.com/

Daniele says: Move over, Rhett Miller, Cincinnati has its own upbeat, Americana-infused rock band that surpasses your Old 97s. Yes, you heard me correctly. I went there. Seriously, this song is great and is only a small indication of how great the new album from Shoot Out the Lights sounds. The Cincinnati band, funnily enough, was formed between Memphis and Nashville when the members discovered they all lived near Cincinnati. They met up again later, and voila, a band was formed. Check out the band as it releases its debut in Southgate House's parlour with The Western and Josh Eagle on March 19. You get a free album with the cover charge, and this track's on there. Another fave of mine is "One of These Days." Yeehaw!

. - Cincinnati Metromix


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Bio

We're a rock Band from Cincinnati. We can be rootsy and folky, we can be spacey and indie, but it's all Rock that doesn't forget to Roll too.

We're currently wrapping up our second album with plans for release in March 2014. I'm super excited to share more news, but until I can, please check out "Let's Get Lost", "Pack it Up" and "Empty Heart" from the upcoming Let's Get Lost album available on this EPK.


Band Members