SJ

SJ

BandR&BPop

And New Orleans-born R&B/ pop/ soul singer SJ breathes new life into music with live instrumentations and heartfelt vocals.

Biography

With so many technological advances in music, instruments have almost become obsolete- until now. And New Orleans-born R&B/ pop/ soul singer SJ breathes new life into music with live instrumentations and heartfelt vocals.

And on his soul-stirring Money Go Getta Entertainment independent debut album With You set to be released in the Fall, SJ is set to bring musicianship back to popular culture. “I don’t do songs for album fillers; I put my heart into every song. I take you back to feel-good music,” says SJ. “My talents are very wide. From rock to R&B to pop and soul, I am a musician who you can’t put in one particular box. I write and compose all of my songs from beginning to end.”

Born and raised in New Orleans, SJ has had a deep love for music for as long as he can remember. He was singing in the church choir since he was in elementary school, and after church you could always find him with some sort of instrument in his hand.

“Coming up, I had uncles that sung,” he recalls. “And they would go all around to perform.” One of those uncles was famed R&B singer Frankie Beverly. Beverly and SJ’s mother share the same father but different mothers.

“I never stopped playing music and writing songs. I thought I was doing it as a hobby, but it wasn’t a hobby. It was my calling,” he says. “I always questioned myself, but people used to tell me my music was hot. So I reached a point where I said I should give it a shot versus me never knowing if I could be a special producer and songwriter.”

Now on the heels of With You, SJ will sure make his mark soon with cuts like the mellow “Say I Do.” Crooning over hypnotic piano chords, a sensual string section and soft, repetitive snares, SJ serenades his sweetheart into holy matrimony. On the rousing “Let’s Get It Poppin,” SJ fulfills the fantasies of that special someone with a hot bubble bath, moonlit dinner and tempting harmonies.

Although SJ can get any couple in the mood for love, SJ offers social commentary on the mid-tempo “Voices 4 Justice.” In his usual calming voice, he addresses the war in Iraq, police brutality and the devastation of Hurricane Katrina.

“If you listen to the Isley Brothers, Bobby Womack, Curtis Mayfield and Lionel Richie today, their music gives you that same feeling as it did when it first came out,” SJ explains. “They were playing from feeling. They had a passion for it. I’m trying to bring that feeling back.”