Snatches of Pink
Gig Seeker Pro

Snatches of Pink

Band Rock

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

The best kept secret in music

Press


Playing rock n' roll that transcends labels and inclusion in some type of sub-genre is growing increasingly difficult, unless you are Snatches of Pink. Taking the best elements of Exile On Main St., Tim and Raw Power, Hyena is a rock purist's dream. Blending thick, swaggering riffs with gripping lyrics, Snatches strut and snarl through a brilliant record. The gritty "Decline" sets the tone, but the record hits its apex with the energized 1-2 punch of "Otto Wood" and " Come to This", two songs that unabashedly kneel at the altar of punk rock while still being melodic as hell. This is a delicate balancing act, and the guys show this off again on "Reptile". I have to respect this band, for they know they have a great sound but refuse to be a one trick pony as evidenced by "Acetate" and "The Last Invention". Upon first listen, these tracks may seem out of place, but they are a great change of pace before the guys launch into rougher guitar dirges such as "Terminal". To close the record, the Snatches pay tribute to a legend with their version of Bowie's gem, "Moonage Daydream". Go get this. - Rich Quinlan
- Jersey Beat Magazine


SNATCHES OF PINK
Hyena
(MoRisen)
One of the best bands to ever come out of the American South (let's jumpstart that hyperbole, shall we?), North Carolina's Snatches of Pink has never gotten the pop culture permeation it deserves, even after 15 years of service. Despite great albums like 1988's Dead Men, 1992's Bent With Pray and 1997's Blood and Commons (under the name Clarissa), SOP has remained under the radar, making distinctive, quality rock & roll that most bands would give their Marshall stacks to claim. Maybe it's because SOP doesn't fit easily under one banner—the trio starts with a Johnny Thunders, hard-edged rock & roll base, but adds folk rock, roots music, glam rock, poetic lyrics and a sort of ambient yearning that softens the group's raucous shell just a touch. Hyena, the band's first album in 6 years and first without the original lineup, grows mainly from Rank's hard rock roots. Loud, dirty and melodic, cuts like "Golden Years," "Nero" and "Come to This" rock hard with attitude and hooks to spare. Rank does find room in the organized chaos for "Acetate" and "The Last Invention," a typically gorgeous pair of his patented ethereal ballads, as well as a spitting, stomping cover of David Bowie's neglected classic "Moonage Daydream." As a bonus, Hyena includes bonus tracks taken from the original sessions for the record; considering how good "God Speed," "Native Tongue" and "Holiday" are, it's a wonder they were originally cut. Remember that hyperbole thing? Here's some more: Hyena is one of the best records of 2003, better than high profile rock & roll releases by Ryan Adams, Paul Westerberg and Iggy Pop. Believe it—Snatches of Pink deserves its place in the pantheon of lauded true believers, and Hyena is the perfect gift of the gods. - Michael Toland [buy it] - High Bias


SNATCHES OF PINK 'Hyena'.
MoRisen Records
Chapel hill glitter rebels Snatches of Pink have been around, in one incarnation or another, since 1985. Back then, they were one of the few bands on the scene skinny enough, and slinky enough, to successfully share stages with supercats like Thunders and Iggy and seem like peers, not posers. Fueled by the unmistakable chime of Michael Rank’s guitar- a crystal sheen roar when the arena came calling, an ethereal, rain-soaked jangle in quieter times- they were a remarkably adept rock and roll machine, capable of Motor City savagery, snake-hipped glam, million-dollar pop, or emotionally charged roots rock, depending on mood or occasion. Although they enjoyed a fair amount of regional success, much like that other great ‘lost’ band of the 90’s, Dramarama, Snatches of Pink were ultimately victims of their own aptitude- they were just too good, and the success they most certainly deserved slipped ‘em by, in favor of grunge and other forms of electrified suicide. In the early 90’s, Rank released a personal and poignant solo record, “Coral”, that remains one of my favorite records, ever. He was the quintessential American rock and roll poet- sad but proud, bruised but unafraid, with his heart on his sleeve but an extra ace in his back pocket, just in case. He sang like Marc Bolan, played guitar like Keef, and looked like Rod Stewart. He was a rock star, if I ever saw one. So, where the fuck did he go?
Snatches of Pink regrouped in the mid-90’s as Clarissa (“It always felt like there was sort of a bad ju-ju curse hanging over Snatches of Pink”, Rank said about the name change, to ESP magazine) and released another 2 albums, but they fell under my radar completely. In fact, I had no idea what happened to Rank after “Coral”, although I did often wonder. Recently, out of the blue, Michael contacted me, to let me know Snatches of Pink were back together, and had a new album out. Well, right on.
“Hyena” is as brilliant as “Coral” was, filled with tough rock and roll songs, tempered with an uncanny pop sensibility. Comparisons to Hunky Dory-era Bowie, Dogs D’Amour, any ex-Gunner’s solo record (Izzy, Duff, Gilby), the Suicide Twins, Nash Kato’s “Debutante”, the aforementioned Dramarama, and just about any other star-spangly true believer in the glory and redemption of all things rock are all welcome, I’m sure, but hardly necessary. I’m sure they’d be pleased just to hear that it sounds kinda like the Stones, and that it made you happy when you listened to it. For me, it’s like running into an old friend after a decade’s absence, and realizing that it wasn’t just the time past that gave me such fond memories, but that there really was something good and noble and true about ‘em, and it’s still there, alive and well and kicking up a storm. I can’t find a song on here that doesn’t sound like something I want to listen to another dozen times, but “Otto Wood” is probably the most immediate hit, with it’s drawling, singalong chorus and it’s choppy sleaze rock riff, and “Chinese Rope” is the raunchiest, with a nasty-ass guitar line that brings to mind the bad dog bite of the Lanternjack. Really, though, the whole record is stellar. “Hyena” is a most welcome return, indeed. Of course, Snatches of Pink are still men out of time- not a lick of emo or nu-anything on here, baby- but I reckon they’re getting used to that.
So, why now, in these terrible endtimes, these days of strife and terror, would a brittle-hearted poet in ragged scarves and sparkly tatters return to the trenches? Well, because rock n' rollers have never been known for good timing, baby. And anyway, purity of intent and honest-to-god soul is timeless, which means that Snatches of Pink are not late to the party at all- they were just waiting for all the posers and good time kids to leave. Now that only the cool people are left, slit-eyed, satisfied, and feelin’ just a little bit melancholy, what better time to break out the battered guitars, dust off the boas and pointy boots, and rock and roll like we used to do, back when anything was not only possible, but probable? “Hyena” is all the good things you remember about being young and good lookin’ and just as rock as fuck, only now they’re older, wiser, and yeah, better. I wouldn’t expect anything less from these guys. Highly recommended.
- Sleazegrinder


SNATCHES OF PINK
Hyena
(MoRisen)
After North Carolina glam-rock combo Snatches Of Pink changed its name to Clarissa in the mid-'90's, it didn't necessarily wimp out. Admittedly, Snatches' rep for pissing off patrons and club owners alike had earned them the dubious sobriquet "most hated band in Chapel Hill," and songwriter Michael Rank had become more interested in chasing an acoustic muse. The two resulting Clarissa albums, while excellent, wound up confusing the group's fanbase. After an extended hiatus, Rank has revived the old moniker and assembled a new lineup. Hopping on the nü-rawk bandwagon? Curb your cynicism, kids. HYENA is a return-to-roots effort for Rank, combining elements of the Stooges, Replacements, and Stones on the careening, swagger-stomp "Decline" (which could pass for an Alice Cooper outtake) and a revved-up cover of David Bowie's "Moonage Daydream." Peering from the eye of the maelstrom, however, are several muted moments (notably, 12-string balad "The Last Invention") and such respites from the din are what prove Rank, a published poet, isn't joining anyone's parade.--Fred Mills - Magnet


SNATCHES OF PINK
HYENA
(MoRisen)
It's a pretty safe bet that anyone who sees Snatches of Pink for the first time, whether via photograph or live performance, will cursorily lump this Chapel Hill quartet in with the current crop of "rock revivalists" such as The Star Spangles, Jet, and need I mention The Strokes. Despite coincidentally sharing the same oddly manicured but lovingly unkempt appearance flaunted on MTV by the aforementioned, Snatches of Pink are the proverbial square peg. For starters, their history dates back to 1987 and they haven't laid any wax (or aluminum)on the public under that moniker for some 11 years. More significantly, they circumvent the now ubiquitous Joy Division-cum-Television flavor of the moment in favor of a decidedly more grizzled and lo-fi aesthetic, akin to Midwest post-Replacements rawk troupes like the Junk Monkeys and Magnolias. As a whole, HYENA packs more snarl than bite, but the Snatches' utter lack of pretension is refreshing. - Neal Agneta - The Big Takeover


SNATCHES OF PINK 'Hyena'.
MoRisen Records
Review by J.R. Oliver
Hey, I’ve noticed a very positive shift in the rock n’ roll planets this past few months. Everything I’ve been sent to review this time around has pretty much been straight out rock n’ roll. Yeah, it’s rock n’ roll and I like it… I said I like it… Yes, I do. It’s about time we got back to the real nitty gritty. Back to what scared the hell out of middle America in the first place. I mean, guitar, bass, drums and a singer with attitude… that’s all you need. Snatches Of Pink fit the bill perfectly. “Hyena” has some Ziggy And The Spiders From Mars Bowie influences with a much harder edge. Maybe if the MC5 had backed Bowie. “Otto Wood” is a snarling rocker and so is “Reptile”. I love rock n’ roll and this is rock n’ roll. Check it out. - Earcandy.com


SNATCHES OF PINK
Hyena
(MoRisen)

Quote: "These are unpredictable musicians performing beautifully violent rock music, and they seem to come from another world."

By Jennifer Layton

The story of how I first encountered this band is a perfect example of their musical shock effect. A couple of months ago, I was sitting in the teeny-tiny Open Eye Cafe in Carrboro, listening to an acoustic folk singer/songwriter named Don Everett Pearce. The vibe was mellow, the guitar chords were warm, and the hot chocolate was to die for. Suddenly, the door opened, and in breezed this...guy. At first, I wasn’t sure if it was a guy. As he strutted past me with four beautiful college girls in tow, I could have sworn I was looking at Rod Stewart in heavy glam makeup, a fur-trimmed leather coat, and platform shoes. Despite the fact that he had captured the dumbfounded stares of everyone in the room, he didn’t seem to be trying to steal the show. He nodded to Pearce and walked straight to the counter. The Open-Eye doesn’t serve alcohol, so after buying his decidedly un-rock-star beverage, he and his entourage floated back out, with another nod of appreciation to the performer, who almost dropped his guitar. After the show, I talked with Pearce, and the first thing he asked me was, “Who WAS that guy?” I was a little embarrassed to admit I didn’t know. Such a striking man...mannequin...certified glam boy would be hard for anyone within a thousand-mile radius to miss. Two days later, I got a review request from a small record label. I opened the envelope, pulled out the press shot, and had a Psychic Friends moment. It was him. The shot was in black and white, but it was the same guy, same hair, same fur-lined coat, same pout. Just the look you want for someone fronting your rock band. But Kevin Clark doesn’t front the band Snatches of Pink. He plays bass. When a band is visually and musically powerful enough for Kevin Clark to be the guy who stands behind the frontman and plays bass, you know to brace yourself for a musically maniacal shock to the senses. Those with high blood pressure or heart conditions should not ride. Snatches of Pink has been around for many years, through many albums and many band members, but the one constant has been guitarist/songwriter/singer Michael Rank. On his own, he’s been lauded for his songwriting by publications such as CMJ and Spin. Now with John Howie, Jr on drums, Marc Smith on guitar, and the coffeehouse-crashing Kevin Clark on bass, Rank leads Snatches of Pink on their new release, the hungry, aggressive, intense Hyena. This is down and dirty yet true glam rock and roll. The music preens like the Stones, bleeds like Iggy Pop, and weaves dark magic through the notes in a way that not many bands can do without sounding silly or pretentious. I find it fitting that they cover David Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust tune “Moonage Dream,” as they flaunt and swagger with the same credibility as Bowie. It’s like this band moved into an apartment just below Bowie and right above the New York Dolls. Snatches of Pink punctuates their deliberately ugly snarls with moments of unabashed prettiness, and it’s all in the vocals. While Rank’s vaguely threatening delivery paves the way, Clark’s feminine side infuses itself into the rest of the band enough for them to blend their voices into sweet, flowing waves of sound before yanking the rug out from underneath and crashing back into the storm. “Otto Wood” is a perfect example. They also pause for the quiet, mournful “Acetate,” with half-breathed lyrics and a mesmerizing melody. There’s a jangly feel to the guitar playing, although it’s a pretty heavy one, and I can just see the band cringing at my use of “jangly” to describe their sound. Then again, they might just laugh and howl at the moon. These are unpredictable musicians performing beautifully violent rock music, and they seem to come from another world. If you can’t get to one of their shows, their web site offers video clips that seem to burst right out of the monitor. Snatches of Pink are already rock stars. Regardless of how many albums they sell or whether or not pop culture TV pays any attention to them. They’d scare the hell out of Ryan Seacrest anyway.
- Indiemusic.com


Johnny Thunder's inspired riffing with Rank turning out melodic lo-fi nuggets that recalls the best of alt-rock...HYENA has all the signatures of Rank's sound.
- Venus Magazine


Discography

Stag
2005 LP (release date is early 2005)
MoRisen Records

Hyena
2003 LP
MoRisen Records

Blood and Commons (Clarissa)
1998 LP
Mammoth Records

Silver (Clarissa)
1996 LP
Mammoth Records

Coral (Michael Rank solo album)
1993
Caroline Records

Bent With Pray
1992
Caroline Records

Deader Than You'll Ever Be
1991
Dog Gone Records

Dead Men
1990
Dog Gone Records

Send in The Clowns
1988
Dog Gone Records

Photos

Feeling a bit camera shy

Bio

“Snatches of Pink would rather rip it to shreds...”
- SPIN

“. . . Arrogant, excessive and beautiful . . .”
– MAGNET

“Michael Rank . . . a songwriter of rare talent and intensity.”
– CMJ

CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA – One of rock music's original renegade bands has re-emerged to once again assassinate all conventions and expose the cruel yet forever glorious face of rock 'n' roll. The band, SNATCHES OF PINK. Their weapon, a MoRisen Records debut entitled HYENA, and their ammunition, a volatile, apocalyptic cocktail of swaggering punk, unabashed glam, and boisterous rock.
Vanguards of North Carolina’s celebrated and inventive rock scene, SNATCHES OF PINK have been heralded by the critical press over the last decade for their shadowy and compelling rock ‘n’ roll style, releasing three groundbreaking albums under the SNATCHES OF PINK namesake and two under the ‘Clarissa’ moniker while sharing bills with the likes of The Ramones, Johnny Thunders, The Cramps, Iggy Pop, and Soundgarden.
In describing the band, SPIN declared: “Snatches of Pink would rather rip it to shreds.” Rockpool opined: “Snatches of Pink have obviously soaked up all the sweat on Johnny Thunder’s dripping guitar and all of the Doll’s malcontent theories, and turned it into a reservoir of unkempt, unruly garage crunch.” About SNATCHES OF PINK’s live show, Magnet poignantly described: “Snatches of Pink left me exhausted – one part drunken noise orgy, one part spiritual cleansing and numerous parts hammer of the gods. Arrogant, excessive and beautiful.”
For the legion of fans who have patiently awaited the outlawed band’s return as well as for a whole new generation of rock ‘n’ rollers ready for the real deal, Hyena delivers the killer blow. From the swirling punk of “Otto Wood” to the surprisingly wistful and melodic “Acetate” to the desperate rock fury of “Chinese Rope’, Hyena fascinates song after song as Snatches struts stridently in its signature disorderly fashion and delves into dark lyrical depths that reveal the full power of their rare and raw brilliance. On Hyena’s eleventh and final track SNATCHES OF PINK give a riveting treatment to David Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust classic “Moonage Dream”.
SNATCHES OF PINK is led by the inimitable Michael Rank, who CMJ New Music Monthly praises “as a songwriter of rare talent and intensity” and who also currently serves as lead guitarist in the newly formed and hotly-tipped rock act MARAT. Joining Rank in SNATCHES OF PINK are longtime bandmate Marc E. Smith on guitar/backing vocals, Kevin Clark on bass and John Howie, Jr. on drums