SON of the SUN
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SON of the SUN

Buffalo, New York, United States | SELF

Buffalo, New York, United States | SELF
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"“Best Of” List for 2011 (Rock and Roll Report) Cleveland, Ohio"

Son of the Sun Almost Not There The second of two EPs to make their way onto my Best Of list for this year is Almost Not There from Son of the Sun. The six songs that make up this release work well to create one strong, though short, release. The variety in the songs is one of the reasons why I include this CD in this list. Son of the Sun offers up some of the best indie rock this year with their Almost Not There CD. This is one CD I wish was longer than it is. - Rock and Roll Report


"The Big List: Best of 2011 (RSL Blog - Boston, MA)"

SUNSHINE FROM THE NORTH - Buffalo, NY's amazing Son of the Sun have rapidly become a regular listen at the RSL Compound. No joke, I've listened to this record dozens of times this year and I've managed to see them three times over the last three months. This is the kind of band I would be willing to drive distances to see. Well here's why; there's six songs (nearly a full-length) of quality on this EP. Pick up this album and fall for Son of the Sun's modern and throwback fusion. The tracks are romantic photographs for your music-loving mind. - Ryan Spaulding - Ryan's Smashing Life


"The Big List: Best of 2011 (RSL Blog - Boston, MA)"

SUNSHINE FROM THE NORTH - Buffalo, NY's amazing Son of the Sun have rapidly become a regular listen at the RSL Compound. No joke, I've listened to this record dozens of times this year and I've managed to see them three times over the last three months. This is the kind of band I would be willing to drive distances to see. Well here's why; there's six songs (nearly a full-length) of quality on this EP. Pick up this album and fall for Son of the Sun's modern and throwback fusion. The tracks are romantic photographs for your music-loving mind. - Ryan Spaulding - Ryan's Smashing Life


"Son of the Sun: Almost Not There"

White Bluff, Nashville, and Middle Tennessee music aficionados, Son of the Sun will officially release their latest EP Son of the Sun: Almost Not There today (July 26, 2011) on the I Blame Yoko Music label. This album is the follow up to their first full length LP The Happy Loss (2010). The new EP and its collection of six songs see no stylistic departure from Son of the Sun’s formula for producing melodic soft edged rock music. Think well written Lo-Fi, psychedelic, nostalgia rock similar to Oasis, Blur, or The Traveling Wilburys. Despite the nostalgic and familiar qualities of Son of the Sun: Almost Not There their sound never comes off as trite or a mere imitation. In fact, the sound is genuine and the bands artistic integrity remains intact as the album seamlessly combines classic and contemporary sounds and sensibilities.

The EP’s first track “As Far as Lucy” is an up tempo guitar driven tune that rocks and slurs its way into your consciousness with a brazen cockiness that will have listeners hooked from the first notes. The vocal performance on the album’s second track “10,000” has all the swagger and smoothness of a Roy Orbison or Carl Perkins song. Furthermore, the pessimism and darkness of the lyrics are juxtaposed against the up tempo rhythm and confident vocal delivery on the song. “Fruit Jar” is another stand out song that for the most part moves along in ¾ time, until the psychedelic sounding bridge and chorus’s distort the tune ala the Beatles “Sgt. Peppers.” The song almost sounds like Syd Barret attempting to perform a country tune after dropping a large dose of LSD or mescaline.

Zak Ward, Joseph Stocker, Jeremy Franklin, Steve Matthews, and Brandon Delmont collectively known as Son of the Sun have made a superb album that is both classic and contemporary. The combination of British pop with American psychedelic-blues based rock sounds works extremely well for this band. Music listeners of many genres including rock, country, pop, blues, and americana will enjoy this album and should not hesitate to add it to their collections. Expect to see a lot more from Son of the Sun in the years to come as this star has just started to burn and from the sound of their new EP they are ready to shine. For more information on Son of the Sun or to purchase their newest music you can find them at http://www.sonofthesunmusic.com/. You can also catch them on facebook at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Son-of-the-Sun/53098113102 and on twitter at http://twitter.com/#!/sotsmusic. - Awaiting The Flood


"Son of the Sun "Almost Not There" Review"

Son of the Sun, a five-piece from Buffalo, NY have produced an excellent EP infused with vintage effects, minimalist arrangements and sincere songwriting. The musical aesthetic throughout Almost Not There maintains a level of consistency from song to song, creating a streamlined experience rather than a collection of tracks thrown together under one name.

In addition to their well-conceived retro sound, Son of the Sun plays with dissonance and harmony, a theme that can be heard both literally and figuratively in the music throughout the record (major and minor tonalities intermingling in “As Far As Lucy” or a slow, more morose song such as “Fruit Jar” injected with a buoyant bridge). This is also expressed lyrically in “10,000” as singer Zak Ward proclaims “I wanna lay down, I wanna record my dissonance” over upbeat music in the background. This juxtaposition creates an experience that stirs disparate emotions in the listener.

The arrangements are also kept to a minimum, though they produce strong and variant moods in each song. An important contributor to this is the sincerity of the lyrics, and Ward performs them dynamically with strength, vulnerability and candor.

Almost Not There provides a snapshot of a band that has a well developed sound and thoughtfully crafted songs, prompting the notion that contrary to the title of their EP, Son of the Sun has arrived. - BuzzChips


"SON OF THE SUN | Almost Not There EP"

Son of the Sun originate from Buffalo, New York, but one of the better songs on their newest EP, “Almost Not There”, finds lead singer Zack Ward singing poetically about good old England with gliding slacker bravado: “I‘ve seen your Henry’s England / I’ve seen him wear his shiny crown / Parading on the streets, in the lovely shops of London town …” That’s about as English as this band gets. Son of the Sun build songs on bouts of combustive electric guitar like sun flair ups, stomping percussive beats, and a 60s psychedelic mentality — but this time around they’ve added something else. It’s the addition of a romantically waltzy, countrified “Fruit Jar”, and the inclusion of the poppier rock sound of a song like, “10,000?, with its melodic backing vocals, and bursting 50s-styled drums. In the latter, Ward sings about trying to find his mojo: “I got to find, I got to find some confidence / Believe in pushing the line into arrogance / Shine a light in opulence / Now turn it off / I’ve never been happy in decadence.” The album opener, “As Far As Lucy”, begins with rollicking guitar and these blazing lyrics: “I see the signs, see the writing on the wall / But I don’t know if I care to (look/love?) …” Since “The Happy Loss” and “Before the After”, Son of the Sun haven’t been interested in taking it slow out of the gate. The music generally says pin your ears back and get ready. The band has always been high-octane. But now they’re showing off even more of their versatility, and their ability to rock out with acoustic guitar, pretty vocal moments and pop melodies. In “Don’t Worry” Son of the Sun shows it can combine their two sides — beginning the track with a drowsy bar-room rhythm that transforms into soaring guitar, backing harmonies and a strange bass sound with serious girth and growl. It’s like some wild, tripped-out, drunken hoedown you don’t ever want to leave. Note: To see the band live: July 22 at the Ulrich City Center, Lockport, N.Y. or July 23 at The Happy Dog in Cleveland, Ohio. – David D. Robbins Jr. - Their Bated Breath


"See You There!"

Buffalo psyche-rockers Son of the Sun have wrapped up their new EP, Almost Not There (I Blame Yoko Records), but don’t let the title indicate otherwise—this band is definitely “there” in terms of talent and number of quality performances they’ve given since forming in 2007. They recently opened for Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros, and Blue Oyster Cult at Thursday at the Square and Artpark respectively, and are slated to play with Our Lady Peace at the Hard Rock Café and the Tea Party at the Molson Canal Series in July. Their new single “My Best Mistake” is a deep, dark garage-pop anthem with psychedelic guitar swirling over lead singer Zak Ward’s gloomy blues vocals. Son of the Sun have proven they belong on the big stage, but before you go see them among the masses this summer, be sure to hear them up close and personal at their EP release show this Saturday (June 25) at Nietzsche’s. Here Come The Comets and Kingsley Flood open the show. —jon wheelock

Read more: http://artvoice.com/issues/v10n25/see_you_there#ixzz1QJhXVl22 - Artvoice - Alt Weekly


"DIG Boston - Defend Yourself with SON of the SUN"

Son of the Sun blew us away back in October when they played Beast of the Northeast, our first ever shindig in New York for CMJ. Now, the Buffalo boys are back—but this time on our turf. Their Joe Stocker tells Duck Tales.


You opened for Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeroes in Buffalo. What was that like?

It was great. It was exciting for us to play with a band who we currently listen to and think are an amazing, relevant band. They’re making quite a big splash—and really smart music—so it was great to do a live show with them.

It was absolutely amazing. Like going to church, sort of.


You guys must deal with typos all the time.

No, it happens. We get “sons” of the sun sometimes, but we have a really good sense of humor about ourselves. If I see a name I think would be a cool name or title, I write it down. To my knowledge, [Son of the Sun] is from William Blake’s poetry—

but if you Google “Son of the Sun” a cartoon from Duck Tales comes up. That’s not what I was inspired by. It just sounded good.

Your latest album, Almost Not There, is about to drop?

An EP, yeah. We’re excited about it. Six songs, called Almost Not There. We’re happy with it. It’s definitely a progression of us, as more of a band—and not just as a studio singer that’s trying to get people together.


If you had to describe the EP in three words, what would those three words be?

Probably “almost not there.” [Laughs]

It’s a very delicate process, being in a band. Whether you’re super successful or not, you’re dealing with four or five egos, emotions, hang-ups, feelings and ideas. It’s interesting to see the finish line, and we’re grateful for that.
- Dig Boston / Hillary Hughes


"MUSIC PROFILE: Son of the Sun"

Son of the Sun is a sensational Buffalo quintet of psychedelic splendor and rock 'n' roll grit. Its sound gets way out there, while remaining relevant and accessible. It's big and bad and beautiful with its multiple layers and dimensions. Yet go and ask guitarist-keyboardist Joseph Stocker and he'll tell you it's really simple.

"It really is," Stocker says. "It's simple in the writing. A 12-year-old could play these chords. The instrumentation and the layering and the arrangements and the sounds that are picked, I think is what delivers it in a slightly more... I don't want to say sophisticated, but it's not like a Ramones' song." He pauses for a minute on the phone and clears his throat before pulling a 180.

"In actuality the songwriting is like a Ramones' song," he says. "I just think the layers really hide it. But its nuts and bolts - if you write out the chords, it's just three chords."

Son of the Sun and its three chords came together with Stocker and vocalist-guitarist Zak Ward in 2007. Ward was on the left coast, but the two worked via internet.

"I would send him instrumentals," says Stocker. "I would write all the music and record all the music and he would write lyrics for them."

It's when Ward returned to Buffalo in 2008 that Stocker says things began to flourish. "We put out a 7'' EP and people really liked it," he says, referencing the "Before the After" project. "So we put a band together." From then on the band included Stocker, Ward, guitarist Jeremy Franklin, bassist Steve Matthews, and drummer Brandon Delmont. Son of the Sun played its first show at The Hard Rock Caf? in Niagara Falls, which went over remarkably well.

"We were kind of shocked it didn't flop," Stocker says. "So we booked another show and it just snowballed."

Son of the Sun released its first full-length album, "The Happy Loss," (produced by Mike Brown) in 2010.

What is both beguiling and intriguing about this band is the blending of influences, almost to the point of anonymity. Where is the sound coming from, exactly? The genres and predecessors to Son of the Sun's wail aren't readily apparent, though Stocker is ready to rattle off a list.

"Personally," he says. "I do like older music; 60's stuff, obviously. The Beatles, Dylan, Bowie. But I really love pop like Roy Orbison and doo-wop, The Everly Brothers, stuff like that. Some bands have an immediate retro sound, and I love that kind of stuff. But I love modern records, too, like Wilco and the Flaming Lips and The National. You can really go both ways, you can totally make a lo-fi throwback kind of sound, but we try to blend them both."

Still, Stocker believes the pursuit of originality may be in vain. "It's a funny thing," he says. "Whenever you get three chords together and it's apparently a new song, really it's a Buddy Holly song. My only rule is, it has to be simple." Simple as in, this band doesn't jam.

"Everything's arranged in practice or in recording," says Stocker. "I feel we really don't go too far, we just really try to put a lot of energy and emotion without sounding like ‘American Idol.' We just try to put everything we have into it at the time. We really don't doodle."

Son of the Sun is wrapping up work on its forthcoming CD, tentatively called "Almost Not There." Then the band plans on putting rubber to the asphalt.

There are two ways of deciphering a band or predicting its path; listen where it is or listen to where it was. Son of the Son is so steeped in its own sonic elegance that it is perhaps easier to listen to where it could go if given the option to go backwards 10 or 20 years. Stocker hazards a guess.

"I don't know, man" he says. "I'd like to have been something off Creation Records. American music was obviously pretty bad until Nirvana. British music was still cool; Oasis, The Jesus and Mary Chain, The Smiths, Echo and the Bunnymen. I think it would depend where you lived. I think just good pop music with a little twist."

Like Son of the Sun does now. "Yeah, we're trying," Stocker says. "Underneath all the crap, it's just a pop song."

Son of The Sun

w/Animal Pants, Auld Lang Syne

Saturday, April 16

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave.

8 p.m. | $6-$8 | 454-2966

sonofthesunmusic.com - Rochester City Newspaper


"'The Happy Loss' makes the Artvoice Best of 2010 list"

Even in the age of digital downloads and shortened attention spans, the good news is that the album is not dead. This year proved to have some of the finest full-lengths in years. Singles alone be damned: long live the long-player!

SON OF THE SUN
The Happy Loss
(I Blame Yoko Records)
If you’ve seen any big acts this past year, chances are you were fortunate enough to catch Son of the Sun opening the show. Already poised with plenty of national attention, Son of the Sun are doing their city proud. Old meets new with vintage style and modern delivery with hip-swaggering rock tunes that never lack in the element of class.

BIG THANKS to everyone for all the local and regional support in 2010! - Artvoice


"Photographic Evidence - Son of the Sun at CMJ BIG"

"Son of the Sun are one of the best new bands in America.
Get In on this Now!" - Ryan Spaulding, rslblog.com - Ryan's Smashing Life Blog


"HEAVEmedia.com reviews 'The Happy Loss'"

Son Of The Sun Takes Sound To New Lengths

Buffalo's Son of the Sun propels personal style on 'The Happy Loss'
Son of the Sun The Happy Loss
Released on Jun 22, 2010

Many bands try to smash together all of their favorite things and make a mess. Let’s face it, as much as a person can love Neil Diamond, Public Enemy, and Justin Timberlake it’s hard to find a cohesive stylistic link between all three. It takes a good band to find what works for all of them and construct a style that they can all operate in and still enjoy. Buffalo’s Son of the Sun has adapted all of their favorite genres into one massive wall of sound. On their latest full-length album The Happy Loss one can hear 50s pop, So Cal surfer, indie rock, alternative country, psychedelic rock, and even a little bit of shoegaze permeating through ten tracks. Better still, all of these things combine perfectly together.

The Happy Loss exudes a sense of warmth normally heard on vinyl records. Lead singer Zak Ward’s vocals positively soar over the slow ballad “How Can it Be?,” each bass note ringing smoothly over the sounds that they’ve built themselves over the years. With music like this, this warm vinyl sound really pays off. Each track crackles with vintage intensity without pandering to keeping it strictly old school. Tracks like “Leopard Print” sound like they’re right off of some hip soundtrack. From “Leopard Print”’s opening alone it’s hard not to imagine watching a scene of you and a significant other zipping down a desolate road in a car, the sun setting behind you. This recording style seems to be getting more and more popular as people are starting to realize how bland mp3s and m4as can be. For some it doesn’t add anything to their recordings but for Son of the Sun it makes The Happy Loss go that extra mile.

Son of the Sun keeps their love for surfer music on The Happy Loss but adds a certain twang that wasn’t present on their previous EP Before the After. Production-wise this album sounds much more like an alt-country album like Cardinology meeting the new/old style of Brian Williams on Smile. It’s something that’s been done before but Son of the Sun adds something that puts them apart from the pack. The problem is I can’t pinpoint it. Where many rocker/country acts find themselves in Nashville and neu-surfer bands in California and Brooklyn, Son of the Sun hails from Buffalo, New York. If you’re not familiar with the musical history of Buffalo don’t worry, most people aren’t. It ranges from Ani DiFranco to the Goo Goo Dolls to Cannibal Corpse. How the hell did Son of the Sun find their sound amongst so many odd bands? Either way I’m glad they found it. Son of the Sun is a band that has a defined style but is ready to rewrite it at any time. Listening to The Happy Loss is like listening to a melting pot of my music collection - soulful songs, hard-hitting guitar riffs, and that surfer girl sound washing over everything.

Posted by Amy Dittmeier on Sep 21, 2010 @ 10:10 am - Heavemedia.com


"Hybrid Magazine Review - September 2010"

Listening to the track "Get Together" conjured up images of Thom Yorke fronting a surfy, psychedelic rock band; but that' just how strange The Happy Loss by Son Of The Sun can seem at times. There are also moments when The Jesus And Mary Chain is fondly recalled, particularly during "Keys (Last Call)". It's as though snippets of other bands/songs jump out while this disc plays. For another example, Dylan's "Knockin' On Heaven's Door" somehow comes to mind with "How Can It Be?" But correct me if I'm wrong; Dylan never worked regularly with a banjo player in his band? "The Franklin", with its jingle bell percussion, sonic-name-drops The Beach Boys' Pet Sounds, even though one would be hard pressed to make any other connection between Brian Wilson's approach, and that of Son Of The Sun.

This group also proves it can create a straight out pop-rock song on "Get Together". It sports organ, and a relatively clean recording. Another 'clean' song is "Stay The Same", which alternates between a chunky electric guitar riff, and dreamy guitar sounds. And for no particular reason, there is also a garage rock solo on it. This album closes with "Tell Me", which - with its gently propulsive bass line - might easily pass for a Morrissey ballad. There's a lot to chew on here, that's for sure. Son of a gun, music fans, you'll have big fun with Son Of The Sun!

-Dan MacIntosh - Hybrid Magazine


"Performer Magazine Review - October 2010 Issue"

RECORD REVIEW: Son of the Sun
The Happy Loss
By: John Barrett

With a timeless sound that both modern and nostalgic, Son of the Sun combines classic, Beatles-esque melodies with distorted, reverberated guitar layers that recall the likes of Brian Jonestown Massacre and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. For the most part, the songs that comprise The Happy Loss stand well on their own and are ambitious on their own terms: concisely arranged and driven by simple, attractive chord progressions, yet still stylistically elusive, often culminating in a chaotic, polyphonic crescendo of sound.

Another consistent element that pervades The Happy Loss is lead vocalist Zak Ward's reverb-soaked, impassioned vocals, which channels The Black Keys in terms of timbre and lends the music an unpretentious air of raw emotion. His contemplative lyrical style draws upon themes universal enough to make them instantly relatable, such as loss, deceit and learning to make the most of an unfavorable situation - reflected in the album's title.

Some of most captivating tracks include the bouncy garage-rock of "Get Together," raucous rocker "The Franklin," which recalls the sparse piano-guitar interplay of Spoon, and opener "The Good Ole Days," which begins with drumbeat a la Gary Glitter's "Rock & Roll, Pt. 2" but dispels that similarity with its psychedelic-shoegaze guitars.

Of the mellower material, "How Can It Be?" stands as Son of the Sun's strongest ballad, sporting doo-wop vocal hooks replete with airy, celestial harmonies. "April Fools" rides on its gorgeous slide work married to an appropriately slow, somber musical framework. (I Blame Yoko Music)

http://www.myspace.com/sonofthesunmusic - Performer Magazine


"'Stay the Same' Placement on MTV's Real World XXIV New Orleans Episode 9"

Episode 9 of Real World XXIV New Orleans on MTV

http://www.mtv.com/videos/misc/554024/missing-lines.jhtml#id=1646121

http://www.mtv.com/videos/..real-world-new-orleans-ep-9-..fired/1646117/playlist.jhtml

The placement is between 35:21 and 35:54
(instrumental) - MTV


"Juxtapoz Album Review"

We Got The Beat: Son of the Sun (album review)

Review by: Randi Hernandez (http://www.missomnimedia.com)

Son of the Sun doesn’t just have a clever band name – the name of their record company, I Blame Yoko Music, is equally as brilliant. In terms of the band’s sound, I personally blame Tom Petty, the movie Reality Bites, and the early 90’s for their simple (albeit pleasing) debut offering, The Happy Loss.

The members of Son of the Sun got to know each other in the same way as most music geeks do – by sharing their musical tastes over the internet through file-swapping. Son of the Sun formed in early 2007 with two members living on opposite sides of the country. Joseph Stocker (guitar, keyboards) lived in New York and Zak Ward (lead vocals, guitar) lived in California. After Zak moved back to Upstate, New York, the duo went on to add Jeremy Franklin (guitar), Steve Matthews (bass), and Brandon Delmont (drums), and shortly afterward (in 2008) they recorded their EP, Before the After. Although the band has been described as “melodically detailed rock” by their managers and handlers, their sound can best be labeled “soft rock” – Not the soft rock on the radio airwaves of your local “Lite” channel – but soft rock before it was for pussies. Lead vocalist Zak Ward sounds thrillingly similar to a male version of Juliana Hatfield, and the band provides instrumentation that seems lightly coated in the psychedelic syrup of The Beatles’ Magical Mystery Tour. Standouts of the album include the soulful “How Can it Be?”, which would be perfect on an angst-ridden soundtrack for a flick boasting a “love gone wrong” theme, and “April Fools”, which could also work well in the aforementioned movie genre – during, of course, a flashback montage of the happier times. Sometimes the sonically simple songs are the most effective, as they are the ones that make your heart ache the most. Look, let’s put it this way – not all records can be written by music theory students, or lyrics by poets. But even when writing about peanut butter sandwiches, Shel Silverstein had the power to move his audience. Such is the case with the music of Son of the Sun – It is straightforward, yet still satiates.

To get more information about the band and upcoming gigs, please visit their website at www.sonofthesunmusic.com or their myspace page. To see the band in action, also please check out their Youtube page.

Juxtapoz review link: http://www.juxtapoz.com/26077-we-got-the-beat-son-of-the-sun - Juxtapoz


"Winner of Ourstage.com Noisepop Competition"

Son of the Sun is officially the winner of the Noisepop Music Festival song competition on Ourstage.com for the month of January 2009! SOTS ranked #1 out of 243 Band's in the competition. - Ourstage.com / Noisepop


"Innocent Words Review - 8/22/10"

Son of the Sun’s debut album, The Happy Loss, is a beautifully melodic, yet heartbreakingly gorgeous piece of work. This is the type of moody rock that can waver in and out as you sit around and relax on a gorgeous summer’s night. Listening to the album, it is obvious that these tracks are all expertly crafted by this Buffalo, NY, group. Son of the Sun have an excellent tendency to produce melodic tracks that still remain highly reminiscent of garage psychedelia from years past. Some of the tracks on The Happy Loss would fit right in with a Nuggets release.

Album standout, “The Other Side,” is a haunting bit of rock supported by multiple harmonies and guitars that echo in and out as lead singer Zak Ward recalls a recent breakup. The Happy Loss is filled with a few mid-tempo numbers, such as “The Other Side” with others like the moody “How Can it Be?” and the beautiful outro “Tell Me.”

Son of the Sun is not shy to turn things up a bit every now and then on The Happy Loss as demonstrated by rockier tracks such as “Stay the Same” a true garage rock throwback and “The Good Ole Days” a tough-spirited classic rock track.

The Happy Loss is an exciting debut album from Son of the Sun and one that deserves to be taken together as a whole. It isn’t too often that an album dealing with a loss ends up being this enjoyable. The Son of the Sun’s loss is our gain. - InnocentWords.com / Greg Walker


"SOTS wins "BEST BAND in WNY" at Buffalo Spree Magazine Awards"

On June 25th 2009 Buffalo Spree Magazine Awarded SON of the SUN the "Best Band in WNY" Award for 2009. The award ceremony took place at Shea's Performing Arts Center in Buffalo NY. SON of the SUN is also featured in the Buffalo Spree Magazine Summer Issue outlining all of the award winners for 2009. Below is the blurb from their review in the magazine.

"A little bit psychedelic, a little bit alt-country, a little bit garage-rock, a little bit dreamy early-sixties pop, and god knows what else, all delivered with the kind of confidence that suggests these guys could (and should!) make a splash nationwide."
-- Buffalo Spree Magazine - Buffalo Spree Magazine


"Fensepost.com | Son of the Sun: The Happy Loss [Album Review]"

Do you have an itch in your neck for some old-school-influenced, void filling, and harmony driven rock and roll? Are you looking to show your father some “new shit” that he might very well approve of? Well, look no further than Son of the Sun’s debut full length album The Happy Loss. Joseph Stocker and Zak Ward, masterminds behind the operation, have a strange sensibility to themselves when it comes to creating the constantly sought “wall of sound” that so many musicians strive to create.

The album’s highlight track, “The Other Side”, would fit amazingly well on your iTunes playlist between Jefferson Airplane and Rush (many fathers’ favorite for some strange reason). The track clocks in at an even 3 minutes, pulls out a touch of surf rock into the well-timed equation, and is an overall joy to endure. The equally catchy, and just as enjoyable quick cut, “Get Together”, might be a bit more updated for dear old Dad with it’s out-of-the-ordinary pop-punk feel. The overall playlist for The Happy Loss is solid. Son of the Sun have a keen understanding of the benefits of guitar-driven harmonies and tantalizing keyboard euphoria.

This New York based band of not so-contemporaries might just be what the mainstream world needs right now. These could very well be the guys that knock Kings of Leon back down off the pedestal the no longer deserve after their latest travesties (pretentious? maybe; whatever). But, when it comes to pure-hearted and perfectly obtuse rock and roll, The Happy Loss hits the proverbial rock dolphin right on the bottle nose of potential mass appeal.

6 JULY 2010 WRITTEN BY RON TREMBATH - Fensepost.com


"Fensepost.com | Son of the Sun: The Happy Loss [Album Review]"

Do you have an itch in your neck for some old-school-influenced, void filling, and harmony driven rock and roll? Are you looking to show your father some “new shit” that he might very well approve of? Well, look no further than Son of the Sun’s debut full length album The Happy Loss. Joseph Stocker and Zak Ward, masterminds behind the operation, have a strange sensibility to themselves when it comes to creating the constantly sought “wall of sound” that so many musicians strive to create.

The album’s highlight track, “The Other Side”, would fit amazingly well on your iTunes playlist between Jefferson Airplane and Rush (many fathers’ favorite for some strange reason). The track clocks in at an even 3 minutes, pulls out a touch of surf rock into the well-timed equation, and is an overall joy to endure. The equally catchy, and just as enjoyable quick cut, “Get Together”, might be a bit more updated for dear old Dad with it’s out-of-the-ordinary pop-punk feel. The overall playlist for The Happy Loss is solid. Son of the Sun have a keen understanding of the benefits of guitar-driven harmonies and tantalizing keyboard euphoria.

This New York based band of not so-contemporaries might just be what the mainstream world needs right now. These could very well be the guys that knock Kings of Leon back down off the pedestal the no longer deserve after their latest travesties (pretentious? maybe; whatever). But, when it comes to pure-hearted and perfectly obtuse rock and roll, The Happy Loss hits the proverbial rock dolphin right on the bottle nose of potential mass appeal.

6 JULY 2010 WRITTEN BY RON TREMBATH - Fensepost.com


"Fensepost.com | Son of the Sun: The Happy Loss [Album Review]"

Do you have an itch in your neck for some old-school-influenced, void filling, and harmony driven rock and roll? Are you looking to show your father some “new shit” that he might very well approve of? Well, look no further than Son of the Sun’s debut full length album The Happy Loss. Joseph Stocker and Zak Ward, masterminds behind the operation, have a strange sensibility to themselves when it comes to creating the constantly sought “wall of sound” that so many musicians strive to create.

The album’s highlight track, “The Other Side”, would fit amazingly well on your iTunes playlist between Jefferson Airplane and Rush (many fathers’ favorite for some strange reason). The track clocks in at an even 3 minutes, pulls out a touch of surf rock into the well-timed equation, and is an overall joy to endure. The equally catchy, and just as enjoyable quick cut, “Get Together”, might be a bit more updated for dear old Dad with it’s out-of-the-ordinary pop-punk feel. The overall playlist for The Happy Loss is solid. Son of the Sun have a keen understanding of the benefits of guitar-driven harmonies and tantalizing keyboard euphoria.

This New York based band of not so-contemporaries might just be what the mainstream world needs right now. These could very well be the guys that knock Kings of Leon back down off the pedestal the no longer deserve after their latest travesties (pretentious? maybe; whatever). But, when it comes to pure-hearted and perfectly obtuse rock and roll, The Happy Loss hits the proverbial rock dolphin right on the bottle nose of potential mass appeal.

6 JULY 2010 WRITTEN BY RON TREMBATH - Fensepost.com


"KEXP "out this week" mention"

KEXP "out this week" The Happy Loss mention. - KEXP


"Ryan's Smashing Life Blog (Boston Show Preview)"

EXCITING NEW MUSIC - Rolling into Boston sometime over the next few hours for the inevitable music bedlam that accompanies great rock bands on the rise, Buffalo's Son of the Sun are someone you should get to know. My immediate thought on listening to the band is that their a cross of two of my all-time favorite bands: Band of Skulls (the amazing new British atmospheric rock trio I have fallen for in a very big way the last 12 months) and the semi-retired Greenhornes (whose percussion and base were stolen by Jack White and Brendan Benson to form The Raconteurs.

As is the case with many musically familiar modern bands, the players from The Raconteurs and The Greenhornes dipped from the well of bands like The Animals and The Zombies and The Kinks. .So there is a clear British Invasion element here (which I have found, historically, irresistible - if done well) but I digress. Son of the Sun have a brand new album and it falls into the familiar, loving recesses of this listener's mind.

The Happy Loss (to which you are listening as you read these words) was co-produced by Mike Brown and the band. It was recorded in part at Temperamental Recordings in Geneseo, NY and mixed by Alan Weatherhead (Sparklehorse, Camper Van Beethoven, Cracker) at Sound of Music Recording Studios in Richmond, VA. - Ryan's Smashing Life


"Their Bated Breath: THE HAPPY LOSS | Son of the Sun"

ON YOUR RADAR: Son of the Sun is a band that won’t be toiling in regional obscurity for long. Zak Ward coos softly, sounding a bit like Coldplay’s Chris Martin. His band will undoubtedly receive all kinds of comparisons, from Interpol to The Kinks and the Kings of Leon. But maybe Son of the Sun more closely resemble a combo of Brit-rock and San Francisco’s Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. This Buffalo, N.Y band is built around Ward’s gorgeous voice, layers of textured harmonies and lots of guitar delay. The most impressive thing about Son of the Sun’s new record, “The Happy Loss”, is how comfortable it all sounds, considering the number of genres the band pulls together. They mix Americana, psychedelia, alt-country and guitar-groove rock with a garage-rock sensibility. Sometimes the kitchen-sink approach makes an album feel like it isn’t unified. But this doesn’t happen on “The Happy Loss”. Son of the Sun have melded all those elements into their own unique style. This is a band with serious commercial appeal, that still maintains a high level of songcraft. Ward sings achingly about relationships, loss and love: “And I will take you out tonight / Wear your leopard-print / And I will sing the song for us / I haven’t tired of that yet / I hope you’re not tired of that yet.” The album-closer “Tell Me” might be the only misstep on this record. It’s a 50s-styled slow-waltz closer with chimes, that feels lyrically light and a bit too perfect of an album wind-down. But that’s hardly a complaint. This is a great debut album. – David D. Robbins Jr. - Their Bated Breath


"SOTS wins local Hard Rock Cafe Competition"

Hard Rock Hosts Successful Battle of the Bands

Contributed by: Buffalo.com/YourHub Deandra Modica on 4/24/2009

On Thursday night, the Niagara Falls Hard Rock Café hosted the Ambassadors of Rock Battle of the Bands. The four talented local bands that performed at this free event are competing with other local bands throughout the United States to perform onstage at Hard Rock Calling 2009, a live concert in London's Hyde Park featuring performances by The Killers, Neil Young, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, Dave Matthews Band and more.


Esteemed judges of the competition included Robby Takac from the Goo Goo Dolls, Anthony Casuccio, a gold record audio engineer and vice president of the Buffalo Music Hall of Fame, Hard Rock Café General Manager Dominic Verni, and James Kurdziel, Program Director for 103.3 The EDGE. Audience members were also distributed ballots to vote for the "fan favorite" who will be given the opportunity to play at the Hard Rock Café in Pittsburgh, PA.


The Common Kings opened the show promptly at 8 PM with six catchy songs that the audience noticeably enjoyed. Members of the crowd were nodding their heads as the band performed their new song "On the Surface." The noticeable highlight of The Common King's set was the band's breathtaking cover of The Kings of Leon's hit "Sex on Fire," in which lead singer Christian Kosmoski displayed his strong vocal abilities and audience members enthusiastically sang along.


Loyal Common Kings fan Rachelle Besser ardently raved about the band's performance. "They played really well tonight. This was an experience that was really enjoyable and I'm really happy I came."


Bryan, an audience member who was unfamiliar with The Common Kings before seeing them at the show, enjoyed the band's style of music. "I feel like they have a sort of 90's vibe and I love the 90's. They did great."


The second band to perform, Six Pin, came to the stage ready to entertain with their harder rock performance. Lead singer Andrew Mitchell prepared the crowd for their set expressing "Are you guys ready to rock out?" The band members were very interactive with the crowd and many fans cheered after each energizing song.


Concert attendee Nikki Rudy was pleased with Sixpin's set although she is not normally a fan of hard rock music. "I really liked Sixpin, they sound hard but have a smooth vibe at the same time," she said. "They're not the type of band that I would usually listen to but I really enjoyed their performance."


Third to the stage was Son of the Sun, a band recently featured in The Buffalo News as one of the Bands to Watch in 2009.

The intense emotional connection that the members of Son of the Sun had with each song they performed was palpable through their body language throughout the entire set. Ward literally shook as he skillfully sang each of the band's lyrically and musically captivating songs.


The Innocent Bystanders provided an upbeat performance full of engaging songs to conclude the show. Fans gathered at the front of the stage to dance and sing along to "Under Wraps" and "Teenage Moments" with the lively and entertaining band.


Alyssa Kreuder communicated her devotion to the local band. "The Innocent Bystanders are amazing. I think that the drummer, Scott Bernard, is awesome," Kreuder said. "I think all the bands that played tonight were great but Innocent Bystanders are my favorite!"


In the end, Son of the Sun won the votes of the judges as well as the audience and were named the fan favorite as well as the judges' pick to move further in the Hard Rock Calling 2009 competition.


A tape of the last two songs the band performed at the show will be sent to the Corporate members of the Hard Rock Café and Steven Vandt from Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band to judge. Son of the Sun will be in the running to perform at Hard Rock Calling 2009 against 21 other bands that competed in their local Ambassadors of Rock Battle of the Bands competitions at other Hard Rock Cafés around the nation.


Audience members were pleased with the outcome of the competition and the overall experience they had at the Hard Rock's event. Kendra and Jillian expressed "The best band won. Son of the Sun really deserved to win this. This was a great event and very well organized."


Crowd member Jessica Rimer also shared her satisfaction with the concert and with the Hard Rock Café for providing such an event. "This was a great concert, a free concert like this gives the local bands a lot of publicity and I think it is great that the Hard Rock provides local bands with such great opportunities." - Buffalo.com


"HEAVE Media Print and Video Review"

Hello Everyone,

Our friends at Heave Media www.heavemedia.com have decided to review our EP on their up and coming video podcast show called "take it or heave it". check it out and let us know what you think.

http://www.heavemedia.com/heave.tv

Get To Know: Son of the Sun
Joey Stocker gets friendly with HEAVEmedia and gives us some insight on the Buffalo band.
By: Amy Dittmeier


New York. The hub of America’s music world. Many bands, good and no good, get spit out of New York City’s rough and tumble environment, hoping for their chance of fifteen minutes of fame. Rarely is there something that pops out of western New York. Buffalo band Son of the Sun may be relatively young, but their unique old-school charm has already garnered notice within the community, with the Buffalo News naming them one of their 2008 bands to watch.


Founding members Joey Stocker and Zak Ward started their working relationship way back in high school when they first were in a band together. Son of the Sun was a gradual growth stemming from their love of music and creativity together. Stocker, originally a drummer, picked up a guitar and started recording instrumental tracks for a personal project which would become the band’s debut EP Before the After. He sent the recordings to Ward for some input. Ward’s immediate liking to the sound led to a collaboration spanning from New York to California. “Six months before that we were kind of going back and forth because [Zak] was living in California for a while,” said Stocker. “He would record the vocals and email them to me and I would line it up with the stuff that I had and we sort of worked actually through the internet that way. We put [the EP] out January and then we wanted to do a show so we put together a band and played our first show last March and now it’s kind of morphed in to a five-piece thing.”


Their sound on Before the After is a whirlwind of decades and emotions. It’s the free love atmosphere of the 60s, the earnest sound of Americana music, and the homegrown sincerity of meaningful lyrics. It’s that old influence pop sound that influences the band to play something bigger than the simple indie rock formula. “It’s not just a typical rock and roll thing and it’s not metal,” said Stocker about their sound. “There’s lots of hardcore and indie rock here and I don’t know, I don’t think we really fit there. People seem to think we sound older. Definitely not hardcore.” The EP’s only eleven minutes but the band still creates a signature sound that leaves an impression on its listeners. Son of the Sun is currently working on their follow-up to Before the After in their home studio in upstate New York and hopes to have their first full-length album tentatively entitled The Happy Loss in the spring.


Their single off of Before the After “Listen Darkly” sounds like the result of Roy Orbinson making music at a luau. Its swaying beat and Ward’s warm vocals create a very laid-back tone that can inspire summer images in winter weather.

- Heave Media Inc.


"Music Review in Rochester City Newspaper"

Son of the Sun (6/8)
By Saby Reyes-Kulkarni on June 3, 2009


Son of the Sun plays Monday, June 8 at Bug Jar.
By now, the marriage of country and rock is hardly a novel idea, but Niagara Falls five-piece Son Of The Sun proves that there are still new and exciting things you can do with it. With so many misguided rock boys chasing glory in cowboy hats, SOTS' taste for soul, and its affinity for Phil Spector's "wall of sound" production style, shows a vision that separates the band from its peers. The Sons do a commendable job of recreating the depth of Spector's touch without flat-out ripping him off, and their songs sound lively and convincing because of it. Aside from all that, these songs would stand tall anyway. Apparently, SOTS knows that atmosphere works best with strong writing to back it up.

Son Of The Sun plays Monday, June 8, 9 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 319 Monroe Ave. $5. 454-2966. - Rochester City Newspaper


"Molson Canal Concert Series SOTS support for Randy Bachman"

Molson Canal Series lineup announced for Lockport waterfront


LOCKPORT - Nine free Friday night concerts were announced today for the second season of the Molson Canal Concert Series on the city's waterfront.
The lineup includes some blues, hard rock and country, with several Canadian performers, some local opening acts and a 1980s slant.

All shows are to be held in Ulrich City Centre, a courtyard between two rows of commercial buildings along Main and Walnut streets. The opening acts will take the stage starting at 5:30 p.m.

Promoter Kathy Paradowski said the blockbuster of the series might be the July 3 holiday weekend show featuring Canadian stars Our Lady Peace.

"Our Lady Peace is No. 2 in Canada to The Tragically Hip. And for free? It's going to be crazy," she said.

Mayor Michael W. Tucker said, "My three daughters are really excited about Our Lady Peace. They're telling me this venue probably won't be big enough to hold all the people who come."

The series opens June 26 with Rusted Root headlining a bill that also will include Steve Johnson (from Big Leg Emma), Bearhunter and New Clear Fusion.

The remainder of the shows are:

July 3: Our Lady Peace, with Inland Eyes and the Incurables.

July 10: The Cult, with Ours and Chylde.

July 17: Kim Mitchell, with the Jeremy Hoyle Band and Friendly Fire.

July 24: Lita Ford, with Sass Jordan and Flyin' Blind.

July 31: Queensryche, with Dave Constantino and Billy Draws Two.

Aug. 7: Eddie Money, with A Potter's Field and Johnny Nobody.

Aug. 14: Charlie Daniels Band, with Her & Kings County and Ransomville.

Aug. 21: Randy Bachman, with Alison Pipitone, Son of the Sun and Scott Celani.

- The Buffalo News and Lockport Journal


"Blog - Wildy's World Reviews SOTS EP"

Son Of The Sun may be the hottest new band in Upstate New York. The Buffalo quintet mixes the ethereal languor of Radiohead with the orchestral complexity of The Moody Blues and the Country/Rock spirit of Blue Rodeo on their EP, Before And After. The EP, a preview of their full length CD The Happy Loss (due Spring, 2009) is revelatory in the depth and breadth of styles and musical choices Son Of The Sun braves. Guitarist/vocalist Zak Ward and multi-instrumentalist Joseph Stocker create a moving target of musical styles across the six songs presented here. Their job is made easier Jeremy Franklin (guitar), Steve Matthews (bass) and Brandon Delmont (drums), who provide an incredibly tight and musical base.

How Can It Be and Big Record Breaker had me thinking of The Moody Blues circa Days Of Future Passed. Singer Ward has a lyric vocal style that first perfectly with these lush, almost ethereal arrangements. Listen Darkly has a straight up Americana feel to it with some Roy Orbison-style guitar embellishments. Spanning Time is something of a sonic watercolor, filling your ears with sounds and rhythms than transcend construction or intent. Son Of The Sun takes a wonderful turn toward the country/rock landscape with punker verve on Stay The Same (my favorite song on the CD). Son Of The Sun winds things down with Tell Me, a sprawling 1950’s style ballad that has a highly memorable melody. My only complaint about the EP at all is that the vocals on the last song were mixed way too low.

Son Of The Sun presents a quandary for classification. It’s not so much that they are all over the map, but that they’ve re-written the map to suit their own musical purposes. Before And After covers everything from symphonic rock to alt-country, even showing some flashes of punk energy on Stay The Same. What do you say about a band that does everything and does it well? Bring on the full length album…

Rating: 4 Stars (Out of 5)

You can learn more about Son Of The Sun at www.myspace.com/sonofthesunmusic, where you can purchase a copy of Before And After [EP] on either CD or vinyl via PayPal. You can also get it digitally through iTunes.

http://wildysworld.blogspot.com/2009/03/review-son-of-sun-before-and-after-ep.html

- Wildy's World Blog


"SOTS featured on CMJ Player CD Sampler with New Music Report"

SON of the SUN featured in the June 2009 CMJ New Music Report as well as on the CMJ Player CD Sampler that comes with the report.

For More Information Visit: http://cmj.com

Our Single "Listen Darkly" is also available on the CMJ Player Sampler that is featured on the CMJ website.


love,

sots - CMJ


"Son of the Sun shines at the Square by Jeff Miers"

Son of the Sun shines at the Square
BY JEFF MIERS
NEWS POP MUSIC CRITIC
Published: July 02, 2010, 12:30 am
http://www.buffalonews.com/2010/07/02/1101575/bright-spot.html

It was all about 1997 on Thursday. For better or worse. Mostly worse. Happily, Buffalo’s own Son of the Sun opened this week’s Thursday at the Square and delivered a short but incisive set that proved to be the evening’s best. Performing songs from the recently released “The Happy Loss” album, and finishing off with a torrid take on Lou Reed’s “Rock & Roll,” the band proved itself the equal of groups like Interpol and Kings Of Leon with an inspired collection of songs. Would that all of Thursday could’ve attained this level.

So on to Ed Kowalczyk, then. With Live, the man delivered some of the most yearning-infused anthems of the middle ’90s. Songs like “Lightning Crashes” and “I Alone” seemed to tap into the zeitgeist of a generation wishing for a populist inclusion that it would be denied. No way to get that without selling out, right? I mean, Creed happened, didn’t it? And it’s about to happen again.

Kowalczyk minus his bandmates in Live is an awful lot like Live. But the sense that any of it matters has been obscured by the passage of time. Once Kowalczyk seemed to be the cheerleader at a pep rally announcing some new way forward. Now he just seemes like the guy who stayed at the party way too long.

With an able band backing him, Kowalczyk certainly didn’t embarrass himself. He sang well, and was an able frontman. However, something seemed to be going seriously amiss as he cavorted about the stage, intermingling bad Bon Jovi moves with ill-timed crotch-thrusts. The end result was akin to a bad aerobics video with a halfhearted ’90s grunge sound-track. Clearly, the man is in need of a way to move forward.

There were not many moments of genuine mid-’90s anthemic brilliance happening, though. Live’s “The Dolphin’s Cry” revealed the tinge of Eastern philosophy Kowalczyk adopted in the late ’90s, and few could’ve denied the power of any of the “Throwing Copper” material the singer summoned forth.

Sadly, though, all of this came across as a sort of oldies act, a pageant celebrating the glory day of grunge. Live was never really a grunge band. Kowalczyk should reconsider his career’s path. He is clearly capable of better.
- The Buffalo News


"Battlemouth.com Album Review"

Son of the Sun was formed in early 2007 from opposite sides of the United States. At the time, Joseph Stocker lived in New York and Zak Ward lived in California, and the two friends and former band-mates experimented with their reflective, lush musical tastes over the internet, swapping files which eventually brought about their first EP in 2008. After Ward moved back to New York, the duo went on to add Jeremy Franklin, Steve Matthews, and Brandon Delmont, and the band were soon tagged as a band to watch in the upstate New York music scene. Son of the Sun have now self-released their debut full-length album, The Happy Loss, and it’s an album that’s well worth checking out.

Son of the Sun are undeniably a guitar band, with layers of textured harmonies and a rich Americana-flavoured sound. The Happy Loss is a comfortable blend of dreamy 60’s pop, garage rock, psychedelica, and alt-country. Kicking off with the stomping “The Good Ole Days”, the album easily shifts through the band’s wheelhouse of musical styles, keeping it pretty unpredictable as to what the next track will be.

Ward’s voice is an interesting listen. With touches of Josh Homme, Damon Albarn, and Eddie Vedder, his vocals are an integral part of each track, shaping and defining. The rest of the band joins in on most tracks, delivering multiple backing vocal lines reminiscent of older styles of music, and culminating in the closing classic 50’s ballad-style track, “Tell Me”.

While The Happy Loss is solid Americana at the core, there is an underlying British feel to the music. Some tracks have a certain Beatles-esque feel to them, while others have an undercurrent of Britpop flowing through them. Combined with Ward’s laidback vocals, Son of the Sun often sounds like what I imagine it’d be like if Damon Albarn led Queens of the Stone Age.

Perhaps in keeping with its name, The Happy Loss is an odd but working juxtaposition of moods. The guitar-rich music is melodic and upbeat, yet there’s a feeling of sadness that comes through. Ward’s style of vocals contributes strongly to this feeling, making the music sound like someone who’s trying to keep a brave face while going through a woeful time. However, this doesn’t create a downer for the listener, but rather sets a theme for the overall listening experience.

Lyrically, the melancholic theme continues, bringing us an album full of tales of loss and personal heartbreak. The lyrics are fairly simple, relaying narratives of mishandled relationships, desperation, and other such common themes. Just like reality, The Happy Loss shows us that life doesn’t always provide a happily-ever-after ending and one may never come to terms with that, but that’s okay as that’s part of being human.

The Happy Loss is a good listen, and the band have hit a solid winner with their debut album. With rippling melodies and well-presented variety, I agree that they are a band to watch, but not just within the upstate New York music scene; look out world, here comes Son of the Sun.
- Battlemouth.com


"Americana UK Album Review"

Son of the Sun “The Happy Loss” (I Blame Yoko Music, 2010)
by: Paul Villers

Sunshine on a rainy day

Of chief biographical note with this band is that the two main protagonists used to live on opposite sides of the States, swapping musical ideas over the internet. All of the press and reviews I’ve read in researching them mentions it so I suppose I’d better do the same. No matter – they and their band mates all ended up in New York and they do have a very New York sound which is the oxymoronic feat of being both ‘spare’ and ‘lush’ at the same time.

They’re a guitar band in essence, acoustic and electric, with bits of keyboard thrown in ('Leopard Print' threatens to be a rehash of 'Strawberry Fields' at one point). What they do with those guitars is pretty nice though – by turns they jangle, sparkle and spike but never quite settle on one or the other. Similarly they sometimes stomp about (opener 'Good Ole Days' and 'Get Together') and sometimes relax into a calmer groove ('How Can It Be?' – a song of trouble and heartbreak – is in this vein and probably the album’s standout track).

Despite these stylistic changes, the project does hang together (the vocal helps, naturally) in a melodious moroseness. The overarching feeling one gets is that sunny California pop has been taken to New York and given a very cold hosing down – which is, by all accounts, what happened. Kudos too for calling their publishing company ‘I Blame Yoko Music’ – that’d guarantee a smile every time.

Date review added: Tuesday, June 22, 2010
Reviewer: Paul Villers - Americana UK


"The Buffalo News "Bands to Watch in 2009""

Full Article: http://www.buffalonews.com/185/story/539732.html

Who: Son of the Sun

What: The brainchild of singer and songwriter Joseph Stocker and cohort Zak Ward, Son of the Sun has grown into a full ensemble with the addition of Jeremy Franklin on guitar, Steve Matthews on bass and Moog, and Girlpope/Odiorne drummer Brandon Delmont manning the engine room. The sound is sprawling and beautiful, suggesting at times a particularly poignant Ryan Adams, and at others, a less strung-out Velvet Underground.

The band’s debut effort, “The Before the After EP,” is available as 7-inch vinyl with CD enclosed. A new album is on the way in ’09. Listen at www.MySpace.com . Why: If this band was working in New York City, it would probably already be breaking big. Things take a little bit longer ‘round here, but the climate is right for this sort of lush, reflective and melodically detailed rock.

- Jeff Miers / Music News / Pop Music Critic - Buffalo News / Jeff Miers


"Midpoint Music Festival Review / Cincinnati City Beat Review"

"SON OF THE SUN (Buffalo, NY): Like a gift from the sky, Son of the Sun is coming to serve up a plate of their southern tinged New York retro R&B rock. Equal parts Velvet Underground and Kings of Leon, their harmony layered cuts of sonic satisfaction will leave you begging for seconds." --- mpmf.com

A flood of adjectives immediately comes to mind upon exposure to Son of the Sun's music, lush, affecting, shimmering, languid, dreamy and ethereal, to name a few, via five guys who surely have albums by everyone from Gram Parsons to the Velvet Underground scattered amid their Buffalo practice space. Truth in advertising: If the son of the sun actually formed a band, this impressive sonic sigh would probably what it would sound like.
Dig: Mazzy Star fronted by a dude, The Beatles in slow motion, lazy Sunday mornings. --- Cincinnati City Beat - Cincinnati City Beat


"Babysue.com 'The Happy Loss' CD Review"

Son of the Sun - The Happy Loss (Independently released CD, Pop)
Son of the Sun originally started out as the internet-connected duo comprised of Joseph Stocker and Zak Ward. After working together electronically Zak moved (back) to New York and the pair completed the band by adding additional members Jeremy Franklin (guitar), Steve Matthews (bass), and Brandon Delmont (drums). You may think --considering the way the band was formed--that Son of the Sun is a techno/electronic pop band. But nothing could be further from the truth. These guys create classy/classic pop/rock using traditional instruments. And all those annoying little modern techno tricks that you usually hear in modern pop don't even rear their ugly little annoying heads on this album. The Happy Loss features songs...very strong songs with dynamite melodies backed with really solid playing. Nothing standard and predictable here. These tunes are mature and intelligent...and they sure don't follow well-worn paths. All ten tracks hit the target, but particular standout cuts include "Good Ole Days," "Leopard Print," "April Fools," and "Tell Me." Top pick. - Babysue.com


"The Hype Machine and Large Hearted Boy Blog 'Get Together' Daily Download"

'Get Together' featured on Large Hearted Boy and The Hype Machine Blogs as 'Daily Download'.

The Hype Machine: http://hypem.com/#/artist/son+of+the+sun

Large Hearted Boy: http://www.largeheartedboy.com/blog/archive/2010/05/daily_downloads_2290.html - Large Hearted Boy / The Hype Machine


"Aiding and Abetting Record Review 'The Happy Loss'"

..If the Brian Jonestown Massacre trafficked a bit more in americana, it might have sounded somewhat like this. These are 60s-ish anthems drenched in organ, reverb and the odd tendency toward rootsy jangle.

It's not an unwelcome notion, as it also recalls the Jayhawks' Sound of Lies, which remains one of my favorite albums. This album, too, is largely stoked by dark thoughts and darker lyrics. It's never grim, but bliss isn't a word I'd associate with these songs, either.

I do like the sound, which notches a fine balance between the minimalism of the songwriting and the lushness of the arrangements. The final result is something of a "let it wash over you" feel. Certainly, standing up to the assault is not recommended.

Just plain good, really. Solid workmanship and stellar execution. This one started well and just got better. Take a dip and you'll go in for the plunge. - Aiding and Abetting


Discography

2011 - Almost Not There EP
Label: I Blame Yoko

2010 - Breakthrough Audio CD Sampler
Song: The Good Ole Days

2010 - The Happy Loss LP
Label: I Blame Yoko

2009 - Road Trip Nation Compilation
PBS Documentary Television Series
Label: Road Trip Nation / PBS / StateFarm
Song: How Can it Be?

2008 - Before the After EP
Label: I Blame Yoko

Sonicbids acting slow? Please visit our other social networking sites for more music, info, and news about the band.

Photos

Bio

Last Updated On: 3/22/2012

----------Band Bio----------

Son of the Sun formed in early 2007 with two members living on opposite sides of the country. Joseph Stocker (guitar, keyboards) lived in New York and Zak Ward (lead vocals, guitar) lived in California. Once band mates and friends, the two experimented with their reflective, lush, "wall of sound" musical tastes over the internet, swapping files which eventually brought about their first E.P. in 2008 Before the After. After Zak moved back to New York the duo went on to add Jeremy Franklin (guitar), Steve Matthews (bass), and Brandon Delmont (drums).

Before the After was received with open arms on the upstate New York music scene bringing in positive reviews. Among them was The Buffalo News who selected SOTS as a "band to watch" in 2009. Playing local shows and touring regionally developed the bands sound into what is described as encompassing elements of groups such as Band of Horses, The Kinks, Gram Parsons, and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club.

In June of 2010 Son of the Sun released their first full-length album The Happy Loss. With the help of co-producer Mike Brown, the album was recorded in part at Temperamental Recordings in Geneseo, NY and mixed by Alan Weatherhead (Sparklehorse, Camper Van Beethoven, Cracker) at Sound of Music Recording Studios in Richmond, VA. Throughout 2010 Son of the Sun continued to tour from the midwest to the east coast and support national headlining acts in the Upstate NY area. With every show sold out at the local level, the band has been able to expand their fan base regionally.

Staying true to their roots in what is described as "melodically detailed rock," Son of the Sun continues to pile on euphonic layers of textured harmonies with an added garage psychedelia that defines their sound so well. Their new EP "Almost Not There" being released in June of 2011 follows their song writing rule of "keep it simple," and 3-chord rock-n-roll. But with instrument choices and mixing classic and modern recording techniques giving the chance to bridge the gap between the two time periods, making it have a familiar "classic" vibe while staying new and refreshing.

"We all draw from the same pool of influence for the most part" says Joey from SOTS. "For me personally I could listen to Roy Orbison's In Dreams as much as Gimme Danger by the Stooges, followed by a Hank Williams song, and get equally turned on by all of those. So watching the movie "Alphaville" is just as motivating as listening to a Velvet Underground record. So in some way all of those things manage to sneak into the songs whether through a songwriting style or a certain choice of instruments, effects, etc."

During the summer of 2011 the band toured the east coast in support of "Almost Not There". They also highlighted their summer / fall with support for national headliners such as Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros, The Tea Party, Blue Oyster Cult, Our Lady Peace and a CMJ Showcase in October.

The band is breaking new ground and will soon be coming to a city near you.

----------Recent Press----------

"Buffalo, NY's amazing Son of the Sun have rapidly become a regular listen at the RSL Compound. No joke, I've listened to this record dozens of times this year and I've managed to see them three times over the last three months. This is the kind of band I would be willing to drive distances to see. The tracks are romantic photographs for your music-loving mind."
- Ryan Spaulding, rslblog.com (Jan, 2012)

"It's about as love at first sight as I've gotten since I met my wife. It's the type of music that two people can interpret in their own way, and still both be right. Son of the Sun is simply amazing."
-Frank De Blase, Rochester City Newspaper (Feb, 14 2011)

"With a timeless sound that both modern and nostalgic, Son of the Sun combines classic, Beatles-esque melodies with distorted, reverberated guitar layers that recall the likes of Brian Jonestown Mass