Sons of Maxwell
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Sons of Maxwell

Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada | SELF

Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada | SELF
Band Folk Adult Contemporary

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"City's favourite Sons awesome!"

(December 9, 2008)

You know it's Christmas time in Timmins when the Sons of Maxwell are playing to sold-out audiences.

For the 10th-consecutive year, the popular recording artists -- consisting of Timmins' own talented brothers Dave and Don Carroll -- returned to town to host their annual Christmas concert.

Several hundred music fans, friends and family members packed the auditorium at Timmins High and Vocational School Friday and Saturday night to once again listen to familiar holiday classics, as well as a mix of original tunes penned and sung by the talented brothers.

To say the Carroll brothers are a Timmins treasure would be an understatement. Even though they have called the East Coast home for many years, Dave and Don Carroll never have forgotten their roots growing up here in the City with the Heart of Gold.

The fact they continually draw hundreds of fans each and every time they return to town to perform as Sons of Maxwell -- or individually as solo artists -- is a testament to their musical ability.

It also highlights how the residents of this community love to support local talent and applaud those who have left town to pursue their artistic dreams.

"We'll keep doing this as long as there is a demand for it," Dave Carroll told Daily Press reporter Arron Pickard following Friday night's sold-out performance. "This concert marks the start of Christmas for us because we play about half a dozen concerts through the holidays."

Returning to Timmins to play the annual Christmas concert -- their popularity has determined they can now support two shows instead of one -- is a welcome homecoming as they love performing in front of dozens of family members and close friends.

It's amazing that the Christmas concerts have been going on for a decade, Dave said.

"This is something we love doing and when you do something you love, time goes by quickly," he said. "There are always new faces every year and new songs that we work into the lineup."

Don Carroll said he and his brother are fortunate to have remained full-time musicians in an industry where careers are usually short.

"We play with a lot of quality musicians, they're all top drawer," he said.

The brothers have no intention of splitting up Sons of Maxwell, but are proud to have pursued solo careers.

Friday's performance was the launch of Don's first solo album called "Valentine's Delivered."

A few months ago, Dave returned to Timmins after proudly launching his first solo work called "Perfect Blue," which has garnered him an award for Inspirational Recording of the Year in Nova Scotia.

That recording also inspired a Nova Scotia man to write a script and produce a film, where Dave has agreed to play the lead role.

"At our core, we're still Sons of Maxwell," Dave said. "But, we've matured to the point where we have our own individual strengths in music."

Mayor Tom Laughren presented the Carroll brothers with plaques for the 10th anniversary of their Christmas shows. He called them great performers and true artistic ambassadors for the city.

"When you look at how these guys have been all over the world, they promote Timmins everywhere they go," Laughren said.

Kudos to two extremely talented and proud lads from Timmins, who have done themselves and the city proud for a long long time.

And here's hoping they keep producing quality music and bringing it back home to Timmins for all their fans to listen to for years to come. - Daily Press


"City's favourite Sons awesome!"

(December 9, 2008)

You know it's Christmas time in Timmins when the Sons of Maxwell are playing to sold-out audiences.

For the 10th-consecutive year, the popular recording artists -- consisting of Timmins' own talented brothers Dave and Don Carroll -- returned to town to host their annual Christmas concert.

Several hundred music fans, friends and family members packed the auditorium at Timmins High and Vocational School Friday and Saturday night to once again listen to familiar holiday classics, as well as a mix of original tunes penned and sung by the talented brothers.

To say the Carroll brothers are a Timmins treasure would be an understatement. Even though they have called the East Coast home for many years, Dave and Don Carroll never have forgotten their roots growing up here in the City with the Heart of Gold.

The fact they continually draw hundreds of fans each and every time they return to town to perform as Sons of Maxwell -- or individually as solo artists -- is a testament to their musical ability.

It also highlights how the residents of this community love to support local talent and applaud those who have left town to pursue their artistic dreams.

"We'll keep doing this as long as there is a demand for it," Dave Carroll told Daily Press reporter Arron Pickard following Friday night's sold-out performance. "This concert marks the start of Christmas for us because we play about half a dozen concerts through the holidays."

Returning to Timmins to play the annual Christmas concert -- their popularity has determined they can now support two shows instead of one -- is a welcome homecoming as they love performing in front of dozens of family members and close friends.

It's amazing that the Christmas concerts have been going on for a decade, Dave said.

"This is something we love doing and when you do something you love, time goes by quickly," he said. "There are always new faces every year and new songs that we work into the lineup."

Don Carroll said he and his brother are fortunate to have remained full-time musicians in an industry where careers are usually short.

"We play with a lot of quality musicians, they're all top drawer," he said.

The brothers have no intention of splitting up Sons of Maxwell, but are proud to have pursued solo careers.

Friday's performance was the launch of Don's first solo album called "Valentine's Delivered."

A few months ago, Dave returned to Timmins after proudly launching his first solo work called "Perfect Blue," which has garnered him an award for Inspirational Recording of the Year in Nova Scotia.

That recording also inspired a Nova Scotia man to write a script and produce a film, where Dave has agreed to play the lead role.

"At our core, we're still Sons of Maxwell," Dave said. "But, we've matured to the point where we have our own individual strengths in music."

Mayor Tom Laughren presented the Carroll brothers with plaques for the 10th anniversary of their Christmas shows. He called them great performers and true artistic ambassadors for the city.

"When you look at how these guys have been all over the world, they promote Timmins everywhere they go," Laughren said.

Kudos to two extremely talented and proud lads from Timmins, who have done themselves and the city proud for a long long time.

And here's hoping they keep producing quality music and bringing it back home to Timmins for all their fans to listen to for years to come. - Daily Press


"Sons of maxwell making the most of a good gene pool"

If Maxwell Carroll hadn’t often kept his two boys up before going to sleep, serenading them with nightmare-inducing folk lullabies like John Henry, then we probably wouldn’t have the gift of the group known as Sons of Maxwell today.

Thousands of fans here in the Maritimes, throughout Canada and abroad thus owe this man a debt of gratitude — for musically guiding his sons with his own gifted talents, while being selfless enough to not seek the spotlight as a performer, subsequently inspiring them to carry out the musical dream that he always had.

This is the story of Dave and Don Carroll, two men at the centre of a Halifax-based group that has been shaking up audiences all over for the past 15 years.

Now with seven recordings, a handful of ECMA nominations, a 2002 roots/traditional group ECMA and a number of other awards under their belt, Sons of Maxwell has certainly been making a great living outta’ making papa proud.

This past Sunday, the boys made the road trip back to P.E.I., their first time here since the Shellfish Festival in the fall and their first time in Summerside since Contact East in 2005.

They played the Jubilee Theatre, and I was lucky enough to be one of 250 wildly appreciative crowd members — a Sons of Maxwell first-timer when I walked in and a raving fan when I walked out.

“So happy to be here tonight!” Don said, dashing up to the mike to greet the crowd.

“We’re pretty glad that the storm they were calling for held off. It was a great day for a drive. We’re gonna’ kick it off with a song called Games People Play.”

On a chugging, chiming acoustic guitar, Dave Carroll proceeded into the opening chords, coming in singing at the mike neighbouring his brother, who sang away as well, tambourine flapping about.

An upbeat song, with a folk/pop vibe from 2004’s Sunday Morning CD, it got the crowd’s toes tapping and heads bobbing right away as it also became instantly notable what one of the shining characteristics of Sons of Maxwell really is: harmony, harmony, harmony.

In every song that followed, in fact, it became further apparent that there really is something to be said for the seamless blend of two great and accomplished voices from the same immediate gene pool.

Backed by a tight drummer and a solid bassist, Sons of Maxwell were both rollicking and driving and soft and contemplative when they needed to be.

But it was the performances of these soft and sweet ballads that really won my reviewer’s heart over that night.

As soon as I heard Don say, “This is one song that many people have used at weddings,” I thought, “Uh oh, we could have some tear flowage here.” (For those who are unaware, which would be most of you, I presume, three weeks ago at a sushi restaurant in Toronto, I proposed to my now fiancée Savannah.)

And one can imagine that as Dave sang, with such sincerity, the chorus line, “And if I died tomorrow, years before my time, I’d be happy knowin’ she’d been mine,” it was pretty hard to keep the ol’ tears from pouring out.

Another song that really shook my soul that night was a song called Now from Dave Carroll’s brand new solo record, Perfect Blue.

As soon as he said, “This next song was inspired by a book I read recently by a man named Eckhart Tolle,” I thought, “Yep. The Power of Now.”

The bestselling book has inspired millions, and now the author’s new book, A New Earth (along the same spiritual lines) is the focus of an Oprah Book Club online workshop.

So, along with feeling a sense of complete blissful enlightenment while listening to Carroll play this song (which I feel is an absolutely pure and perfect musical representation of Tolle’s message), I thought, of course, “Oh, man, this guy’s gotta’ get this in the hands of someone at Oprah.”

It could be instant millions for Carroll if it were possible.

And in talking to him after the show, he did mention that he sent the song to Tolle himself, who finds it to be “enthralling.”

I have a feeling Carroll’s tribute to the present could indeed end up being quite a gift to many, many people.

The band brought it all home with some real barn-burners to top off the night like Mary Mac, Oceanside Again and Rocky Road to Dublin, getting people up outta’ their seats, clapping away and bringing on two standing ovations before it was all said and done.

Check out www.sonsofmaxwell.com for all the info on the band and Dave Carroll’s new CD, which you need to get — now.

...

Each week, Todd MacLean brings his readers into the experience of a new musical event, from Island ceilidhs and festivals, to the city’s bar scene and rock concerts. He loves to hear feedback and suggestions for future musical endeavours. He can be reached at tmaclean@theguardian.pe.ca or at 626-1242. - The Guardian


"Sons of maxwell making the most of a good gene pool"

If Maxwell Carroll hadn’t often kept his two boys up before going to sleep, serenading them with nightmare-inducing folk lullabies like John Henry, then we probably wouldn’t have the gift of the group known as Sons of Maxwell today.

Thousands of fans here in the Maritimes, throughout Canada and abroad thus owe this man a debt of gratitude — for musically guiding his sons with his own gifted talents, while being selfless enough to not seek the spotlight as a performer, subsequently inspiring them to carry out the musical dream that he always had.

This is the story of Dave and Don Carroll, two men at the centre of a Halifax-based group that has been shaking up audiences all over for the past 15 years.

Now with seven recordings, a handful of ECMA nominations, a 2002 roots/traditional group ECMA and a number of other awards under their belt, Sons of Maxwell has certainly been making a great living outta’ making papa proud.

This past Sunday, the boys made the road trip back to P.E.I., their first time here since the Shellfish Festival in the fall and their first time in Summerside since Contact East in 2005.

They played the Jubilee Theatre, and I was lucky enough to be one of 250 wildly appreciative crowd members — a Sons of Maxwell first-timer when I walked in and a raving fan when I walked out.

“So happy to be here tonight!” Don said, dashing up to the mike to greet the crowd.

“We’re pretty glad that the storm they were calling for held off. It was a great day for a drive. We’re gonna’ kick it off with a song called Games People Play.”

On a chugging, chiming acoustic guitar, Dave Carroll proceeded into the opening chords, coming in singing at the mike neighbouring his brother, who sang away as well, tambourine flapping about.

An upbeat song, with a folk/pop vibe from 2004’s Sunday Morning CD, it got the crowd’s toes tapping and heads bobbing right away as it also became instantly notable what one of the shining characteristics of Sons of Maxwell really is: harmony, harmony, harmony.

In every song that followed, in fact, it became further apparent that there really is something to be said for the seamless blend of two great and accomplished voices from the same immediate gene pool.

Backed by a tight drummer and a solid bassist, Sons of Maxwell were both rollicking and driving and soft and contemplative when they needed to be.

But it was the performances of these soft and sweet ballads that really won my reviewer’s heart over that night.

As soon as I heard Don say, “This is one song that many people have used at weddings,” I thought, “Uh oh, we could have some tear flowage here.” (For those who are unaware, which would be most of you, I presume, three weeks ago at a sushi restaurant in Toronto, I proposed to my now fiancée Savannah.)

And one can imagine that as Dave sang, with such sincerity, the chorus line, “And if I died tomorrow, years before my time, I’d be happy knowin’ she’d been mine,” it was pretty hard to keep the ol’ tears from pouring out.

Another song that really shook my soul that night was a song called Now from Dave Carroll’s brand new solo record, Perfect Blue.

As soon as he said, “This next song was inspired by a book I read recently by a man named Eckhart Tolle,” I thought, “Yep. The Power of Now.”

The bestselling book has inspired millions, and now the author’s new book, A New Earth (along the same spiritual lines) is the focus of an Oprah Book Club online workshop.

So, along with feeling a sense of complete blissful enlightenment while listening to Carroll play this song (which I feel is an absolutely pure and perfect musical representation of Tolle’s message), I thought, of course, “Oh, man, this guy’s gotta’ get this in the hands of someone at Oprah.”

It could be instant millions for Carroll if it were possible.

And in talking to him after the show, he did mention that he sent the song to Tolle himself, who finds it to be “enthralling.”

I have a feeling Carroll’s tribute to the present could indeed end up being quite a gift to many, many people.

The band brought it all home with some real barn-burners to top off the night like Mary Mac, Oceanside Again and Rocky Road to Dublin, getting people up outta’ their seats, clapping away and bringing on two standing ovations before it was all said and done.

Check out www.sonsofmaxwell.com for all the info on the band and Dave Carroll’s new CD, which you need to get — now.

...

Each week, Todd MacLean brings his readers into the experience of a new musical event, from Island ceilidhs and festivals, to the city’s bar scene and rock concerts. He loves to hear feedback and suggestions for future musical endeavours. He can be reached at tmaclean@theguardian.pe.ca or at 626-1242. - The Guardian


"Taylor Guitars - Sunday Morning CD Review"

Mention the magic words “sibling harmonies” while describing a music act and you’ll be sure to boost the expectations of listeners. Well, Halifax, Nova Scotia-based brothers Dave and Don Carroll, a.k.a. the Sons of Maxwell, don’t disappoint. Their vocal interplay forms the melodic centerpiece of their classic roots-pop sound, and on their seventh release, Sunday Morning, they brew up a fresh blend of tight two-part harmonies that would likely score a supportive nod from the Everly Brothers.

Dave serves as the principal songwriter, lead vocalist, and guitarist, and displays a knack for sharply focused song structures that lend uncluttered immediacy to the sound. The songs come across as impeccably groomed without being needlessly flashy, and leave ample room for hanging hooky turns and choruses.

The record’s melodic sensibility is frequently flavored with vintage strokes — Byrds-y guitar jangle, emotive pedal steel, simmering organ — which the Carrolls use to explore a broad range of styles, from the upbeat roots rock drive of “Live in the Movies” and “The Best Things” to the country-ish breakup ballad, “Whole Lot Lighter”.

“Give Me a Reason” is a throwback to ’70s AM radio. “I’m Willing”, co-written with Grammy-winning tunesmith Jon Vezner, slips into the easy groove of a timeless soft-rock hit, while “Games People Play” borrows the mad guitar and mandolin skills of session ace and Americana singer-songwriter Darrell Scott to churn out an uptempo current of strummed and picked acoustic parts. They even break out the polyrhythms and festive island harmonies on the Caribbean dance-pop flavored “Like You Do”. It’s a testament to the range of the Carrolls’ songwriting that one could imagine these guys equally at ease whether performing at a folk festival, rock club, Nashville honky tonk, or Irish pub.

Lyrically, Sunday Morning’s songs tap familiar themes of relationship comings and goings, life’s ever-changing perspectives, and the slow realization that we never really manage to figure it all out. Peppered with a mix of wry and poignant observations, Dave’s point-of-view smoothly connects the personal with the universal.

The Carroll brothers don’t need rock ‘n’ roll swagger or emo angst to make a statement. Their brotherly pipes say it all.

— Jim Kirlin - http://www.taylorguitars.com/news/onreview/sons_of_maxwell_sunday_morning.html


"Taylor Guitars - Sunday Morning CD Review"

Mention the magic words “sibling harmonies” while describing a music act and you’ll be sure to boost the expectations of listeners. Well, Halifax, Nova Scotia-based brothers Dave and Don Carroll, a.k.a. the Sons of Maxwell, don’t disappoint. Their vocal interplay forms the melodic centerpiece of their classic roots-pop sound, and on their seventh release, Sunday Morning, they brew up a fresh blend of tight two-part harmonies that would likely score a supportive nod from the Everly Brothers.

Dave serves as the principal songwriter, lead vocalist, and guitarist, and displays a knack for sharply focused song structures that lend uncluttered immediacy to the sound. The songs come across as impeccably groomed without being needlessly flashy, and leave ample room for hanging hooky turns and choruses.

The record’s melodic sensibility is frequently flavored with vintage strokes — Byrds-y guitar jangle, emotive pedal steel, simmering organ — which the Carrolls use to explore a broad range of styles, from the upbeat roots rock drive of “Live in the Movies” and “The Best Things” to the country-ish breakup ballad, “Whole Lot Lighter”.

“Give Me a Reason” is a throwback to ’70s AM radio. “I’m Willing”, co-written with Grammy-winning tunesmith Jon Vezner, slips into the easy groove of a timeless soft-rock hit, while “Games People Play” borrows the mad guitar and mandolin skills of session ace and Americana singer-songwriter Darrell Scott to churn out an uptempo current of strummed and picked acoustic parts. They even break out the polyrhythms and festive island harmonies on the Caribbean dance-pop flavored “Like You Do”. It’s a testament to the range of the Carrolls’ songwriting that one could imagine these guys equally at ease whether performing at a folk festival, rock club, Nashville honky tonk, or Irish pub.

Lyrically, Sunday Morning’s songs tap familiar themes of relationship comings and goings, life’s ever-changing perspectives, and the slow realization that we never really manage to figure it all out. Peppered with a mix of wry and poignant observations, Dave’s point-of-view smoothly connects the personal with the universal.

The Carroll brothers don’t need rock ‘n’ roll swagger or emo angst to make a statement. Their brotherly pipes say it all.

— Jim Kirlin - http://www.taylorguitars.com/news/onreview/sons_of_maxwell_sunday_morning.html


"All Eyes On Carroll Bros."

S.O.M. one of ten bands in Canada chosen for CCMA showcase
TIMMINS DAILY PRESS

All Eyes On Carroll Bros.

Saturday, July 22, 2006 - 10:00

Editorial - Two of Timmins's favourite sons are getting their chance to shine in the national spotlight. The Sons of Maxwell - Dave and Don Carroll - have been chosen to perform for the Canadian Country Music Association Awards as part of Country Music Week in Saint John, N.B.

The brothers won the right to perform in the New Artist Showcase by beating out scores of other bands and artists.

A jury made up of music industry executives whittled down the submissions to a list of 10. Included on the list are the Timmins brothers, who now make their home in Halifax.

The Sons of Maxwell won't be the first Timmins performers to play the showcase. Fans of Canadian music may remember witnessing the performance of a then-unknown singer named Shania Twain.

Traditionally, Country Music Week is a means by which up-and-comers can gain some recognition within the industry. Rather than traditional country-music, the Sons of Maxwell sound is more like non-traditional country bridged with pop and folk.

To play at the New Artist Showcase is quite an honour. "Any (Canadian country musician) who has made it has been showcased during CCMA's Country Music Week," said Brandi Mills of CCMA's communication and marketing department, adding it's an opportunity not often available for new artists. "The exposure is huge."

The brothers have established quite a following in the hot east coast music scene. In fact, their talents were recognized at the East Coast Music Awards this year where they took home the award for Country Recording of the Year. But national exposure will surely be a boon to their careers.


Although Don and Dave Carroll have been riding a wave of greater successes these days, they have never forgotten their fans and friends in Timmins.

For years the brothers have been making the trek to Timmins to play their annual Christmas concert, and sold-out shows are how fans thank them every year. The Carrolls have even graciously accepted invitations to make appearances at charity events in Timmins, including a Lung Association fashion show staged several years ago. Dave Carroll admits the chance to perform to a national audience could help Sons of Maxwell become accepted by people in the traditional-country music world. Finally, these fans will know what the people in Timmins have always known: The Sons of Maxwell have what it takes to make it big. - Daily Press


"All Eyes On Carroll Bros."

S.O.M. one of ten bands in Canada chosen for CCMA showcase
TIMMINS DAILY PRESS

All Eyes On Carroll Bros.

Saturday, July 22, 2006 - 10:00

Editorial - Two of Timmins's favourite sons are getting their chance to shine in the national spotlight. The Sons of Maxwell - Dave and Don Carroll - have been chosen to perform for the Canadian Country Music Association Awards as part of Country Music Week in Saint John, N.B.

The brothers won the right to perform in the New Artist Showcase by beating out scores of other bands and artists.

A jury made up of music industry executives whittled down the submissions to a list of 10. Included on the list are the Timmins brothers, who now make their home in Halifax.

The Sons of Maxwell won't be the first Timmins performers to play the showcase. Fans of Canadian music may remember witnessing the performance of a then-unknown singer named Shania Twain.

Traditionally, Country Music Week is a means by which up-and-comers can gain some recognition within the industry. Rather than traditional country-music, the Sons of Maxwell sound is more like non-traditional country bridged with pop and folk.

To play at the New Artist Showcase is quite an honour. "Any (Canadian country musician) who has made it has been showcased during CCMA's Country Music Week," said Brandi Mills of CCMA's communication and marketing department, adding it's an opportunity not often available for new artists. "The exposure is huge."

The brothers have established quite a following in the hot east coast music scene. In fact, their talents were recognized at the East Coast Music Awards this year where they took home the award for Country Recording of the Year. But national exposure will surely be a boon to their careers.


Although Don and Dave Carroll have been riding a wave of greater successes these days, they have never forgotten their fans and friends in Timmins.

For years the brothers have been making the trek to Timmins to play their annual Christmas concert, and sold-out shows are how fans thank them every year. The Carrolls have even graciously accepted invitations to make appearances at charity events in Timmins, including a Lung Association fashion show staged several years ago. Dave Carroll admits the chance to perform to a national audience could help Sons of Maxwell become accepted by people in the traditional-country music world. Finally, these fans will know what the people in Timmins have always known: The Sons of Maxwell have what it takes to make it big. - Daily Press


"Sons of Maxwell"

Fire Fighters in training Dave and Don Carroll (Part of Feedline)
RURAL NEWS (Part of Feedline, A NEWSLETTER DEDICATED TO MEMBERS OF HALIFAX REGIONAL FIRE & EMERGENCY).

Sons of Maxwell
by Jeanette MacKay

Welcome Aboardwarm up

We want to welcome Don and Dave Carroll - the Sons of Maxwell – to Zone 4 of Halifax Regional Fire & Emergency, working out of Station 41 (Waverley). Don and Dave signed up as volunteer firefighters in September and already are close to achieving their Level 1 Certification. Way to Go! Like all volunteers, they must do a balancing act, dividing available hours between day time jobs, family, fire department training and calls, but even more so for these two brothers who find themselves on tour a good part of their lives. Better known as “The Sons of Maxwell”, these talented brothers are often “working” on the road performing concerts throughout Canada, and around the world, or in studio recording CD’s. Originally from Timmons, Ontario, the duo moved to the Halifax area about 10 years ago. They joined the department because they wanted to feel a part of the community and to be more grounded. And well grounded they are! Since becoming volunteers firefighters, they have seen lots of action, including being on-scene during the MKL plane crash in October. Not only were they there, but they made it to the National News. As new members, they wore black helmets which means they are still not trained, but members of the press thought they were in charge andasked Dave Carroll questions. Notknowing any better (they do now), they spoke to the press. They have also been to many car fires,chimney fires, and medical assists.

Station #41 (Waverley) receives over 200 calls a year, and responds not only to Waverley but also to the communities of Wellington, Fall River, Oakfield, Lakeview, Grand Lake, Windsor Junction and Goffs, including the airport. Dave & Don enjoy being volunteers at the Waverley station and say it is a very professional department and members take their firefighting duties seriously. There is a good mixture of age, experience and backgrounds at the station. As children, they hung out with their grandmother, while she worked cleaning the local fire station. This is how they first got interested in the fire service! Of course with a name like Carroll, they have an Irish background which is rooted in everything they do.

About their Music

Now it’s time to get to know the ‘Sons of Maxwell’ and find out about their music. While their music is considered pop-folk, you can usually hear them on CHFX or CBC. Their latest CD is called “Sunday Morning” and they are in the process of making a new video. Their fans range from age 20-70, appealing to many audiences. They play the downtown scene, including the Fife and Drum, the Casino, Thirsty Duck and you can find them at the Alehouse on St. Patrick’s Day. Already Fire has secured their talents for the upcoming FDIC Conference in Wolfville in June. When not playing in the evening,they will be participating in the training during the day. “The two are very keen. In fact they are going through their Level 1 at the Fire School so they can get their certification more quickly. They are fitting in well with the other members and I am glad to have them both on board. I thought we might have some groupies volunteering after the New Years Eve performance at the Grand Parade, but so far they haven’t been pounding down the door!
Composite Chief Ron Dalrymple

“We are continually amazed by the talents of our firefighters. To our great delight, the well known singing duo ‘Sons of Maxwell’ are living their other passion as volunteer firefighters with Halifax Regional Fire and Emergency”.

Bill Mosher, Deputy Chief Director, Rural Operations

Vol. 38 - January/February 2005 Page 7

NEW OFFICERS
- Feedline


"Sons of Maxwell"

Fire Fighters in training Dave and Don Carroll (Part of Feedline)
RURAL NEWS (Part of Feedline, A NEWSLETTER DEDICATED TO MEMBERS OF HALIFAX REGIONAL FIRE & EMERGENCY).

Sons of Maxwell
by Jeanette MacKay

Welcome Aboardwarm up

We want to welcome Don and Dave Carroll - the Sons of Maxwell – to Zone 4 of Halifax Regional Fire & Emergency, working out of Station 41 (Waverley). Don and Dave signed up as volunteer firefighters in September and already are close to achieving their Level 1 Certification. Way to Go! Like all volunteers, they must do a balancing act, dividing available hours between day time jobs, family, fire department training and calls, but even more so for these two brothers who find themselves on tour a good part of their lives. Better known as “The Sons of Maxwell”, these talented brothers are often “working” on the road performing concerts throughout Canada, and around the world, or in studio recording CD’s. Originally from Timmons, Ontario, the duo moved to the Halifax area about 10 years ago. They joined the department because they wanted to feel a part of the community and to be more grounded. And well grounded they are! Since becoming volunteers firefighters, they have seen lots of action, including being on-scene during the MKL plane crash in October. Not only were they there, but they made it to the National News. As new members, they wore black helmets which means they are still not trained, but members of the press thought they were in charge andasked Dave Carroll questions. Notknowing any better (they do now), they spoke to the press. They have also been to many car fires,chimney fires, and medical assists.

Station #41 (Waverley) receives over 200 calls a year, and responds not only to Waverley but also to the communities of Wellington, Fall River, Oakfield, Lakeview, Grand Lake, Windsor Junction and Goffs, including the airport. Dave & Don enjoy being volunteers at the Waverley station and say it is a very professional department and members take their firefighting duties seriously. There is a good mixture of age, experience and backgrounds at the station. As children, they hung out with their grandmother, while she worked cleaning the local fire station. This is how they first got interested in the fire service! Of course with a name like Carroll, they have an Irish background which is rooted in everything they do.

About their Music

Now it’s time to get to know the ‘Sons of Maxwell’ and find out about their music. While their music is considered pop-folk, you can usually hear them on CHFX or CBC. Their latest CD is called “Sunday Morning” and they are in the process of making a new video. Their fans range from age 20-70, appealing to many audiences. They play the downtown scene, including the Fife and Drum, the Casino, Thirsty Duck and you can find them at the Alehouse on St. Patrick’s Day. Already Fire has secured their talents for the upcoming FDIC Conference in Wolfville in June. When not playing in the evening,they will be participating in the training during the day. “The two are very keen. In fact they are going through their Level 1 at the Fire School so they can get their certification more quickly. They are fitting in well with the other members and I am glad to have them both on board. I thought we might have some groupies volunteering after the New Years Eve performance at the Grand Parade, but so far they haven’t been pounding down the door!
Composite Chief Ron Dalrymple

“We are continually amazed by the talents of our firefighters. To our great delight, the well known singing duo ‘Sons of Maxwell’ are living their other passion as volunteer firefighters with Halifax Regional Fire and Emergency”.

Bill Mosher, Deputy Chief Director, Rural Operations

Vol. 38 - January/February 2005 Page 7

NEW OFFICERS
- Feedline


"Carroll brothers' tunes get tastier each time out - Spending Sunday Morning with the Sons of Maxwell"

Carroll brothers' tunes get tastier each time out

Spending Sunday Morning with the Sons of Maxwell

SONS OF MAXWELL'S Dave and Don Carroll know their strength lies in slice of life storytelling; they even pose on the cover of their latest Sunday Morning (independent) at a formica breakfast table with a retro-look toaster, a slab of bread sticking out.

As with every Sons outing, the slices get a little thicker and a little tastier each time out, as songwriter Dave - with occasional help from the likes of brother Don and Canadian country pro Patricia Conroy - peeks at the hearts behind the front doors on every street, mirroring the ups and downs he finds there in his lyrics.

The album's structured like a work week, starting on a Monday morning with Uphill Battle and the struggle to eke out a mundane existence while dreams lay gathering dust in the corner.

It's chiming folk-rock sound is anything but dour though, as Carroll's protagonist tries to figure out how to jump the groove he's trapped in. The record progresses through love on the afro-beat of Like You Do, the daydreams of Live in the Movies, the daily emotional runaround of Games People Play and the drug-fueled Saturday night abandon of Mr. Nobody.

Finally we arrive at the title track and its reflection of the fact that no matter how screwed up your life is, the Sunday morning paper is full of a week's worth of craziness that makes your own existence look like Leave It to Beaver.

Sons of Maxwell have a way of reassuring listeners that they're just like them, and that all of these experiences ring truer because of their "we've all been there" approach. Carroll's imagery has enough detail and humour to make it personal, but without losing sight of the universality of his situations.

Staring at a just-closed door on Whole Lot Lighter or the heart-mind tug o' war of Give Me a Reason stick in your mind not because they're unique, but because they flick on a familiar switch in every brain that comes across them.

It's a tactic most commonly found in country music, but Sons of Maxwell aren't so easily painted into a musical corner, getting gritty with Tom Petty-ish rock on Live in the Movies or evoking Springsteen with a ringing 12-string and a tale of small-town boys on that metaphysical road in The Best Things. The change-ups keep things fresh, while Don's and Dave's harmonies remain one of the East Coast's most distinctive sounds.

By STEPHEN COOKE / At the Movies
- At the Movies


"Carroll brothers' tunes get tastier each time out - Spending Sunday Morning with the Sons of Maxwell"

Carroll brothers' tunes get tastier each time out

Spending Sunday Morning with the Sons of Maxwell

SONS OF MAXWELL'S Dave and Don Carroll know their strength lies in slice of life storytelling; they even pose on the cover of their latest Sunday Morning (independent) at a formica breakfast table with a retro-look toaster, a slab of bread sticking out.

As with every Sons outing, the slices get a little thicker and a little tastier each time out, as songwriter Dave - with occasional help from the likes of brother Don and Canadian country pro Patricia Conroy - peeks at the hearts behind the front doors on every street, mirroring the ups and downs he finds there in his lyrics.

The album's structured like a work week, starting on a Monday morning with Uphill Battle and the struggle to eke out a mundane existence while dreams lay gathering dust in the corner.

It's chiming folk-rock sound is anything but dour though, as Carroll's protagonist tries to figure out how to jump the groove he's trapped in. The record progresses through love on the afro-beat of Like You Do, the daydreams of Live in the Movies, the daily emotional runaround of Games People Play and the drug-fueled Saturday night abandon of Mr. Nobody.

Finally we arrive at the title track and its reflection of the fact that no matter how screwed up your life is, the Sunday morning paper is full of a week's worth of craziness that makes your own existence look like Leave It to Beaver.

Sons of Maxwell have a way of reassuring listeners that they're just like them, and that all of these experiences ring truer because of their "we've all been there" approach. Carroll's imagery has enough detail and humour to make it personal, but without losing sight of the universality of his situations.

Staring at a just-closed door on Whole Lot Lighter or the heart-mind tug o' war of Give Me a Reason stick in your mind not because they're unique, but because they flick on a familiar switch in every brain that comes across them.

It's a tactic most commonly found in country music, but Sons of Maxwell aren't so easily painted into a musical corner, getting gritty with Tom Petty-ish rock on Live in the Movies or evoking Springsteen with a ringing 12-string and a tale of small-town boys on that metaphysical road in The Best Things. The change-ups keep things fresh, while Don's and Dave's harmonies remain one of the East Coast's most distinctive sounds.

By STEPHEN COOKE / At the Movies
- At the Movies


"Sons' Sunday best"

Carroll brothers back to indie roots with release of Sunday Morning, most of which was written on the road

Sons' Sunday best

The Halifax Herald - Wednesday, August 4, 2004

The Sons of Maxwell just want people to have fun. The Waverley-based duo - a.k.a. brothers Dave and Don Carroll - are releasing Sunday Morning, their eighth album and fourth of all-original music, Thursday at 8 p.m. at the Schooner Room in Casino Nova Scotia, Halifax.

And among the lessons they have learned in 11 years of performing, touring and recording is that people have limited entertainment dollars and want to spend those dollars in places that bring them pleasure.

"Someone said to me early on that we should be there to entertain not educate," says Dave Carroll. "We're entertainers first and if we can deliver a message great, but people come to see us to have fun and that's what we want to deliver."

Being entertainers rather than simply playing songs they like is one of the lessons the engaging pair have learned since their first gig in the campus bar while they were students at Carleton University in Ottawa, where Don studied psychology and Dave political science.

"We played covers of traditional songs and we were more sober than the audience which is a good place to start," joked Dave.

Those early years performing by the brothers who grew up in Timmons, Ont., are memorialized on the autobiographical Best Things.

"It covers our days playing in university for fun, and how our career goals changed, ending up in different places than we planned," says Don, noting they never expected to be playing music professionally but are happy with their career path and excited about the release of Sunday Morning, which brings them back to their indie roots, after a brief stint with a record label.

"A record deal looks like its all good and then you realize what you have to give up and hope the company can deliver what they promised, but if not you're better off being independent. We're much happier being in control," says Dave, who wrote or co-wrote each of Sunday Morning's 13 songs.

"If decisions that are made are wrong, at least they're our decisions. We've learned to value our own gut instincts."

Don notes that there are no traditional tunes on the album and fans won't be disappointed with S.O.M.'s evolution.

The disc differs from previous ones, including Among the Living, which won an East Coast Music Award for roots/traditional album in 2002, in that the music was mostly written on the road and was played for live audiences and demoed before they went into the studio to record, instead of recording first, touring later.

Sunday Morning includes three tracks, Whole Lot Lighter, You Let Me Love You and Sunday Morning, for which Mir's Asif Illyas did string quartet arrangements, adding an additional richness.

It also includes the first song co-written by Don and Dave, Like You Do, (they have worked together on arrangements on other tunes) and marked Dave's first experience penning songs with other writers.

He wrote Every Day of Your Life with Canadian country star Patricia Conroy and Daryl Burgess (author of Colin James' hit Stay) and I'm Willing with Jon Vezner (who won a Grammy in 1990 for Where've You Been co-written with fellow singer/songwriter Don Henry, recorded by Kathy Mattea).

Sunday Morning was recorded mainly in Montreal and mixed and mastered at Compass Point Studios in the Bahamas by Terry Manning.

"Almost every big name has recorded there over time. They day we got there REM had just left and Alan Jackson was coming in," says Dave. "The experience Terry has shines through, it takes it up a notch."

But one thing that hasn't changed is the harmonies for which the brothers are famous.

"People think of Sons of Maxwell and think of the harmonies and this album delivers," says Dave, noting the brothers sing in the same range and switch back and forth singing high and low. "One of us sings high until he gets tired, then the other guy goes high."

Thursday's concert also features Jon Park-Wheeler on guitar, Stefan Morin on drums, Julian Marentette on percussion, Bruce Dixon on bass guitar and Stephen Muise on keyboards. Tickets are $12.50.

The duo, who have just signed up to be volunteer firefighters, can be heard playing a pub show at the Fife and Drum at the Casino Aug. 21 and 22 and are planning a Halifax Christmas concert, something they haven't done in a couple of years. And on the horizon is a 10-city tour of China in September 2005.

Sunday Morning is available in stores and on their website www.sonsofmaxwell.com.

By ANDREA NEMETZ / Entertainment Reporter
- Halifax Herald


"Sons' Sunday best"

Carroll brothers back to indie roots with release of Sunday Morning, most of which was written on the road

Sons' Sunday best

The Halifax Herald - Wednesday, August 4, 2004

The Sons of Maxwell just want people to have fun. The Waverley-based duo - a.k.a. brothers Dave and Don Carroll - are releasing Sunday Morning, their eighth album and fourth of all-original music, Thursday at 8 p.m. at the Schooner Room in Casino Nova Scotia, Halifax.

And among the lessons they have learned in 11 years of performing, touring and recording is that people have limited entertainment dollars and want to spend those dollars in places that bring them pleasure.

"Someone said to me early on that we should be there to entertain not educate," says Dave Carroll. "We're entertainers first and if we can deliver a message great, but people come to see us to have fun and that's what we want to deliver."

Being entertainers rather than simply playing songs they like is one of the lessons the engaging pair have learned since their first gig in the campus bar while they were students at Carleton University in Ottawa, where Don studied psychology and Dave political science.

"We played covers of traditional songs and we were more sober than the audience which is a good place to start," joked Dave.

Those early years performing by the brothers who grew up in Timmons, Ont., are memorialized on the autobiographical Best Things.

"It covers our days playing in university for fun, and how our career goals changed, ending up in different places than we planned," says Don, noting they never expected to be playing music professionally but are happy with their career path and excited about the release of Sunday Morning, which brings them back to their indie roots, after a brief stint with a record label.

"A record deal looks like its all good and then you realize what you have to give up and hope the company can deliver what they promised, but if not you're better off being independent. We're much happier being in control," says Dave, who wrote or co-wrote each of Sunday Morning's 13 songs.

"If decisions that are made are wrong, at least they're our decisions. We've learned to value our own gut instincts."

Don notes that there are no traditional tunes on the album and fans won't be disappointed with S.O.M.'s evolution.

The disc differs from previous ones, including Among the Living, which won an East Coast Music Award for roots/traditional album in 2002, in that the music was mostly written on the road and was played for live audiences and demoed before they went into the studio to record, instead of recording first, touring later.

Sunday Morning includes three tracks, Whole Lot Lighter, You Let Me Love You and Sunday Morning, for which Mir's Asif Illyas did string quartet arrangements, adding an additional richness.

It also includes the first song co-written by Don and Dave, Like You Do, (they have worked together on arrangements on other tunes) and marked Dave's first experience penning songs with other writers.

He wrote Every Day of Your Life with Canadian country star Patricia Conroy and Daryl Burgess (author of Colin James' hit Stay) and I'm Willing with Jon Vezner (who won a Grammy in 1990 for Where've You Been co-written with fellow singer/songwriter Don Henry, recorded by Kathy Mattea).

Sunday Morning was recorded mainly in Montreal and mixed and mastered at Compass Point Studios in the Bahamas by Terry Manning.

"Almost every big name has recorded there over time. They day we got there REM had just left and Alan Jackson was coming in," says Dave. "The experience Terry has shines through, it takes it up a notch."

But one thing that hasn't changed is the harmonies for which the brothers are famous.

"People think of Sons of Maxwell and think of the harmonies and this album delivers," says Dave, noting the brothers sing in the same range and switch back and forth singing high and low. "One of us sings high until he gets tired, then the other guy goes high."

Thursday's concert also features Jon Park-Wheeler on guitar, Stefan Morin on drums, Julian Marentette on percussion, Bruce Dixon on bass guitar and Stephen Muise on keyboards. Tickets are $12.50.

The duo, who have just signed up to be volunteer firefighters, can be heard playing a pub show at the Fife and Drum at the Casino Aug. 21 and 22 and are planning a Halifax Christmas concert, something they haven't done in a couple of years. And on the horizon is a 10-city tour of China in September 2005.

Sunday Morning is available in stores and on their website www.sonsofmaxwell.com.

By ANDREA NEMETZ / Entertainment Reporter
- Halifax Herald


"Sons of Maxwell deliver Instant Christmas"

Sons of Maxwell deliver Instant Christmas

by Raymond J. Arsenault, Journal Pioneer, Summerside, PE

Nova Scotia's Sons of Maxwell have scored big once again, this time with the their seventh album, the glorious Instant Christmas. The independently released disc features 10 cuts, including several classic favourites
and a few new ones. By far the best -- and the most energetic -- track on the disc is Dave and Don Carroll's super-joyous rendition of Go Tell It On The Mountain. They attack this bluesy-organ backed country-hillbilly hand clapper with religious fervor, practically in
black gospel style. Its truly uplifting, thanks to the bang-on vocal conviction and a great gospel-hall piano solo. I was humming that little gem long after the CD player was turned off.

Not musicians to be pigeon-holed into any one specific genre, the brotherly
duo presents a wide variety of musical styles on this great disc. Fort he Celtic touch, they perform a beautiful version of I Saw Three Ships,
backed by a neat bodhran beat and some beautiful synthesized Celtic flute, as well as the very Irish sounding Christmas in Killarney, with the mandatory bodhran, mandolin and bagpipes (again thanks to the
synthesizer).

On the jazzier side of things, they present a super-cool funky, finger snappable version of Let It Snow, backed on cool guitars by none other than Ian Janes. The brushed drums, the deep bass line and Don's great vocal delivery make it quite memorable.

For those who want to smile, the dazzling duo has included the fun, lively, countrified foot-tapper, Mele Kalikimaka/ Hawaiian Christmas. Dave does a great job whistling one of the verses.

And for those who may want a chuckle, Dave wrote the hilarious Cape Breton Christmas Eve, a pleasant-melodied, danceable, pop-country-rock ditty about two drunken Cape Bretoners who, without thinking, decide to go deer hunting on Christmas Eve. I'll let you figure out the rest.

But the brothers deliver this one in their trademark upbeat style, complete with Everly Bothers-style harmonies. Nostalgia reigns high in the
beautiful Christmas Time At Home, written by Dave. It's got a nice shuffly, mid-tempo beat, a smooth melody and picture perfect harmonies.

For the religiously inclined, they've included a superb rendition of the midnight mass classic, O Holy Night. It begins with a nice piano solo, with a bit of a different arrangement, followed by Don's deep-voiced and conviction filled performance. The synthesized string orchestra eventually joins in to bring it all to a resounding crescendo.

The slow Bleak Mid Winter has a nice light sway yet a profound feeling, thanks to some strong cello effects.

But the most captivating song here is probably Stan Rogers' First Christmas Away From Home. Don, with his pleasant, resounding and deep voice, pays great homage to the master Maritime folk singer in this melancholic yet touching piece. Once again, John Spearns' light cello effects make the song rise to new heights.
- Journal Pioneer


"Sons of Maxwell deliver Instant Christmas"

Sons of Maxwell deliver Instant Christmas

by Raymond J. Arsenault, Journal Pioneer, Summerside, PE

Nova Scotia's Sons of Maxwell have scored big once again, this time with the their seventh album, the glorious Instant Christmas. The independently released disc features 10 cuts, including several classic favourites
and a few new ones. By far the best -- and the most energetic -- track on the disc is Dave and Don Carroll's super-joyous rendition of Go Tell It On The Mountain. They attack this bluesy-organ backed country-hillbilly hand clapper with religious fervor, practically in
black gospel style. Its truly uplifting, thanks to the bang-on vocal conviction and a great gospel-hall piano solo. I was humming that little gem long after the CD player was turned off.

Not musicians to be pigeon-holed into any one specific genre, the brotherly
duo presents a wide variety of musical styles on this great disc. Fort he Celtic touch, they perform a beautiful version of I Saw Three Ships,
backed by a neat bodhran beat and some beautiful synthesized Celtic flute, as well as the very Irish sounding Christmas in Killarney, with the mandatory bodhran, mandolin and bagpipes (again thanks to the
synthesizer).

On the jazzier side of things, they present a super-cool funky, finger snappable version of Let It Snow, backed on cool guitars by none other than Ian Janes. The brushed drums, the deep bass line and Don's great vocal delivery make it quite memorable.

For those who want to smile, the dazzling duo has included the fun, lively, countrified foot-tapper, Mele Kalikimaka/ Hawaiian Christmas. Dave does a great job whistling one of the verses.

And for those who may want a chuckle, Dave wrote the hilarious Cape Breton Christmas Eve, a pleasant-melodied, danceable, pop-country-rock ditty about two drunken Cape Bretoners who, without thinking, decide to go deer hunting on Christmas Eve. I'll let you figure out the rest.

But the brothers deliver this one in their trademark upbeat style, complete with Everly Bothers-style harmonies. Nostalgia reigns high in the
beautiful Christmas Time At Home, written by Dave. It's got a nice shuffly, mid-tempo beat, a smooth melody and picture perfect harmonies.

For the religiously inclined, they've included a superb rendition of the midnight mass classic, O Holy Night. It begins with a nice piano solo, with a bit of a different arrangement, followed by Don's deep-voiced and conviction filled performance. The synthesized string orchestra eventually joins in to bring it all to a resounding crescendo.

The slow Bleak Mid Winter has a nice light sway yet a profound feeling, thanks to some strong cello effects.

But the most captivating song here is probably Stan Rogers' First Christmas Away From Home. Don, with his pleasant, resounding and deep voice, pays great homage to the master Maritime folk singer in this melancholic yet touching piece. Once again, John Spearns' light cello effects make the song rise to new heights.
- Journal Pioneer


"Living it up"

Living it up

Saturday June 2, 2001
By Andrea Nemetz / Entertainment Reporter

Living it up

With their new CD, Among the Living, Sons of Maxwell have come into their own

Dave and Don Carroll had some of the best seats in the house for last year's Tall Ships Parade of Sail.

The pop/folk duo, known as Sons of Maxwell, were playing facing the harbour during a corporate function at Halterm pier.

"It was our own private reviewing stand," says Don with a laugh.

That July week was the busiest the duo have had in a 10-year career that has seen them playing at festivals, corporate events, in pubs and soft-seat auditoriums across Canada as well as two tours of Germany and
a two-week stint in the Dominican Republic.

"We were doing two gigs a day, one in the morning, one in the
evening for seven days," Dave recalls of Tall Ships week, noting one of the highlights was playing a corporate event on the majestic HMS Rose,
a 40.5-metre, three-masted ship, modelled after an 18th-century British frigate.

"It was a good-spirited crowd, with another 1,000 on the dock listening to the music, and lights shining up the masts. Our parents were here and my dad's a real ship lover and I got him a pass to hear us play."

The Carrolls - who hail from Timmins, Ont. where they went to high school with Shania Twain - also released a CD of sea-related songs during the Tall Ships. Sailors Story was a very well-received novelty
CD, in the striking shape of a tall ship.

And proceeds from that project which featured standards like Barrett's Privateers and Sonny's Dream, funded their next CD.

Among the Living, the group's sixth album, was released at Casino Nova Scotia Thursday night and is slated to hit stores on Tuesday.

The first single - So Confusing - was mailed to stations across the country and after a week has had "very, very positive feedback" from as far away as Victoria, says Don.

"So Confusing is upbeat - you're not supposed to introduce yourself to radio with a ballad," he explains. "It also has a strong message, is radio friendly and is representative of our live show."

The 12 songs on Among the Living are a mix of up-tempo and ballads to keep the listener's attention from start to finish, explains Dave, who wrote them all.

"I make an effort to make sure one song does not sound like another one," he says. "To a certain degree all the songs are inspired by life, truth and imagination combined."

Hold On, a sweet ballad, is based on a true story related by Dave's father (named Maxwell, of course).

"It's about a guy who went to visit his wife who has Alzheimers in a nursing home on their anniversary. The names are made up and the particulars are changed," says Dave.

"Burning Bridges has the sentiment of frustration we've experienced in the music business, people who've held you back a little bit, when
you're trying to do something worthwhile."

The title track, Among the Living, represents the Carolls' place on their career path.

"We've reached a point where we have come into our own. It's our
first all-original project. So Confusing, Burning Bridges, Among the Living, they are all about coming of age," says Don.

The songs were written over two years, from just after the 1998
release of The Neighbourhood, their most successful CD to date, to midway through the recording of Among the Living at Steve Richard's Big Sky Studio One in Bedford.

"We wanted to make sure our next CD was at least as good if not better than The Neighbourhood and this is better in all aspects," says
Dave.

"We spent twice the time on this one and much more thought went into production. Mistakes made on recording we had the budget and time to fix," says Don.

The Neighbourhood was as good as we could do at the time and I'm nothing but proud of it, but we've raised the bar."

A video from The Neighbourhood - Oceanside Again - made it into the CMT top 100, no small feat for an independent band.

"It was really memorable, because it's national. You can call someone in Vancouver and they're watching the same video at the same time, everyone in the whole country could be watching," says Don.

It's a good bet their mom, Sharon, was one of those tuning in.

Growing up in a musical household, the brothers played piano and joined the junior high band.

Dave took up sax and developed a love of old Glenn Miller tunes and Don played trombone. Don liked music so much that in Grade 11 he took two music classes a day - even though he only got credit for one. He
just wanted to play.

The talented twosome went to Carleton University in Ottawa where Dave studied political science and Don took psychology but a career in music didn't enter their minds until they got really strong response to
their campus pub shows in Bree's Inn and later The Rooster.

"Our mother blew on that spark and asked what would it take to
follow music as a career and we listed a great deal of obstacles like advertis - By Andrea Nemetz


"Living it up"

Living it up

Saturday June 2, 2001
By Andrea Nemetz / Entertainment Reporter

Living it up

With their new CD, Among the Living, Sons of Maxwell have come into their own

Dave and Don Carroll had some of the best seats in the house for last year's Tall Ships Parade of Sail.

The pop/folk duo, known as Sons of Maxwell, were playing facing the harbour during a corporate function at Halterm pier.

"It was our own private reviewing stand," says Don with a laugh.

That July week was the busiest the duo have had in a 10-year career that has seen them playing at festivals, corporate events, in pubs and soft-seat auditoriums across Canada as well as two tours of Germany and
a two-week stint in the Dominican Republic.

"We were doing two gigs a day, one in the morning, one in the
evening for seven days," Dave recalls of Tall Ships week, noting one of the highlights was playing a corporate event on the majestic HMS Rose,
a 40.5-metre, three-masted ship, modelled after an 18th-century British frigate.

"It was a good-spirited crowd, with another 1,000 on the dock listening to the music, and lights shining up the masts. Our parents were here and my dad's a real ship lover and I got him a pass to hear us play."

The Carrolls - who hail from Timmins, Ont. where they went to high school with Shania Twain - also released a CD of sea-related songs during the Tall Ships. Sailors Story was a very well-received novelty
CD, in the striking shape of a tall ship.

And proceeds from that project which featured standards like Barrett's Privateers and Sonny's Dream, funded their next CD.

Among the Living, the group's sixth album, was released at Casino Nova Scotia Thursday night and is slated to hit stores on Tuesday.

The first single - So Confusing - was mailed to stations across the country and after a week has had "very, very positive feedback" from as far away as Victoria, says Don.

"So Confusing is upbeat - you're not supposed to introduce yourself to radio with a ballad," he explains. "It also has a strong message, is radio friendly and is representative of our live show."

The 12 songs on Among the Living are a mix of up-tempo and ballads to keep the listener's attention from start to finish, explains Dave, who wrote them all.

"I make an effort to make sure one song does not sound like another one," he says. "To a certain degree all the songs are inspired by life, truth and imagination combined."

Hold On, a sweet ballad, is based on a true story related by Dave's father (named Maxwell, of course).

"It's about a guy who went to visit his wife who has Alzheimers in a nursing home on their anniversary. The names are made up and the particulars are changed," says Dave.

"Burning Bridges has the sentiment of frustration we've experienced in the music business, people who've held you back a little bit, when
you're trying to do something worthwhile."

The title track, Among the Living, represents the Carolls' place on their career path.

"We've reached a point where we have come into our own. It's our
first all-original project. So Confusing, Burning Bridges, Among the Living, they are all about coming of age," says Don.

The songs were written over two years, from just after the 1998
release of The Neighbourhood, their most successful CD to date, to midway through the recording of Among the Living at Steve Richard's Big Sky Studio One in Bedford.

"We wanted to make sure our next CD was at least as good if not better than The Neighbourhood and this is better in all aspects," says
Dave.

"We spent twice the time on this one and much more thought went into production. Mistakes made on recording we had the budget and time to fix," says Don.

The Neighbourhood was as good as we could do at the time and I'm nothing but proud of it, but we've raised the bar."

A video from The Neighbourhood - Oceanside Again - made it into the CMT top 100, no small feat for an independent band.

"It was really memorable, because it's national. You can call someone in Vancouver and they're watching the same video at the same time, everyone in the whole country could be watching," says Don.

It's a good bet their mom, Sharon, was one of those tuning in.

Growing up in a musical household, the brothers played piano and joined the junior high band.

Dave took up sax and developed a love of old Glenn Miller tunes and Don played trombone. Don liked music so much that in Grade 11 he took two music classes a day - even though he only got credit for one. He
just wanted to play.

The talented twosome went to Carleton University in Ottawa where Dave studied political science and Don took psychology but a career in music didn't enter their minds until they got really strong response to
their campus pub shows in Bree's Inn and later The Rooster.

"Our mother blew on that spark and asked what would it take to
follow music as a career and we listed a great deal of obstacles like advertis - By Andrea Nemetz


Discography

Sons of Maxwell
Bold Frontier
Live at Tim's House
The Neighbourhood
Sailors Story
Among the Living
Instant Christmas
Sunday Morning
Unity
Christmas Super Deluxe

For video of live performances please visit: http://www.youtube.com/SonsofMaxwell

Photos

Bio

For video of live performances please visit: http://www.youtube.com/SonsofMaxwell

Sons of Maxwell blend original music & the best holiday standards on their brand new CD! Christmas Super Deluxe, released in November 2012.

Don & Dave Carroll began their music career in University when they started a singing duo and they have not slowed down since. With much dedication and spirit, the 'Don and Dave Show' evolved into the ECMA award-winning band Sons of Maxwell (S.O.M.). The band's namesake comes from their father Max.

Dave Carroll has written, recorded and released over 40 original songs on the band's ten CDs, shared in multiple nominations and awards and the band has toured North America, Europe, Asia and the Caribbean.

S.O.M.’s energetic performances are highlighted by a great sense of humour, their signature harmonies and original Pop-Folk songs. The strength of the duo is built upon its diversity. The fact is, what sets them apart has also made them so popular with such a broad spectrum of people. They have done prolific work and have developed a large, dedicated fan base. Sons of Maxwell have been nominated for 5 East Coast Music Awards and have won 2 ECMA’s (one in 2006 with Sunday Morning for Country Album of the year and in 2002 with Among the Living for Roots Traditional Group of the year).

Along with their long and successful joint career in S.O.M both the Carroll brothers have individual musical interests. Dave released his first solo album 'Perfect Blue' in 2008 and 'Raincoat in Vegas' in 2012. Don has followed his love of jazz standards, putting together a swing band and also released an album of his own, 'Valentine Delivered.'

Most recently, the band's talent was introduced to millions when Dave Carroll's 2009 anthem 'United Breaks Guitars’ became a worldwide sensation. The song chronicled Dave's experience in the customer service process with United Airlines. His creative use of social media to share that message as an Independent Musician, has reached over 150 million people. As the #1 most watched YouTube Music Video in the world in July 2009, United Breaks Guitars has been called ‘one of the most important [videos] in Google’s history,’ and became a metaphor for change and innovation.

The United Breaks Guitars trilogy has awakened companies everywhere to the importance of focusing on the customer and on delivering exceptional customer experience.

Dave has been featured in major news media around the world (including ABC’s ‘The View,’ ABC’s 20/20, CNN, LA Times, Chicago Tribune, Rolling Stone Magazine, Wall Street Journal & BBC to name a few). Several case studies and book references about United Breaks Guitars have been published including one’s by Harvard Business School, University of Toronto and a Thesis by Allison Soule for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. On February 16th, 2011, Dave Carroll and United Breaks Guitars were featured as part of a question/answer on the hit show Jeopardy.

Dave has testified (and sung) on Capitol Hill in Washington, delivered keynotes at Columbia University’s Brite Conference, TedX Hoboken, NewComm Forum, Mesh Conference, Atlantic Brand Confabulation (with Gene Simmons), SXSW Interactive, The Power of PR CPRS Conference, G-Force Prague, G-Force Melbourne & other significant customer service & corporate events (including for RightNow Technologies & Sandvik Coromant).

In May, 2012 Dave Carroll wrote a book about his customer experience called, “United Breaks Guitars: The Power of One Voice in the Age of Social Media”, published by Hay House Publishing. Whether you are a guitarist, a baggage handler, or a boardroom executive, this book will entertain you and remind you that we are all connected, that each of us matters, and that we all have a voice worth hearing.

In 2010 Dave's song and video 'Everyday Heroes' was released on 911Song.com. In a world where broken promises are commonplace, when it counts most, there are people willing to help strangers because they gave their word that they would. The essence of 'Everyday Heroes' is about these individuals keeping their promise to respond, regardless of who is in need or the unknown risks that may await the First Responders. As a volunteer firefighter himself for 5 years, Dave wrote ‘Everyday Heroes’ after being challenged by a friend to honour those who answer the call.

Often called 'the nicest guys in the business' Don and Dave continue to deliver high energy quality entertainment that is both relevant and accessible to live music fans of all ages. With a large and loyal fan base and several industry awards behind them, they continue to record and tour music halls, theaters and festivals.