Sons of the Radio
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Sons of the Radio

Baltimore, Maryland, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2009 | SELF

Baltimore, Maryland, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2009
Band Rock Alternative

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Nov
05
Sons of the Radio @ Axum's Level X Lounge

Washington, District of Columbia, USA

Washington, District of Columbia, USA

Oct
29
Sons of the Radio @ Perrys Odies

Odenton, Maryland, USA

Odenton, Maryland, USA

Oct
27
Sons of the Radio @ Angel's Rockbar

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Oct
22
Sons of the Radio @ Ramblewood

Darlington, Maryland, USA

Darlington, Maryland, USA

Oct
21
Sons of the Radio @ Sonoma's Bar & Grille

Columbia, Maryland, USA

Columbia, Maryland, USA

Oct
10
Sons of the Radio @ Amstel Light Bier Garden Stage

Washington, District of Columbia, USA

Washington, District of Columbia, USA

Oct
06
Sons of the Radio @ Perrys Odies

Odenton, Maryland, USA

Odenton, Maryland, USA

Oct
02
Sons of the Radio @ Fells Point

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Oct
01
Sons of the Radio @ Laurel Park Racetrack

Laurel, Maryland, USA

Laurel, Maryland, USA

Sep
18
Sons of the Radio @ FedEx Field

Landover, Maryland, USA

Landover, Maryland, USA

Sep
17
Sons of the Radio @ Sonar

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Feb
11
Sons of the Radio @ SINIX

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Jan
22
Sons of the Radio @ Bourbon Street Ballroom

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Jan
08
Sons of the Radio @ Uncle Dave's American Bistro

Olney, Maryland, USA

Olney, Maryland, USA

Dec
10
Sons of the Radio @ Bourbon Street Ballroom

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Nov
14
Sons of the Radio @ Laurel Park Raceway

Laurel, Maryland, USA

Laurel, Maryland, USA

Oct
30
Sons of the Radio @ Perry's Golden Flame

Odenton, Maryland, USA

Odenton, Maryland, USA

Oct
29
Sons of the Radio @ Morgan's Sports Bar & Lounge

Woodbridge, Virginia, USA

Woodbridge, Virginia, USA

Oct
23
Sons of the Radio @ Coconut Joe's

Edgewater, Maryland, USA

Edgewater, Maryland, USA

Oct
16
Sons of the Radio @ Nabb's Creek Dock Bar

Glen Burnie, Maryland, USA

Glen Burnie, Maryland, USA

Oct
16
Sons of the Radio @ Baltimore Humane Society

Reisterstown, Maryland, USA

Reisterstown, Maryland, USA

Oct
15
Sons of the Radio @ Cacao Lane

Ellicott City, None, USA

Ellicott City, None, USA

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This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


The Delicate Machinery (self released) is the excellent sophomore album from Sons of the Radio. This adrenaline-infused album combines a fun mix of catchy musicianship and inspiring lyrics, and blurs the lines between Alternative and Metal making them extremely AOL & Alt radio-friendly indeed. After checking out their debut, “Heartstrings & Heresies”, The Crowgrrl predicted this was a band to watch, and they certainly proved me right. Hailing from Maryland, Sons of the Radio are: vocalist Matt Gomez (who also provides hand percussion), drummer Jimmy Herberson, bassist/vocalist Tom Kravulski, and guitarist/vocalist Mike Sullivan. “The Delicate Machinery” boasts a few guest appearances as well. King Belvedere’s Johnny Sexx contributed guest vocals on “Lady Conundrum”. Also on that song, you can hear Jimmy’s Chicken Shack’s Jerome Maffeo on congas. The band introduces Heather Nicole, who adds her vocals to “A Love Song (For Lovers)”. Former SotR bassist Richie Widzbor also contributed to “Melodramatic Yellow.”

All songs on “The Delicate Machinery” were written by Sons of the Radio, and vocalist Matt Gomez penned all the lyrics.

“Melodramatic Yellow” (see what they did there? Kickstarting off of Donovan’s Mellow Yellow”) seriously Rocks as it exposes a superficial drama queen. Fantastic melodies permeate the empowering “Posters On The Wall”, which reaches out to all those who feel unnoticed. “The Last Words He Spoke Echoed Forever” is a brief, nice guitar solo. “The Suppliant” is inescapably hypnotic.

The Power Ballad “Dreams In The Rain” is refreshingly optimistic. I love the percussion in the excellent “Lady Conundrum” – caliente! The instrumental “21225” has a Gaelic flavor that one can almost dance a traditional jig to. The infectious “Bagman” shines the spotlight on a crazy homeless man.

“Damage Collective” finds someone being pushed almost to their breaking point. The fantastic “A Love Song (For Lovers)” reminds couples to put aside mundane worries and concerns, and just focus on their feelings for each other. The ominous “Premonition” is probably the heaviest song on the album, reminiscent of early Black Sabbath. The pulsating instrumental “In The Fall” wraps things up with a sense of urgency.

Excellent album! The Crowgrrl highly recommends it. - MusicArtery.com


The Delicate Machinery (self released) is the excellent sophomore album from Sons of the Radio. This adrenaline-infused album combines a fun mix of catchy musicianship and inspiring lyrics, and blurs the lines between Alternative and Metal making them extremely AOL & Alt radio-friendly indeed. After checking out their debut, “Heartstrings & Heresies”, The Crowgrrl predicted this was a band to watch, and they certainly proved me right. Hailing from Maryland, Sons of the Radio are: vocalist Matt Gomez (who also provides hand percussion), drummer Jimmy Herberson, bassist/vocalist Tom Kravulski, and guitarist/vocalist Mike Sullivan. “The Delicate Machinery” boasts a few guest appearances as well. King Belvedere’s Johnny Sexx contributed guest vocals on “Lady Conundrum”. Also on that song, you can hear Jimmy’s Chicken Shack’s Jerome Maffeo on congas. The band introduces Heather Nicole, who adds her vocals to “A Love Song (For Lovers)”. Former SotR bassist Richie Widzbor also contributed to “Melodramatic Yellow.”

All songs on “The Delicate Machinery” were written by Sons of the Radio, and vocalist Matt Gomez penned all the lyrics.

“Melodramatic Yellow” (see what they did there? Kickstarting off of Donovan’s Mellow Yellow”) seriously Rocks as it exposes a superficial drama queen. Fantastic melodies permeate the empowering “Posters On The Wall”, which reaches out to all those who feel unnoticed. “The Last Words He Spoke Echoed Forever” is a brief, nice guitar solo. “The Suppliant” is inescapably hypnotic.

The Power Ballad “Dreams In The Rain” is refreshingly optimistic. I love the percussion in the excellent “Lady Conundrum” – caliente! The instrumental “21225” has a Gaelic flavor that one can almost dance a traditional jig to. The infectious “Bagman” shines the spotlight on a crazy homeless man.

“Damage Collective” finds someone being pushed almost to their breaking point. The fantastic “A Love Song (For Lovers)” reminds couples to put aside mundane worries and concerns, and just focus on their feelings for each other. The ominous “Premonition” is probably the heaviest song on the album, reminiscent of early Black Sabbath. The pulsating instrumental “In The Fall” wraps things up with a sense of urgency.

Excellent album! The Crowgrrl highly recommends it. - MusicArtery.com


There are still some bands out there trying hard to keep rock from dying, and Baltimore’s Sons of the Radio is one such band. Back in 2012 Muzikreviews.com named their debut album, Heartstrings & Heresies, a Pick of the Week. Now the quartet is back with their follow-up album The Delicate Machinery.

Sons of the Radio is comprised of Matt Gomez (vocals), Jimmy Herbson (drums), Mike Sullivan (guitars/vocals), and Tom Kravulski (bass/vocals), who is new to the band for this release. Together they lean on what has worked in the past, but also make sure to expand their sound and show growth on the dozen new tracks that make up their sophomore effort.

What I like best about The Delicate Machinery is the range that Sons of the Radio show. It keeps this album sounding fresh from start to finish and keeps it from sounding similar after a while. The album starts with a heavier rock tune with “Melodramatic Yellow,” and it gets more melodic with a tune like “Dreams in the Rain,” and even gets a little funky with “Lady Conundrum.” I am not even going speculate as to how “21225” came about as it doesn’t really seem to fit in, but it certainly is something different for SOTR.

The two best songs for me on this album would have to be “The Suppliant” and “Damage Collective.” “The Suppliant” is just the most complete and mature song for me on the album. It reminds of me Tool and really shows good cohesion between the rhythm section and it gives the guitar a chance to wail, then it goes on a nice little journey. “Damage Collective” is probably the heaviest tune on the album and really showcases Gomez’s range. I would also recommend “Premonition” and its Soundgarden/Alice In Chains grunge rock vibe.

Overall, The Delicate Machinery shows an exciting amount of progress from Sons of the Radio. They do a wonderful job of trying new things, and more often than not they are successful and keep this rock release from sounding repetitive from start to finish. The result is a very good album that makes continual growth seem promising as their sound continues to evolve.

* * * * - Muzikreviews.com


The driving rhythm and guitar in the intro to "Melodramatic Yellow" captures me immediately and reels me in to the point of being hypnotized. The implementation of the vocals just has me bound, there's no escaping a good song and this was a great song to entice the listener into swimming further upstream for more nuggets on to be found on TDM. SOTR don't play when it comes to delivery, whether it's musically, lyrically or otherwise. Emotional guitar work, Zeppelin influenced perhaps with the straight ahead Rock and Roll sound evidenced on "Dreams In The Rain" that is SOTR trademark, close your eyes and imagine. These guys are Rock and Roll, they live it, write about it and perform it with an intensity that other bands could only imagine, they're the real deal. Cool songs over all but "Lady Conundrum," with it's soulful, bluesy guitar, and it's smoky spoken word and 21225, which may or may not be about Brooklyn abound on this disc. There's also some sort of Sea Shanty intro., song or whatever...there's a lot going on here. Check it out the guys at www.facebook.com/sonsoftheradio or www.sonsoftheradio.com - Shockwave Magazine


The driving rhythm and guitar in the intro to "Melodramatic Yellow" captures me immediately and reels me in to the point of being hypnotized. The implementation of the vocals just has me bound, there's no escaping a good song and this was a great song to entice the listener into swimming further upstream for more nuggets on to be found on TDM. SOTR don't play when it comes to delivery, whether it's musically, lyrically or otherwise. Emotional guitar work, Zeppelin influenced perhaps with the straight ahead Rock and Roll sound evidenced on "Dreams In The Rain" that is SOTR trademark, close your eyes and imagine. These guys are Rock and Roll, they live it, write about it and perform it with an intensity that other bands could only imagine, they're the real deal. Cool songs over all but "Lady Conundrum," with it's soulful, bluesy guitar, and it's smoky spoken word and 21225, which may or may not be about Brooklyn abound on this disc. There's also some sort of Sea Shanty intro., song or whatever...there's a lot going on here. Check it out the guys at www.facebook.com/sonsoftheradio or www.sonsoftheradio.com - Shockwave Magazine


Through the years Maryland natives Sons of the Radio have grown from being a cover band to performing sets of all original material and opening for national touring acts like My Darkest Days at some of Maryland’s largest venues!

“The Delicate Machinery” is the bands sophomore release and this time around they have found their niche with music that’s standard hard rock with hooky grooves (“Lady Conundrum”), while maintaining the heaviness (“Melodramatic Yellow”) with an alternative flavor (“Bagman”).

This 12 song disc is a step forward for the band and it shows musical growth with how the band operates as a unit.... Matt’s vocals are really dominant on this record and the bands debut disc was a stepping stone for where they are now. I give Sons of the Radio props for really coming together as a band...the sounds on this disc are unique & you can tell the band have figured out who/what they are now!

“21225” is a quirky little instrumental that sounds like it could have been on a Perfect Circle’s debut record as an interlude & the track that follows it called “Bagman” is actually one of my personal favorites off the disc because it’s got this drive and demanding rhythm that makes it an instantly memorable song!

It’s funny that I’ve seen the band performing many of these tracks live for the past year or so & to finally hear the studio versions of these songs....the band captured the essence of their live sound very well on these studio versions & this is definitely one of the best self released rock records from an unsigned Maryland band!

“Premonition” clocks in at just over 6 minutes long and it’s the bands epic track on this cd and it’s also the heaviest song vibe wise on this disc too!

“The Suppliant” is the stand out track on this disc because there’s a really cool dynamic to the song...the changes within it, the mood, the vibe....it’s really strong simply because it’s the most open and fragile moment on the record... it’s a rock song but also has this tender spot in it which makes it an open book moment for the record.

Sons of the Radio have stepped up things with “The Delicate Machinery” and they have redefined who/what they are...the highs are higher while the lowers are deeper and I’m impressed with the bands musical evolution! - Rock N Roll Experience


Heartstrings & Heresies is the self-released debut album by Sons Of The Radio, and if this is anything to judge by, this is definitely a band to watch as the future approaches. Aptly named, the band is influenced by and pays homage to AOR and Alternative Radio soundscapes. Their music is as timeless as it is Rockin’!

Hailing from Laurel, MD, Sons Of The Radio are: vocalist Gomez, guitarist and vocalist Mike Sullivan, drummer Jimmy Herberson, and bassist Tom Kravulski. The band is known best for their live shows in the Mid Atlantic region, and it’s only a matter of time before they conquer the world. Find out more at sonsoftheradio.com .

Sons Of The Radio’s signature sound is built on rock solid drum/bass foundations, soaring guitars, and crystal clear vocals. The album is downright catchy throughout, and impossible to sit still through.

“Just Press Go” is a schizophrenic song – a Frankenstein’s monster of moods from fast-paced catchy interspersed with more mellow feels, but in a way that totally works. It’s Alive! Alive! The first single from the album, “Get It In” is a sultry encounter with a temptress.

The electricity-charged “Til Tonight” builds with excitement. The dark, manic “Center So Vile” faces inner demons. “Suspicious” is my personal favorite, slightly dangerous and filled with intrigue.

“On The Road” just plain Rocks Out! The bass-driven intro brings us into the feral “Tomorrow’s Wolves” – another stand-out gem.

~Athena Schaffer - MusicArtery.com


With all the controversy that is associated with Craigslist (murders, robberies and prostitution) it’s nice to see something positive come of it. In January of 2009 the three remaining members of power pop band Savage Mill put an ad in Craigslist looking for a vocalist. Matt Gomez responded. Later that year they replaced their guitarist with Mike Sullivan, the planets all aligned and the rock gods bear offspring, Sons of the Radio.
Sons of the Radio are: vocalist Matt Gomez, guitarist and vocalist Mike Sullivan, drummer Jimmy Herberson, and bassist Tom Kravulski. They are one of the hardest working bands in Maryland and the surrounding area. Sons of the Radio have a loyal following that insisted on them recording their original music. The band gave them what they wanted, the self-produced Heartstrings & Heresies.

The first thing from Heartstrings & Heresies that caught my attention is the crystal clear, unyielding vocals starting with “Just Press Go,” “Step up and press go, watch me as I lose control.“

“Tomorrow’s Wolves,” takes the album from pretty straight forward rock and roll to something a bit more diverse. It begins with an infectious bass groove that drifts in and out of a wild ruckus. Also notable about this track are the adept backup vocals.

Just about the time you think that Heartstrings & Heresies is getting a bit pensive, Sons of the Radio blow off some steam with “Get It In,” the lauded tale of the vixen and the tainted spoils she reaps for her soul.

I love the way, “Center so Vile,” starts with a clean finger picked style guitar and then the rhythm section comes in and blows the roof off. In the verses the bottom drops out and you have a seductive distorted bass and drums playing sparsely under the vocal. The guitar jumps back in at the chorus to give you that driving force that throws you into reckless abandon.

Heartstrings & Heresies finishes strong with “Suspicions.” Gomez really changes it up vocally on this song. He takes some risks here that I think really end up working out well.

Sons of the Radio have created an album that really showcases what a strong rock album should be. The songs are well written. There is plenty of great musicianship on Heartstrings & Heresies but it doesn’t get in the way of the songs. I will be bragging that I was listening to them since before they were signed.

* * * * - Muzikreviews.com


With all the controversy that is associated with Craigslist (murders, robberies and prostitution) it’s nice to see something positive come of it. In January of 2009 the three remaining members of power pop band Savage Mill put an ad in Craigslist looking for a vocalist. Matt Gomez responded. Later that year they replaced their guitarist with Mike Sullivan, the planets all aligned and the rock gods bear offspring, Sons of the Radio.
Sons of the Radio are: vocalist Matt Gomez, guitarist and vocalist Mike Sullivan, drummer Jimmy Herberson, and bassist Tom Kravulski. They are one of the hardest working bands in Maryland and the surrounding area. Sons of the Radio have a loyal following that insisted on them recording their original music. The band gave them what they wanted, the self-produced Heartstrings & Heresies.

The first thing from Heartstrings & Heresies that caught my attention is the crystal clear, unyielding vocals starting with “Just Press Go,” “Step up and press go, watch me as I lose control.“

“Tomorrow’s Wolves,” takes the album from pretty straight forward rock and roll to something a bit more diverse. It begins with an infectious bass groove that drifts in and out of a wild ruckus. Also notable about this track are the adept backup vocals.

Just about the time you think that Heartstrings & Heresies is getting a bit pensive, Sons of the Radio blow off some steam with “Get It In,” the lauded tale of the vixen and the tainted spoils she reaps for her soul.

I love the way, “Center so Vile,” starts with a clean finger picked style guitar and then the rhythm section comes in and blows the roof off. In the verses the bottom drops out and you have a seductive distorted bass and drums playing sparsely under the vocal. The guitar jumps back in at the chorus to give you that driving force that throws you into reckless abandon.

Heartstrings & Heresies finishes strong with “Suspicions.” Gomez really changes it up vocally on this song. He takes some risks here that I think really end up working out well.

Sons of the Radio have created an album that really showcases what a strong rock album should be. The songs are well written. There is plenty of great musicianship on Heartstrings & Heresies but it doesn’t get in the way of the songs. I will be bragging that I was listening to them since before they were signed.

* * * * - Muzikreviews.com


We have been aware of Sons of the Radio for a while but had not had a chance to experience their live show until we caught up with them at Sonar in Baltimore, Maryland on 9/17/11. Sons of the Radio (SoTR) formed in January of 2009 and makes regular appearances at multiple venues in the Baltimore Metropolitan area.

Right from the start of their set, we could tell that SoTR was a great live act. Their music is a hard rock blend claiming influences from Alice in Chains, Soundgarden amd Incubus just to name a few. The four piece band demonstrates a lot of creativity and versatility. The style of the music changes slightly throughout the show, but never deviates too far from gritty rock and roll.

SoTR released the album "Heartstings and Heresies" in 2010 which geatures 7 great tunes. The strongest tune on the album is "Get it In" which you can check out on their Reverbnation site....This song has a contagious riff to it that definitely sticks in your head....

Sons of the Radio are Matt Gomez - Vocals, Mike Sullivan - Guitar/Vocals, Richie Widzbor - Bass, Jimmy Herberson - Drums Go check these guys out live!

We hope you will check out the rest of the live stuff when we post it. We had a blast at their live show and are certain we will be seeing them again. They have a number of live shows coming up in the Baltimore area in September and October. You can chek out their schedule on their Reverbnation site.

K-rock - Mid-Atlantic Rock Reviews


Baltimore's local music scene shines bright every Monday when 98 Rock's "Noise In The Basement" hosted by Matt Davis takes over Bourbon Street in downtown Baltimore for it's weekly showcase of the best the region has to offer.

On this particular night Sons of the Radio & Frenamie were the featured attractions on the bill & this was actually my first time seeing Frenamie.

Frenamie is an interesting band...it's comprised of 3 girls & one guy; Abs handles the vocals in a gutsy & outgoing manner, Allison (Bass) & Whitney (Drums) hold down the rhythm section clean & tight, while Nick adds the testosterone riffs that fuel the bands sound with elements of funk, rock & pop.

Nick's guitar was interesting to me, it was a green, glitter covered Ibanez Iceman but the body was actually inverted & I've never seen an Iceman like that before.


Ab's vocals are gutsy & soulful & the bands music is really hard to categorize simply because there's many styles that are infused in the bands sound which makes them who they are.

By the time Frenamie were belting out their last song of the night the crowd were clearly enjoying what they received from the band performance wise & it's interesting to note that all of the bands this night used Frenamie's drum kit.

Sons of the Radio were up next & last time the band played Noise in the Basement they were good, but with this show they were even better than last time!

Gomez's voice was solid, his performance was strong & I see elements of Scott Weiland & Sully from Godsmack in his onstage performance.

Mike's guitar work is mostly solid rhythm with tasteful guitar solo's scattered about for good measure & on a performance level Sons of the Radio's secret weapon is their super tight rhythm section!


Richie is a monster on bass, it's clear that he's a fan of Tool & his playing alongside Jimmy's drums is the element that gives Sons of the Radio their power on a musical level.

Songs about sex, girls & bad things are the featured topics in most of the bands original music & it was pretty cool to see the band play a full set that was ALL originals with no covers, although I will admit they do play killer covers!

The beauty of the Maryland music scene is that the bands all support each other for the most part & while Sons of the Radio rocked out onstage member of numerous local bands were upfront supporting their brothers in Sons of the Radio!

Sons of the Radio nailed it & their set was good, the sound was clean, you could hear all the vocals, the bands songs have solid grooves that make then songs you can move to & both Sons of the Radio & Frenamie brought out nice sized crowds for a Monday night!

For more info on Sons of the Radio go to: www.sonsoftheradio.com - SEN Baltimore


Baltimore's local music scene shines bright every Monday when 98 Rock's "Noise In The Basement" hosted by Matt Davis takes over Bourbon Street in downtown Baltimore for it's weekly showcase of the best the region has to offer.

On this particular night Sons of the Radio & Frenamie were the featured attractions on the bill & this was actually my first time seeing Frenamie.

Frenamie is an interesting band...it's comprised of 3 girls & one guy; Abs handles the vocals in a gutsy & outgoing manner, Allison (Bass) & Whitney (Drums) hold down the rhythm section clean & tight, while Nick adds the testosterone riffs that fuel the bands sound with elements of funk, rock & pop.

Nick's guitar was interesting to me, it was a green, glitter covered Ibanez Iceman but the body was actually inverted & I've never seen an Iceman like that before.


Ab's vocals are gutsy & soulful & the bands music is really hard to categorize simply because there's many styles that are infused in the bands sound which makes them who they are.

By the time Frenamie were belting out their last song of the night the crowd were clearly enjoying what they received from the band performance wise & it's interesting to note that all of the bands this night used Frenamie's drum kit.

Sons of the Radio were up next & last time the band played Noise in the Basement they were good, but with this show they were even better than last time!

Gomez's voice was solid, his performance was strong & I see elements of Scott Weiland & Sully from Godsmack in his onstage performance.

Mike's guitar work is mostly solid rhythm with tasteful guitar solo's scattered about for good measure & on a performance level Sons of the Radio's secret weapon is their super tight rhythm section!


Richie is a monster on bass, it's clear that he's a fan of Tool & his playing alongside Jimmy's drums is the element that gives Sons of the Radio their power on a musical level.

Songs about sex, girls & bad things are the featured topics in most of the bands original music & it was pretty cool to see the band play a full set that was ALL originals with no covers, although I will admit they do play killer covers!

The beauty of the Maryland music scene is that the bands all support each other for the most part & while Sons of the Radio rocked out onstage member of numerous local bands were upfront supporting their brothers in Sons of the Radio!

Sons of the Radio nailed it & their set was good, the sound was clean, you could hear all the vocals, the bands songs have solid grooves that make then songs you can move to & both Sons of the Radio & Frenamie brought out nice sized crowds for a Monday night!

For more info on Sons of the Radio go to: www.sonsoftheradio.com - SEN Baltimore


Heartstrings and Heresies starts off strong with track one, entitled, Just Press Go with driving guitar rhythms and insane energy and cool change ups. The one thing I’m not sure about is the vocals, the singer sometimes seems rather casual, yet he’s more than adequate to deliver the vocal duties for a rock band. I do love the rhythms in the songs, mainly because they really drive the feeling overall. The lyrics are a bit typical too with the whole “temptress” thing, bad girl lyrics seem a bit mundane and played out…(It is rock and roll though. What else are you gonna write about?). Track four I’m really digging, reminds me of a band from back in the day only a much more updated version. Track six and seven pretty much are highlighted by the guitarist’s playing and musicianship overall. The disc as whole is a really good rock and roll record, great for a party or just background music. I’d give it 5 out of 5 stars for it’s over all production, rhythm and competency. - Shockwave Magazine


Heartstrings and Heresies starts off strong with track one, entitled, Just Press Go with driving guitar rhythms and insane energy and cool change ups. The one thing I’m not sure about is the vocals, the singer sometimes seems rather casual, yet he’s more than adequate to deliver the vocal duties for a rock band. I do love the rhythms in the songs, mainly because they really drive the feeling overall. The lyrics are a bit typical too with the whole “temptress” thing, bad girl lyrics seem a bit mundane and played out…(It is rock and roll though. What else are you gonna write about?). Track four I’m really digging, reminds me of a band from back in the day only a much more updated version. Track six and seven pretty much are highlighted by the guitarist’s playing and musicianship overall. The disc as whole is a really good rock and roll record, great for a party or just background music. I’d give it 5 out of 5 stars for it’s over all production, rhythm and competency. - Shockwave Magazine


After a much needed break from the scene, I finally decided to make my way out to Bourbon St. for this show. For some, a month away from the scene can feel like a lifetime. Which, in a way, it did. So walking into Bourbon St. was almost like going to a family reunion of sorts. Coal was already onstage, and by the time I actually got to see them play, they were done. So much for that. So I made my way around to see who was there and mingle a bit and perhaps grab a drink. As soon as I made my way up to the front bar, I was greeted by Sons of the Radio, who were selling t-shirts and newly released CD, Heartstrings and Heresies...which rocks, by the way. So, I did a shot with the boys of SotR, and we all headed to the stage, where King Belvedere was about to put on a show.
And put on a show they did. Maybe I'm biased, because I simply love these guys. Aside from having a case of the mean roadies, everything about them is spectacular. I'm just kidding, their roadies aren't mean. Actually, they're the hottest roadies around. So hot in fact, I had to change my shirt after KB was done playing their new song, "My Kind of Rock & Roll". Can't wait for their next CD. I have their first one, but that CD was done by a different version of KB. No, not some imposters, but different guys who have come and gone from the band. I like this version of KB better. If I had my way, these guys would be playing national shows. I might even start a campaign for them I like them so much.

Sin 4 Sin was up next. I feared lead singer Brandon would give me a beer shower, especially after what I said in my review of their CD. I got a light sprinkling of Natty Boh, but the people I ducked behind got soaked. And I may have said Sin 4 Sin's CD wasn't so great but maybe it's because I would rather have the music loud and in my face. S4S really did a great job, I can tell you that. I'm still not a fan of their song "Buy Me a Drink", but they really did sound terrific.

After S4S was done, I was invited upstairs to meet and possibly interview LA Guns. First, singer Jizzy Pearl basically walked right past me and snubbed me, saying, "Maybe later." I got to meet the rest of the band and was told, "Maybe after the show you can come back. You might wanna wait til then." And it wasn't the words coming out of their mouth, but the way that they spoke to me that totally turned me off. I'm not a very aggressive person, and didn't want to come off as a bitch, so I told them MAYBE I'd come back after the show and left the dressing room. Let me ask this, people...if there are two versions of a band, who do the same songs from 20 years ago, but one of them does meet and greets with their fans and the other won't even bother talking to a fan who happens to write for a magazine, which version do you think will have a bigger following? I hadn't even seen them play yet and was already ready to pass up seeing them play. But I had two more bands to watch before that happened anyway, so I headed back downstairs to watch P.U.S.H.

I'm not one to accept bribes, but these are very hard economic times, so it was difficult for me to turn down the $20 Space from P.U.S.H. offered me for a good review. I'm kidding, I promise. It would take a lot more than $20. Again, I'm joking. I quite enjoy these guys. They always have such great energy and their originals are great. And again, as I have mentioned before, they cover my favorite Poison song. (Which one you ask? Read Shockwave a bit more often and you'd already know!) So Space, that $20 wasn't even needed. You all did a fine job, I promise. You did so great I had to change my shirt...again.

Sons of the Radio were about to go on, and the place was roaring for them. Actually, throughout all the previous sets, the place was packed. Everyone wanted to be front and center to see SotR, so there was a good bit of pushing, shoving and "Get the hell out of my way" going on when "Excuse me" didn't suffice. Can't say I blame people. SotR is just a great band all around. Mike Sullivan's guitar playing is kick-ass. Matt Gomez is a great front man. Richie Widzbor, bass player, knows exactly how to work a crowd and drummer Jimmy Herberson, who happened to be celebrating his birthday, gets people fired up and jumping. I really, REALLY like these guys. And yes, they had a few mishaps, but sh*t happens. So what if they had to use Johnny Sexx's kick drum because theirs split in half? So what if Gomez's guitar strap broke? It's when something goes wrong and you manage to get through it without breaking stride is when your professionalism shows. By the way, classy move, Johnny Sexx. Not everyone will haul ass to their equipment trailer, unpack half their stuff and run with a big ass kick drum to let someone else use it. And here's to you, KB roadie Shawn, for helping Johnny get to his kick drum so quickly.

Last and pretty much least, was LA Guns. As I had said earlier, I was already not impressed with these guys, based on their - Shockwave Magazine


After a much needed break from the scene, I finally decided to make my way out to Bourbon St. for this show. For some, a month away from the scene can feel like a lifetime. Which, in a way, it did. So walking into Bourbon St. was almost like going to a family reunion of sorts. Coal was already onstage, and by the time I actually got to see them play, they were done. So much for that. So I made my way around to see who was there and mingle a bit and perhaps grab a drink. As soon as I made my way up to the front bar, I was greeted by Sons of the Radio, who were selling t-shirts and newly released CD, Heartstrings and Heresies...which rocks, by the way. So, I did a shot with the boys of SotR, and we all headed to the stage, where King Belvedere was about to put on a show.
And put on a show they did. Maybe I'm biased, because I simply love these guys. Aside from having a case of the mean roadies, everything about them is spectacular. I'm just kidding, their roadies aren't mean. Actually, they're the hottest roadies around. So hot in fact, I had to change my shirt after KB was done playing their new song, "My Kind of Rock & Roll". Can't wait for their next CD. I have their first one, but that CD was done by a different version of KB. No, not some imposters, but different guys who have come and gone from the band. I like this version of KB better. If I had my way, these guys would be playing national shows. I might even start a campaign for them I like them so much.

Sin 4 Sin was up next. I feared lead singer Brandon would give me a beer shower, especially after what I said in my review of their CD. I got a light sprinkling of Natty Boh, but the people I ducked behind got soaked. And I may have said Sin 4 Sin's CD wasn't so great but maybe it's because I would rather have the music loud and in my face. S4S really did a great job, I can tell you that. I'm still not a fan of their song "Buy Me a Drink", but they really did sound terrific.

After S4S was done, I was invited upstairs to meet and possibly interview LA Guns. First, singer Jizzy Pearl basically walked right past me and snubbed me, saying, "Maybe later." I got to meet the rest of the band and was told, "Maybe after the show you can come back. You might wanna wait til then." And it wasn't the words coming out of their mouth, but the way that they spoke to me that totally turned me off. I'm not a very aggressive person, and didn't want to come off as a bitch, so I told them MAYBE I'd come back after the show and left the dressing room. Let me ask this, people...if there are two versions of a band, who do the same songs from 20 years ago, but one of them does meet and greets with their fans and the other won't even bother talking to a fan who happens to write for a magazine, which version do you think will have a bigger following? I hadn't even seen them play yet and was already ready to pass up seeing them play. But I had two more bands to watch before that happened anyway, so I headed back downstairs to watch P.U.S.H.

I'm not one to accept bribes, but these are very hard economic times, so it was difficult for me to turn down the $20 Space from P.U.S.H. offered me for a good review. I'm kidding, I promise. It would take a lot more than $20. Again, I'm joking. I quite enjoy these guys. They always have such great energy and their originals are great. And again, as I have mentioned before, they cover my favorite Poison song. (Which one you ask? Read Shockwave a bit more often and you'd already know!) So Space, that $20 wasn't even needed. You all did a fine job, I promise. You did so great I had to change my shirt...again.

Sons of the Radio were about to go on, and the place was roaring for them. Actually, throughout all the previous sets, the place was packed. Everyone wanted to be front and center to see SotR, so there was a good bit of pushing, shoving and "Get the hell out of my way" going on when "Excuse me" didn't suffice. Can't say I blame people. SotR is just a great band all around. Mike Sullivan's guitar playing is kick-ass. Matt Gomez is a great front man. Richie Widzbor, bass player, knows exactly how to work a crowd and drummer Jimmy Herberson, who happened to be celebrating his birthday, gets people fired up and jumping. I really, REALLY like these guys. And yes, they had a few mishaps, but sh*t happens. So what if they had to use Johnny Sexx's kick drum because theirs split in half? So what if Gomez's guitar strap broke? It's when something goes wrong and you manage to get through it without breaking stride is when your professionalism shows. By the way, classy move, Johnny Sexx. Not everyone will haul ass to their equipment trailer, unpack half their stuff and run with a big ass kick drum to let someone else use it. And here's to you, KB roadie Shawn, for helping Johnny get to his kick drum so quickly.

Last and pretty much least, was LA Guns. As I had said earlier, I was already not impressed with these guys, based on their - Shockwave Magazine


A month or so ago, I received an email via Facebook from Matt Gomez, the lead singer of local band (ok, they're really from Laurel) Sons of the Radio. He asked if I was interested in checking out a show or reviewing their soon-to-be-released CD. After listening to a few songs online, I agreed to both. I haven't made it to a show yet, but Matt was kind enough to send me an advance copy of their CD, Heartstrings & Heresies, for review.

Sons of the Radio classify themselves as a Modern Rock band, and I have to admit, I was a bit hesitant about agreeing to this; anyone who reads my articles can quickly see where my interests lie. I'm not familiar with many of their influences; sure, I've heard of Weezer, The Toadies, Sublime, and Incubus, but I couldn't name a single song by any of them. On the other hand, other influences such as The Doors and Metallica are favorites of mine, so I thought maybe I can do this.

I listened to the CD for the first time yesterday. Then I listened to it a second time, and a third time. And I listened to it again today. If you haven't figured it out by now, Jimmy (drums), Richie (bass), Gomez (vocals) and Mike (Guitars) have created a pretty damn good album. It's a mix of blues, hard rock, and I suppose modern rock, although someone will have to confirm that last part for me.

There are seven original songs on the album. All are guitar-driven mid to fast tempo rockers, well written, aggressive, edgy, but without the anger of many current rock songs. The drums and bass maintain a steady and energetic rhythm, the riffs are exciting, the guitar solos weave seamlessly in and out of the songs, and the vocals have a theatrical quality that adds power and emotion to each song.

I wish I could classify this CD to help give you a better idea of the style of music, but I'm just not familiar enough with the styles to say if this is Modern Rock, Alternative Rock, or something else altogether. What I can tell you though, is that this album appeals to me on many levels, and I expect it to remain in my playlist for a long time to come.

Sons of the Radio have a CD release party on October 1 at the 8 x 10. For more information, check them out on either myspace or Facebook.
- The Baltimore Examiner


A month or so ago, I received an email via Facebook from Matt Gomez, the lead singer of local band (ok, they're really from Laurel) Sons of the Radio. He asked if I was interested in checking out a show or reviewing their soon-to-be-released CD. After listening to a few songs online, I agreed to both. I haven't made it to a show yet, but Matt was kind enough to send me an advance copy of their CD, Heartstrings & Heresies, for review.

Sons of the Radio classify themselves as a Modern Rock band, and I have to admit, I was a bit hesitant about agreeing to this; anyone who reads my articles can quickly see where my interests lie. I'm not familiar with many of their influences; sure, I've heard of Weezer, The Toadies, Sublime, and Incubus, but I couldn't name a single song by any of them. On the other hand, other influences such as The Doors and Metallica are favorites of mine, so I thought maybe I can do this.

I listened to the CD for the first time yesterday. Then I listened to it a second time, and a third time. And I listened to it again today. If you haven't figured it out by now, Jimmy (drums), Richie (bass), Gomez (vocals) and Mike (Guitars) have created a pretty damn good album. It's a mix of blues, hard rock, and I suppose modern rock, although someone will have to confirm that last part for me.

There are seven original songs on the album. All are guitar-driven mid to fast tempo rockers, well written, aggressive, edgy, but without the anger of many current rock songs. The drums and bass maintain a steady and energetic rhythm, the riffs are exciting, the guitar solos weave seamlessly in and out of the songs, and the vocals have a theatrical quality that adds power and emotion to each song.

I wish I could classify this CD to help give you a better idea of the style of music, but I'm just not familiar enough with the styles to say if this is Modern Rock, Alternative Rock, or something else altogether. What I can tell you though, is that this album appeals to me on many levels, and I expect it to remain in my playlist for a long time to come.

Sons of the Radio have a CD release party on October 1 at the 8 x 10. For more information, check them out on either myspace or Facebook.
- The Baltimore Examiner


Losing Control with SONS OF THE RADIO!

9/6/10

Bourbon Street

Noise In The Basement

by: Bob Suehs

Laurel, Maryland based rockers Sons of the Radio headlined 98 Rock's local music showcase "Noise in the Basement" on September 6, 2010 & this was my first taste of the bands live show.

Sons of the Radio have a rock solid groove & rhythm which I immediately picked up on as the band hammered through their first song.

Jimmy on drums & Ritchie on bass lay down the backbone for what is the Sons of the Radio's foundation & on this particular night, midway though the bands set, bassist Ritchie decided to climb on top of his bass rig & do a rather high jump from the top which was a great climax to the end of one song.

Mike's guitar work was surprisingly solid & I say "surprisingly" because quite often you will get guitarists who simply copy whatever is popular & that causes a lack of originality, but that's NOT the case here because Mike's a solid player who's style is a mix of modern rock, classic rock & there's touches of blues & indie rock that also flavor his sound.

If I were to dumb things down totally for one moment, I'd say that I really liked the sounds I heard when I saw Sons of the Radio and what I mean by that is this:

The guitar tone was pleasing to the ear, the bass was thick but not overpowering & the tones changed on certain songs & it created a really good groove while the drums were punchy & strong.

The vocals are the icing on the cake & lead singer Gomez is an interesting character. Gomez's vocals match his stage presence; Gomez is a thin guy who slithers around the stage in his leather dress jacket & hat...his looks leave a certain amount of mystique to who he is & his singing voice is clean with moments of aggression yet the overall vocal tone from Gomez has a very charming & warm feel which fits the sound of Sons of the Radio so well.

Interesting thing about the bands stage presence is that each member of the band has their own "vibe" & "look" as well....sadly, most local bands have an issue when it comes to looks & what I mean is that you usually have 1 or 2 guys who look the part of a "rocker" while the other guys look like weekend rockers & it's apparent that they have other priorities higher than playing rock n roll. With the 4 members of Sons of the Radio they all gel well, look decent onstage & they have that certain "something" about them that most local bands lack...you can tell music is in their blood!

Interjected in the bands set were 2 covers; my personal favorite was a cover of The Toadies "Possum Kingdom" which was very true to the original version & kicked serious ass!


Gomez gave me a copy of the bands new CD which will be released on October 1 & here's an early review of the bands soon to be released CD!


SONS OF THE RADIO
Heartstrings & Heresies"

"Sons of the Radio have a rock solid groove & rhythm"

Tracklisting: Just Press Go, Get It In, Till Tonight, Center So Vile, Suspicions, On The Road, Tomorrow's Wolves

Independent music is a lovely commodity for the true music fan, it gives us a rare glimpse at unpolished gems & in many cases it's the first taste of what's to come! Sons of the Radio's "Heartstrings & Heresies" is a rock n roll reaction to love, loss & life; the band writes anthemic rock songs that push full steam ahead & "Just Press Go" is the perfect opener to prove that point!

"Just Press Go" is fast paced, there's a few quirky moments, a pep rally styled chant midway through the song & overall this song is a fast & fun track.

"Get It In" is oddly sexual both in title & lyrics while "Till Tonight" is mid tempo & a mix of blues & alternative in its musical approach. "Center So Vile" reminds me of The Toadies ever so slightly & if I had to describe the bands sound & overall tone on this record I'd say that they are very modern sounding, they play aggressive rock that has a great groove to it, I know Gomez will probably not like this reference, BUT, I think his vocals are on the same level as Chris Daughtry, they have that same appeal & credibility, but Gomez's vocals are stronger than Daughtry's!

This 7 song CD is a very solid release, it shows what the band can do & what they are all about....kudos to Sons of the Radio for giving the Maryland area some great original rock tunes!
- SEN Baltimore Magazine


Losing Control with SONS OF THE RADIO!

9/6/10

Bourbon Street

Noise In The Basement

by: Bob Suehs

Laurel, Maryland based rockers Sons of the Radio headlined 98 Rock's local music showcase "Noise in the Basement" on September 6, 2010 & this was my first taste of the bands live show.

Sons of the Radio have a rock solid groove & rhythm which I immediately picked up on as the band hammered through their first song.

Jimmy on drums & Ritchie on bass lay down the backbone for what is the Sons of the Radio's foundation & on this particular night, midway though the bands set, bassist Ritchie decided to climb on top of his bass rig & do a rather high jump from the top which was a great climax to the end of one song.

Mike's guitar work was surprisingly solid & I say "surprisingly" because quite often you will get guitarists who simply copy whatever is popular & that causes a lack of originality, but that's NOT the case here because Mike's a solid player who's style is a mix of modern rock, classic rock & there's touches of blues & indie rock that also flavor his sound.

If I were to dumb things down totally for one moment, I'd say that I really liked the sounds I heard when I saw Sons of the Radio and what I mean by that is this:

The guitar tone was pleasing to the ear, the bass was thick but not overpowering & the tones changed on certain songs & it created a really good groove while the drums were punchy & strong.

The vocals are the icing on the cake & lead singer Gomez is an interesting character. Gomez's vocals match his stage presence; Gomez is a thin guy who slithers around the stage in his leather dress jacket & hat...his looks leave a certain amount of mystique to who he is & his singing voice is clean with moments of aggression yet the overall vocal tone from Gomez has a very charming & warm feel which fits the sound of Sons of the Radio so well.

Interesting thing about the bands stage presence is that each member of the band has their own "vibe" & "look" as well....sadly, most local bands have an issue when it comes to looks & what I mean is that you usually have 1 or 2 guys who look the part of a "rocker" while the other guys look like weekend rockers & it's apparent that they have other priorities higher than playing rock n roll. With the 4 members of Sons of the Radio they all gel well, look decent onstage & they have that certain "something" about them that most local bands lack...you can tell music is in their blood!

Interjected in the bands set were 2 covers; my personal favorite was a cover of The Toadies "Possum Kingdom" which was very true to the original version & kicked serious ass!


Gomez gave me a copy of the bands new CD which will be released on October 1 & here's an early review of the bands soon to be released CD!


SONS OF THE RADIO
Heartstrings & Heresies"

"Sons of the Radio have a rock solid groove & rhythm"

Tracklisting: Just Press Go, Get It In, Till Tonight, Center So Vile, Suspicions, On The Road, Tomorrow's Wolves

Independent music is a lovely commodity for the true music fan, it gives us a rare glimpse at unpolished gems & in many cases it's the first taste of what's to come! Sons of the Radio's "Heartstrings & Heresies" is a rock n roll reaction to love, loss & life; the band writes anthemic rock songs that push full steam ahead & "Just Press Go" is the perfect opener to prove that point!

"Just Press Go" is fast paced, there's a few quirky moments, a pep rally styled chant midway through the song & overall this song is a fast & fun track.

"Get It In" is oddly sexual both in title & lyrics while "Till Tonight" is mid tempo & a mix of blues & alternative in its musical approach. "Center So Vile" reminds me of The Toadies ever so slightly & if I had to describe the bands sound & overall tone on this record I'd say that they are very modern sounding, they play aggressive rock that has a great groove to it, I know Gomez will probably not like this reference, BUT, I think his vocals are on the same level as Chris Daughtry, they have that same appeal & credibility, but Gomez's vocals are stronger than Daughtry's!

This 7 song CD is a very solid release, it shows what the band can do & what they are all about....kudos to Sons of the Radio for giving the Maryland area some great original rock tunes!
- SEN Baltimore Magazine


Discography

Our second recording, "The Delicate Machinery", was released in June 2013. It features 12 tracks of rock music that show a lot of diversity and have the vibe and energy of a classic rock record.

Our debut, Heartstrings & Heresies, was released on October 1, 2010. The 7-track recording can be found on iTunes, Amazon, Spotify and other major online distributors. Several tracks from the album play on Baltimore's legendary 98 Rock, Annapolis' WRNR radio, and Baltimore's 94.7 HFS.

Reviews of Heartstrings & Heresies describe it as:
* "A rock n roll reaction to love, loss & life" featuring "anthemic rock songs that push full steam ahead" [Bob Suehs, SEN Baltimore Magazine, www.senbaltimore.com]
* "A pretty damn good album" that "appeals to me on many levels, and I expect it to remain in my playlist for a long time to come." [Joel Hammerman, Baltimore Rock Music Examiner, http://www.examiner.com/rock-music-in-baltimore]
* "5-out-of-5 stars" [Vince Anderson, Shockwave Magazine, http://www.shockwavemagazine.com/]

Photos

Bio

Sons of the Radio was born in early 2009 as a radio rock cover band, but that changed quickly. Soon after our first gig, we received an offer from a Baltimore area promoter to play at Ram's Head Live, the most prestigious music venue in Baltimore. The catch was...we needed original music.
30 days later we took the stage with 7 original songs in front of a crowd of about 500. We impressed fans and the promoter and have had many opportunities since to play with established rock acts such as Candlebox, My Darkest Days, CAVO, Black Stone Cherry, The Misfits, Charm City Devils, Plain White Ts, Bang Tango, Hawthorne Heights, LA Guns, Adema and others. We recorded our debut EP in 2010, recording at the studio of Jimmie's Chicken Shack drummer, Jerome Maffeo, with Jerome co-producing and engineering. We released our second record, The Delicate Machinery in June 2013.
What makes us different from other bands are experience, drive, chemistry and interactivity. We still play as a cover act in the Baltimore area, so we perform live 1-3 times per week and have since early 2009. When we take the stage, whether covering a Zeppelin classic in a bar or delivering a set of our original tunes, we're polished and tight, and that makes for a better show experience for our audience. We have the drive to do everything ourselves: we're self-managed, booked, promoted, marketed and even self-produced our records. Because we love what we do, we're driven to make it our own. We also play off of each others' ideas and develop them into totally unique creations in our songwriting process, and that chemistry leads to original music that is less driven by what is trendy and safe. Finally, our audiences appreciate feeling like they are part of a network. We interact on stage as well as on our Facebook and social media with fans daily. Fans take photos, design flyers, and sell merch. And our T Shirt design, black with the stark white radio tower, reflects this ideal that we are part of a network with our fans.
These elements have propelled us to where we are today and we are confident that our fans will continue to elevate us to achieve greater things.