Soultrap
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Soultrap

Atlanta, Georgia, United States | SELF

Atlanta, Georgia, United States | SELF
Band Rock Soul

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Sep
08
Soultrap @ I Lounge - 1287 Glenwood Ave SE, Atlanta, Georgia 30316

Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Aug
18
Soultrap @ The Funkshion Factory - 608 Interchange Drive Atlanta, GA

Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Atlanta, Georgia, USA

May
29
Soultrap @ Smith's Olde Bar

Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Atlanta, Georgia, USA

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


The very-trendy East Atlanta Village is full of characters you might see in a really nifty independent film. iLounge, tucked along Glenwood Avenue has the chilly underground look that attracts the fashionably indifferent. As I find a seat, I wonder whether the crowd is this diverse on other nights. But then I imagine that many of them have arrived to support SoulTrap a local fusion band. The blend of folks is an eclectic one---something that seems to be par for the course in many parts of the city.

Low slung tables house hookahs. Eventually, hookahs, cupcakes (isn’t someone always celebrating?) and colorful cocktails punctuate the cool atmosphere. And I do mean cool. The room, awash in cool blue, is the result of creative black-lighting and some well placed reflective fabrics.

The entertainment...

The night of February 25th belongs to SoulTrap and its tight group of guest acts. As is common practice for local bands, Soultrap launches into a few popular neo-soul covers, courtesy of Kenyada Roberts. People like being warmed up by songs they know, and are relatively grateful for any live energy that slices through the environment. Interestingly enough, the people seemed to be having their own parties.

It’s clear that this place has been better designed for super-schmoozing, rather than live band showcases. I can’t help wishing that the band was positioned differently, and on some sort of raised platform or stage with lights. The sounds emanating from their instruments warrant that. With these multiple “parties” going on, it’s slightly difficult to get the full impact of what they can really do if you’re not paying attention. But this is no fault of theirs. And the show goes on.


The nitty gritty...

But then, they launch into their originals. It is when this band plays originals that it comes to life. The discerning ear suddenly shuts out all that droning background noise---and hones in on what’s happening. Neo-soul-rock fusion (as the band describes their style) contains many elements that evolved out of the 90s and quickly was digested by the machine that is fueled by electronic palpitations. Is Soultrap covering brand new ground? Not necessarily so. But this may not be a bad thing. As trends dictate, sometimes revisiting music’s purest art forms is the best way to remain relevant.


What's their shtick?

SoulTrap launches into “Lead Shoes.” The song is very straightforward musically, chord changes progressing naturally and settling into a popular rock rhythm. The song’s ultimate hue is provided by JahQues, lead vocalist---whose interesting delivery lands somewhere between old school hip-hop and blues singing. The first original song of the night deals primarily with the singer’s desire to put lead shoes on his woman—for fear that she’ll leave him. Nice analogy, especially for a song like this.

They also showcase an up tempo ditty called “Fire Water.” Now I’m excited. This swingy tempo is loose and jangly. JahQues sings and raps on this one-- painting pictures of wise old women, pastors, and yesteryear imagery. We’re onto something here. Songs like these are the little nuggets of goodness that keep club crawlers meandering from bar to bar in Atlanta’s East Villagy neighborhoods.
- Ayanna Guyhto


The very-trendy East Atlanta Village is full of characters you might see in a really nifty independent film. iLounge, tucked along Glenwood Avenue has the chilly underground look that attracts the fashionably indifferent. As I find a seat, I wonder whether the crowd is this diverse on other nights. But then I imagine that many of them have arrived to support SoulTrap a local fusion band. The blend of folks is an eclectic one---something that seems to be par for the course in many parts of the city.

Low slung tables house hookahs. Eventually, hookahs, cupcakes (isn’t someone always celebrating?) and colorful cocktails punctuate the cool atmosphere. And I do mean cool. The room, awash in cool blue, is the result of creative black-lighting and some well placed reflective fabrics.

The entertainment...

The night of February 25th belongs to SoulTrap and its tight group of guest acts. As is common practice for local bands, Soultrap launches into a few popular neo-soul covers, courtesy of Kenyada Roberts. People like being warmed up by songs they know, and are relatively grateful for any live energy that slices through the environment. Interestingly enough, the people seemed to be having their own parties.

It’s clear that this place has been better designed for super-schmoozing, rather than live band showcases. I can’t help wishing that the band was positioned differently, and on some sort of raised platform or stage with lights. The sounds emanating from their instruments warrant that. With these multiple “parties” going on, it’s slightly difficult to get the full impact of what they can really do if you’re not paying attention. But this is no fault of theirs. And the show goes on.


The nitty gritty...

But then, they launch into their originals. It is when this band plays originals that it comes to life. The discerning ear suddenly shuts out all that droning background noise---and hones in on what’s happening. Neo-soul-rock fusion (as the band describes their style) contains many elements that evolved out of the 90s and quickly was digested by the machine that is fueled by electronic palpitations. Is Soultrap covering brand new ground? Not necessarily so. But this may not be a bad thing. As trends dictate, sometimes revisiting music’s purest art forms is the best way to remain relevant.


What's their shtick?

SoulTrap launches into “Lead Shoes.” The song is very straightforward musically, chord changes progressing naturally and settling into a popular rock rhythm. The song’s ultimate hue is provided by JahQues, lead vocalist---whose interesting delivery lands somewhere between old school hip-hop and blues singing. The first original song of the night deals primarily with the singer’s desire to put lead shoes on his woman—for fear that she’ll leave him. Nice analogy, especially for a song like this.

They also showcase an up tempo ditty called “Fire Water.” Now I’m excited. This swingy tempo is loose and jangly. JahQues sings and raps on this one-- painting pictures of wise old women, pastors, and yesteryear imagery. We’re onto something here. Songs like these are the little nuggets of goodness that keep club crawlers meandering from bar to bar in Atlanta’s East Villagy neighborhoods.
- Ayanna Guyhto


Discography


Photos

Bio

Established in the Summer 2011 in Snellville a city twenty minutes east of Atlanta, GA. (((Soultrap))) features Hip Hop/Neo Soul Lyricist JahQues and a collection of some of the best musicians on the Atlanta music scene. Bass, keys, drums, and guitar with two amazing vocalist all together create a vibe a nuance of sound, imagination and rhythm that is unique, raw and explosive.