St. Boheme
Gig Seeker Pro

St. Boheme

| SELF

| SELF
Band Folk Alternative

Calendar

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

The best kept secret in music

Press


"St. Boheme parlays its gypsy-rock success to a seat at premier music event in Austin"

By David Sweeney
February 20, 2007 | For St. Bohème, necessity is the mother of invention . . . of band names.
Two months ago the Logan-based folk quartet was unknown, limited local exposure aside. But after winning Showdown to Slammys on Feb. 10 at the Depot in Salt Lake City, the group has a thousand bucks and a pass to South by Southwest in Austin, Texas. The event is March 9-18.
The band is so new it didn't have a name -- a Showdown requisite. And front-man Beaux Underwood says the group is still formulating musical and professional expectations.
The largest amateur expo in the country offers some food for thought. It's a "golden opportunity" no one in the band saw coming, Underwood said. He entered Slammys seeking only a motivational spark, a popular confirmation to keep the aspiring group on track toward a label.
During spring break, St. Bohème will travel gratis to the 21st annual music and film festival that is defining of Austin's reputation as an underground utopia for contract-hungry newcomers.
"We hope to get in contact with the people who will help us help ourselves help them help us," said percussionist Phil Lefler, referring to the convoluted process of breaking into the recording industry.
Lefler said the band probably won't perform at South by Southwest, though St. Bohème is pushing for an invitation to play. Still, bands that don't make the invitation-only line-up can usually find a nighttime venue, he said. Austin boasts hundreds of bars that, during SXSW, will cater especially to the festival crowd, giving exposure to undiscovered talents from across the country.
In addition, St. Bohème will have its name on a Utah compilation album that will be distributed to everyone at SXSW. City Weekly magazine is organizing the compilation.
"The name means as little or as much as you want it to," Underwood said. Inspired by Puccini's La Bohème, St. Bohème wants to reflect the "starve-for-the-arts" sentiments of the characters in the opera. Underwood, who discovered a "self-identity" in St. Bohème, said he doesn't have a full-time job because he ranks music as his highest priority.
Underwood said he was tickled to win the competition. He was especially pleased to be recognized by the production manager of the Depot, who voted for St. Bohème in the final round of the competition and asked the band to play future shows.
"It holds a lot of water in a venue like that," Underwood said of the distinction.
Lefler credited the large Logan turnout in helping St. Bohème win a competition headlined by Salt Lake City bands with a "home-field advantage." The final round also featured Medicine Circus, Alex Boye and The Rubes.
"We have amazing friends," Lefler said.
St. Bohème plays a distinct cross-genre brand of alternative-folk that incorporates mandolin, accordion and mallet percussion. Lefler lightly pedals a concert bass drum he found secondhand -- a remnant of a 1920s marching band.
The band's gypsy-rock flavor is stylistically flexible, though pinning down a singular sound is difficult. Bill Hepworth, the band's upright-bassist, jokingly asked the Depot audience to help classify the music.
Hepworth says the band derives its theatrical stage presentation from the visually striking lounge music popularized in the Paris arts district of Montmartre near the turn of the century. Aping Bohemian cabaret style, the band takes a multimedia approach to the arts. Underwood, garbed at the Salt Lake City performance in a plain white shirt, hat and suspenders, had all the accoutrements of a leading man from a '50s musical.
After the first round of Showdown to Slammys, Hepworth thought the band's high-maintenance act had backfired.
"I thought, 'I hate this. We did so bad,'" Hepworth said after multiple sound production problems seemed to remove St. Bohème from the running.
Hundreds of voters apparently thought otherwise. St. Bohème will next perform 7 p.m. Friday in the Taggart Student Center at a benefit concert organized by the Utah State Independent Music Club and Aggies for Africa. The event costs $4.
- Hard News Cafe


"St. Boheme parlays its gypsy-rock success to a seat at premier music event in Austin"

By David Sweeney
February 20, 2007 | For St. Bohème, necessity is the mother of invention . . . of band names.
Two months ago the Logan-based folk quartet was unknown, limited local exposure aside. But after winning Showdown to Slammys on Feb. 10 at the Depot in Salt Lake City, the group has a thousand bucks and a pass to South by Southwest in Austin, Texas. The event is March 9-18.
The band is so new it didn't have a name -- a Showdown requisite. And front-man Beaux Underwood says the group is still formulating musical and professional expectations.
The largest amateur expo in the country offers some food for thought. It's a "golden opportunity" no one in the band saw coming, Underwood said. He entered Slammys seeking only a motivational spark, a popular confirmation to keep the aspiring group on track toward a label.
During spring break, St. Bohème will travel gratis to the 21st annual music and film festival that is defining of Austin's reputation as an underground utopia for contract-hungry newcomers.
"We hope to get in contact with the people who will help us help ourselves help them help us," said percussionist Phil Lefler, referring to the convoluted process of breaking into the recording industry.
Lefler said the band probably won't perform at South by Southwest, though St. Bohème is pushing for an invitation to play. Still, bands that don't make the invitation-only line-up can usually find a nighttime venue, he said. Austin boasts hundreds of bars that, during SXSW, will cater especially to the festival crowd, giving exposure to undiscovered talents from across the country.
In addition, St. Bohème will have its name on a Utah compilation album that will be distributed to everyone at SXSW. City Weekly magazine is organizing the compilation.
"The name means as little or as much as you want it to," Underwood said. Inspired by Puccini's La Bohème, St. Bohème wants to reflect the "starve-for-the-arts" sentiments of the characters in the opera. Underwood, who discovered a "self-identity" in St. Bohème, said he doesn't have a full-time job because he ranks music as his highest priority.
Underwood said he was tickled to win the competition. He was especially pleased to be recognized by the production manager of the Depot, who voted for St. Bohème in the final round of the competition and asked the band to play future shows.
"It holds a lot of water in a venue like that," Underwood said of the distinction.
Lefler credited the large Logan turnout in helping St. Bohème win a competition headlined by Salt Lake City bands with a "home-field advantage." The final round also featured Medicine Circus, Alex Boye and The Rubes.
"We have amazing friends," Lefler said.
St. Bohème plays a distinct cross-genre brand of alternative-folk that incorporates mandolin, accordion and mallet percussion. Lefler lightly pedals a concert bass drum he found secondhand -- a remnant of a 1920s marching band.
The band's gypsy-rock flavor is stylistically flexible, though pinning down a singular sound is difficult. Bill Hepworth, the band's upright-bassist, jokingly asked the Depot audience to help classify the music.
Hepworth says the band derives its theatrical stage presentation from the visually striking lounge music popularized in the Paris arts district of Montmartre near the turn of the century. Aping Bohemian cabaret style, the band takes a multimedia approach to the arts. Underwood, garbed at the Salt Lake City performance in a plain white shirt, hat and suspenders, had all the accoutrements of a leading man from a '50s musical.
After the first round of Showdown to Slammys, Hepworth thought the band's high-maintenance act had backfired.
"I thought, 'I hate this. We did so bad,'" Hepworth said after multiple sound production problems seemed to remove St. Bohème from the running.
Hundreds of voters apparently thought otherwise. St. Bohème will next perform 7 p.m. Friday in the Taggart Student Center at a benefit concert organized by the Utah State Independent Music Club and Aggies for Africa. The event costs $4.
- Hard News Cafe


"Logan's St. Boheme (and their fans) win the night at The Depot"

Bill Frost: This year, the ultimate winner of City Weekly’s annual Showdown battle o’ the bands (for an expense-paid trip to Austin’s South by Southwest Music Conference in March) was chosen strictly by The People...

...St. Boheme, a Logan band of facial-hair enthusiasts who’d apparently brought most of northern Utah with them. The foursome, all acoustic instruments and ’40s ragamuffin threads, came across as a collegiate Soggy Bottom Boys or Devotchka without the rainbow of ethnic influences. For such a new group (three months old, they say), St. Boheme know how to put on an impassioned show and work a crowd—and it didn’t hurt that each song was more tuneful and memorable than the last. They were the quietest band of the night (probably the quietest band to ever make it to the Showdown Finals), but St. B easily had the loudest fans.... - Salt Lake City Weekly


"Logan's St. Boheme (and their fans) win the night at The Depot"

Bill Frost: This year, the ultimate winner of City Weekly’s annual Showdown battle o’ the bands (for an expense-paid trip to Austin’s South by Southwest Music Conference in March) was chosen strictly by The People...

...St. Boheme, a Logan band of facial-hair enthusiasts who’d apparently brought most of northern Utah with them. The foursome, all acoustic instruments and ’40s ragamuffin threads, came across as a collegiate Soggy Bottom Boys or Devotchka without the rainbow of ethnic influences. For such a new group (three months old, they say), St. Boheme know how to put on an impassioned show and work a crowd—and it didn’t hurt that each song was more tuneful and memorable than the last. They were the quietest band of the night (probably the quietest band to ever make it to the Showdown Finals), but St. B easily had the loudest fans.... - Salt Lake City Weekly


"St. Boheme, "LOVE, LOVE, LOVE""

Not many Salt Lakers were familiar with Logan's St. Boheme before City Weekly's Showdown to the SLAMMY's competition last month. They won, by the way, and there's this rumor going around that the band is only 3 months old. They look like a better-dressed Dexy's Midnight Runners, and they sound like Tom Waits, Iron & Wine and The Shins, if you can imagine that. I've been playing "LOVE, LOVE LOVE," but I personally love, love, LOVE "The Only Thing That Stays the Same is Change." It's a melancholic, beautiful song that sounds like it should be in Garden State 2. And they're incredible live too; clubs are already asking me who they are and probably my peeps here at City Weekly as well.

Portia Early, X96 dj. - SL City Weekly


"St. Boheme, "LOVE, LOVE, LOVE""

Not many Salt Lakers were familiar with Logan's St. Boheme before City Weekly's Showdown to the SLAMMY's competition last month. They won, by the way, and there's this rumor going around that the band is only 3 months old. They look like a better-dressed Dexy's Midnight Runners, and they sound like Tom Waits, Iron & Wine and The Shins, if you can imagine that. I've been playing "LOVE, LOVE LOVE," but I personally love, love, LOVE "The Only Thing That Stays the Same is Change." It's a melancholic, beautiful song that sounds like it should be in Garden State 2. And they're incredible live too; clubs are already asking me who they are and probably my peeps here at City Weekly as well.

Portia Early, X96 dj. - SL City Weekly


Discography

Demo material for now. We will be in the studio as soon as we can afford it.

Photos

Feeling a bit camera shy

Bio

St. Boheme mixes style, grace and energy to produce
a poignant and penetrating sound that entrances its
audience from the start and holds their attention
until the final note of the performance.
Their tall glass of unique sound pours from a pitcher
of mixed influences: bossa nova, folk, rock, gypsy,
jazz, bluegrass, and on. By skillfully braiding these
various genres, they create a sublime and bewitching
sound at once unique and accessible to a mixed variety
of listeners.
The live performance of St. Boheme is one not to be
forgotten. Their captivating charm and endemic energy
quickly create a personal relationship with their
audience, and when the show is over one feels that
they have become intimate acquaintences with the
performing bohemians. The band's instrumentation
(pretty guitars, upright bass, concertina,
glockenspiel, mandolin, banjo and marching band drum)
also make for a visually enticing and highly memorable
pageant. The hopeful songs are a window to the heart
of these troubadours, whose body is headed with
gypsy-rock movers and freckled with porceline pearls,
as calm and clear as they are captivating and sincere.
St. Boheme has the undeniable talent of real
musicians coupled with the unavoidable and magnetic
charm of the best of performers.