Steel Audrey
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Steel Audrey

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada | SELF

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada | SELF
Band Folk Americana

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Jan
26
Steel Audrey @ STREAMING CAFE (www.streamingcafe.net)

Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada

Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada

Nov
11
Steel Audrey @ Jay Bowcott Residence T1B 3M3

Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada

Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada

Nov
10
Steel Audrey @ UBU Lounge

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Music

Press


"The great thing about a debut album is that you have time to prepare. We’ve had a few years to hone these songs and were able to choose the strongest ones that told the most cohesive story. We really wanted to show how the continuation of seasons is much like the ebb and flow of life, and that time runs out for all. The characters (on this album) have fallen on hard times, and are in the twilight of their lives. We chose to bookend the album with two very different renditions of the same song: Sunshine Hill (Summer) & Sunshine Hill (Winter) symbolizing this recurring relinquishment that is apparent throughout.” - Derek Kehler (Steel Audrey) - Vancouver Weekly


"The great thing about a debut album is that you have time to prepare. We’ve had a few years to hone these songs and were able to choose the strongest ones that told the most cohesive story. We really wanted to show how the continuation of seasons is much like the ebb and flow of life, and that time runs out for all. The characters (on this album) have fallen on hard times, and are in the twilight of their lives. We chose to bookend the album with two very different renditions of the same song: Sunshine Hill (Summer) & Sunshine Hill (Winter) symbolizing this recurring relinquishment that is apparent throughout.” - Derek Kehler (Steel Audrey) - Vancouver Weekly


Geographically in Canada, alt-country/roots music is usually found in one of two places: the prairies or Ontario. It was somewhat surprising, then, to find out about Steel Audrey, a Vancouver-based band who has put out a surprisingly strong first EP.

When you examine the band’s biography, though, you’ll find out that front man Derek Kehler actually grew up in a small prairie town. You can certainly hear the prairies in this EP, particularly in some of the more sombre tracks on this album.

One thing that always make a good roots recording is songs full of memorable characters. Steel Audrey delivers amply on that front, with people like Pocketwatch Patrick, a mysterious gunman in New Mexico and a beat-up hobo with an alcohol addiction. If these characters don’ necessarily sound like the most cheery characters you wouldn’t be wrong, but I’ll get to that.

Before these characters come in, the EP starts off with “Sunshine Hill (Summer).” The song, as the title might imply, is one full of joy. This is achieved thanks to the constant stomping and clapping, the featured sound of the ukulele and some great group vocals. Then we enter the world of the aforementioned “Pocketwatch Patrick,” which starts at first as a mournful melody before picking up quite a bit by the end.

“Silver City” takes up the tale of the mysterious gunman. If you follow along to the area references, you might be able to figure out who the gunman is before his name is revealed at the end of the song. It’s also a pretty sad song, and it begins to show that the EP won’t be getting even remotely as happy as the first song.

“Beat Up Old Hobo” is most definitely the most badass song on the EP. Kehler’s voice is extra powerful and raspy here as he details the life of the hobo from childhood to old age. It’s not a pretty picture, but then, life never is. “Fears of my Father” is straight-up sorrow, and it sets up the last song well.

“Sunshine Hill (Winter)” is the complete opposite of its summer counterpart; the melody is just as beautiful but this time extremely sad. Summer is always the season associated with good times; winter is usually season of bad times. Such is the case with this song. The line “I’ve lost romances by taking stances” is also included in the summer version of the song but sounds extremely depressing here. It’s a bleak ending to the EP, but it works.

However depressing the EP may be, it’s a very strong first effort from this obviously talented band. This EP is available for streaming and/or purchase from Bandcamp.

Top Tracks: “Sunshine Hill (Summer)”; “Beat Up Old Hobo”

Rating: Proud Hoot (Really Good) - Gray Owl Point


Geographically in Canada, alt-country/roots music is usually found in one of two places: the prairies or Ontario. It was somewhat surprising, then, to find out about Steel Audrey, a Vancouver-based band who has put out a surprisingly strong first EP.

When you examine the band’s biography, though, you’ll find out that front man Derek Kehler actually grew up in a small prairie town. You can certainly hear the prairies in this EP, particularly in some of the more sombre tracks on this album.

One thing that always make a good roots recording is songs full of memorable characters. Steel Audrey delivers amply on that front, with people like Pocketwatch Patrick, a mysterious gunman in New Mexico and a beat-up hobo with an alcohol addiction. If these characters don’ necessarily sound like the most cheery characters you wouldn’t be wrong, but I’ll get to that.

Before these characters come in, the EP starts off with “Sunshine Hill (Summer).” The song, as the title might imply, is one full of joy. This is achieved thanks to the constant stomping and clapping, the featured sound of the ukulele and some great group vocals. Then we enter the world of the aforementioned “Pocketwatch Patrick,” which starts at first as a mournful melody before picking up quite a bit by the end.

“Silver City” takes up the tale of the mysterious gunman. If you follow along to the area references, you might be able to figure out who the gunman is before his name is revealed at the end of the song. It’s also a pretty sad song, and it begins to show that the EP won’t be getting even remotely as happy as the first song.

“Beat Up Old Hobo” is most definitely the most badass song on the EP. Kehler’s voice is extra powerful and raspy here as he details the life of the hobo from childhood to old age. It’s not a pretty picture, but then, life never is. “Fears of my Father” is straight-up sorrow, and it sets up the last song well.

“Sunshine Hill (Winter)” is the complete opposite of its summer counterpart; the melody is just as beautiful but this time extremely sad. Summer is always the season associated with good times; winter is usually season of bad times. Such is the case with this song. The line “I’ve lost romances by taking stances” is also included in the summer version of the song but sounds extremely depressing here. It’s a bleak ending to the EP, but it works.

However depressing the EP may be, it’s a very strong first effort from this obviously talented band. This EP is available for streaming and/or purchase from Bandcamp.

Top Tracks: “Sunshine Hill (Summer)”; “Beat Up Old Hobo”

Rating: Proud Hoot (Really Good) - Gray Owl Point


For those of you that are seeking out a few more notes of truth and just that many more words of wisdom, I recommend Steel Audrey.

However, it won’t be enough to merely press play and go about your daily routine. The first listening experience of Steel Audrey’s self-titled EP should be one of adventure and renewal. I recommend you and your lover each share an ear bud and press up against each other while a roaring fire lights up an endless sky and the sound of the waves and the darkness that surrounds them brings you deeper and deeper into a…

…I unfortunately did not have that first listening experience. My experience began on a run at quarter-to-midnight on a Wednesday. It wasn’t as epic as what I suggest you experience but man did it get me going.

The album starts out with a track named “Sunshine Hill” (the summer version). It tells the story of a man that becomes master of his own destiny. He has ‘skills in these bones’ but the ‘tendons will not hold’. He argues that he in fact will cultivate these ‘skills’ or ‘talents’ on what author Derek Kehler later abstractly juxtaposes as a park bench (maybe humanity?) on Sunshine Hill (possibly the hereafter?).

While I don’t like to read into lyrics too often, as I personally believe that they are part of a conversation that happens between reader and listener and are constantly changing and are never just one static expression, I thought I’d give my two cents.

It’s really that type of album though. It’s the type of record where you want to read in. You don’t want to just sit idly bye and be told by some random over-thinker (that’s me) what to take from Steel Audrey. You want to make it your own and seek out your own message amongst that entire abstract and beautifully written lyric.

Steel Audrey’s self-tilted album is not a well formulated after thought. It’s not just Americana for the sake of being Americana or Canadiana for the sake of being Canadiana. Steel Audrey has mixed just the right amount of abstraction with just the right amount of insight. It is quite beautiful and has become one of my top albums of the year.

Kehler then goes on to tell an amazingly well researched and articulated tale in his song of *spoiler* Billy the Kid (sorry readers). There is a low rumble to Kehler’s narration. He is captivating. He makes you want to go ‘300 miles south of Sante Fe’ as the track “Silver City” screams out.

Please make your way through the journey that is Steel Audrey.

The Debut EP will be Available July 3rd. You can learn more about them at http://steelaudrey.com/ - Vancouver Weekly


For those of you that are seeking out a few more notes of truth and just that many more words of wisdom, I recommend Steel Audrey.

However, it won’t be enough to merely press play and go about your daily routine. The first listening experience of Steel Audrey’s self-titled EP should be one of adventure and renewal. I recommend you and your lover each share an ear bud and press up against each other while a roaring fire lights up an endless sky and the sound of the waves and the darkness that surrounds them brings you deeper and deeper into a…

…I unfortunately did not have that first listening experience. My experience began on a run at quarter-to-midnight on a Wednesday. It wasn’t as epic as what I suggest you experience but man did it get me going.

The album starts out with a track named “Sunshine Hill” (the summer version). It tells the story of a man that becomes master of his own destiny. He has ‘skills in these bones’ but the ‘tendons will not hold’. He argues that he in fact will cultivate these ‘skills’ or ‘talents’ on what author Derek Kehler later abstractly juxtaposes as a park bench (maybe humanity?) on Sunshine Hill (possibly the hereafter?).

While I don’t like to read into lyrics too often, as I personally believe that they are part of a conversation that happens between reader and listener and are constantly changing and are never just one static expression, I thought I’d give my two cents.

It’s really that type of album though. It’s the type of record where you want to read in. You don’t want to just sit idly bye and be told by some random over-thinker (that’s me) what to take from Steel Audrey. You want to make it your own and seek out your own message amongst that entire abstract and beautifully written lyric.

Steel Audrey’s self-tilted album is not a well formulated after thought. It’s not just Americana for the sake of being Americana or Canadiana for the sake of being Canadiana. Steel Audrey has mixed just the right amount of abstraction with just the right amount of insight. It is quite beautiful and has become one of my top albums of the year.

Kehler then goes on to tell an amazingly well researched and articulated tale in his song of *spoiler* Billy the Kid (sorry readers). There is a low rumble to Kehler’s narration. He is captivating. He makes you want to go ‘300 miles south of Sante Fe’ as the track “Silver City” screams out.

Please make your way through the journey that is Steel Audrey.

The Debut EP will be Available July 3rd. You can learn more about them at http://steelaudrey.com/ - Vancouver Weekly


Discography

Steel Audrey (Self-titled EP) - 2012

Photos

Bio

A bare-knuckle boxer with a soft side - that’s Steel Audrey.

The Vancouver-based americana/folk rock trio (influenced by The Avett Brothers, Johnny Cash and Ryan Adams) can go from powerful and raucous in one moment to melodic and sorrowful the next. Singing embellished tales of seedy characters set to a gritty and energetic live performance; their blue-collar origins are evident in both their narrative and delivery. Whether past or present, their stories give voice to the oppressed, the dark horse, and the downtrodden.

An evolution of Derek Kehler’s self-titled solo work, Steel Audrey expresses a way of life now past; one which is rooted in the Canadian prairies, on a small-town farm where he grew up. The songs on their latest album are a collection of stories that have been crafted over the years through performances and collaborations with other songwriters and troubadours.

2010 was significant for Steel Audrey – it represents the transition from solo folk musician to folk rock trio, when both Derek’s wife, Rachele, and Krista Lehman contributed their uniquely distinct talents to the band: Rachele brought her ethereal soprano voice, penchant for old instruments (accordion and concertina) and the impressive ability to sing, play accordion and stomp a kick drum at the same time; Krista, her sultry alto vocal and propensity for the harmonica and all things bluesy.

Steel Audrey has also been known to include other musicians for live shows whenever the opportunity presents itself, filling out their sound with instruments such as electric guitar, lapsteel, bass and drums.

In late 2011 they began recording with award-winning producer Matthew Rogers of Neighbourhood Productions (C.R. Avery, Mark Berube, Adrian Glynn), and then released their debut self-titled EP on July 3, 2012.

In September 2012, they embarked on the first of three successful western Canadian tours, in support of their recently released album.

Early 2013 will find Steel Audrey back in the studio, writing and recording their first full-length album which is set to be released in later that year.