Sunday Recovery
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Sunday Recovery

London, England, United Kingdom

London, England, United Kingdom
Band Rock Alternative

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It is exciting to hear their individual sounds slot in so well with each other; satisfying like that perfect game of Tetris. This tight knit team of contrasting talent allows for a sound that, despite any feeling of Eurovision cheesiness tingling in the back of your mind, allows them to be taken more seriously in
in terms of musicians.
- Live Music Scene


Italian Alt / Prog Rock band Sunday Recovery were formed in 2009, and their debut album “Coma” has one them some ardent fans, amongst them Porcupine Tree’s bass player Colin Edwin. In fact Edwin is such a fan he agreed to do contribute to the tracks “In Front of You” and “Side C”. There’s an orchestral feel to some of the tracks, unsurprising given they were penned by Italy’s Gianluca Cucchiara, whose collaboration with Mirko Pertini and Fabio Staffieri lay the foundation for Sunday Recovery.


Nice vocal texture to Mirko’s voice, but there are times he just forces it just a bit too much (such as the second track “I Know Better”), but when he’s a little more relaxed there’s a tint of Chris Rea type vocal styling such as that on the oddly jazzy feeling track of “In Front of You” (despite the Dio type guitar riff midway).

There’s some nice guitar work from Staffieri, never over complicated or overpowering, precisely delivering some almost Lifeson / Petrucci type guitar riffs, and Fabio Testaferrata is totally comfortable in swinging the beat. The quartet work extremely well together, but they’re not afraid of bringing in other additional elements, case in point the lovely strings at the start of “Press Play On Tape”, with subtle complimentary acoustic guitar work.

Coma is an unusual combination, involving a number of different talents in the song writing process, but nevertheless the end result is a slick professional presentation with an overall quite melancholic vibe to it. It‘s certainly a promising debut album from Sunday Recovery. - The Jitty


Alt-rock, eh. The alt part of that usually means shite, and the rock part can only be ironic, due to a severe lack of the rawk. Which is why the world is full of bands utterly devoid of talent or meaning. Say hello to Radiohead, Elbow, Athlete, Arsehole, and all the others who should be beaten about the head with the guitars they make a mockery of. Now say hello to the Italian entry in the Eurokeech contest.

Formed in 2009 when main composer Gianluca Cucchiara began working with singer Mirko Petrini and guitar player Fabio Staffieri, they were later joined by drummer Fabio Testaferrata and bass player Emanuele Nazzaro, before setting up camp in the recording studio to set about recording this début album. With world domination the aim, they worked with lyricist Andrew James Whelan on a few tracks to ensure that the international market could sing along to the choruses, while the rain pours down on a festival field.

And there is absolutely no reason why the world should not be theirs. They've got the slow-fast-slow-here comes the bridge - swell to an epic finish template down pat, and there are more than enough Radioheady bits to keep the serious rock press happy while the girls get weepy and the lads get beery. If they make a windswept video for 'Lost And Gone', and get some serious MTV Rocks / Q video plays, then it should easily be a chart breaker for them.

Over on the arty side, they can channel a wee bit Muse on the likes of 'In Front of You' and 'Side C', both of which happen to feature some guest bass from Porcupine Tree's Colin Edwin. They walk the fine line between populism and art-rock, but never steer to far away from crowd pleasing. If you're a Londoner, you can make up your own mind, when they play some Autumn shows dahn Lahndan way. - Zeitgeist


Right I am going to do something I’ve been trying to avoid with reviews of late and that’s write in the first person – go on check through the other reviews I’ve written as they are second person or even third person in the cases of the introduction to the reviews. So why pray tell has it come to this I hear you cry?

There is of course the argument that all reviews, no matter how they are written are subjective and as I’m not really writing (typing to be accurate) some universal truth, then to a degree why should I continue in the third person? I know I’m trying to be impartial, to try and regal to you the reader what I can hear, more so than whether I enjoy it or not and maybe I’m wrong, but I’ve learnt that it is possible to write reviews of music in a fair, balanced manner and which isn’t to my liking, but may well be to others who appreciate that genre more.

Enough waffling though, for this one review I’ve dropped the second person as for me this has been a personal journey. In fact it has been so personal that I can’t do justice to the review without making this equally as personal.

Now within my music collection I have Super Furry Animals Mwng and plenty of Sigur Ros and what links these albums is that they are written in the language of the country where the band hails from. For the pedants out there Sigur Ros do at times use a made up language for their songs, but it is based on their Icelandic language so still counts. This is not to say that all musicians need to write in their mother tongue, but there is sometimes a problem when you attempt to sing in English when your first language isn’t English.

To some degree the problem of European bands singing in English is that the Eurovision Song Contest had labelled music of that ilk to be almost classed as kitsch with a niche following. This is the biggest hurdle that Italian rock band Sunday Recovery have to face when trying to break the English speaking market and the reason why I have lived with this album for so long. It has grown on me over the weeks to a stage where I can appreciate the music, maybe others will find it easier to immediately find that hook which drags them in, but for me it has taken some time to get to this stage.

Sunday Recovery already have a substantial following in Italy, have built up a decent reputation and are now embarking on trying to crack the British market. Ironic really when our focus is on bands who can crack America, it is sometimes forgotten that there are bands who see breaking into the British music market as an important developmental step. Formed back in 2009 when Gianluca Cucchiara (composer), Mirko Petrini (vocals) and Fabio Staffieri (guitar) began working together and added Fabio Testaferrata (drums) and Emanuele Nazzaro (bass) to form Sunday Recovery. The band have worked with lyricist Andrew James Whelan and also Porcupine Tree bassist Colin Edwin to create Coma, an album that the band hope will give them enough momentum to grow beyond their Italian roots.

On first listen to Sunday Recovery’s debut album Coma there are huge swathes of memories of the German rock act Scorpions, with many rock officionados being taken back to that oft played track Wind of Change, this may well turn many listeners off at this point or excite others and that’s really where Sunday Recovery will live or die by the critical sword.

Overall this is unashamedly full on rock music opening with Private Joke, the slightly muffled vocals being separated from the main theme by durms and guitars. Mirko has a classic rock voice, with a throatyness to the oration of each word, but there is power in there as well. The band themselves come across as a tightly knitted group of individuals who are happy to move between moments of lightness and heavy rock with great skill and aplomb.

I Know Better has a surprising acoustic guitar opening that would not have looked out of place during The Bends era Radiohead, but that lasts about 30 seconds before a guitar licks into place and eventually it all just rocks out. The track does return to the original theme although the drum underneath the acoustic guitar gives more flesh to the phrase and the heavy rocked out moment returns. However, this then allows Fabio to have his solo moment and throw a few shapes around with his guitar. The light and shade moments of I Know Better work well together, although heavy rockers might just want more darker moments to feel truly satisfied.

Title track Coma is more anguished than what has gone before, although whether intentional or not there is a rather irritating distorted sound in the background that I’m not sure is either due to the recording levels being out or a choice of the band. The flatlining sounding ending to Coma is not unexpected, although there’s something sadly lacking in Coma that doesn’t really grab me enough to feel truly satisfied by it.

Now what truly excites me is Young Blood as it is different; opening with a love - Grumpy Rocker


With an obvious eagerness it was suggested that attention was given to the new album from Italian rock band Sunday Recovery sooner rather than later. On hearing Coma, the debut album from the quartet, this slightly less than forceful thought was understandable and appreciated, as Sunday Recovery have recorded a release that shows a very talented and skilful band and one who ooze promises of great things to come. It might not be a complete album in some ways but it is one of the more inspiring and certainly one of the most enjoyable that has seen the light this year so far.

The band formed in 2009 upon the collaboration between composer Gianluca Cucchiara, singer Mirko Petrini and guitarist Fabio Staffieri. Upon the addition of drummer Fabio Testaferrata and bass player Emanuele Nazzaro, the four musicians immediately began work on their debut album. The time and hard work that went into it obvious and clearly seen on the eleven extremely well written and presented tracks that make up Coma. Emotive lyrics and sounds alongside addictive hooks, riffs and engaging melodies sweep from every track ensuring the ear and senses never have a moment to lose interest or be distracted. Lyricist Andrew James Whelan came in to work on the words with Petrini, Staffieri and Tancredi Gaetani to form lyrics that would touch senses outside of their native land as powerfully as for their countrymen. The proof to their success is in a well rounded and powerful album that touches more than just the ear drums.

Sunday Recovery hit the floor running with the opening two tracks ‘Private Joke’ and ‘I Know Better’, immediately proving the band and Coma are worthy of your full attention. The first track is a song seemingly in cruise control, the bands confidence and total control of their abilities driving the song forward eagerly bringing striking riffs, a delicious beckoning bass line, and Petrini’s great vocals. Other slower and more emotion fuelled tracks show his voice off to great effect but which ever attack the band bring he adds a touch that means more than just ears react to the songs. The latter of the two songs opens on a neat Alice In Chains sound expanding into an expressive track completed by a sing-a-long chorus that defies you not to join in.

These two tracks are the strongest and most satisfying on the release apart from the irrepressible and addictive track ‘Pornstar’ later on the album with its excellent choppy crashing guitars and a sexy bassline your partner would be jealous of. Because of the fast and powerful start there is a sense of a drop in intensity in the release from then on in, not due to quality but more the positions of certain tracks in the list. The slower, dramatic tracks are often side by side and over a complete listen of Coma it is noticeable and often the urge to break them up by forwarding to a song with more punch then returning is hard to resist.

There are no poor songs on the album though, that should be made clear, the power and emotion of the title track, the heart touching ‘Another Place’, and the pulse driven ‘In Front Of You’ all stir the blood in their varied ways and tempos, each a strong mix amongst themselves and within their own musical walls. The last of the three features Porcupine Tree bassist and fan Colin Edwin, as does also ‘Side C’, bringing a different flavour to their mix.

Listed influences for the band and others mentioned as references include the likes of Porcupine Tree, Muse, Manic Street Preachers and Radiohead and all can be heard in different degrees at times but the one band that really comes over is Poets Of The Fall. Many times as Coma played one could hear parts that would find a ready home in the Finnish bands songbook and vice versa to be fair.

Coma is released on October 3rd via Mazepa Records and really that day should only consist of finding it and listening intently so you can discover the promise and joy that is Sunday Recovery.

RingMaster 08/09/2011

- Ring Master


SUNDAY RECOVERY 'Coma' Mazepa Records www.mazeparecords.com

Formed back in 2009 by the band's main composer Gianluca Cucchiara with vocalist Mirko Petrini and guitarist Fabio Cucchiara. Porcupine Tree's bass player Colin Edwin also guests on two songs as he was an early fan of the band.

This album will be of interest to fans of Porcupine Tree (for the intricate arrangements on some songs), the Manic Street Preachers (lyrically) and Pearl Jam (for the agression particulary on 'Private Joke').

'Lost And Gone' is one of those understated numbers, mainly piano, acoustic guitar and vocals, that bands in the progressive music fiedl do so well. 'Pornstar' has the crossover appeal to make daytime radio despite its lyrical content.

Hopefully this album will get the exposure and buzz it deserves as it has the chance to appeal to fans of the aforementioned bands. ****

Review by Jason Ritchie - Get Ready To Rock


Sunday Recovery are proof that first impressions aren’t necessarily correct. Looking at the very professional CD casing with its arty imagery I was under the illusion that the Editor was again attempting to expand my musical tastes into areas it’s successfully avoided for the last 30 years. A box set of Europop favourites on its way right now, young man… Ed.

But instead of some pretentious bleepy pop pap, the opening track ‘Private Joke’ hits you with a meaty, bass heavy sound with some of the best vocals out there. This Italian bands press blurb states they pay close attention to song craft and for once the marketing people are right on the money. Their strength lies in the lyrics and vocal talents of Mirko Petrini matched with some deeply dark bass lines and guitar riffs to produce a sound that really hits home.

As the album rolls through track after track, you get a cacophony of reality driven songs that cover everyday issues and delivered with emotion and determination that puts them firmly into the intellectual end of the rock spectrum along with the likes of Muse and Porcupine Tree, whose bass player contributed on the tracks ‘In front of you’ and ‘Side C’.

The album sound descends into more melodic sounds at time on ‘Press Play On Tape’ but the true strength of the album comes with the more hard hitting tracks including the opener ‘Private Joke’ or the Muse sound infused sounds of ‘Another Place’ but for me ‘In Front Of You’ is the stand out track off the album with its more melodic opening that builds into a seriously crunchy guitar rift.

It reminds me of a darker version of Ed Kowalczyk recent solo album which I also thoroughly enjoyed. Over the years, my weakness for European rock music has lead me to some seriously dodgy listening (most of which I’ve enjoyed) but Sunday recovery deliver so much more with Coma and it’s a definite recommendation for all those people who expect a little more intelligence mixed into their music.

Simon Mulholland - Vanguard online


Sunday Recovery – Coma – Review

BY DAVID MASSEN ON SEPTEMBER 15, 2011
Italian rockers, Sunday Recovery, release their album Coma on 3rd October on Mazepa Records and we just got a copy through the gates of hell. First impressions… Awesome!

The opening track ‘Private Joke’ offers up some beautiful riffs and great lyrics and takes you back to days of Radiohead (The Bends) but for us ends a little too quickly. This album is definitely a summer sounding album and its a shame it wasn’t released earlier, those are the breaks we guess.

The band certainly do this for the love and dynamics of the music, the title track ‘Coma’ is very heartfelt and full of soundscapes like medical heart monitors and synths, a common element throughout the album.

To us this sounds very much like it could be a film soundtrack which gives it a great feel but also unless you fully understand the concept or story behind it, might prove difficult to get into. If you just want something to fill a silence in your head this album does that and a lot more and is certainly worth listening to.

Tracks like ‘Pornstar’ and ‘Side C’ are worth a definitely repeated listening to and overall the album has something to offer most rock fans. The album is polished and clean sounding with even a hint of REM in the vocals. This might not appeal to some people but will most definitely have something for most people on there. Our favourite? Life_sweet.com the last track which made this review worth doing just for that song.

Words: Dave Massen - Rock Industry


Alt-rock, eh. The alt part of that usually means shite, and the rock part can only be ironic, due to a severe lack of the rawk. Which is why the world is full of bands utterly devoid of talent or meaning. Say hello to Radiohead, Elbow, Athlete, Arsehole, and all the others who should be beaten about the head with the guitars they make a mockery of. Now say hello to the Italian entry in the Eurokeech contest.

Formed in 2009 when main composer Gianluca Cucchiara began working with singer Mirko Petrini and guitar player Fabio Staffieri, they were later joined by drummer Fabio Testaferrata and bass player Emanuele Nazzaro, before setting up camp in the recording studio to set about recording this début album. With world domination the aim, they worked with lyricist Andrew James Whelan on a few tracks to ensure that the international market could sing along to the choruses, while the rain pours down on a festival field.

And there is absolutely no reason why the world should not be theirs. They've got the slow-fast-slow-here comes the bridge - swell to an epic finish template down pat, and there are more than enough Radioheady bits to keep the serious rock press happy while the girls get weepy and the lads get beery. If they make a windswept video for 'Lost And Gone', and get some serious MTV Rocks / Q video plays, then it should easily be a chart breaker for them.

Over on the arty side, they can channel a wee bit Muse on the likes of 'In Front of You' and 'Side C', both of which happen to feature some guest bass from Porcupine Tree's Colin Edwin. They walk the fine line between populism and art-rock, but never steer to far away from crowd pleasing. If you're a Londoner, you can make up your own mind, when they play some Autumn shows dahn Lahndan way. - Therocker.co.uk


They are a tight band, and while maintaining an overall feel, offer plenty of variety within each song with definite prog overtones, and after listening to it a few time it did grow on me, and I recognise that for many this will be a very enjoyable album, with good quality songs. SM - CLASSIC ROCK SOCIETY


"SUNDAY RECOVERY - Coma: Wow! That's all I've got to say about this album from Italian quartet 'Sunday Recovery'. These guys certainly know how to rock out in style. I'm in awe. A splendid album which also see's Colin Edwin (Porcupine Tree) playing bass on a number of tracks. There's definitely something very cool about this album. In fact it's been such a good listen I actually forgot to review it! The opening track 'Private Joke' is a killer on an opener if you think that couldn't get any better then give the title track 'Coma' a listen along with 'Young Blood', 'Press Play On Tape', 'Pornstar' and 'Lost And Gone'. This is hard hitting rock music at its best filled with great tunes and originality. The production is amazing as is the packaging! That's all I need to say!" 9.5/10
Street Voice UK - Street Voice UK


Formed back in 2009 by the band's main composer Gianluca Cucchiara with vocalist Mirko Petrini and guitarist Fabio Cucchiara. Porcupine Tree's bass player Colin Edwin also guests on two songs as he was an early fan of the band.

This album will be of interest to fans of Porcupine Tree (for the intricate arrangements on some songs), the Manic Street Preachers (lyrically) and Pearl Jam (for the agression particulary on 'Private Joke'). 'Lost And Gone' is one of those understated numbers, mainly piano, acoustic guitar and vocals, that bands in the progressive music fiedl do so well. 'Pornstar' has the crossover appeal to make daytime radio despite its lyrical content.

Hopefully this album will get the exposure and buzz it deserves as it has the chance to appeal to fans of the aforementioend bands.

****
Jason Ritchie
- GRTR! General Rock Reviews


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Bio

Sunday Recovery formed in 2009. Once a tight unit, the quartet wasted no time in recording their debut album, and the ambitious rock of Coma is the result.
Musically, the band pay close attention to songcraft whilst pushing boundaries with progressive overtones, whilst lyrically the album deals with everyday issues such as love, sex, politics and the environment.
The band secured Porcupine Tree bass player Colin Edwin who contributed to the project by playing bass on the tracks In Front of You and Side C. The band wanted to create an international feel to their debut album, which led them to mix the CD at Sphere Studios in London. The Cd has been mixed by Francesco Cameli and mastered at Metropolis Group by John Davis.
Taking influence from the likes of Colin EdwinÂ’s afformentioned Porcupine Tree, King Crimson and the melodic soundscapes of Muse and The Bends-era Radiohead, Sunday Recovery more than meld a sound of their own. Undeniably a brew that contains as much dark as it ever did light, the band are proving experts in the field of hard hitting rock music.