SuperSonic Lips
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SuperSonic Lips

Dallas, Texas, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2010 | SELF

Dallas, Texas, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2010
Band Rock Indie

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Dec
31
SuperSonic Lips @ Canton Hall

Dallas, Texas, United States

Dallas, Texas, United States

Dec
16
SuperSonic Lips @ Ruins

Dallas, Texas, United States

Dallas, Texas, United States

Nov
18
SuperSonic Lips @ Trees

Dallas, Texas, United States

Dallas, Texas, United States

Music

Press


Don’t call it a comeback! After a whole year of not playing shows, local rock band SuperSonic Lips brought down the house at Deep Ellum’s own Ruins. If they hadn’t mentioned the hiatus, any first time on-looker wouldn’t have even known because of how flawlessly their chemistry is as a band. Vocalist and synth player Yaya, joined by guitarist Saulo, bassist Micky, and drummer Jawdat provided natural, raw and eclectic energy, backed by an exciting light show that made the tiny Ruins stage feel as if it was a bigger venue like House of Blues or the Bomb Factory.

From a semi-crowded room to a packed house by the time SuperSonic Lips took the stage, everyone was having a great time jamming out with this eclectic rock band. They kicked off their set right around midnight and immediately brought the heat to a very chilly night in Dallas. Bringing in people of all ages and cliques, from older metal heads to youthful pop enthusiasts, and even one guy that looked like Crocodile Dundee. They attracted the diversity that encompasses Deep Ellum and had the entire mixed crowd on their feet and moving along with their infectious energy. There couldn’t have been a better place to escape the cold weather on a Saturday night.

If you haven’t heard of SuperSonic Lips before, I recommend that you keep an eye out for them in the upcoming year because they are back and ready to rock all the way to the big stage. If you are a Dallas local that likes fun, catchy rock music, give these guys a listen and keep those eyes peeled for the new album they’ll be releasing in 2019. And be sure to catch one of their live gigs, the professional sound and light design will blow you away. Give them a follow on Instagram or Facebook to stay in the loop so you can catch their next show.

– Lauren Frederick - The Void Report


Beating drums, solid bass, the guitar riffs and a haunting voice, the Supersonic Lips take the stage. “Don’t you know, you are a wicked man,” sings Yaya, Jawdat keeps the drums in constant crescendo, Miguel’s bass reverberates in your chest, Saulo’s guitar goes crazy, and Yaya’s voice explodes. Their sound is different, odd, and raw, their show is energetic, frenzied, and explosive.

When Yaya and Saulo met they immediately realized that they had the same musical ideas, so it was just a matter of time that they came up with a project, the Supersonic Lips were born. It took them about two years to until they found the right pieces, but when Miguel and Jawdat joined them, the puzzle was complete. “We had the idea of the band, six years ago,” explains Yaya, “but it wasn’t until two years ago that we found the perfect combination.” “I met Jawdat about ten years ago, but he doesn’t remember. He was playing with a Metal band in Arlington, ” tells Saulo. “Ever since I saw Miguel playing with a cover band, and I knew I wanted him in my band!” adds Yaya, “eventually, he decided he didn’t want to play covers anymore.”

I never thought I would be singing, writing songs, it just happened
They are as different as they can be, but maybe that’s their secret, each one of them brings a new flavor to the table. “Yaya likes more indie. Jawdat and me,” explains Saulo, “are the metal kids, while Miguel is more into jazz.” You can hear all of those influences in their sounds. Saulo grew up with classic rock, his dad showed him to appreciate rock classics like Queen, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd. “I was five years old when I saw The Wall.” In contrast, Yaya never thought she would be a singer, “I never thought I would be singing, writing songs, it just happened, and people like it!” Miguel started playing in church, while Jawdat’s roots come from metal.

“We are family; we love each other. When we get together we can create a song out of nothing. Music just flows.” Their inspiration sources are also a mix: movies, comics, Nietzsche. Yaya draws a lot of her emotions to write the lyrics, and you can hear it when she performs.

I first saw them performing at the North Texas Latin Showcase a few months ago. At time they were nominated for the DOMA Awards as Best Latin / Tejano Band, but to be honest when I heard their songs, I found nothing particularly Latin or Tejano; they don’t even sign in Spanish. So I had to ask, “Do you identify as Latin music?” “From the moment you are labeled, Latin music, some doors close,” admits Saulo. “We want to play with any bands, that sing in Spanish, English… or French.”

Although they come from a Hispanic background, Saulo is from Monterrey, Miguel from Colombia and both Yaya and Jawdat families have Mexican roots, and they are proud of their heritage, the Supersonic Lips have very clear that they want their music to go further, “We are Omnivorous rock,” sentences Saulo. Dallas musical scene is just the perfect brewing grounds for them, new bands, new venues, and “the best part is that everyone is mixing. We’ve played in shows with indie bands, punk bands, etc.” affirms Saulo.

We will definitively be hearing more of them; they are currently working in a new EP. “There will be some acoustic songs. We are playing with a flamenco sound and for the first time we’ll be signing in Spanish,” announces Yaya. “Our Latin fans have been asking us to sing in Spanish,” says Jawdat. “But we follow what the song asks… If I feel this song has to be in English, I’ll write in English,” reassures Yaya, “this time it feels like Spanish.” They plan on releasing it this year, they are also thinking about touring, but on the meantime, catch their show on April 20th at Three Links and we’ll dance through the night.

What are you currently listening?

Yaya: “A bit of everything, tango, flamenco, rock. Right now Natalia Lafourcade, and cumbia, cumbia always relaxes me.”

Jawdat: “BORNS, La Femme and El Guincho.”

Miguel: “Tame Impala and La MiniTK del Miedo.”

Saulo: “Garbage, Bomba Stereo.” - The Wild Detectives


When SuperSonic Lips took the stage at the Dallas Observer Music Awards showcase this past December, they soaked up every bit of spotlight at the dark Deep Ellum metal bar Reno's Chop Shop. As singer Yaya Lion jumped up and down in a hoodie like a non-pregnant Juno, they became one of the indisputable highlights of the night.

The rest of the band is made up of drummer Jawdat Anguiano, bassist Miguel Santana and guitarist Saulo Ramon, and it's the kind of group you want to stalk and hope to join. SuperSonic Lips was nominated for a DOMA for its third consecutive year in the best Latin/Tejano category. They state adamantly that they're grateful for the recognition — which otherwise consists of autographs requested of Santana, who they say is mistaken for the Mars Volta guitarist with unusual frequency. Yet they don't consider themselves as belonging to that particular genre, as they've previously discussed with Mollie Mollotova.

In fact, SuperSonic Lips' sound is genre-fluid and would take an imaginative sentence to describe adequately. Just when you're satisfied that you've correctly identified their music as a moody punk/rock/pop hybrid, Ramon's guitar psychs the crap out of you. Though there's a Latin influence to tracks like "Affliction Sweetness," they have a joyfully dark aesthetic, like a happy band that's caught an (un-alarming) case of '90s depression. Lion and her group describe the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Metric as their biggest influences, while Ramon offers a clever description: "I call it omnivore rock, because it feeds off everything."

The band came together after being part of the "Spanish rock scene," which they say is comprised of no more than 30 people, and where they all played covers with other bands. "That's what the Spanish crowd wants," says Santana. Dissatisfied with doing covers, Ramon and Lion started their own project in 2010, first by quietly absorbing each other's musical libraries, later by recruiting Anguiano and going through an impressive six bassists. They refer to those members as "the bass player hall of fame," until Santana officially agreed to join after playing their first DOMA. "We were passing around a bottle of Captain Morgan onstage and popped the question after that show," Ramon says. "But we had to get him drunk first."

They named the band SuperSonic Lips to represent the "catchy, in your face" sound they were aspiring toward, and switched from Spanish to English. They describe a slight feeling of backlash upon breaking from that scene, like it was some crossover move like Shakira's. "It was hard to get the Spanish crowds to come to our shows. We don't claim to be a Latin band, we're Hispanic and we have a rock band," Santana states. "We are influenced by 70's salsa bass lines, though."

Ramon was born in Monterey; Santana in Bogota, Colombia. Lion is American of Mexican descent and Anguiano was born in Oregon but raised in Mexico. They say that, privately, they switch back and forth in near-schizophrenic Spanglish. "None of us are politically involved, just informed, in the Latin community," Anguiano says. "We still play Latin shows today." Those include the Indie Rock Latin America mini-fest, and shows with other touring Latin bands like Making Movies and AJ Davila. Still, Anguiano describes some difficulty getting on local bills and festivals. "It's easier to get connected to the Latin shows," he admits.

SuperSonic Lips are very much the golden embryos in the music scene's womb, emerging full of promise and with expectations from their elders, and they've been championed by the local pop beau monde. Their first EP, released this past December, was produced by Son of Stan leader and Grammy winner Jordan Richardson, who raves about them. "I think the results are a great expression of a really relaxed environment. Combining all the styles ... be it modern rock or classic Western-influenced stuff that meets Yaya's incredible sense of melody and being an amazing front woman ... all of this combined with a focus on ass-shaking rhythm, I think made one of the most unique and dynamic releases in all of North Texas."

"That was a turning point," Anguiano says of recording at Electric Barryland Studios with Richardson. "He twisted our minds a little bit and pulled out the best of us."

Ramon says the EP's title, Grey Space, symbolizes the range within the album's themes: "The songs are an eclectic collection of feelings. Like humans have," he says with a laugh. This last New Year's Eve they joined an enviable bill for Ishi's yearly show at Trees, along with Dezi 5 and True Def. They say they're honored "to play with a band with nationwide recognition" and, in turn, Ishi frontman JT Mudd has his expert eye on them. "This is an up-and-coming band I've enjoyed watching progress," Mudd says. "Their raw energy and sound is key. I look forward to seeing what they bring to the music scene."

They've spoken of relocating but are too drawn by the diversity and mixed genres across Dallas shows. "We're really impressed with all the shows with mixed genres. I talk to a lot of people in other states and they don't do that," Anguiano says. Santana concurs: "There's something going on here in Dallas, a good sense of camaraderie," he says. "It's very cool that we are able to play on disparate bills. We play with rap, rock, punk, it's really special. There's so much talent here and it's so awesome to be a part of it right now."

For now, though, the SuperSonic Lips' biggest ambition for the immediate future, other than going on their first tour, is getting nominated again for a DOMA award, but this time in the correct category. Not that there's a category for "Omnivore Rock" — at least not yet. - Dallas Observer


It’s impossible to fit Supersonic Lips into a neat little box, especially when you consider that the band describe themselves as making “dirty alley, acid-trip Tejano music for punks who don’t consider themselves punk.” But even if you can’t find the right words, just know that Supersonic Lips are good. The electronic elements keep the gritty, punky sound fresh and current, along with giving you an excellent soundtrack for your Friday night debauchery. And that’s exactly what a rock band should do. - The Dallas Observer


For a minute there, the stage at Deep Ellum venue Three Links stage felt like it might've been in San Juan, not Dallas.

No, it wasn't when the night's headliners, AJ Davila y Terror Amor, ended its Velvet Undergroud- and Stooges-indebted set with a fierce rendition of its "Noches Negras" single. Actually, it was before that, when the band's frontman namesake joined Johnny Otis, his former Davila 666 bandmate and a current member of Terror Amor, for a performance of their old group's "La Killer Bitch" -- a song that somehow elevated this already swagger-filled performance to an even higher level of revelry.

It was an unadulterated moment of trash punk exuberance -- the kind of showcase that helped spring AJ Davila and his old band into the limelight from its Puerto Rican beginnings in the first place, right back around the turn of the decade. Nostalgic only starts to describe it.

And yet it was just another highlight in a night that was otherwise all-in from start to stop. Earlier in the night, local punks SuperSonic Lips and Sealion set the table well for the charmingly sloppy fury that'd follow.

Kind of amazing for a Wednesday night. - Central Track


On Saturday night at Club Dada, a different flavor reigned supreme. You could see it, your could smell it and you could taste it. But, most of all, you could hear it: "Otra!" the crowd yelled instead of "Encore!" went it wanted more music on this night.

That was the idea. This five-act Indie Rock Latin America showcase featured two local outfits (SuperSonic Lips, Mayta), one from Kansas City (Making Movies) and two from Buenos Aires, Argentina (Chancha Via Circuito, Pommez Internacional), as well as a variety of merchants and food vendors, all of which boasted a clear south-of-the-border appeal.

It was meant to be a truly international affair and it fit that billing: SuperSonic Lips opened the night with its English-language punk; Making Movies utilized some mambo influence in its show; Mayta brought a jazzy aesthetic to its Spanish-language indie rock; Pommez Internacionnal romanced crowds with its spacey sounds; and final performer Chancha via Circuito took the room to another place entirely, infusing his cumbia- and merengue-indebted electronic productions with primal screams and animal sounds.

On the outside patio out back, meanwhile, a set of handmade leather bags stood out from the fashions available for purchase, and, among the many food items up for sale, the melt-in-your-mouth cubanos were the clear favorite.

It all contributed towards the night's rather intimate, friendly and almost familial vibes, as performers local and touring alike mingled with and danced alongside the crowds. But, more than that, it was an embraced-with-open-arms break from the Deep Ellum norm -- and, to that end, something we'd like to see more of, to be frank. - Central Track


Here in the U.S. we love labels. That beer is not just a beer, it's a craft beer. What kind of movie was it? It was an avant-garde, neo-Fellini-esque, dark comedy. And music is no different. Raise your hand if you remember the Krautrock movement of the '70s or the Britpop invasion of the early '90s?

For many South American musicians who migrate to the U.S., simply being from a Latin country automatically garners you that regional title, regardless of your preferred musical genre. And with Dallas' large South American population, it's a situation that many local musicians know well.

"For me it's kind of interesting to have that label for music that has influences from jazz to Cumbia," says Victor "Chino" Rimach, the guitarist for local Latin-folk-rock band Mayta. "They call it Latin because they are from Latin America, which doesn't happen in South America at all. It's sometimes very confusing."

So Rimach has made it a point to try and embrace that often over-simplified (dare we say whitewashed?) mix of cultures by orchestrating the Indie-Rock Latin America showcase at Club Dada this Saturday. Dallas' music scene is, of course, an increasingly progressive melting pot, and with the flood of festivals like 35 Denton and Spillover hitting the area over the coming week thanks to SXSW it's a perfect time to showcase this under-appreciated corner of the scene. The idea is to catch these Latin-based artists before they hit the festival circuit, for a pre-tour event of sorts.

"It's a show that focuses more on alternative Latin-American music -- for those [bands] that are going to South By, that stop in Dallas before." Rimach explains. This is the third (or fourth, depending on who you ask) installment of IRLA, which combines the talents of multiple Latin-influenced musical acts with artisans, fashion designers and various culinary wizards.

The term "Latin", as it relates to music, is one that is used in most places around the world, except South America. The main reason being that there are, like with rock 'n' roll, countless sub-genres within that category, that it would be misleading to refer to certain bands as such.

The problem we, as listeners, run into is the incessant need to hone in on certain, sometimes less relevant, attributes of a band, (ex. ethnic background) and allow that to guide our opinions of their music before we ever give it a chance. By doing so, we tend to limit ourselves within the parameters of our musical comfort zones.

SuperSonic Lips guitarist, Saulo Ramon explains, "When you say 'Latin band,' the thing that comes to mind for a lot of people is Santana. It doesn't necessarily have to be in Spanish, it's just the vibe of the music."

While some may look at this generic label as a roadblock of sorts, drummer Jawdat Anguiano takes a more measured look at things. "I don't think it hinders us musically," he argues. "What it does do is it puts a certain label on us that we feel we don't really fit into."

That being said, both Mayta and the SuperSonic Lips agreed that they are beyond proud of their heritage and acknowledge its influence on the music they play. However, both bands are adamant that the Latin label does not define who they are as musicians.
Citing everything from Afro-Cuban and Cumbia to prog and pyschedelic rock, both bands also reported that Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd and even early Brian Eno were among those who had a heavy impact on their creative styles.

Possibly the most exciting aspect of this Saturday's IRLA show is the fact that while all musical acts share Latin-American roots, they are all so strikingly diverse.

For example, show openers the SuperSonic Lips have a distinct, electro-pop, indie-rock vibe, featuring the Karen-O channeling front-woman Yaya Lion, that is sure to do much more than get the party started. The SuperSonic Lips, with the production help of Son of Stan's Jordan Richardson, will be releasing an EP called Grey Space later this year. (Spoiler Alert: They will be playing many of the new tracks at the IRLA event this weekend.)

Alternatively, Mayta zeroes in on a more traditionally Peruvian, folk-infused, indie-rock format. But while it is sung primarily in Spanish, Mayta's sound transcends language barriers and allows listeners to genuinely understand the music on a much deeper, almost primal level. Oh, and percussionist Bryan Gonzalez can and will rock a theremin.

The other musical acts set to perform at this year's Indie Rock Latin America festival will be coming from well outside the confines of Dallas, making this a great opportunities for locals to appreciate a diverse sampling. Those artists include headliner Chancha Via Circuito and Pommez Internacional (both of whom are from Argentina) as well as Making Movies from Kansas City.

But as the name of the festival itself suggests, the goal is to take some seemingly simple and familiar ideas (like, say, "indie rock") and open doors to a more nuanced understanding of them. Maybe then we'll also appreciate how much more there is to "Latin music" than mere stereotypes.

As Rimach puts it, "It's easier here in the States to just use the label of 'Latin music' to start a good conversation." Here's hoping it works. - Dallas Observer


N/A, it's video and it's in Spanish. - Telemundo


SuperSonic Lips have made being versatile and the eclectic their creative endeavor. They can be described as dance, Latin, and guitar rock all rolled into one package. The result is an act that a layman can enjoy listening to and a music expert will love listening and studying. - Dallas Observer


**TRANSLATED USING GOOGLE**

On the eve of the Dallas Observer Music Awards 26th that will take place this Saturday December 6th. and having as different venues in Deep Ellum venue, the band Supersonic Lips returns for the second time the awards ceremony and according to its members, this year will prize in hand.
"For us it means a great honor and a great responsibility," says Jawdat Anguiano, drummer of the group. "We are very used to getting media attention, then work hard to justify nominations in each concert."

The drummer and music lover also tells us that has simpre had a sweet addiction for music and his involvement with Supersonic Lips in 2014 DOMA has a holistic meaning for him personally.
"Fascinate me! The music scene in Dallas-Fort Worth truly is lovely and this event obviously do their best to have the best local talent. Here those winners are the new proposals, as they are benefiting from the extensive coverage gives the Dallas Observer months before the "Showcase", and care of the thousands of people attending the festival ".
"It should also be noted that compared to other festivals, Domas Showcase has an amazing variety of genres and styles, and all the bands are local (60+). Here you can not find one local band that you like, is bitter. "
According to band members, an independent artist must have available to devote delivery projects as they have to Supersonic Lips spread their music, connect to the local music scene, and participate in events where more people will be found.
"Patience is recommended," said Jawdat as an artist or indie band usually has a lot of creative freedom, but overworked.
"The major labels have lost too much power lately and are very selective about what they want, and our music is a labyrinth of sounds. Perhaps a serious independent label more appropriate in the near future ... we hope. "
And while new bands continue to emerge in the independent music scene in Dallas and existing with extensive experience but often seek to survive, according to Jawdat, you should switch in venues which have a projection to new audience to evolve.
"For an indie band survive in Dallas, must play live. But it's not just about playing, it's about changing things up a bit ... like playing with different bands in different places, with different audiences. Whether on a venue, at a house show, or your aunt taqueria (no kidding! Search "Taqueria Pedritos" on YouTube). "

Before concluding Jawdat told us that in 2015 expect to make a mini tour through southern US among other projects. Supersonic Lips presented on Saturday December 6 in the Green Room in Deep Ellum. Click here to see the entire lineup. - UtopiaDFW


Tossing out the rule book for genre norms, Super Sonic Lips tests the limits of Latin music. With danceable synths, fuzzy guitars, and brooding bass lines- Super Sonic Lips appeals to the new wave of Latin electro pop. The group draws influence from bands like Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Metric, and Muse- featuring mostly English lyrics. Lead singer Yaya Lion's seductive cooing is compelling, yet understated, and could give a lot of Dallas' most prominent pop songstresses a run for their money. They will fit perfectly into their DOMA showcase bill this year. - The Dallas Observer


Eclectic, that’s the best description for the Supersonic Lips sound. A mix of punk guitar, strong beats, melodic synth and powerful vocals, the Dallas based band fights against labels, seeks a broad and diverse public with great results so far.

Beating drums, solid bass, the guitar riffs and a haunting voice, the Supersonic Lips take the stage. “Don’t you know, you are a wicked man,” sings Yaya, Jawdat keeps the drums in constant crescendo, Miguel’s bass reverberates in your chest, Saulo’s guitar goes crazy, and Yaya’s voice explodes. Their sound is different, odd, and raw, their show is energetic, frenzied, and explosive.

When Yaya and Saulo met they immediately realized that they had the same musical ideas, so it was just a matter of time that they came up with a project, the Supersonic Lips were born. It took them about two years to until they found the right pieces, but when Miguel and Jawdat joined them, the puzzle was complete. “We had the idea of the band, six years ago,” explains Yaya, “but it wasn’t until two years ago that we found the perfect combination.” “I met Jawdat about ten years ago, but he doesn’t remember. He was playing with a Metal band in Arlington, ” tells Saulo. “Ever since I saw Miguel playing with a cover band, and I knew I wanted him in my band!” adds Yaya, “eventually, he decided he didn’t want to play covers anymore.”

I never thought I would be singing, writing songs, it just happened
They are as different as they can be, but maybe that’s their secret, each one of them brings a new flavor to the table. “Yaya likes more indie. Jawdat and me,” explains Saulo, “are the metal kids, while Miguel is more into jazz.” You can hear all of those influences in their sounds. Saulo grew up with classic rock, his dad showed him to appreciate rock classics like Queen, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd. “I was five years old when I saw The Wall.” In contrast, Yaya never thought she would be a singer, “I never thought I would be singing, writing songs, it just happened, and people like it!” Miguel started playing in church, while Jawdat’s roots come from metal.

“We are family; we love each other. When we get together we can create a song out of nothing. Music just flows.” Their inspiration sources are also a mix: movies, comics, Nietzsche. Yaya draws a lot of her emotions to write the lyrics, and you can hear it when she performs.

I first saw them performing at the North Texas Latin Showcase a few months ago. At time they were nominated for the DOMA Awards as Best Latin / Tejano Band, but to be honest when I heard their songs, I found nothing particularly Latin or Tejano; they don’t even sign in Spanish. So I had to ask, “Do you identify as Latin music?” “From the moment you are labeled, Latin music, some doors close,” admits Saulo. “We want to play with any bands, that sing in Spanish, English… or French.”

Although they come from a Hispanic background, Saulo is from Monterrey, Miguel from Colombia and both Yaya and Jawdat families have Mexican roots, and they are proud of their heritage, the Supersonic Lips have very clear that they want their music to go further, “We are Omnivorous rock,” sentences Saulo. Dallas musical scene is just the perfect brewing grounds for them, new bands, new venues, and “the best part is that everyone is mixing. We’ve played in shows with indie bands, punk bands, etc.” affirms Saulo.

We will definitively be hearing more of them; they are currently working in a new EP. “There will be some acoustic songs. We are playing with a flamenco sound and for the first time we’ll be signing in Spanish,” announces Yaya. “Our Latin fans have been asking us to sing in Spanish,” says Jawdat. “But we follow what the song asks… If I feel this song has to be in English, I’ll write in English,” reassures Yaya, “this time it feels like Spanish.” They plan on releasing it this year, they are also thinking about touring, but on the meantime, catch their show on April 20th at Three Links and we’ll dance through the night.

What are you currently listening?

Yaya: “A bit of everything, tango, flamenco, rock. Right now Natalia Lafourcade, and cumbia, cumbia always relaxes me.”
Jawdat: “BORNS, La Femme and El Guincho.”
Miguel: “Tame Impala and La MiniTK del Miedo.”
Saulo: “Garbage, Bomba Stereo.” - The Wild Detectives


Discography

Blinded Pleasures
EP, 2017

Track List:

  1. Fool
  2. Let Me Go
  3. Interlude
  4. Lost Dreams
  5. Memories
  6. Lost Dreams

Grey Space
EP, 2015

Track List:
  1. Affliction Sweetness
  2. Wicked Man
  3. Bombs
  4. Runaway
  5. DTTN

Photos

Bio

Founded in Dallas, TX in 2011, SuperSonic Lips have been nominated as “Best Latin Band” by the Dallas Observer four years in a row (2013, 2014, 2015, 2016). Currently, the band consists of founders Yaya Lion (vocals, synths) and Saulo Ramón (guitars, synths), as well as Jawdat Anguiano (drums) and Miguel Santana (bass).

They are known for their upbeat concerts and flexible sound, which has allowed them to perform with a wide range of artists from different genres (Ishi, Blue The Misfit, Sealion, Mayta, Nite, Crocodiles, AJ Davila, Ken South Rock).
In 2015, SuperSonic Lips released their debut EP, “Grey Space.” Recorded and produced by Jordan Richardson (Son of Stan), the EP has received numerous comparisons to the sounds of Yeah Yeah Yeahs, The Strokes, and The Kills. SuperSonic Lips recently took part in Ninkasi Brewing Company’s “Last Band Standing” program (also presented by Spune, Untapped Festival, and Do214) and emerged as winners of the competition; they earned free recording time at Ninkasi Studios in Oregon, as well as a spot in Untapped Festival 2016 alongside TV On The Radio and Gogol Bordello.
“Grey Space” by SuperSonic Lips is available on Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon Music, and CD Baby.

Band Members