Suturee
Gig Seeker Pro

Suturee

New York City, New York, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2014 | INDIE

New York City, New York, United States | INDIE
Established on Jan, 2014
Band Rock Pop

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


"Suturee: A Breath MP3"

Suturee returns with the duo’s now signature bedroom pop on “A Breath”, a newly released single off their forthcoming LP, Skim The Surface. The subtleties off the songs this band creates makes it the perfect title. “A Breath” pushes Suturee forward; harmonies are more in sync, instrumentation dreamier, the rises and wanes of volume more pronounced.

“A Breath” can be considered among the band’s finest works to date. It features a heftier drum beat without breaching the confines of the bedroom. Instruments, too, are more plush. A trumpet accompanies steadfast in the background, while the bass maintains forefront in the rhythm section. The guitar, while not an afterthought, isn’t as dominant as you’d expect.

That’s not to say their prior work was anything to scoff at; it certainly was not. “A Breath” is just a progression forward for Suturee, and a solid one at that. It makes Skim The Surface an album to anticipate highly. - FensePost


"Suturee: A Breath MP3"

Suturee returns with the duo’s now signature bedroom pop on “A Breath”, a newly released single off their forthcoming LP, Skim The Surface. The subtleties off the songs this band creates makes it the perfect title. “A Breath” pushes Suturee forward; harmonies are more in sync, instrumentation dreamier, the rises and wanes of volume more pronounced.

“A Breath” can be considered among the band’s finest works to date. It features a heftier drum beat without breaching the confines of the bedroom. Instruments, too, are more plush. A trumpet accompanies steadfast in the background, while the bass maintains forefront in the rhythm section. The guitar, while not an afterthought, isn’t as dominant as you’d expect.

That’s not to say their prior work was anything to scoff at; it certainly was not. “A Breath” is just a progression forward for Suturee, and a solid one at that. It makes Skim The Surface an album to anticipate highly. - FensePost


"Review: Suturee – Skim The Surface"

Back in 2008, I was given the opportunity to review the debut album from Suturee. Led by two Puerto Ricans, Julian Brau and Rebeccca Adorno, the duo captivated with their insouciant harmonies dovetailing perfectly with arrangements which straddled the boundaries of folk and shoegaze. As befits a group who have a distinctively lazy charm, the follow-up has taken another four years to produce and it sounds like they took their time over it too.
Initially, ‘Void’ seems to continue where the first album left off but now the production is grander and made up of new layers. At the song’s core are jangly guitars and the familiar languid harmonies from the two main protagonists. They may sound effortless and carefree but this belies the clever melodies underpinning the song. ‘Bleak’ builds slowly and gloriously before exploding into an effects-driven finale, whilst Brau and Adorno combine so beautifully for ‘In Spite Of” and ‘To Lend’, it’s hard to think of a pair of male/female vocals being so in tune with each other. Now as a four piece, the group also incorporate brass and strings into their portfolio and even if they lose a little dynamism towards the end of the record, the moodiness they generate is unerringly seductive right up to the command to “calm down now” on final track ‘Fell’.

Suturee have been compared to Beach House amongst others and it’s a favourable connection they have but whereas that band are bullish in their approach to melodrama, Suturee are more introverted in their approach and yet no less effective in delivering the end product. So, definitely a band who have more depth beneath the surface then. - Leonard's Lair


"Review: Suturee – Skim The Surface"

Back in 2008, I was given the opportunity to review the debut album from Suturee. Led by two Puerto Ricans, Julian Brau and Rebeccca Adorno, the duo captivated with their insouciant harmonies dovetailing perfectly with arrangements which straddled the boundaries of folk and shoegaze. As befits a group who have a distinctively lazy charm, the follow-up has taken another four years to produce and it sounds like they took their time over it too.
Initially, ‘Void’ seems to continue where the first album left off but now the production is grander and made up of new layers. At the song’s core are jangly guitars and the familiar languid harmonies from the two main protagonists. They may sound effortless and carefree but this belies the clever melodies underpinning the song. ‘Bleak’ builds slowly and gloriously before exploding into an effects-driven finale, whilst Brau and Adorno combine so beautifully for ‘In Spite Of” and ‘To Lend’, it’s hard to think of a pair of male/female vocals being so in tune with each other. Now as a four piece, the group also incorporate brass and strings into their portfolio and even if they lose a little dynamism towards the end of the record, the moodiness they generate is unerringly seductive right up to the command to “calm down now” on final track ‘Fell’.

Suturee have been compared to Beach House amongst others and it’s a favourable connection they have but whereas that band are bullish in their approach to melodrama, Suturee are more introverted in their approach and yet no less effective in delivering the end product. So, definitely a band who have more depth beneath the surface then. - Leonard's Lair


"Suturee"

A “Suture” is defined as “A stitch or row of stitches holding together the edges of a wound or surgical incision.” Enter Suturee who have “sutured” their hearts to their sleeves with their latest release titled “Skim The Surface.”

Julian Brau and Rebecca Adorno first met in their homeland of Puerto Rico in 2007. Five years later in 2012, both Julian and Rebecca re-located to NYC. With new surroundings and experiences the band began putting together new material along with two new members (Raul Reymundi & Ryan Correira).

The songs carry loads of layers, melodies and heart-felt vocals shared between Julian and Rebecca. The opening track “Void” has a sound reminiscent of the band American Football, as the record progresses new elements are added and the dynamics evolve but never fray. - Figment


"Suturee"

A “Suture” is defined as “A stitch or row of stitches holding together the edges of a wound or surgical incision.” Enter Suturee who have “sutured” their hearts to their sleeves with their latest release titled “Skim The Surface.”

Julian Brau and Rebecca Adorno first met in their homeland of Puerto Rico in 2007. Five years later in 2012, both Julian and Rebecca re-located to NYC. With new surroundings and experiences the band began putting together new material along with two new members (Raul Reymundi & Ryan Correira).

The songs carry loads of layers, melodies and heart-felt vocals shared between Julian and Rebecca. The opening track “Void” has a sound reminiscent of the band American Football, as the record progresses new elements are added and the dynamics evolve but never fray. - Figment


"Suturee: 'Afraid Of Hands'"

Certain albums seem to lend themselves to a particular season. Some bands make music that beautifully accompanies those long, lazy summer days spent in the shade. Other artists, like today's group, Suturee, perfectly compliment the bleakness of winter, even though the band is originally from sunny San Juan, Puerto Rico. Suturee's self-titled debut album is mellow and melodic without aggravating your Seasonal Affective Disorder. Suturee channels the warmth and coziness of an afternoon spent by the fire, sipping hot chocolate while the snow falls.

Like other moody groups (Mojave 3, Adem, A Weather), Suturee makes a languid blend of folk, pop, and shoegaze. The instrumentation is richly textured, but the gently sung vocals of chief members Julian Brau and Rebecca Adorno are the key to the group's appeal. As the band's name implies, Suturee makes music for those who have felt the sting of sutures or encountered "the disease of sound" mysteriously alluded to in the track "Me To Meet." - NPR


"Suturee: 'Afraid Of Hands'"

Certain albums seem to lend themselves to a particular season. Some bands make music that beautifully accompanies those long, lazy summer days spent in the shade. Other artists, like today's group, Suturee, perfectly compliment the bleakness of winter, even though the band is originally from sunny San Juan, Puerto Rico. Suturee's self-titled debut album is mellow and melodic without aggravating your Seasonal Affective Disorder. Suturee channels the warmth and coziness of an afternoon spent by the fire, sipping hot chocolate while the snow falls.

Like other moody groups (Mojave 3, Adem, A Weather), Suturee makes a languid blend of folk, pop, and shoegaze. The instrumentation is richly textured, but the gently sung vocals of chief members Julian Brau and Rebecca Adorno are the key to the group's appeal. As the band's name implies, Suturee makes music for those who have felt the sting of sutures or encountered "the disease of sound" mysteriously alluded to in the track "Me To Meet." - NPR


Discography

Suturee - S/T  2008
Among Friends - 2011
Skim the Surface 2012

Photos

Bio

When Julian Brau and Rebecca Adorno met for the first time it was 2007 in Puerto Rico. The two quickly bonded in music and started working on a project together. Through their effort emerged a highly received self-produced album under the name Suturee. Their murmur-like approach to songwriting made the album dark and expressive, with vocal melodies lead by the two in a truly unique style.

It is now 2013 and a lot has changed since the first album. Julian and Rebecca decided to relocate to New York City. With the change in their lives came a new motive into the creation of a second full-length album. Adding members Ryan Correira and Raul Reymundi with a collaboration of new musical elements, the 4-person band has now become Suturee. The sophomore album titled Skim The Surface is the insight between the groups transition and progression. It is a look into new surroundings, relationships, emotions, truths; the ups and downs we all encounter in our lives that often lend themselves to contradictions. Used as a word that could describe one who is sutured, Suturee brings us ideas of our experiences good and bad, our endurance to reach our goals, the good feelings and the ones we sometimes try to mend. Their outcome is intellectual and thoughtful while still instantly recognizable as a sound only they can bring.

Band Members