Tallulah Rendall
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Tallulah Rendall

London, England, United Kingdom

London, England, United Kingdom
Band Rock Alternative

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This band has not uploaded any videos

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"Next Big Thing"

”This whole product is a testament to the belief that art is a shape shifting goddess with boundless gifts.”
http://wp.me/p4eaZ-du - NBT


"Next Big Thing"

”This whole product is a testament to the belief that art is a shape shifting goddess with boundless gifts.”
http://wp.me/p4eaZ-du - NBT


"Next Big Thing"

”This whole ?product' is a testament to the belief that art is a shape shifting goddess with boundless gifts.”
http://wp.me/p4eaZ-du - NBT


"Music That Demands Attention"

This is music that demands attention, and hopefully won't go ignored by an industry currently over-saturated with mediocrity.' - Nicholas Shaikh


"Madonna's World"

Christopher Ciccone says, “Her music has inspired my art like no one else has in years.” - Ciccone


"Madonna's World"

Christopher Ciccone says, “Her music has inspired my art like no one else has in years.” - Ciccone


"Alive review"

?My only advice is to listen to this beautiful work, to understand the complexity of a female soul and the music she can create.' - Roberta Capuano


"Tallulah Rendall – The Lioness Is Ready To Roar"

Whether performing solo or with her full band…”What comes across live is her all-embracing energy… Her incredible aura and her majestic strength, shows in the command she holds of the stage…”

“Breathy vocals are juxtaposed with strong, almost operatic bursts and she can barely hide her star quality… This is Avant-guard rock/pop at its best” - Richmond Harding


"Tallulah Rendall – The Lioness Is Ready To Roar"

Whether performing solo or with her full band…”What comes across live is her all-embracing energy… Her incredible aura and her majestic strength, shows in the command she holds of the stage…”

“Breathy vocals are juxtaposed with strong, almost operatic bursts and she can barely hide her star quality… This is Avant-guard rock/pop at its best” - Richmond Harding


"This album i a pure dream.."

This album is a pure dream, I have to admit that I’ve never heard the name of Tallulah Rendall before and it’s a shame because this singer songwriter deserves to be as successful as Anna Calvi. Indeed they came from the same music school, but where Anna is dark like Siouxsie, Tallulah is dreaming like Kate Bush, she has got the same kind of grace.

I wanna start from the last song of this remarkable sophomore album titled Alive. Lost on the way cradles the listener with a gently harp and is caressed by Tallulah’s vocals. Luckily she’s different from Florence Welch but they have in common the delicacy and the use of harp that is a fatal weapon paired with those voices.

But Tallulah has also got a rock soul, Alive starts with a smooth guitar, an echo of piano and this shining, powerful but thin voice that plays the melody like an instrument, she starts like Kate Bush to turn into Pj Karvey after a minute.

But she remains Tallulah, she is not a mere copy of other singers, I will be absolutely able to recognize her voice and her music amongst hundreds.

About the songwriting, songs have a linear structure, but it’s the most convenient to show her vocal talent, because instruments are almost on the background, to emerge only when she takes a breath; guitars use clear sounds, there are no electro effects, when the tension grows up the tune usually turns into a rock piece, as Go Bathe into light.

Underground is the jewel of this album, strings give a solemn to touch to her blown voice accompanied by sirens choirs, the song is called underground but I feel under the sea, like I live in a muffled world.

Another quality is performing songs, she’s theatrical like she’s acting it, indeed some songs could be part of a musical, Nothing is over is a perfect example of a melodramatic tune sung with a fragile intensity.

Colorblind could be a single with its dark – dance groove, while Blind like a fool is the first released single and it’s a perfect choice because it’s another face of Rendall’s music, smarter and blinky, with a country vein.

Ghost in the water and Older than the hills are once more a demonstration of her feeling with ethereal sounds, like she’s a nymph running in a forest.

What can I add? My only advice is to listen to this beautiful work, to understand the complexity of a female soul and the music she can create. - Roberta Capuano


"This album i a pure dream.."

This album is a pure dream, I have to admit that I’ve never heard the name of Tallulah Rendall before and it’s a shame because this singer songwriter deserves to be as successful as Anna Calvi. Indeed they came from the same music school, but where Anna is dark like Siouxsie, Tallulah is dreaming like Kate Bush, she has got the same kind of grace.

I wanna start from the last song of this remarkable sophomore album titled Alive. Lost on the way cradles the listener with a gently harp and is caressed by Tallulah’s vocals. Luckily she’s different from Florence Welch but they have in common the delicacy and the use of harp that is a fatal weapon paired with those voices.

But Tallulah has also got a rock soul, Alive starts with a smooth guitar, an echo of piano and this shining, powerful but thin voice that plays the melody like an instrument, she starts like Kate Bush to turn into Pj Karvey after a minute.

But she remains Tallulah, she is not a mere copy of other singers, I will be absolutely able to recognize her voice and her music amongst hundreds.

About the songwriting, songs have a linear structure, but it’s the most convenient to show her vocal talent, because instruments are almost on the background, to emerge only when she takes a breath; guitars use clear sounds, there are no electro effects, when the tension grows up the tune usually turns into a rock piece, as Go Bathe into light.

Underground is the jewel of this album, strings give a solemn to touch to her blown voice accompanied by sirens choirs, the song is called underground but I feel under the sea, like I live in a muffled world.

Another quality is performing songs, she’s theatrical like she’s acting it, indeed some songs could be part of a musical, Nothing is over is a perfect example of a melodramatic tune sung with a fragile intensity.

Colorblind could be a single with its dark – dance groove, while Blind like a fool is the first released single and it’s a perfect choice because it’s another face of Rendall’s music, smarter and blinky, with a country vein.

Ghost in the water and Older than the hills are once more a demonstration of her feeling with ethereal sounds, like she’s a nymph running in a forest.

What can I add? My only advice is to listen to this beautiful work, to understand the complexity of a female soul and the music she can create. - Roberta Capuano


"4 Stars"

'Out on her own label this this album fuses her dreamy self penned songs with subtle embellishments' - Daily Mail review


"4 Stars"

'Out on her own label this this album fuses her dreamy self penned songs with subtle embellishments' - Daily Mail review


"AAA Music"

Part silken Persian, part electric Siamese, Tallulah Rendall is an electro-hearted songstress with an eerie, keening purr that on her ‘Alive’ two-track EP illuminates her spine-tingling musical nous. - Katie H-Halinski


"UNCUT Review"

“Same impudent mix of power and vulnerability as Martha Wainwright” - Nigel Williamson


"UNCUT Review"

“Same impudent mix of power and vulnerability as Martha Wainwright” - Nigel Williamson


"Blind Like A Fool"

a sure-fire hit, and she is definitely among Britain’s as-of-yet undiscovered talent. - Michael Buttigieg


"Blind Like A Fool"

a sure-fire hit, and she is definitely among Britain’s as-of-yet undiscovered talent. - Michael Buttigieg


"Bristol Review"

‘The bare facts – Tallulah Rendall writes songs and plays guitar while she sings them – don’t do justice to the rock’n'roll energy and vision of her work. In her head there’s a stadium and her gutsy music fills it more than adequately’. - The Canteen


"Great Album "Jools Holland""

"Great Album" - Jools Holland


"Great Album "Jools Holland""

"Great Album" - Jools Holland


"Spoonfed - Tallulah performance review"

In this world of homogenised pop and rock, it’s these moments of something a bit different, something with a dollop of good old fashioned British eccentricity, that makes music interesting. - Spoonfed


"Spoonfed - Tallulah performance review"

In this world of homogenised pop and rock, it’s these moments of something a bit different, something with a dollop of good old fashioned British eccentricity, that makes music interesting. - Spoonfed


"Tallulah rendall live"

Tallulah Rendall graced the stage with her band (which featured Jo Quail returning as part of the ensemble). Sadly, I had to leave to catch the last train after two songs, but what I did manage to see was something really special. Backed up by a rock solid four-piece, Tallulah and her band commanded the stage with an assertive presence reminiscent of fem-rock legends such as No Doubt, Skunk Anansie and Alanis Morissette, albeit with slightly less angst and slightly more authority. Vocally, Tallulah is definitely up there with the pros. She has bags of character and presence, and she knows her way around a guitar. And of course it helps that she is stunning.



Musically, Tallulah’s songs are fiercely earnest and intense but also quite reflective. There are many layers to her music both musically and conceptually. With her new EP “Alive” recently released on iTunes, I have no doubt that she will be making big waves on the underground scene. This is music that demands attention, and hopefully won’t go ignored by an industry currently over-saturated with mediocrity.

It was truly a rarity to experience three artists of this calibre in one night - I wanted to grab people in the DJ room next door, and drag them in to show them what they are missing out on. - Never Enough Notes


"AOL listening party with Radiohead"

http://www.music.aol.com/new-releases-full-cds/spinner#/9 - AOL


"Tallulah Rendall 93 Feet East"

Despite an audience consisting of hard-nosed, critical party-loving music aficionados Tallulah blew their minds with her combination of powerful yet feminine stage presence and soulful vocals.

A packed house amongst which those which were not stunned by her stage presence, danced and gravitated to get a better look at someone who will no doubt continue her ascent into the annals of incredible singer-songwriters, the names of which include the likes of Nora Jones and Nina Simone.

Having had her performance pushed back to eleven o’clock Tallulah did not let it affect her as she pumped out a mixture of tracks from her new LP ‘Alive’ and first release ‘Libellus’ with consummate professionalism belying her brevity upon this harsh, unforgiving musical platform.

As the crowd jostled for a better view there was no doubt in anyone’s mind that Tallulah is a talent that never ceases to deliver impressive performances while remaining incredibly adept at creating fresh angles of perspective on her back catalogue.

Not a live show to be missed for the world….. - Guy Waddington - Music Non Stop


"Live Review"

Tallulah Rendall @ The Tabernacle 04.03.11

An icy clear Friday night sky sets the stage for the launch of Tallulah’s second album ‘Alive’ with an audience, amongst which stood both the great and the good of contemporary society.

Amidst the hushed throng, a sublime smattering of musical impresarios all waited breath abaited for Tallulah, fresh from far flung antipodean shores, to caress them with her vocal visage.

Tallulah’s sirenesque lungs did not disappoint, allowing allusions of a young Shirley Bassey to assault soothe, and ooze breathless vocals over huge, self-deprecating orchestral whisperings.

The evening, however short and sweet, still allowed Tallulah time to lay bare her growing maturity in both vocal and lyrical arrangements, thus leaving no shadow of a doubt that Tallulah’s unique spiritual and soulful music will shine on.

And on… - Music Non-stop


"I spy Tallulah"

Oh Tallulah!
Tallulahs tend to be sexy, impassioned things, but this one boasts a mesmeric voice and creative intelligence to boot.

In her new album, ‘Alive’, out 28th March, Tallulah presents an exciting slalom through different creative mediums, proving she’s got much more to offer than just a tight-clad package and blonde bed hair. Miss Rendall’s album is an impressive collaborative feat, in which she has given a dozen artists a different track each to inspire a unique piece of work. The result is a multi-faceted body of work with co-conspirators including Kilford the Music Painter who paints to the title track, sculptor Andrew Logan, Jonathan Bishop, whose work is made up of tiny Japanese stickers, playwright Danae Brook, animator Joanna Czajka, who contributes a 4.5 minute film, cartoonist Gray Jollisse and illustrator Beshlie Mckelvie, who designed an ethereal book of drawings to compliment Tallulah’s first album ‘Libellus’.

Tallulah has battled the cold on Trafalgar Square’s Fourth Plinth with her guitar and pitched up at St Pancras for one of their Station Sessions. Jumping from one project to the next and across oceans like the ‘whirling dervish’ she sings of, she is an example of insistent and forceful creativity. Her songs are brimming with quirky power and a raw abandon, while sticky lyrics ‘drip desire’ and demand attention. i-D Online caught up with the vital blonde, and instigator of this glorious collision of art and music, following her Australian tour.

What gave you the inspiration for this ambitious project? The illustrated book to my first album ‘Libellus’ was so well received that I was keen to open the project out to include movement, words and sculpture. I was touring in Japan with an aerial artist, Amy Richardson-Impey, who does a fantastic type of pole-dancing that’s really more like ballet on a pole, and she was keen to get involved. We filmed her for eleven hours to ‘Ghost on the Water’ and went from there.

How did the dozen artists you approached react to the idea? None of them had ever done anything like this before, so they were all excited and enthused by the concept. They did the work for free as they believe in the music and me, so it was a fantastic experience. There was a real sense of community and camaraderie, which you have to really fight for in London.

You seem to be touring a lot, off anywhere nice in 2011? We’re doing a little whirl around the UK and then we’re off to Germany, France, Spain and New York. I love being on tour, gathering material from every new experience, sleeping on the bus, listening to Pink Floyd for energy and focussing on the work. It’s when I’m at my most content.

- iD online


"‘London’s Most Creative Woman’"

Tallulah Rendall: how to battle your fear, find inspiration and live like an artist

Tallulah Rendall, the singer-songwriter whose album Alive is set to be released in March 2011, sits down with Asylum to discuss music, creativity and inspiration.

Every winter, when you (I) sit at your (my) cubicle drenched in melted snow and look on at emails limping into your (my) inbox, the old feeling returns: if only I (you) could give it all up to be an artist.

As I sit in a SoHo cafe waiting for Tallulah Rendall (a London-based, half-Australian singer, song-writer and one of the most relentlessly creative people in the Northern Hemisphere) I guardedly sketch my secret dinosaur comics and wonder what she would say about that dream.

Well, as it turns out, she has a lot of encouraging advice. She just won’t let you pretend that it’s going to be easy.

“It is difficult being an artist,” Tallulah tells me, while outside on Old Compton Street a phalanx of transvestites and transsexuals drop their coats in freezing winds for the benefit of movie cameras, as if to prove her point. “If I was to stop and rationally think about what I’m trying to do I’d never do it.”

Thankfully, she does. Her first album, Libellus, was released in 2009, and two singles from the new record due in March have already been released, the latest being Blind Like A Fool (see below).

If you value your time at all, you’ll read on for Tallulah’s advice on creating great art… and killing zombies.



The phrase ‘female singer-songwriter’ conjures up images of pastels, acoustic guitars and whistling. That isn’t Tallulah Rendall’s style. When I saw her perform at Bermondsey’s Shunt on a recent Thursday she was a Bowie-esque giant in gold spangles, intimidating and glorious, and her music had an intense sense of psychosis behind its lilting melodies.

Off-stage Tallulah is a different person, obviously, but there is still an intensely charming (and barely restrained) creativity below the surface, as well as the sense that she’s always on the clock, battling for the next success. She arrives at the cafe in a blizzard of hellos with a man in a suit who appears to be some kind of record executive. I wonder briefly whether she has just plucked the man out of the crowd at random, in an act of inspired entrepreneurial wizardry.

She hasn’t, but it wouldn’t be surprising.

“It’s difficult,” she repeats once the exec has left. “(Being an artist) is quite confidence challenging, and there are lots of different things that come at you, but if you’re staying true to yourself the better your art is going to be.”

Even as Tallulah prepares to release her second album ‘Alive’ (and a massive associated multi-media art project, incorporating everything from dance to jewelery), she is still technically without a record deal. That 200 people gave their own money to fund the album is just a reflection of Tallulah’s talent, charisma and apparently pathological self-belief.

One fan — the first to pledge — donated despite struggling to raise £4,000 a year to fund their own life-saving health treatment. “When the email came through I just burst into tears,” Tallulah says.

That might sound like a lot of pressure, but Tallulah’s only pressure comes from herself. She would be forcing herself to write music even if she was trapped alone in a cave for the rest of human history.

“I love writing in the morning,” she says. “You wake up, and there’s that point before your day becomes saturated with anything else that’s going on, phone conversations or the fact you’re struggling to pay rent, and that’s the point where it works. I’ll happily sit there for five or six hours and just press record and play and play.”

So how can the Asylum reader, whose guitar or paintbrush has been long since retired to the cupboard, start being creative again?

“Anyone can learn to sing, or learn to play an instrument,” Tallulah says. “We all have the basic faculties, it’s just that some people’s talents are naturally more honed that other people. But I could sit here and teach you to sing. I could give you the tools and I could train your ear. People need to be nurtured.”

And if you’re in doubt, Tallulah admits, a good way to start is by ripping people off. Kinda. “If you start listening to Dylan or the Stones, most of those songs are three chords,” she says. “If you’re learning on a guitar just master those chords and write a melody on top of it. If you find someone who can sing and you play guitar, but you’re both shit, you can both get better together. That momentum can carry you.”

In the age of the Internet, trying to create something can be even more intimidating that normal. Why draw a webcomic when you can do a Google search and find 1,000 others? And why write a song when iTunes is full of millions of already written tunes? Does Tallulah have any advice on getting past that fear?

“The trick is that in the end it’s about what you do,” she offers, per - Asylum/AOL


"‘London’s Most Creative Woman’"

Tallulah Rendall: how to battle your fear, find inspiration and live like an artist

Tallulah Rendall, the singer-songwriter whose album Alive is set to be released in March 2011, sits down with Asylum to discuss music, creativity and inspiration.

Every winter, when you (I) sit at your (my) cubicle drenched in melted snow and look on at emails limping into your (my) inbox, the old feeling returns: if only I (you) could give it all up to be an artist.

As I sit in a SoHo cafe waiting for Tallulah Rendall (a London-based, half-Australian singer, song-writer and one of the most relentlessly creative people in the Northern Hemisphere) I guardedly sketch my secret dinosaur comics and wonder what she would say about that dream.

Well, as it turns out, she has a lot of encouraging advice. She just won’t let you pretend that it’s going to be easy.

“It is difficult being an artist,” Tallulah tells me, while outside on Old Compton Street a phalanx of transvestites and transsexuals drop their coats in freezing winds for the benefit of movie cameras, as if to prove her point. “If I was to stop and rationally think about what I’m trying to do I’d never do it.”

Thankfully, she does. Her first album, Libellus, was released in 2009, and two singles from the new record due in March have already been released, the latest being Blind Like A Fool (see below).

If you value your time at all, you’ll read on for Tallulah’s advice on creating great art… and killing zombies.



The phrase ‘female singer-songwriter’ conjures up images of pastels, acoustic guitars and whistling. That isn’t Tallulah Rendall’s style. When I saw her perform at Bermondsey’s Shunt on a recent Thursday she was a Bowie-esque giant in gold spangles, intimidating and glorious, and her music had an intense sense of psychosis behind its lilting melodies.

Off-stage Tallulah is a different person, obviously, but there is still an intensely charming (and barely restrained) creativity below the surface, as well as the sense that she’s always on the clock, battling for the next success. She arrives at the cafe in a blizzard of hellos with a man in a suit who appears to be some kind of record executive. I wonder briefly whether she has just plucked the man out of the crowd at random, in an act of inspired entrepreneurial wizardry.

She hasn’t, but it wouldn’t be surprising.

“It’s difficult,” she repeats once the exec has left. “(Being an artist) is quite confidence challenging, and there are lots of different things that come at you, but if you’re staying true to yourself the better your art is going to be.”

Even as Tallulah prepares to release her second album ‘Alive’ (and a massive associated multi-media art project, incorporating everything from dance to jewelery), she is still technically without a record deal. That 200 people gave their own money to fund the album is just a reflection of Tallulah’s talent, charisma and apparently pathological self-belief.

One fan — the first to pledge — donated despite struggling to raise £4,000 a year to fund their own life-saving health treatment. “When the email came through I just burst into tears,” Tallulah says.

That might sound like a lot of pressure, but Tallulah’s only pressure comes from herself. She would be forcing herself to write music even if she was trapped alone in a cave for the rest of human history.

“I love writing in the morning,” she says. “You wake up, and there’s that point before your day becomes saturated with anything else that’s going on, phone conversations or the fact you’re struggling to pay rent, and that’s the point where it works. I’ll happily sit there for five or six hours and just press record and play and play.”

So how can the Asylum reader, whose guitar or paintbrush has been long since retired to the cupboard, start being creative again?

“Anyone can learn to sing, or learn to play an instrument,” Tallulah says. “We all have the basic faculties, it’s just that some people’s talents are naturally more honed that other people. But I could sit here and teach you to sing. I could give you the tools and I could train your ear. People need to be nurtured.”

And if you’re in doubt, Tallulah admits, a good way to start is by ripping people off. Kinda. “If you start listening to Dylan or the Stones, most of those songs are three chords,” she says. “If you’re learning on a guitar just master those chords and write a melody on top of it. If you find someone who can sing and you play guitar, but you’re both shit, you can both get better together. That momentum can carry you.”

In the age of the Internet, trying to create something can be even more intimidating that normal. Why draw a webcomic when you can do a Google search and find 1,000 others? And why write a song when iTunes is full of millions of already written tunes? Does Tallulah have any advice on getting past that fear?

“The trick is that in the end it’s about what you do,” she offers, per - Asylum/AOL


"Tallulah Rendall - Port Elliot Festival"

A hit on the summer festival circuit over the past couple of years, this sultry, spellbinding singer also boasts the rare accolade of being invited to play Dame Shirley Bassey’s 70th birthday party as the only musical entertainment.

Tallulah’s debut album Libellus, produced by Bjork and PJ Harvey producer Marius de Vries, was released in June on her own record label, Transducer Records. The launch was a night-long burlesque festival at London’s temple of decadence, Café de Paris, showcasing Tallulah’s exuberant theatrical style and enchanting artistry. - Port Elliot Festival


"Tallulah Rendall - Port Elliot Festival"

A hit on the summer festival circuit over the past couple of years, this sultry, spellbinding singer also boasts the rare accolade of being invited to play Dame Shirley Bassey’s 70th birthday party as the only musical entertainment.

Tallulah’s debut album Libellus, produced by Bjork and PJ Harvey producer Marius de Vries, was released in June on her own record label, Transducer Records. The launch was a night-long burlesque festival at London’s temple of decadence, Café de Paris, showcasing Tallulah’s exuberant theatrical style and enchanting artistry. - Port Elliot Festival


"Blindly Falling For Tallulah Rendall"

Tallulah Rendall is to return early next year with her sophomore LP Alive, a conglomeration of art and music in its purest form. Each track is to be accompanied by an art piece spanning jewelery, acrylic, oil, animation, and dance. Blind Like A Fool, the first single out of the blocks, scheduled for a November 15th release, is a jovial slice of wispy, withering acoustica reminiscent of Fantasia over background music provided by boot-stomper Lissie. The saccharine-sweet visuals are courtesy of Italian trio Stefano Tambellini, Federico Parodi, and Jacopo Lanza (Jelly Brain Productions), and their collaborative effort can be experienced below as a Dots & Dashes exclusive, along with a rough'n'ready demo of the track in question. - Dots and Dashes


"Libellus 8/10"

London songstress Tallulah Rendall releases her debut LP 'Libellus' on the 1st of June, 2009. Initial copies of 'Libellus' will be presented within a 50 page, illustrated hardback book. Produced by Marius de Vries (Bj?rk, PJ Harvey) 'Libellus' sounds expansive and also contains echoes of another great female artist, Kate Bush. Tallulah's voice is soft and emotional resonant, she's also something of a multi-instrumentalist, playing Glochenspiel and Piano as well as guitar on the album. Despite the references above, she also manages to sound utterly unique and after three or four listens to 'Libellus' you'll be firmly in her world, forgetting other music even existed. Slow moving and carefully constructed it may be, which doesn't really match this ever faster spinning modern world will live in, yet suffice to say'Libellus' is well worth the wait and the speed it imposes on you. It stops you in your tracks and forces you to listen attentively.

One of her early singles 'Lay Me Down' reveals hints of Jazz within both the music and vocal delivery. Suitably haunting and smoky, this is one for dark late nights with the headphones on. 'Only You' bursts out magnificently in faintly pyschedelic fashion half-way through before dipping back into the same kind of beautiful quiet it began. A little bit of a jaw-opener is 'Only You', an absolutely brilliant piece. 'Lost In The Morning' is remarkably of a similar quality yet utterly different, a weaving spell with gorgeously atmospheric backing vocals and picturesque lyrics. 'Wake Up' is pretty and uplifting whilst the closer 'Rest In Peace' reminiscent of Kate Bush's more dreamy, 'Hounds Of Love' side two, moments. All in all, a hugely impressive debut album. - Adrian Denning


"Libellus 8/10"

London songstress Tallulah Rendall releases her debut LP 'Libellus' on the 1st of June, 2009. Initial copies of 'Libellus' will be presented within a 50 page, illustrated hardback book. Produced by Marius de Vries (Bj?rk, PJ Harvey) 'Libellus' sounds expansive and also contains echoes of another great female artist, Kate Bush. Tallulah's voice is soft and emotional resonant, she's also something of a multi-instrumentalist, playing Glochenspiel and Piano as well as guitar on the album. Despite the references above, she also manages to sound utterly unique and after three or four listens to 'Libellus' you'll be firmly in her world, forgetting other music even existed. Slow moving and carefully constructed it may be, which doesn't really match this ever faster spinning modern world will live in, yet suffice to say'Libellus' is well worth the wait and the speed it imposes on you. It stops you in your tracks and forces you to listen attentively.

One of her early singles 'Lay Me Down' reveals hints of Jazz within both the music and vocal delivery. Suitably haunting and smoky, this is one for dark late nights with the headphones on. 'Only You' bursts out magnificently in faintly pyschedelic fashion half-way through before dipping back into the same kind of beautiful quiet it began. A little bit of a jaw-opener is 'Only You', an absolutely brilliant piece. 'Lost In The Morning' is remarkably of a similar quality yet utterly different, a weaving spell with gorgeously atmospheric backing vocals and picturesque lyrics. 'Wake Up' is pretty and uplifting whilst the closer 'Rest In Peace' reminiscent of Kate Bush's more dreamy, 'Hounds Of Love' side two, moments. All in all, a hugely impressive debut album. - Adrian Denning


"Tallulah Rendall - Ghost On The Water"

London singer Tallulah Rendall releases the first offering from her new album Alive. The talented singer has been gaining some real interest overseas with her amazing voice and has spent time collaborating with twelve different artists to produce different works of art for each of her songs on new album.

And so Ghost On The Water tells the tale of Rendall's time spent on a houseboat watching the sun rise and set. Being half Australian, Rendall has a certain fondness for the water and the sun and was inspired to write the song based on those experiences living on the houseboat.

Its a very haunting and atmospheric piece that highlights Rendall's silky smooth voice. The haunting piano at the beginning lures the listener in as Rendall then puts her subtle musings across this barren landscape. A cello adds to the atmospheric and haunting feel of the song and gives a nice counterpoint to Rendall's voice. Its almost a lullaby with her breathy vocals at times but its also filled with drama and tension as the chorus approaches.

This is a great piece to showcase whats in store for the rest of the album. Having heard snippets of the album, we can safely say there's much more instore from Tallulah Rendall and we hope she'll get the success here, that she gained during her overseas touring. - Entertainment Focus


"Tallulah Rendall - Ghost On The Water"

London singer Tallulah Rendall releases the first offering from her new album Alive. The talented singer has been gaining some real interest overseas with her amazing voice and has spent time collaborating with twelve different artists to produce different works of art for each of her songs on new album.

And so Ghost On The Water tells the tale of Rendall's time spent on a houseboat watching the sun rise and set. Being half Australian, Rendall has a certain fondness for the water and the sun and was inspired to write the song based on those experiences living on the houseboat.

Its a very haunting and atmospheric piece that highlights Rendall's silky smooth voice. The haunting piano at the beginning lures the listener in as Rendall then puts her subtle musings across this barren landscape. A cello adds to the atmospheric and haunting feel of the song and gives a nice counterpoint to Rendall's voice. Its almost a lullaby with her breathy vocals at times but its also filled with drama and tension as the chorus approaches.

This is a great piece to showcase whats in store for the rest of the album. Having heard snippets of the album, we can safely say there's much more instore from Tallulah Rendall and we hope she'll get the success here, that she gained during her overseas touring. - Entertainment Focus


"Reviews from Tallulah's last album and tour"

If you follow this link you will arrive at a full collection of Tallulah's reviews - collection of reviews


Discography

The Banshee And The Moon - recorded Jan 2013

ALIVE Remix EP - June 2011
ALIVE - 4th March 2011
ALIVE EP - 28th February 2011
Blind Like A Fool Single - November 2010
Ghost On The Water Single - September 2010

Full Album Libellus 2009 - Transducer Records/Univeral Music
Lay Me Down Single - BBC6 Spot Play, student radio stations
Time Away - student radion stations
Only You vinyl/viral release 2008

Without Time 2006

Photos

Bio

What makes Tallulah Rendall different to other British singer songwriters? Well a stunning voice and awe inspiring musicianship are a mere starting point. A soaring and mesmerizing vocal presence combined with theatrical prowess lying second to none is the centre piece of an incredibly special body of work. James Blake

LIVE

Spoonfed
Tallulah Rendall is a unique talent a hybrid of Patty Smith meets Kate Bush Tom Olesen

Beat Magazine
Whether performing solo or with her full band...What comes across live is her all-embracing energy... Her incredible aura and her majestic strength.
Richmond Harding

Alt Sounds

Tallulahs show is one not to be missed. A truly mesmeric performer with an artistic vision Jack Stovin

Alive is a great album Jools Holland
One To Watch Evening Standard
Rendall could be very interesting. In fact, she already is CMU
Ferociously talented singer songwriter thelondonword 


London's Most Creative Woman Asylum/AOL

BBC Merseyside
'Fantastic'

BBC London
'Mesmerising'

BBC East Anglia
'Amazing'..

REVIEWS

AAA Music
Tallulah is not a mere copy of other singers, I will be absolutely able to recognize her voice and her music amongst hundreds.. Robert Capuano

Daily Mail 4 stars
Out on her own label this album fuses her dreamy self-penned songs with subtle embellishments.

Uncut
Same impudent mix of power and vulnerability as Martha Wainwright Nigel Williamson

AAA Music
Part silken Persian, part electric Siamese, Tallulah Rendall is an electro-hearted songstress with an eerie, keening purr that illuminates her spine-tingling musical nous. Katie Halinski

"Produced by Marius de Vries (Bjork, PJ Harvey) Rendalls Debut album Libellus sounds expansive and also contains echoes of another great female artist, Kate Bush. Tallulah's voice is soft and emotional resonant, she's also something of a multi-instrumentalist, playing Glochenspiel and Piano as well as guitar on the album." Adrian Denning

Next Big Thing
This whole product is a testament to the belief that art is a shape shifting goddess with boundless gifts"

GayDar Nation
Singer-songwriter Tallulah Rendall has created an album of gloriously powerful songs characterised by lush instrumentation and a PJ Harvey-esque aplomb. Bree Hoskin

Contact Music
sublime, fragile, soulful and heart-piercing in its intensity.

The Unsigned Band Review
"A sure-fire hit, and she is definitely among Britains as-of-yet undiscovered talent." Michael Buttigieg 

FEATURES

I-D Online
Tallulahs tend to be sexy, impassioned things, this one boasts a mesmeric voice and creative intelligence to boot. 

The Girls Are
Rendalls music is ethereal yet powerful, delicate and yet vociferous in its insistent, intricate and a beautifully orchestrated sound. Clare Tucker

Retro Magazine
http://content.yudu.com/Library/A1qdxa/RetroMagazineIssueSi/resources/index.htm?referrerUrl=http://w...

Kalbult Magazine
Tallulah Rendall is a star. She is an iconic artist breaking boundaries. Her new album is a masterpiece.

The London Plinth
http://londonplinth.blogspot.co.uk/2009/06/tallula-rendalls-festival-of-libellus.html
Tallulah performed as part of the Anthony Gormley Plinth Series

Cool Hunting Three features
http://www.coolhunting.com/cgi-bin/mt/mt-search.cgi?IncludeBlogs=9&limit=33&search=tallulah+rendall

Never Enough Notes
This is music that demands attention, and hopefully won't go ignored by an industry currently over-saturated with mediocrity." Nicholas Shaikh

Chaos Magazine feature
http://issues.chaos-mag.com/

Label Magazine
http://www.lborosu.org.uk/media/label/beta/article.php?id=190

Creative Boom
Possessed with a pervasive strength, the songs rise into soaring, expansive climaxes with Tallulahs voice a mesmerising consta

Band Members