TEA COZIES
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TEA COZIES

Seattle, Washington, United States | SELF

Seattle, Washington, United States | SELF
Band Rock Pop

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This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Nov
28
TEA COZIES @ The Crocodile

Seattle, Washington, USA

Seattle, Washington, USA

Oct
27
TEA COZIES @ Columbia City Theater

Seattle, Washington, USA

Seattle, Washington, USA

Jun
15
TEA COZIES @ Barboza

Seattle, Washington, USA

Seattle, Washington, USA

Music

Press


When I arrived home last Saturday night around 2AM from Seattle's Chop Suey club, I noticed that not only did my clothes, hair, and camera gear have beer all over them, but there was beer actually in my shoes. On my shoes, of course, but also inside my shoes. This will give you some idea of how "Cinco de Ty" went, as I have been referring to the Cinco de Mayo quad-bill garage-psych-pop spectacular starring California's Ty Segall and White Fence, and locals The Pharmacy and Tea Cozies. As a well-experienced garage rock concertgoer, I expected a rowdy crowd for the holiday as well as a packed house at the small venue even on a night with lots of concert choices, so I can't say the beer explosion was a total surprise. I wouldn't have wanted to be anywhere else; this was the show I most wanted to see this year in Seattle, and others could enjoy the Tacoma Dome with Van Halen's Diamond Dave preening over his hairplugs and adjusting his codpiece or something.

After a quick dinner at Chop Suey neighbor Piecora's Pizza, I arrived to see most of Tea Cozies set. Fellow music writer Chris Burlingame is a big fan and thought I would like them as well, and I really did. The guys held down the rhythm section and the girls handled the guitars, mixing a little '90s alt grit, the sweet side of Britpop, clever lyrics, and simple, catchy hooks into a very appealing and confident set. (Click on photos to enlarge) - Popthomology


When I arrived home last Saturday night around 2AM from Seattle's Chop Suey club, I noticed that not only did my clothes, hair, and camera gear have beer all over them, but there was beer actually in my shoes. On my shoes, of course, but also inside my shoes. This will give you some idea of how "Cinco de Ty" went, as I have been referring to the Cinco de Mayo quad-bill garage-psych-pop spectacular starring California's Ty Segall and White Fence, and locals The Pharmacy and Tea Cozies. As a well-experienced garage rock concertgoer, I expected a rowdy crowd for the holiday as well as a packed house at the small venue even on a night with lots of concert choices, so I can't say the beer explosion was a total surprise. I wouldn't have wanted to be anywhere else; this was the show I most wanted to see this year in Seattle, and others could enjoy the Tacoma Dome with Van Halen's Diamond Dave preening over his hairplugs and adjusting his codpiece or something.

After a quick dinner at Chop Suey neighbor Piecora's Pizza, I arrived to see most of Tea Cozies set. Fellow music writer Chris Burlingame is a big fan and thought I would like them as well, and I really did. The guys held down the rhythm section and the girls handled the guitars, mixing a little '90s alt grit, the sweet side of Britpop, clever lyrics, and simple, catchy hooks into a very appealing and confident set. (Click on photos to enlarge) - Popthomology


he Bomber Jacket had the privilege to meet up with two members of the Seattle band Tea Cozies for coffee the day after a crazy, sold-out show opening for Ty Segall. The setting was a neighborhood coffee shop in an old house with a spectacular wrap-around porch. The interview took place outside in the sun on the back deck. There was live music playing from a venue nearby, which contributed to the pleasant, late-afternoon atmosphere. The interview was interrupted halfway through by a man who was eager to network with the band, and the ladies politely humored him. The following is what transpired.
THE BOMBER JACKET: Why don’t we start off by just introducing you guys. Names and instruments. Pretty straightforward.
Jessi Reed: I’m Jessi. I play guitar and sing in Tea Cozies.
Brady Harvey: I’m Brady, and I play guitar, and I sing and play keyboards.
How did you form?
J: Brady and I went to high school together. We grew up in Colorado, and we moved out to Seattle to start a band. That’s where we met Jeff, our bass player. He was actually a guitar player in another band, Daguerreotypes, but we converted him to bass because neither of us wanted to play bass. It’s not that bass is not cool…
B: We just like guitars.
J: [Laughs] And then Garrett (drums) came later. He’s been in a ton of bands. He’s an amazing drummer. His major claim to fame is that he was in Fleet Foxes before they got huge. So those two are Washingtonians, and we are Coloradoans.
Was there a particular moment when you knew you wanted to play in a band or do music? A song or an artist that inspired you?
J: Yes. For me it was Led Zeppelin. My first show that I saw was with my dad, and it was Jimmy Page and Robert Plant at Red Rocks. It was unbelievable. I was so naïve about music that when they left the stage after the show they hadn’t played their biggest hits, and I was super pissed. They hadn’t played “Communication Breakdown,” they hadn’t played “Stairway to Heaven,” or all of the major jams, and I was mad. My dad said, “If you yell really loud and clap maybe they’ll come back out,” and I was like, “Are you kidding me? They’re done, they left, they said goodbye.” He said, “Look, just yell! These other people are doing it, just yell and clap!” so I yelled and clapped really loud, and they came back out, and it that was magical. I thought, “This is what I want to do.”
B: I was always doing music since I was a kid. My mom was my music teacher in elementary school, which was kind of weird because it was always in our house, but I had never picked up an electric guitar or any of those instruments. It had always been classical instruments all the time. I went to the Hall Dance at our school, and [Jessi’s] band played. They were going to do this cover of a song that I knew by The Living End–they’re this cool punk band from Australia–but for some reason your singer girl was too nervous to do it. She froze up and wouldn’t sing. And they were like, “Brady come sing it!” and I was a little too freaked out to do it, but then afterwards I was like, “I should’ve done that…I wanna do that!” So I did. It was cool. It was one of those things where I thought, “I could do that better than that girl.” [Laughs] She sucked.
Do you have a favorite song of yours to play live?
J: My current favorite to play is a new one that’s going to be on our EP called “Muchos Dracula” because it’s really fast. It’s like a punk-rock song. It’s pretty easy to play, but there’s just lots of energy.
B: Yeah, I like that one. I think it’s our whole band’s new favorite because we all love it. Except Garrett has to play it really fast, so I don’t know if he likes it as much. [Laughs]
J: He hates opening with that song. He’s begged us several times to not open the set with it. I guess a lot of the new ones for me are more fun because we just wrote them and they’re fresh. It’s exciting to play and see what people do.
Moving in a different direction…How would you describe the Seattle music scene? Is it accessible for new bands? What was it like trying to book shows and get to know other bands when you moved up here?
B: People are really nice throughout the scene for sure. You can get a show at a lot of places pretty easily when you first are trying to start out.
B&J: There are so many venues!
B: Unless you’re under 21. It’s a little bit trickier. But it is really easy to meet people and just ask them their opinion: “Hey, do you know any other bands who could get on this bill?”
J: I do remember when we first started out we would read [the local newspaper] The Stranger…it was like our bible. We didn’t have friends. The only people we knew were from when I tried starting other bands using Craigslist ads, and those were my only friends, and they were a bunch of weirdos. No offense to them. They all went on to start other cool bands. But there were all these cool bands getting written about in The Stranger who were playing The Capitol Hill Block Party, and I remember e-mailing tho - The Bomber Jacket


he Bomber Jacket had the privilege to meet up with two members of the Seattle band Tea Cozies for coffee the day after a crazy, sold-out show opening for Ty Segall. The setting was a neighborhood coffee shop in an old house with a spectacular wrap-around porch. The interview took place outside in the sun on the back deck. There was live music playing from a venue nearby, which contributed to the pleasant, late-afternoon atmosphere. The interview was interrupted halfway through by a man who was eager to network with the band, and the ladies politely humored him. The following is what transpired.
THE BOMBER JACKET: Why don’t we start off by just introducing you guys. Names and instruments. Pretty straightforward.
Jessi Reed: I’m Jessi. I play guitar and sing in Tea Cozies.
Brady Harvey: I’m Brady, and I play guitar, and I sing and play keyboards.
How did you form?
J: Brady and I went to high school together. We grew up in Colorado, and we moved out to Seattle to start a band. That’s where we met Jeff, our bass player. He was actually a guitar player in another band, Daguerreotypes, but we converted him to bass because neither of us wanted to play bass. It’s not that bass is not cool…
B: We just like guitars.
J: [Laughs] And then Garrett (drums) came later. He’s been in a ton of bands. He’s an amazing drummer. His major claim to fame is that he was in Fleet Foxes before they got huge. So those two are Washingtonians, and we are Coloradoans.
Was there a particular moment when you knew you wanted to play in a band or do music? A song or an artist that inspired you?
J: Yes. For me it was Led Zeppelin. My first show that I saw was with my dad, and it was Jimmy Page and Robert Plant at Red Rocks. It was unbelievable. I was so naïve about music that when they left the stage after the show they hadn’t played their biggest hits, and I was super pissed. They hadn’t played “Communication Breakdown,” they hadn’t played “Stairway to Heaven,” or all of the major jams, and I was mad. My dad said, “If you yell really loud and clap maybe they’ll come back out,” and I was like, “Are you kidding me? They’re done, they left, they said goodbye.” He said, “Look, just yell! These other people are doing it, just yell and clap!” so I yelled and clapped really loud, and they came back out, and it that was magical. I thought, “This is what I want to do.”
B: I was always doing music since I was a kid. My mom was my music teacher in elementary school, which was kind of weird because it was always in our house, but I had never picked up an electric guitar or any of those instruments. It had always been classical instruments all the time. I went to the Hall Dance at our school, and [Jessi’s] band played. They were going to do this cover of a song that I knew by The Living End–they’re this cool punk band from Australia–but for some reason your singer girl was too nervous to do it. She froze up and wouldn’t sing. And they were like, “Brady come sing it!” and I was a little too freaked out to do it, but then afterwards I was like, “I should’ve done that…I wanna do that!” So I did. It was cool. It was one of those things where I thought, “I could do that better than that girl.” [Laughs] She sucked.
Do you have a favorite song of yours to play live?
J: My current favorite to play is a new one that’s going to be on our EP called “Muchos Dracula” because it’s really fast. It’s like a punk-rock song. It’s pretty easy to play, but there’s just lots of energy.
B: Yeah, I like that one. I think it’s our whole band’s new favorite because we all love it. Except Garrett has to play it really fast, so I don’t know if he likes it as much. [Laughs]
J: He hates opening with that song. He’s begged us several times to not open the set with it. I guess a lot of the new ones for me are more fun because we just wrote them and they’re fresh. It’s exciting to play and see what people do.
Moving in a different direction…How would you describe the Seattle music scene? Is it accessible for new bands? What was it like trying to book shows and get to know other bands when you moved up here?
B: People are really nice throughout the scene for sure. You can get a show at a lot of places pretty easily when you first are trying to start out.
B&J: There are so many venues!
B: Unless you’re under 21. It’s a little bit trickier. But it is really easy to meet people and just ask them their opinion: “Hey, do you know any other bands who could get on this bill?”
J: I do remember when we first started out we would read [the local newspaper] The Stranger…it was like our bible. We didn’t have friends. The only people we knew were from when I tried starting other bands using Craigslist ads, and those were my only friends, and they were a bunch of weirdos. No offense to them. They all went on to start other cool bands. But there were all these cool bands getting written about in The Stranger who were playing The Capitol Hill Block Party, and I remember e-mailing tho - The Bomber Jacket


The Tea Cozies can't get used to the sheer number and diversity of jackets Seattle locals own and wear.

"The amount of jackets out here is just crazy!" exclaims Jessi Reed, guitarist and singer in the local indie-rock band, which relocated from Ft. Collins, Colo. The four-piece group — two frontwomen and a male rhythm section — plays Chop Suey Friday. They've worked through their awe over Seattle's multicoat strategy to become one of the city's most-followed unsigned bands and a KEXP favorite.

Drawing from a mutual love of '90s Britpop — they cite Elastica, Blur and Supergrass as prime inspirations — the Cozies filter chiming pop melodies and left-hook guitar riffs through a booming wall of '60s garage-rock rhythms and echo.

Reed and fellow guitarist-singer Brady Harvey met in high school. Reed came to Seattle in 2004; Harvey followed the next year.

"A lot of bands weren't even stopping in Denver," Reed says.

The Cozies began their Seattle career in earnest with drummer Kelly Viergutz — a fellow Colorado transplant — and bassist Jeff Anderson. A self-titled EP and a 2009 album, "Hot Probs," established their distinctive sound.

With new drummer Garrett Croxon, formerly of Fleet Foxes, the first half of 2011 already has been eventful. The Cozies played four sets at Austin's South By Southwest conference in March and released two dark, resounding songs, "Dead Man's Sister" and "Cosmic Osmo," on Record Store Day in April.

"These songs are like they were written in a cave — a little more introspective," Reed says.

Nationally, the Tea Cozies might be most recognized from an appearance in an episode of "$5 Cover: Seattle," the MTV-backed Web series about the music scene directed by local acclaimed filmmaker Lynn Shelton.

The Tea Cozies' vignette, shot at local store American Music, spoofs the male-dominated world of rock. When the band's fictitious road manager, a man, picks up supplies, a fellow customer, also a man, mistakenly thinks the manager is the musician and Reed and Harvey are his groupies.

"Lynn tweaked a story that happened to us," Harvey explains. "Sometimes when a woman goes into music stores with a guy, they'll immediately help the guy. It does happen. Not necessarily at American Music." - Seattle Times


The Tea Cozies can't get used to the sheer number and diversity of jackets Seattle locals own and wear.

"The amount of jackets out here is just crazy!" exclaims Jessi Reed, guitarist and singer in the local indie-rock band, which relocated from Ft. Collins, Colo. The four-piece group — two frontwomen and a male rhythm section — plays Chop Suey Friday. They've worked through their awe over Seattle's multicoat strategy to become one of the city's most-followed unsigned bands and a KEXP favorite.

Drawing from a mutual love of '90s Britpop — they cite Elastica, Blur and Supergrass as prime inspirations — the Cozies filter chiming pop melodies and left-hook guitar riffs through a booming wall of '60s garage-rock rhythms and echo.

Reed and fellow guitarist-singer Brady Harvey met in high school. Reed came to Seattle in 2004; Harvey followed the next year.

"A lot of bands weren't even stopping in Denver," Reed says.

The Cozies began their Seattle career in earnest with drummer Kelly Viergutz — a fellow Colorado transplant — and bassist Jeff Anderson. A self-titled EP and a 2009 album, "Hot Probs," established their distinctive sound.

With new drummer Garrett Croxon, formerly of Fleet Foxes, the first half of 2011 already has been eventful. The Cozies played four sets at Austin's South By Southwest conference in March and released two dark, resounding songs, "Dead Man's Sister" and "Cosmic Osmo," on Record Store Day in April.

"These songs are like they were written in a cave — a little more introspective," Reed says.

Nationally, the Tea Cozies might be most recognized from an appearance in an episode of "$5 Cover: Seattle," the MTV-backed Web series about the music scene directed by local acclaimed filmmaker Lynn Shelton.

The Tea Cozies' vignette, shot at local store American Music, spoofs the male-dominated world of rock. When the band's fictitious road manager, a man, picks up supplies, a fellow customer, also a man, mistakenly thinks the manager is the musician and Reed and Harvey are his groupies.

"Lynn tweaked a story that happened to us," Harvey explains. "Sometimes when a woman goes into music stores with a guy, they'll immediately help the guy. It does happen. Not necessarily at American Music." - Seattle Times


In the tangled list of drop-down, drag-out music festivals in our country, there are three important ones that come immediately to mind:

Here in the Northwest, Bumbershoot reigns supreme and has been host to the likes of Ani DiFranco, Beck, BB King and the Wu-Tang Clan. Farther south in California, we find the legendary Coachella, where movie stars wander the matted valley grasses during April, listening to the sonic tribulations of pop kings and queens. And in one week, beyond the dunes of Death Valley, farther south than the Four Corners, and just off Interstate 35 in the city limits of Austin, Texas, you will find South By Southwest (SXSW).

SXSW isn't just a festival, though; it's a slam-dancing genre party where techies go to gab about the wild world of multimedia, where film junkies look for that big break and, with as many as 2,000 bands at 90 venues, where musicians and fans alike descend into what has become one of the largest music gatherings in the world.

But don't feel left out in the cold, Seattle. At least three of our own will be making the trek from north to south to represent our name in music:

Wild Orchid Children: Slightly theatric, though sonorously serious, WOC is a wave of straight rock pummeled with hail stones of tribal drums and folklike realism. Occasionally dabbling in Seattle's current hotbed, the band's guitar will sometimes drift in and out of rockabilly-esque episodes before, during and after their jam-band tendencies show themselves. Live, these guys tend to use up to three drum sets, leaving us to wonder just how big their van will have to be as they make their way south. You can catch their frantic set live, post-SXSW, at El Corozon, March 27.

Tea Cozies: Though these guys (well, three women and one man) don't hail originally from Seattle, this quartet of Colorado transplants are of near-local status musically. The Tea Cozies are all about fun: They act fun, they sound fun -- heck, they even play fun when they aren't being absolutely serious musicians who know exactly how to put on a good show. Their sound is pop with a side of rock, though what might be the coolest about them is that their songs are completely danceable. With the instincts of Joan Jett, the Tea Cozies drive an audience into silence when they need to and pound you into oblivion when they don't. And, hey, who doesn't like a band whose name reminds you of Grandma's snoring?

The Horde and the Harem: The Horde and the Harem is a band whose music continues to propel itself entirely on the enjoyment of playing. It is evident in the lyrics and the way in which they're sung, in the instrumentation and the way the musicians play, and it is evident in the quadratic core of four-part harmony present for the entirety of each song. If the dodging dirge of rhythmic mathematics could ever let you down, the drummer in this band certainly won't. He lets out gut-busting cadences that drive the whole thing down the street like a slumbering elephant, teetering to the brink of disaster before choreographed turns take him in a new direction. We think these guys will have the most fun on their trip to Austin. Tonight, find them at The Sunset for a 9:30pm set. - City's Best Seattle Magazine


Steeped in garage rock and british indie, Tea Cozies take influences from guitar-driven pop bands as Blur, Elastica, and the Pixies. Though Seattle-based, the origins of Tea Cozies began in Northern Colorado where Jessi Reed (vocals, guitar), Brady Harvey (vocals, guitar) and former drummer Kelly Viergutz attended Fort Collins High School together.

Jessi started playing guitar at age 15 in punk rock bands, with stints on public access television and in high school talent shows. Brady, the daughter of a music teacher, was classically trained in flute, saxophone, piano, and choir. The two met in 10th grade, bonding over a love of britpop and camping. Brady quickly picked up guitar and they began playing music together with the addition of Kelly. The trio played only one Colorado show at a New Years Eve party, before relocating to Seattle due to boredom and ocean-craving.

With the addition of Jeff Anderson (bass, handclaps), Tea Cozies released a 5 song EP recorded in the living room of their house. Cutting their chops at just about every dive bar in Seattle, the band spent the year gigging relentlessly on tour and at local music festivals. In 2009, the band released the infectious Hot Probs (produced by Erik Blood), which Seattle Weekly describes as "equal parts garage rock and '60s girl group, punk and bubblegum, Blur and Bikini Kill." Hot Probs was picked up by regional radio such as KEXP and 107.7 The End, earning the band slots at the 2009 Seattle City of Music Awards and in the GIVE Seattle Compilation (along with Ben Gibbard and The Long Winters.)

In late 2009, the band parted ways with drummer Kelly Viergutz, who now plays in the folk-rock group, Origami Ghosts. Tea Cozies enlisted former Fleet Fox Garrett Croxon (drums) and are currently working on their sophomore album. Look for them in the upcoming MTV.com series $5 Cover: Seattle. - Paper Garden Records


Steeped in garage rock and british indie, Tea Cozies take influences from guitar-driven pop bands as Blur, Elastica, and the Pixies. Though Seattle-based, the origins of Tea Cozies began in Northern Colorado where Jessi Reed (vocals, guitar), Brady Harvey (vocals, guitar) and former drummer Kelly Viergutz attended Fort Collins High School together.

Jessi started playing guitar at age 15 in punk rock bands, with stints on public access television and in high school talent shows. Brady, the daughter of a music teacher, was classically trained in flute, saxophone, piano, and choir. The two met in 10th grade, bonding over a love of britpop and camping. Brady quickly picked up guitar and they began playing music together with the addition of Kelly. The trio played only one Colorado show at a New Years Eve party, before relocating to Seattle due to boredom and ocean-craving.

With the addition of Jeff Anderson (bass, handclaps), Tea Cozies released a 5 song EP recorded in the living room of their house. Cutting their chops at just about every dive bar in Seattle, the band spent the year gigging relentlessly on tour and at local music festivals. In 2009, the band released the infectious Hot Probs (produced by Erik Blood), which Seattle Weekly describes as "equal parts garage rock and '60s girl group, punk and bubblegum, Blur and Bikini Kill." Hot Probs was picked up by regional radio such as KEXP and 107.7 The End, earning the band slots at the 2009 Seattle City of Music Awards and in the GIVE Seattle Compilation (along with Ben Gibbard and The Long Winters.)

In late 2009, the band parted ways with drummer Kelly Viergutz, who now plays in the folk-rock group, Origami Ghosts. Tea Cozies enlisted former Fleet Fox Garrett Croxon (drums) and are currently working on their sophomore album. Look for them in the upcoming MTV.com series $5 Cover: Seattle. - Paper Garden Records


While the Bit Saloon was packed to capacity during the Tea Cozies' set last night, that's not what was most remarkable about the whole thing. Even though everyone in the venue obviously loved the Tea Cozies' poppy garage rock, the people who showed the most enthusiasm weren't in the venue at all, but were actually outside on the sidewalk behind the stage, peering in the windows. After sizing up the situation, those people stuck around for half the set, throwing down dance moves out there on the street with more enthusiasm than anyone in the venue itself -- mainly because there wasn't any space to dance inside. The place was quite literally filled to bursting. Best of all, the band played my favorite song from their debut full-length, "Behind the Glass Eye," live for the first time, rendering their set one of my favorites of the entire festival.

-Sara Brickner
- Seattle Weekly


Tea Cozies
'Hot Probs' (So Hard)
Such as getting mauled by bears, getting overwhelmed by Paris, and foreseeing the end of grrrlpop civilization as they know it ("Huffy Walrus," "Paris Syndrome").

-Robert Christgau
- MSN Music


While there were good performances during the awards ceremony, like all awards shows the afterparty was where the real action was to be found. It included a set by The Tea Cozies, a jangle-pop garage-rock band that was more upbeat and energetic than anything during the preceding two hours. Unfortunately by the time The Tea Cozies took the stage the Showbox had almost emptied. But the handful of folks who stuck around were treated to a fun, playful set by a young group with plenty of potential.

Unfortunately there was no hip hop celebrated in the form of an award Wednesday (maybe next year?) but local hip hop was in the house. Tilson of party-rap group The Saturday Knights along with Champagne Champagne members Pearl Dragon and Thomas Gray were up front and center in the crowd rocking out to the Tea Cozies. It is great that Seattle supports the music community with Seattle City of Music, but it is better that the scene supports itself. That’s something that comes more naturally than scented candles and a red carpet at the Showbox.

-Travis Hay
- Ear Candy: Seattle Post-Intelligencer


Seattle band Tea Cozies are undeniable. Sly with garage tendencies of rock and pop, their Noir fire, she to she vocals make Twister mat anthems. Guitar-synth smarts see the scooter mow down the 18-wheeler road hog. The combo of Jessi Reed and Brady Harvey is a pillow fight gone right. A catchy-catch pair of dashing choose your own adventure vigor.

Tea Cozies: “Boys at the Metro”


Choose your own adventure, as in:

- If you think the marks are worth trying to decode, turn to pg. 23
- If you reject Silas’s advice, and continue on, ignoring the voice, turn to pg. 32
- If you go straight to Prague, turn to pg. 38
- If you hide behind the curtain and wait, turn to page 46

I met Tea Cozies at a lodge, in the study, and we sat on a seven by seven foot ottoman:

Where did you record “Boys at the Metro? With who?
We recorded it at MRX with Blood. Erik Blood. We ate lots of Taco Del Mar that day I'm sure since that's what we eat every day. Erik was probably chain-smoking while playing the tambourine and looking important.

Talk about the sounds in the song.
The vocals are minimal and shouty with some mega phone. Drums and bass were recorded to tape and then dumped into Pro Tools. Erik made them sound pretty huge and evil. The guitars have delay and reverb with some crunchy distortion. They're on opposing beats to symbolize our constant inner-band battle for guitar solo supremacy. All of us hand clapped throughout, except Jeff (Anderson). It was a real team building experience.

What influenced the song?
Wine? The lyrics were all haikus at one point until we forgot about that and just started hating on Spielberg. Drunk people like it.

What’s the song about?
Spielberg.

What was the hardest part about recording it?
The length of it. Due to the handclapping required.

If you were about to be mauled by a water buffalo, what would you do?
We would look it in the eye and tell it that it's beautiful. Then it would maul us passionately.

If you could be any mythical creature, what would you be?
A gnome, so we could be tiny and ride foxes.

Talk about the basement where you all rehearse.
We just moved in to this new place and it’s probably haunted. The house came with a framed picture of bamboo and tons of science books about leaves and earthquake statistics and medical journals. We think it’s probably the former abode of a hermit professor. The basement is huge with really low ceilings. No jumping for joy allowed.

How do you soundproof it?
We used the science books.

How does it smell down there?
Like mildew and knowledge.

Do you get complaints from the neighbors?
They haven't talked to us yet but one of them smiled at me when I locked myself out. In our last house we used to get passive aggressive notes on our doorstep about our "alternative schedules" and how other people "had studying to do."

Is the basement really creepy, or just partially creepy?
It's really partially creepy.

Whats coming up for Tea Cozies?
We're playing a secret haunted house party in March and a SXSW kickoff here in Seattle at the new Hard Rock on March 3rd. We’re mainly working on stuff for our new album. Email us for details about the ghost party if you like.

-Trent Mooreman - The Stranger


Bouncing between quirk and mayhem with a bubblegum-punk quartet.

"I'm Brady, and I like to giggle."

"I'm Jessi, and I like to frown."

"I'm Kelly. I don't like anything."

In person, the Tea Cozies make the same first impression as their debut record, Hot Probs: charming, funny, unapologetically tongue-in-cheek. The band—drummer Kelly Viergutz, guitarists and frontwomen Jessi Reed and Brady Harvey, and bassist Jeff Anderson (who was in New York City at the time of this interview)—is equal parts garage rock and '60s girl group, punk and bubblegum, Blur and Bikini Kill. As always, it's the pretty pop sheen that sucks you in first, then the clever lyrics.

"Corner Store Girls," a catchy, saccharine ditty about prowling for boys, is the record's most approachable song. What's not to love about girl-group harmonies, a catchy synth organ hook, and lines like "Boardwalk boys always get fake names"? Hot Probs is packed with funny one-liners: "Told Mom and Dad I can't do the dishes/Now I gotta, now I gotta sleep with the fishes." The Tea Cozies' adorable quirks even extend to a baffling preoccupation with Steven Spielberg, unceremoniously told to go fuck himself on Hot Probs' first track, "Boys at the Metro."

"I hate Jaws," Reed explains. "It made me fear the ocean because of sharks, but it also made me fear fresh water because of the part where the shark goes into that bay and eats that kid off the boogie board."

Sure, these girls can write cute, clever songs, but when the band addresses their fears, it suddenly sounds less like pop and more like art, as on Hot Probs' apocalyptic last song, "Behind the Glass Eye." "[I wrote that] when I was riding the bus home every day during rush hour and was imagining the end of the world and meteors smashing into everything," Reed says. "I have recurring nightmares about the apocalypse."

Bouncing between cotton-candy pop and three-chord punk-rock mayhem might seem like an amateur move, but the Tea Cozies have cultivated a distinct sound that binds the record together—whether Harvey's shrieking into the microphone like a banshee or Reed's crooning about the end of the world. "To me, the best type of album is the kind that you can make seven different kinds of mixtapes from," Reed says.

"Sometimes I love listening to Nick Drake, and I just want to listen to an album that feels the same from the beginning to the end. But I really like an album that has a total jellybean mix of different kinds of songs in the same sound that you can pull apart, but together they sound amazing, too."

Sara Brickner
- Seattle Weekly


Tea Cozies - Hot Probs
so hard records
A-

If the sound of blistering guitars on the opening track, "Boys at the Metro," doesn't get a listener's attention, the "hey!" shouts will make it clearly known that Seattle's Tea Cozies are not willing to go unnoticed. Following a 5-song EP, which received airplay on Seattle's KEXP and numerous Internet radio stations, Tea Cozies continue to deliver an enticing mix of '60s girl pop and swirling garage rock on their full-length debut, Hot Probs.

With sweet harmonies and 3/4ths of the band being female, Tea Cozies possess the raw sound similar to that of bands like Vivian Girls, but the energy is at a much higher level and more likely to provoke people to dancing. While there are plenty of angelic seesaw rhythms and cute lyrics, such as, "I had a boy and he had a bike and we got along real nice," vocalists Jessi Reed and Brady Harvey are also witty and sharp-tongued. Pop culture icons Steven Spielberg, Oscar Wilde, Fred Astaire and Mary Shelley find their way into songs among words of wisdom, which reveal, "Even pretty pages crack in old books/ You can't rely on your good looks."

The music arrangements are just as interesting to listen to as the lyrics. Tea Cozies have a standard rock set-up -- with two guitars, bass, drums, and the occasional organ -- but they manage to incorporate unexpected twists and turns into songs. "Like Luca Brasi" switches back and forth from an upbeat pace to a dreamy stride, which happens a bit sudden but still sounds seamless. The song, which is about a girl who is hesitant to go swimming while on a trip with friends, but is convinced to do so and ends up drowning, summarizes the band pretty well. However, unlike the girl in the story who did not listen to her instincts, Tea Cozies are very instinctive. The band members are loud and forceful when they feel the need and slow it down if they get the urge, which adds a lot of diversity to the album.

For every straightforward pop track on Hot Probs, there is one rocking garage or soothing psychedelic track to counteract the sugary goodness. "Corner Store Girls" can be best described as bibbity bop as images of bunnies hopping in meadows, bees buzzing in gardens, and couples rollerskating at the boardwalk come to mind. The song is followed by "The South Turned Him Sour," which contains rich and gritty sounds of roller derbies and hot rod racing.

Toward the end of the album, the music loses a bit of momentum as songs become slower and more psychedelic. There are some instances where the vocalists sound bored, but that could be mistaken with bravado. Even as the songs slow down, there is a strong aura of confidence, but it is never pretentious.

Reviewed by: KARLA HERNÁNDEZ. - REDEFINE MAGAZINE


Tea Cozies - Hot Probs
so hard records
A-

If the sound of blistering guitars on the opening track, "Boys at the Metro," doesn't get a listener's attention, the "hey!" shouts will make it clearly known that Seattle's Tea Cozies are not willing to go unnoticed. Following a 5-song EP, which received airplay on Seattle's KEXP and numerous Internet radio stations, Tea Cozies continue to deliver an enticing mix of '60s girl pop and swirling garage rock on their full-length debut, Hot Probs.

With sweet harmonies and 3/4ths of the band being female, Tea Cozies possess the raw sound similar to that of bands like Vivian Girls, but the energy is at a much higher level and more likely to provoke people to dancing. While there are plenty of angelic seesaw rhythms and cute lyrics, such as, "I had a boy and he had a bike and we got along real nice," vocalists Jessi Reed and Brady Harvey are also witty and sharp-tongued. Pop culture icons Steven Spielberg, Oscar Wilde, Fred Astaire and Mary Shelley find their way into songs among words of wisdom, which reveal, "Even pretty pages crack in old books/ You can't rely on your good looks."

The music arrangements are just as interesting to listen to as the lyrics. Tea Cozies have a standard rock set-up -- with two guitars, bass, drums, and the occasional organ -- but they manage to incorporate unexpected twists and turns into songs. "Like Luca Brasi" switches back and forth from an upbeat pace to a dreamy stride, which happens a bit sudden but still sounds seamless. The song, which is about a girl who is hesitant to go swimming while on a trip with friends, but is convinced to do so and ends up drowning, summarizes the band pretty well. However, unlike the girl in the story who did not listen to her instincts, Tea Cozies are very instinctive. The band members are loud and forceful when they feel the need and slow it down if they get the urge, which adds a lot of diversity to the album.

For every straightforward pop track on Hot Probs, there is one rocking garage or soothing psychedelic track to counteract the sugary goodness. "Corner Store Girls" can be best described as bibbity bop as images of bunnies hopping in meadows, bees buzzing in gardens, and couples rollerskating at the boardwalk come to mind. The song is followed by "The South Turned Him Sour," which contains rich and gritty sounds of roller derbies and hot rod racing.

Toward the end of the album, the music loses a bit of momentum as songs become slower and more psychedelic. There are some instances where the vocalists sound bored, but that could be mistaken with bravado. Even as the songs slow down, there is a strong aura of confidence, but it is never pretentious.

Reviewed by: KARLA HERNÁNDEZ. - REDEFINE MAGAZINE


In June's Seattle Sound Magazine, KEXP DJ John Richards picks out five NW bands to listen to this summer. Check it:

BRING THE HEAT

Tea Cozies

"I'm not going to lie to you: When I see a name like that, I assume bad things. Of course, I thought that when a band named Death Cab For Cutie gave me its first release. This band brings to mind early Breeders or Elastica, and there ain't nothing cozy about that." - Seattle Sound Magazine


In June's Seattle Sound Magazine, KEXP DJ John Richards picks out five NW bands to listen to this summer. Check it:

BRING THE HEAT

Tea Cozies

"I'm not going to lie to you: When I see a name like that, I assume bad things. Of course, I thought that when a band named Death Cab For Cutie gave me its first release. This band brings to mind early Breeders or Elastica, and there ain't nothing cozy about that." - Seattle Sound Magazine


As we wrap up the KEXP Spring Membership Drive we’ve had the chance to hear what KEXP means to our listeners and our volunteers who help power KEXP. Today we get to hear from a local artist who donated their new self-released single to KEXP listeners via the Song of the Day podcasts. These podcasts are a great way to check out new music from your favorite artists as well as find new favorite artists recommended by KEXP DJs.

One such artist is Seattle’s Tea Cozies who are a perfect blend of Brit Pop goodness mixed with the wit and swagger of garage rockers around the world. They first hit the scene with their Erik Blood-produced debut album Hot Probs in 2009. Lead by Jessi Reed and Brady Harvey (who have known each other since high school), the band is well-known for their high-energy, high-fun live shows and sweetly addicting songs which often feature oooohs and handclaps. Today’s song is a sneak peak at new material by the group which seems to be incorporating some psychedelic elements into their repertoire. Jessi and crew took a few minutes to share some info about this song and what they hope to get out of their upcoming trip to Austin, TX, for their first SXSW experience.


We’re nearing the end of the KEXP membership drive. What can you tell our listeners about KEXP’s role in your lives?

KEXP is immensely important to us. For one, it’s super supportive of local bands. KEXP has played a huge part in getting our name out there among the thousands of other talented bands in this region. The fact that an unsigned band can get international airplay on this station is pretty incredible. Because of you guys, we have fans in countries we’ve never set foot in and probably can’t find on a map without google. Like, Australia (SIKE. we don’t have fans there.) KEXP is magical, like a fairy… eating a unicorn.


Are you guys working on a new album or were you just getting this song out of your system?

We’re working on material for our next release, which will either be in the form of an EP or an album. We’ve just been writing and recording like crazy… hopefully getting some people excited about the new stuff while we’re down at SXSW. We can’t wait to get back in the studio.


What’s your songwriting process? Is there a primary songwriter or is it pretty collaborative?

Songs originate with either Jessi or Brady. We usually record a demo version on GarageBand, then bring it to the band to work through it as a collective. We write a lot of lyrics on the bus.


What can you tell me about “Dead Man’s Sister?”

(Jessi) — I wrote this song after watching the movie On the Waterfront for the first time. The lyrics are inspired by that story and I wanted the overall vibe to feel really cold and angular. In contrast, the reverby chorus “oooh ooohs” are kind of the empathy of the song, or the sister from the film. It’s sort of a sad song, but we all come out alright in the end. (… except the dead man.)


What’s the story behind the upcoming video? (also if you could touch on when you think it will be available that would be great too)

We just saw a rough cut today and it’s looking pretty incredible. The concept of the video is rock-n-roll concert + 60s sci-fi b-movie. It was really fun to shoot. The film crew we worked with, Loaded Pictures are incredible and came up with this insane story line. I don’t want to give too much away, but there are some hardcore dance sequences and ray guns involved. The video drops Monday, March 14.


Glad to hear you are heading to SXSW! What are you doing to mentally and physically prepare yourselves for the total insanity that is SXSW (i.e. what are you doing in your “Rocky”-style montage??)

I bought a travel sized thesaurus and purple cowboy boots… and my mom sent us a map of Texas. We also bought sunglasses. We’re making lots of lists, like lists of bands to see, places to check out, taco trucks to find. We’ve started speaking in a southern drawl and drinking whiskey out of boot-shaped glasses. In case we get heckled, we’re preparing some Texas sized retorts. Like, if someone said “don’t mess with texas” we’d say “don’t bash wah-shington.” We might get shot.


We hope not!

The Tea Cozies just played the SXSW Kick-Off Party & Musician’s Bazaar with D. Black, Wild Orchid Children, and State of the Artist and they are ready to head down to Austin for SXSW. For folks heading to Texas this year you can catch them for free at the Lovely Hearts Club showcase on 3/17 at Uncorked Wine Bar or the SXSeattle Party on 3/18. The line-up is incredible and includes Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, Fences, Campfire OK, The Physics, The Redwood Plan, and more. More info can be found on their Facebook page.

In the meantime, here they are from last year’s Concerts at the Mural performing “The South Turned Him Sour.”

-Leigh Bezezekoff - KEXP Blog


Among the Seattle acts I'll be trailing: Hip-hop act Shabazz Palaces, jangle-rock band Tea Cozies, folk band The Head and the Heart and UW dance-music duo Beat Connection.

TEA COZIES
Led by dueling singer/guitarists Brady Harvey and Jessi Reed, Tea Cozies makes energetic pop rock. The band supplied theme music for Seattle director Lynn Shelton's "$5 Cover" series for MTV, but is still largely unknown. Harvey hopes to correct that at SXSW:

"I think our number one reason [for playing SXSW] is exposure. It seems like a really good way to get your music out to a lot of different kinds of people, and a lot of those people are writers, and labels, and other rad bands. And fans."

-Andrew Matson - Seattle Times: Matson on Music


Perhaps in an effort to quell the complaints that MTV no longer features, ya know, music, they are launching a brand new webseries called "$5 Cover: Seattle" which is a fascinating docudrama about the Seattle music scene that not only features oodles and oodles of killer performances, but it's directed by the brilliant Lynn Shelton.

In anticipation of tomorrow's debut, PopWrap got a sneak peek at one of the featured bands -- Tea Cozies -- performing our favorite song from the series, "Pretty Pages."

-Jaret Wiselman - NYPost


“Tea cozies are such an unnecessary thing, they’re like stockings you put on your teapot” jokes Jessi Reed, one of the two frontwomen for the fantastic Seattle indie pop/rock band that took their name from those unnecessary teapot stockings.

Few bands are as fun as Tea Cozies. They have very catchy pop sounds with a sly sense of humor and overt hooks. The Stranger called the band “a pillow fight gone right” and that seems accurate. Their songs are catchy and addictive and often very funny. The often cite Brit pop as their main influence and a quick search on YouTube will yield several different live Elastica covers. I met the two frontwomen of Tea Cozies, Jessi Reed and Brady Harvey for an interview last week to discuss the band and it’s history and its quite obvious that they are as funny off stage as their are on and on record. (For example, on asking about working with producer Erik Blood, Reed said “he sounds like he’s an evil genius because of his name, but he’s actually very sweet.”)

The band formed several years ago, when Reed and Harvey were high school friends and met original drummer Kelly Viergutz in their hometown of Fort Collins, Colorado. Reed moved to Seattle first and Harvey and Viergutz followed shortly after. In Colorado, Reed explains, “We used by called Kesque, which is from the Talking Heads song ‘Psycho Killer’. It is French for ‘what is this?’ We originally spelled it the French way, which was impossible for anyone who wasn’t French to know what we were saying. I don’t know if we were trying to be pretentious or what.” She added “We changed the name to the Americanized spelling and then when we moved to Seattle we thought ‘this name sucks’”.

The name that they decided didn’t suck came about, according to Reed, when “I think we were trying to think of something that paid tribute to our influences, which were British bands. It wasn’t a very interesting story. I think we were sitting at someone’s computer and someone said ‘cozy’ someone else said ‘tea cozy’ and we all laughed.”

When I wrote the review of their first LP, Hot Probs, for Three Imaginary Girls almost two years ago, I noted, “On the band’s bio, they list artists like Talking Heads, Can, Pixies and Stereolab as influences and their one-sheet bio features a quote comparing them to The Breeders and PJ Harvey. All fine artists and ones I’d want to be compared to, sure, but really, Tea Cozies have a lot more fun. And so do their listeners.” What I didn’t write enough about at the time was the musicianship the band has. Both Reed and Harvey are excellent guitarists and songwriters with a top-notch rhythm section to complement them. Bassist Jeff Anderson, a converted guitarist, completed the quartet with the three ladies from Colorado and drummer Garrett Croxon, who played in previous bands like Fleet Foxes and The Little Penguins, joined later, replacing Viergutz.

The most recent item involving the band that may have gotten the band the most attention yet is when they were featured in filmmaker Lynn Shelton’s web series “$5 Cover: Seattle”. In one episode, Reed and Harvey enter a guitar shop where a chauvinistic sales clerk assumed that their manager at the time, Troy Nelson (now in the acclaimed band The Young Evils and is a DJ on KEXP), was the one looking for equipment, not the women in actually in the band.

On meeting Shelton at a show at the Comet, Reed said “I was sitting on the ground putting my pedals away and this lady sat next to me and started talking to me about this documentary thing and gave me her card and left. I remember that everyone was asking me about what was she like and and if she seemed serious and was for real. I said that she sat on the ground next to me and that’s a good sign. A lot of people are too fancy to sit on the dirty floor.”

Of that experience, Harvey said “Talking to her, she’s so genuine and hilarious and she believed in [the project] so much that we believed in it too. Everyone who worked on it was just super cool and laid back. It didn’t feel like it was very corporate. It was very home-grown and it was all local people working on it.” She said they loved the experience because “The bands we met, we hadn’t heard before because our genres don’t usually mingle, like Champagne Champagne or The Maldives or THEESatisfaction. It was cool because we did become friends and start going to each others shows.”

Meeting Nelson turned out to be a lucky break for Tea Cozies, and not just because he became their manager shortly thereafter. Reed explains bringing their debut, self-titled EP into a record store for consignment with an endearing sense of naivete in hindsight, “We didn’t know what we were doing so we just thought we’d bring this CD right into the record store and sell it. We went in to Easy Street and gave it to the guy working there and he was nonchalant about it but said he’d listen to it and see if they could sell it. That night they played it on KEXP and we were like - Another Rainy Saturday


by Daniela Garcia
April 2nd, 2008

IN A NUTSHELL
The humble beginnings of the Tea Cozies began when Jessi Reed and Brady Harvey met in 1999 while attending high school in Fort Collins, Colorado. Even though they ended up at different colleges (Reed at Colorado University and Harvey at the University of Northern Colorado), the girls still found time to meet up and jam to Elastica songs. They went through a slew of drummers before finding former high school classmate and drummer Kelly Viergutz, courtesy of a want ad at a local record store. As a trio, they managed to play only one show on New Years Eve 2003 at what was suspected to be a haunted condo. The current lineup only became complete after all three ladies made their way to Seattle. There, they met bassist Jeff Anderson at a party and asked him to join on Halloween, according to Reed, partially due to his impressive land shark costume.

For those who may be wondering: a tea cozy is a cutely decorated cloth cover for teapots that helps keep tea warm, more often seen in the U.K. So the choice to name themselves "tea cozies" actually aligns well with the band's Brit-based sound but mostly stems from their desire to call themselves something that would most likely appeal to knitters and British grandmothers. And much like their namesake, the band is to the indie scene what tea cozies are in the U.S.: obscure and unknown, yet still appreciated by a chosen few.
You'd be surprised how many people don't know what tea cozies are, Viergutz says. Our bass player still doesn't.

The band calls its sound "gargadelic janglepop" which involves sampling well-known genres and mixing the sounds into something new. The band's primary influences are David Bowie, Justine Frishmann, Ray Davies, Michel Gondry, Prince, the Beatles, Morrissey, and Kim Deal, all chosen not only for their musical prowess but also due the band's personal belief that they're all aliens.

Songs like "Loxo" and "Stir the Cup", from their 2006 self-titled EP, are a testament to their sound: catchy guitar jams mixed with upbeat pop that you can shimmy and shake to while the girls wail and croon. Others like "Tranciting" stick to the same beat, only with a noticeably grittier, underground sound. One of their newer singles, "Pretty Pages" is comprised of jingly sounds (including a tambourine) played along with fast-paced pop.

With their fun, danceable beats, you would think the Tea Cozies are all about energy at their shows. And they are, if there's enough room. Harvey reminisces about one show in which the band was packed into the corner of a small cafe. There was so little space that if they moved around, they would hit each other with instruments or accidentally turn off their power strip and unplug half of their equipment. It was ridiculous, Harvey says. Then a drunk woman took off her shirt and danced in a swimming suit for the rest of our set; it made us feel better.

Lyric writing is mainly left in the hands of Reed and Harvey, who also share vocal duties. Reed is known for translating her lyrics into various languages and back to English through Babelfish. Harvey likes to mix together phrases and double meanings until they become long chains of words. On top, they'll throw in fun words to shout and melodic chants. Other songs are the products of jam sessions played repetitively to the point where it's either permanently stuck in their heads or something they never want to hear again. We all have little handheld recording devices at our side during practice, Reed says. When we play something really bitchin, we'll each record it. We have tapes and tapes of those. It's like an archive of thoughts and silliness.

GOALS
The band will tour the West Coast in May 2008 and will be joined with fellow Seattleites Daguerreotypes and the Little Penguins. Tea Cozies are working on songs for a new album and says its mission statement is to keep making music until the apocalypse hits.

Full Article: http://venuszine.com/articles/music/features/2799/Band_of_the_Month_Tea_Cozies - Venus Zine


Tea Cozies —Hot Probs {8}
Buy it!
{Self-released}

Hot Probs is the newest album from Tea Cozies, and it is a pure pop record – and a damn good one at that.

Tea Cozies are a three-fourths female pop band that has crafted some very fun and catchy songs on this very good album. The setup is fairly traditional: two guitars, bass and drums. Although I’ve only seen them play live one time - and they were not playing their own songs, but Liz Phair’s (at TIG’s Exile in {Imaginary} Girlville night last summer) - it was obvious from their take on Phair’s “Gunshy” (where they increased the tempo but lost none of the emotional impact of that song), that they could be a really enjoyable band to listen to; Hot Probs confirms it.

After the first listen of Hot Probs, it sounds familiar. It’s full of pop tricks like handclaps and “oh oh ohs”, it borrows from surf pop (think The Beach Boys, Jan and Dean and Frankie and Annette), making for a great record that gets better as the weather gets warmer. It makes sense that the album was produced by Erik Blood, the Turn-Ons guitarist and producer who is a fan of Phil Spector’s production aesthetics and understands pop music as well as anyone in the northwest.

The album opens with “Boys at the Metro”, which has the jerky guitar opening from Imperial Teen’s “Baby” on top of a Gina Schock-like drum beat. It takes over a minute to get to the lyrics, which are “the universe is dead, it’s just a theater, hey fuck you Spielberg.” Even with the four-letter word directed at the famous director, it is one of the catchiest songs on a very catchy record.

“Like Luca Brasi” is arguably my favorite track on the record (track three, often the best track on any given album). It’s a story set in a bad dream about a trip swimming that, well, ends badly. It has my favorite verse on the album, which includes “I should have listened to my instincts, because I can’t swim for shit; tell mom and dad I can’t do the dishes, now I gotta sleep with the fishes.” It reminds me of the Sleater-Kinney song “Wilderness” with the dual-layered guitar parts, the “bad idea gets worse” storyline and the harmonies on “Like Luca Brasi” sound like Carrie Brownstein’s here. The Tea Cozies’ song is much sugary, of course, but the spirit from my absolute favorite band is transcendent.

“Tri-Part-Ite” is another highlight, with its fun swagger and Dick Dale-esque surf guitar parts, sounds like a hit song from the 1950s or early 60s. If you had a convertible, this would be a song you want blasting with the top down, in ninety degree weather while you cruise around while wearing sunglasses.

If there is a misstep here (and be aware that that is a term I am hesitant to use), it would be “Huffy Walrus”. The song isn’t bad per se, in fact far from it. The song is well-constructed and still pretty catchy but it is more of a garage rock song rather that a sugary pop number and the guitar parts are more Jack White (see The White Stripes’ song “Girl You Have No Faith in Medicine”) and less Dick Dale. That’s fine and all (and saying “that song doesn’t sound like the others” is probably a pretty dickish thing to complain about anyway), but I also felt like it interrupted the continuity as there was a power pop track in the middle of a sunshine pop album. Still, though, that’s a minor quibble overall.

Hot Probs is a very solid record from a promising band that recalls the upbeat, fun, summertime pop I grew up on. I’m suspecting that band members Jessi Reed, Brady Harvey, Kelly Viergutz and Jeff Anderson grew up loving the same Beach Boys music that I did. On the band’s bio, they list artists like Talking Heads, Can, Pixies and Stereolab as influences and their one-sheet bio features a quote comparing them to The Breeders and PJ Harvey. All fine artists and ones I’d want to be compared to, sure, but really, Tea Cozies have a lot more fun. And so do their listeners.

-ChrisB, April 30, 2009

http://www.threeimaginarygirls.com/recordreview/2009apr/hotprobs
- Three Imaginary Girls


I recently had the pleasure of enjoying an evening of music at The Comet here in Seattle. You never know what you’re going to get at some shows. I’ve been underwhelmed by some local bands lately. But there are great ones out there as well.

Tea Cozies are a Seattle four-piece who play what they’ve adorably coined garagadelic janglepop, and I’m in love. Their debut album HOT PROBS is produced by none other than our dear friend, Erik Blood, and will drop in early May. Their infectious spirit and melodic songwriting will make your summer, I promise.
HOT PROBS shows that their live performance transfers well to record. When the album was first played for me, I was taken at how relentless it sounded. I even wondered if some of the songs could be shorter. After seeing them play live, I couldn’t imagine it! Without falling into the “jam band” category, they bring it down, pick it up and don’t bother setting it down too gently. Their performance was unpretentious, which I really appreciated.

I hear tones of Elastica or Lush on their early EP’s. Although they covered Elastica in their recent set, these three girls and one boy definitely have a sound all their own.
Tea Cozies upcoming shows: April 17th @ Kelly’s Olympian in Portland (w/Swallows) and May 1st @ The High Dive in Seattle (Album Release Party w/The Ironclads and Katharine Hepburn’s Voice)

http://thecolorawesome.com/2009/04/02/tea-cozies-seriously-hot-probs/ - The Color Awesome


I recently had the pleasure of enjoying an evening of music at The Comet here in Seattle. You never know what you’re going to get at some shows. I’ve been underwhelmed by some local bands lately. But there are great ones out there as well.

Tea Cozies are a Seattle four-piece who play what they’ve adorably coined garagadelic janglepop, and I’m in love. Their debut album HOT PROBS is produced by none other than our dear friend, Erik Blood, and will drop in early May. Their infectious spirit and melodic songwriting will make your summer, I promise.
HOT PROBS shows that their live performance transfers well to record. When the album was first played for me, I was taken at how relentless it sounded. I even wondered if some of the songs could be shorter. After seeing them play live, I couldn’t imagine it! Without falling into the “jam band” category, they bring it down, pick it up and don’t bother setting it down too gently. Their performance was unpretentious, which I really appreciated.

I hear tones of Elastica or Lush on their early EP’s. Although they covered Elastica in their recent set, these three girls and one boy definitely have a sound all their own.
Tea Cozies upcoming shows: April 17th @ Kelly’s Olympian in Portland (w/Swallows) and May 1st @ The High Dive in Seattle (Album Release Party w/The Ironclads and Katharine Hepburn’s Voice)

http://thecolorawesome.com/2009/04/02/tea-cozies-seriously-hot-probs/ - The Color Awesome


Discography

BANG UP (EP) release date 10/30/2012
1. Muchos Dracula
2. Paul
3. April Fool
4. Cosmic Osmo
5. Silhouette in a Suitcase

DEAD MAN'S SISTER (Single) release date 4/16/2011
1. Dead Man's Sister
2. Cosmic Osmo

"Dead Man's Sister" radio airplay: 90.3 KEXP Seattle, 107.7 The End, KBCS Bellevue; KEXP Song of the Day, Virgin America Airlines.

HOT PROBS (LP) released nationally 9/15/2009
1. Boys at the Metro
2. Pretty Pages
3. Like Luca Brasi
4. Huffy Walrus
5. Corner Store Girls
6. The South Turned Him Sour
7. Paris Syndrome
8. Tri-part-ite
9. 40° N
10. Behind the Glass Eye

All have received radio airplay: 90.3 KEXP Seattle, 89.3 KAOS Olympia, Opbmusic.org Portland, 90.5 KCSU Ft.Collins CO, Radio 1190 Boulder CO, Woxy, ETC
"Pretty Pages" featured in Mtv's $5 Cover Seattle.
"Corner Store Girls" hand picked for Caffe Vita's GIVE Compilation.

PRETTY PAGES (Single) Released 03/25/08
1. Pretty Pages
2. Reglons
*both tracks have radio airplay: 90.3 KEXP Seattle

TEA COZIES (EP) Released 10/10/06
1. Stir the Cup
2. Tranciting
3. Knee Sox
4. Olivia
5. Loxo
*All 5 songs have had radio airplay and have been streamed on many internet radio websites.
"Tranciting" radio airplay: 90.3 KEXP Seattle, 107.7 The End

* "Tranciting" is featured on "Sounds from the Seattle Underground," a compilation of local Seattle bands presented by Nadamucho.com and Global Seepej Records released on 7/1/08

Photos

Bio

Nestled somewhere between garage rock and indie pop lives a Seattle band called Tea Cozies. Taking their influence from 60s British Invasion bands and 90s indie rock, this four-piece creates a cyclone of reverb drenched guitars, girl-on-girl harmonies, and surf rock beats.

Vocalist/guitarists Jessi Reed and Brady Harvey met in high school in Colorado and started playing music soon after. They relocated to Seattle and recruited bassist Jeff Anderson and later, drummer Garrett Croxon (former Fleet Foxes) with the final lineup cemented in 2010.

The band's debut album Hot Probs (produced by Erik Blood) is soon to be followed by a new EP, Bang Up in October 30, 2012 with their sophomore album to follow. Tea Cozies have recently shared the stage with Ty Segall and Wussy and made appearances at Doe Bay Festival, City Arts Fest, and SXSW.

Band Members