TERESAJENEE
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TERESAJENEE

St. Louis, Missouri, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2007 | SELF

St. Louis, Missouri, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2007
Solo Alternative Soul

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Jul
17
TERESAJENEE @ Missouri Botanical Gardens

St. Louis, Missouri, USA

St. Louis, Missouri, USA

Jun
23
TERESAJENEE @ Madame Walker Theater Centre

Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Apr
12
TERESAJENEE @ The Gramophone

Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


We were absolutely sure that we put together an incredible shortlist of local artists we wanted to reach out to perform at our inaugural MOTH showcase at Old Rock House. Ironically, we were able to get the top 3 names, and one of those was the ubiquitous Teresajenee. I’d been introduced to her music by a write-up in the always-on-point Riverfront Times A to Z blog, and upon reading the description of the sound I bought her album The Ecklectic with no further deliberation. Now, in this economy, that doesn’t happen very often. She’s a unique artist that’s rooted in a genre that (as a majority) couldn’t be further removed from the principles on display in her music. She’s keeping that fire, that fearless sense of innovation and exploration, alive in her sound. And she’s not alone: she’s one of the many outstanding artists in Saint Louis (many of who are branded as being a member of The Force) who are re-calibrating our collective perception of 21st African-American music in the most fantastic way possible: But putting out progressive (and exceptional) product. We corresponded via e-mail, on the eve of her performance alongside Solange Knowles on January 21st, about writer’s block, The Ecklectic: Part Two, and touring.
I’d like to talk to you about how you approach songwriting: How many hours a day do you write for, and would you say it’s mostly a solo endeavor, or a more collaborative experience?

For placements or work for hire its collaborative & definitely about writing a song on the spot. Usually, I have to finish a tune in 5-10 minutes. As far as MY music goes…It’s funny cause I have a very random way of writing music. I write solo, I dont write on paper, and I take my time; as I’m inspired I slowly put a song together in my head. Sometimes it’ll take days for me to write a song for myself…and sometimes it can take months.

What do you if you get writer’s block?

I seriously wait it out. I cant write when Im in a block. I mean, I can put a song together…it just wont be great…to me .

In a recent interview you mentioned that some of the material that you’re working on for your next record that will feature live-band versions of songs previously released on The Ecklectic. I was curious to ask you about the creative process of reinventing songs over a period of time – What factors influence how you approach the material?

I hear it in my head first…like literally hear the arrangement in my head. When I first thought about having a live version of the EK, thats how it began. For songs like “Tortoise vs. Hare”, which my brother Mike ‘Wildmann’ Rainier helped me produce. I heard the music first. I heard the guitar riffs, drum rhythms, even the different keyboard synth sounds. I worked it out on my piano them drove over to his studio and played it out for him. He took it, hopped on each instrument and executed my vision. Artists don’t do that much anymore, that live sound…not in my lane they don’t. I wanted to stir things up a bit this time around for the album.

Would you say that its similar to translating the songs from record to a live setting?

Definitely. For me its like gravy on the potatoes. Im just taking something and perfecting it.

It’s also noted that the follow-up that your working on was billed as a second part to The Ecklectic. Was it always your intent that this would be a two-album arc? Are there certain themes or concepts that are carried over from the first?

It wasn’t always my intention to do a part two, but after 2 years the album is finally getting nationwide attention. Once I’d seen this, I knew I had to extend its life. The main theme of this upcoming album is the same as in part one; which is really no theme at all…no rules…right down to the spelling of the album’s name.

What’s been your experience playing live in Saint Louis? During your set at the MOTH show at the Old Rock House you had a very tasteful transition between playing solo & incorporating Lamar Harris’ various talents of DJing and live instrumentation. Has this versatility helped you play a variety of different venues and shows?

Most times St. Louisans who see me for the first time dont even think I’m from here. I often get asked “Where are you from”? Its very weird. I work so hard on being versatile, to be able to connect with any crowd…anywhere. At the same time, I don’t consider what I do to be so different to the point that I’m not recognizable as “hometown” by my hometown. When I hit the stage here, I set a goal for myself. The goal is to get past the first song with the crowd. If I can get past that first song, its usually smooth sailing from there. So far it has worked.

How has the involvement & support of The Force helped influence local music in Saint Louis? What have been your observations on this?

I think The Force has tapped into a lane that hasnt been tapped into here yet. The Force collective are prime examples of versatility; some have their music in heavy rotation in venue - Justin Price (MusicoftheHour.com)


We were absolutely sure that we put together an incredible shortlist of local artists we wanted to reach out to perform at our inaugural MOTH showcase at Old Rock House. Ironically, we were able to get the top 3 names, and one of those was the ubiquitous Teresajenee. I’d been introduced to her music by a write-up in the always-on-point Riverfront Times A to Z blog, and upon reading the description of the sound I bought her album The Ecklectic with no further deliberation. Now, in this economy, that doesn’t happen very often. She’s a unique artist that’s rooted in a genre that (as a majority) couldn’t be further removed from the principles on display in her music. She’s keeping that fire, that fearless sense of innovation and exploration, alive in her sound. And she’s not alone: she’s one of the many outstanding artists in Saint Louis (many of who are branded as being a member of The Force) who are re-calibrating our collective perception of 21st African-American music in the most fantastic way possible: But putting out progressive (and exceptional) product. We corresponded via e-mail, on the eve of her performance alongside Solange Knowles on January 21st, about writer’s block, The Ecklectic: Part Two, and touring.
I’d like to talk to you about how you approach songwriting: How many hours a day do you write for, and would you say it’s mostly a solo endeavor, or a more collaborative experience?

For placements or work for hire its collaborative & definitely about writing a song on the spot. Usually, I have to finish a tune in 5-10 minutes. As far as MY music goes…It’s funny cause I have a very random way of writing music. I write solo, I dont write on paper, and I take my time; as I’m inspired I slowly put a song together in my head. Sometimes it’ll take days for me to write a song for myself…and sometimes it can take months.

What do you if you get writer’s block?

I seriously wait it out. I cant write when Im in a block. I mean, I can put a song together…it just wont be great…to me .

In a recent interview you mentioned that some of the material that you’re working on for your next record that will feature live-band versions of songs previously released on The Ecklectic. I was curious to ask you about the creative process of reinventing songs over a period of time – What factors influence how you approach the material?

I hear it in my head first…like literally hear the arrangement in my head. When I first thought about having a live version of the EK, thats how it began. For songs like “Tortoise vs. Hare”, which my brother Mike ‘Wildmann’ Rainier helped me produce. I heard the music first. I heard the guitar riffs, drum rhythms, even the different keyboard synth sounds. I worked it out on my piano them drove over to his studio and played it out for him. He took it, hopped on each instrument and executed my vision. Artists don’t do that much anymore, that live sound…not in my lane they don’t. I wanted to stir things up a bit this time around for the album.

Would you say that its similar to translating the songs from record to a live setting?

Definitely. For me its like gravy on the potatoes. Im just taking something and perfecting it.

It’s also noted that the follow-up that your working on was billed as a second part to The Ecklectic. Was it always your intent that this would be a two-album arc? Are there certain themes or concepts that are carried over from the first?

It wasn’t always my intention to do a part two, but after 2 years the album is finally getting nationwide attention. Once I’d seen this, I knew I had to extend its life. The main theme of this upcoming album is the same as in part one; which is really no theme at all…no rules…right down to the spelling of the album’s name.

What’s been your experience playing live in Saint Louis? During your set at the MOTH show at the Old Rock House you had a very tasteful transition between playing solo & incorporating Lamar Harris’ various talents of DJing and live instrumentation. Has this versatility helped you play a variety of different venues and shows?

Most times St. Louisans who see me for the first time dont even think I’m from here. I often get asked “Where are you from”? Its very weird. I work so hard on being versatile, to be able to connect with any crowd…anywhere. At the same time, I don’t consider what I do to be so different to the point that I’m not recognizable as “hometown” by my hometown. When I hit the stage here, I set a goal for myself. The goal is to get past the first song with the crowd. If I can get past that first song, its usually smooth sailing from there. So far it has worked.

How has the involvement & support of The Force helped influence local music in Saint Louis? What have been your observations on this?

I think The Force has tapped into a lane that hasnt been tapped into here yet. The Force collective are prime examples of versatility; some have their music in heavy rotation in venue - Justin Price (MusicoftheHour.com)


The envelope-pushers.

Let’s just be real with ourselves…there aren’t that many left. We’re living in a digi-info age, especially when it comes to our beloved music. Of course that’s not to say that aren’t any artists challenging us, broadening our scope and bringing us new sounds and new vibes that’ll ‘stimulate yo’ mind’, to paraphrase the great Smokey from Friday.

But even with these artists being out there, and even with us ready and willing to open up our ears and our hearts, the cruel and ironic truth is that while the information age is supposed to make things easier and more convenient, it’s getting harder and harder to wade through all the music websites, blogs, networks, online magazines and data that keeps popping up in droves for today’s music junkie. The end result is that one starts to ask him or herself…”Where’s all the music that’s supposed to challenge us? Where are the envelope-pushers?”

St. Louis native Teresa Jenee is an envelope-pusher, to say the least. It’s plain as day that, upon first look and listen, it’s difficult to place her into one category. Sure, you could call her Neo-soul (as evidenced by a voice that could make a grown man fall to his knees and curl up into a fetal, thumb sucking-type position), but what about the obvious electronic and acoustic influences from time to time? (For hardcore evidence of the former, peep the Yoruba Soul Mix of her song “Remember”). You could say she’s just for the hipster/tight jeans/skateboarding crowd, but you might find yourself underestimating her vocal, production, beat-making and songwriting skills, on top of the fact that she’s well-versed in FOUR separate instruments (piano, organ, clarinet, drums).

You might even try to convince yourself that she’s just another Indie R&B Internet flavor of the month…until you find out that she’s rocked shows from Brooklyn to Atlanta, from SOB’s and Village Underground to University of Missouri and Tennessee State University, with names like Solange Knowles and Eric Roberson (check out live performance footage from SOB’s in NYC), been featured on BET Centric and SoulTrain.com, AND that she’s had her own label in Athena Sounds Music Group since 2002. Basically, all your assumptions about Teresa Jenee a.k.a TJ a.k.a Jenee Eklectic, are dashed to dust, once you dig deeper and take a closer peek.

Yes, Teresa Jenee is an envelope-pusher, dances to the beat of her own drummer and could be on the verge of something very special and career-changing. But most importantly, unequivocally and beyond a shadow of a doubt…Teresa Jenee is a woman on a mission.

BB: Can you talk about some of your influences musically? What artists and/or genres led you to make your style of music?

TJ: Hmmm, that’s a long list. Frank Sinatra all day!!! Um, lemme think…David Bowie, The Clark Sisters, Kim Burrell, Lauryn Hill, Thompson Community Singers, Walter Hawkins, Elton John, Erykah Badu, Jill Scott, Sade, John Mayer, Stevie Wonder, Brian McKnight, SWV, The Police, Lonestar, Cold Play, Jay-Z, Outkast…shall I continue?? [Laughs.]

BB: You seem to come from a very musically talented family, with both your mother and father having been performers in the past. Tell me about your upbringing in terms of what you were exposed to musically and artistically.

TJ: I came up in a very strict Christian household, so I wasn’t allowed to listen to Rap music at all…or even most R&B, for that matter. What I was allowed to listen to was soft rock. My mother used to turn on the radio at night in my bedroom to lull me to sleep with it. All I would hear were classics like “Space Oddity”, “Blue Eyes”, and “My Way”.

BB: Can you talk a little bit about what ‘Soultronica’ is?

TJ: Basically, just Soul fused with electronic. My soul side comes from within, my gospel roots, the piano I play at shows. The electronic side is very much my adventurous side: exploring new sounds, approaches to writing and composing, even the way I put together my beats when I’m producing.

BB: The music of the Midwest is very diverse and varied. Being from St. Louis, what impact has the city’s music scene and that of the Midwest overall had on you as an artist?

TJ: Well, St. Louis is a hard city for musicians. A lot of what is relevant now, gets the shine. Anything that strays out of the trend or goes outside of the box gets little or none of it. It’s fueled my rebellion in a way. I have a determination more now than ever to do the music that I want and allow my weirdo thoughts to bleed out through my sound. I want to be the sore thumb!

BB: Judging from your presence on the Internet, you’ve been able to create quite a buzz for yourself. Would you talk about the approach you’ve taken to build up your name and reputation thus far?


TJ: It has been crazy rough, very much a struggle, and I’m still far from my goal. But I will say this much: God has really blessed me by just putting me in the hearts and minds of key people who have in turn - Ron Grant (Brooklyn Bodega)


The envelope-pushers.

Let’s just be real with ourselves…there aren’t that many left. We’re living in a digi-info age, especially when it comes to our beloved music. Of course that’s not to say that aren’t any artists challenging us, broadening our scope and bringing us new sounds and new vibes that’ll ‘stimulate yo’ mind’, to paraphrase the great Smokey from Friday.

But even with these artists being out there, and even with us ready and willing to open up our ears and our hearts, the cruel and ironic truth is that while the information age is supposed to make things easier and more convenient, it’s getting harder and harder to wade through all the music websites, blogs, networks, online magazines and data that keeps popping up in droves for today’s music junkie. The end result is that one starts to ask him or herself…”Where’s all the music that’s supposed to challenge us? Where are the envelope-pushers?”

St. Louis native Teresa Jenee is an envelope-pusher, to say the least. It’s plain as day that, upon first look and listen, it’s difficult to place her into one category. Sure, you could call her Neo-soul (as evidenced by a voice that could make a grown man fall to his knees and curl up into a fetal, thumb sucking-type position), but what about the obvious electronic and acoustic influences from time to time? (For hardcore evidence of the former, peep the Yoruba Soul Mix of her song “Remember”). You could say she’s just for the hipster/tight jeans/skateboarding crowd, but you might find yourself underestimating her vocal, production, beat-making and songwriting skills, on top of the fact that she’s well-versed in FOUR separate instruments (piano, organ, clarinet, drums).

You might even try to convince yourself that she’s just another Indie R&B Internet flavor of the month…until you find out that she’s rocked shows from Brooklyn to Atlanta, from SOB’s and Village Underground to University of Missouri and Tennessee State University, with names like Solange Knowles and Eric Roberson (check out live performance footage from SOB’s in NYC), been featured on BET Centric and SoulTrain.com, AND that she’s had her own label in Athena Sounds Music Group since 2002. Basically, all your assumptions about Teresa Jenee a.k.a TJ a.k.a Jenee Eklectic, are dashed to dust, once you dig deeper and take a closer peek.

Yes, Teresa Jenee is an envelope-pusher, dances to the beat of her own drummer and could be on the verge of something very special and career-changing. But most importantly, unequivocally and beyond a shadow of a doubt…Teresa Jenee is a woman on a mission.

BB: Can you talk about some of your influences musically? What artists and/or genres led you to make your style of music?

TJ: Hmmm, that’s a long list. Frank Sinatra all day!!! Um, lemme think…David Bowie, The Clark Sisters, Kim Burrell, Lauryn Hill, Thompson Community Singers, Walter Hawkins, Elton John, Erykah Badu, Jill Scott, Sade, John Mayer, Stevie Wonder, Brian McKnight, SWV, The Police, Lonestar, Cold Play, Jay-Z, Outkast…shall I continue?? [Laughs.]

BB: You seem to come from a very musically talented family, with both your mother and father having been performers in the past. Tell me about your upbringing in terms of what you were exposed to musically and artistically.

TJ: I came up in a very strict Christian household, so I wasn’t allowed to listen to Rap music at all…or even most R&B, for that matter. What I was allowed to listen to was soft rock. My mother used to turn on the radio at night in my bedroom to lull me to sleep with it. All I would hear were classics like “Space Oddity”, “Blue Eyes”, and “My Way”.

BB: Can you talk a little bit about what ‘Soultronica’ is?

TJ: Basically, just Soul fused with electronic. My soul side comes from within, my gospel roots, the piano I play at shows. The electronic side is very much my adventurous side: exploring new sounds, approaches to writing and composing, even the way I put together my beats when I’m producing.

BB: The music of the Midwest is very diverse and varied. Being from St. Louis, what impact has the city’s music scene and that of the Midwest overall had on you as an artist?

TJ: Well, St. Louis is a hard city for musicians. A lot of what is relevant now, gets the shine. Anything that strays out of the trend or goes outside of the box gets little or none of it. It’s fueled my rebellion in a way. I have a determination more now than ever to do the music that I want and allow my weirdo thoughts to bleed out through my sound. I want to be the sore thumb!

BB: Judging from your presence on the Internet, you’ve been able to create quite a buzz for yourself. Would you talk about the approach you’ve taken to build up your name and reputation thus far?


TJ: It has been crazy rough, very much a struggle, and I’m still far from my goal. But I will say this much: God has really blessed me by just putting me in the hearts and minds of key people who have in turn - Ron Grant (Brooklyn Bodega)


It was such a pleasure to meet and talk to this next featured artist in our Get to Know series. Hailing from St. Louis, Teresa Jenee is indeed making a name for herself. Her passion hangs proudly on her sound, an “eclectic” mixture that will surely keep you tuned in. Her debut album, The Eklectic, is one of those rare treats giving you a variety of different sounds and genres from one artist (So awesome!). She recently made a guest appearance at The Word and graced me with some of her time. Get to Know: Teresa Jenee

So what prompted you to want to come and perform in Memphis?

Well Tonya asked but, I actually view Memphis as one of the next if not, great soul cities. It has such a rich history in music with blues, soul and rock and roll. And the soul scene is so hot right now. It’s right there with Philly. And I personally feel that if you want to hit any couple of cities you have to do Philly, got to do Chicago, got to hit Memphis.

I always ask artist this question, but how do you categorize your sound? I am always intrigued by an artist’s answer.

Trail Mix. I call it a trail mix. It’s supposed to be soultronica plus rock and a little bit of everything. The whole eclectic thing. I do the soul; some techno elements. There’s a part in my show where I do the acoustic and the piano. And then, of course, you know I like to rock it out a bit. I’m just a bit of everything. Like a trail mix.

Speaking of the eclectic sound, the name of your first album is The Eklectic correct?
Yes.

How is the album different from the Teresa Jenee EP?

Well the Teresa Jenee EP was an introduction to let people know that I was out here. With no one knowing my name, but them seeing me out there and hearing me. I wanted to put a product out there. There were only five songs, but every last one of those songs was a sample of my sound. And when I got ready to do Eklectic, I’m like okay I’ve given them a sampler, now let’s give them a whole meal and that’s what I did. You get a bit of everything. From song to song I try to touch on a different genre. From blues, to chop, to house, to soul. I wanted to cover it all.

I like seeing artist take on the task of covering different genres and not being boxed into a category. Like some artist that are categorized as neosoul are rarely given wiggle room to venture outside of that genre and be accepted.

Yes. I use to wonder why people would get so mad at neosoul. I was like let neosoul be neosoul, but I’ve come to see that it really is a box. It’s crazy to box something that’s always evolving. You have so many directions you can take with it and have the voice still be rich and the message be uplifting. It’s still soul, but there are many phases of soul like alternative soul and urban soul.

Where can we find your album?

The downloads are available on iTunes and Rhapsody. You can also get music at my bandcamp page www.teresajenee.bandcamp.com and you can get the music directly from me.

I’m sorry. I want an actual CD. Something I can hold in my hand.

(Laughter) Oh ok. You can get an actual CD at any of my live shows. Outside of that they are available online.

Okay good. I will be needing that then.

Okay cool.

I’ll get there one day. We’re starting small.

Completely understand.

Now what’s next for you after this stop?

I have two upcoming shows back home in St. Louis and then making some stops in Atlanta, Richmond, and possibly New York. Hopefully do more.

What’s in the future for Teresa Jenee?

Repackaging and adding two tracks to the Eklectic. Releasing Eklectic 2.0. Do a couple more videos. Just keep moving and keep doing shows. Who knows? One day I might want to act. Win a Grammy. Hey if Eric Roberson can do it, why can’t I?

Indeed!

He gives me hope and I admire him.

Okay last question. Who’s in your iPod? What are you listening to?

Oh my goodness. I’ve got Quadron, Brittany Bosco, a lot of R&B. I got the Usher, the LeToya. Love Regret. I like a good R&B cut. Eric Roberson, of course, Roots, telepop music. I have a lot of little things. Too many to name. I know when I walk away I’m going to remember them and wish I had mentioned them.
- GhettoJane (Neosoulville.com)


It was such a pleasure to meet and talk to this next featured artist in our Get to Know series. Hailing from St. Louis, Teresa Jenee is indeed making a name for herself. Her passion hangs proudly on her sound, an “eclectic” mixture that will surely keep you tuned in. Her debut album, The Eklectic, is one of those rare treats giving you a variety of different sounds and genres from one artist (So awesome!). She recently made a guest appearance at The Word and graced me with some of her time. Get to Know: Teresa Jenee

So what prompted you to want to come and perform in Memphis?

Well Tonya asked but, I actually view Memphis as one of the next if not, great soul cities. It has such a rich history in music with blues, soul and rock and roll. And the soul scene is so hot right now. It’s right there with Philly. And I personally feel that if you want to hit any couple of cities you have to do Philly, got to do Chicago, got to hit Memphis.

I always ask artist this question, but how do you categorize your sound? I am always intrigued by an artist’s answer.

Trail Mix. I call it a trail mix. It’s supposed to be soultronica plus rock and a little bit of everything. The whole eclectic thing. I do the soul; some techno elements. There’s a part in my show where I do the acoustic and the piano. And then, of course, you know I like to rock it out a bit. I’m just a bit of everything. Like a trail mix.

Speaking of the eclectic sound, the name of your first album is The Eklectic correct?
Yes.

How is the album different from the Teresa Jenee EP?

Well the Teresa Jenee EP was an introduction to let people know that I was out here. With no one knowing my name, but them seeing me out there and hearing me. I wanted to put a product out there. There were only five songs, but every last one of those songs was a sample of my sound. And when I got ready to do Eklectic, I’m like okay I’ve given them a sampler, now let’s give them a whole meal and that’s what I did. You get a bit of everything. From song to song I try to touch on a different genre. From blues, to chop, to house, to soul. I wanted to cover it all.

I like seeing artist take on the task of covering different genres and not being boxed into a category. Like some artist that are categorized as neosoul are rarely given wiggle room to venture outside of that genre and be accepted.

Yes. I use to wonder why people would get so mad at neosoul. I was like let neosoul be neosoul, but I’ve come to see that it really is a box. It’s crazy to box something that’s always evolving. You have so many directions you can take with it and have the voice still be rich and the message be uplifting. It’s still soul, but there are many phases of soul like alternative soul and urban soul.

Where can we find your album?

The downloads are available on iTunes and Rhapsody. You can also get music at my bandcamp page www.teresajenee.bandcamp.com and you can get the music directly from me.

I’m sorry. I want an actual CD. Something I can hold in my hand.

(Laughter) Oh ok. You can get an actual CD at any of my live shows. Outside of that they are available online.

Okay good. I will be needing that then.

Okay cool.

I’ll get there one day. We’re starting small.

Completely understand.

Now what’s next for you after this stop?

I have two upcoming shows back home in St. Louis and then making some stops in Atlanta, Richmond, and possibly New York. Hopefully do more.

What’s in the future for Teresa Jenee?

Repackaging and adding two tracks to the Eklectic. Releasing Eklectic 2.0. Do a couple more videos. Just keep moving and keep doing shows. Who knows? One day I might want to act. Win a Grammy. Hey if Eric Roberson can do it, why can’t I?

Indeed!

He gives me hope and I admire him.

Okay last question. Who’s in your iPod? What are you listening to?

Oh my goodness. I’ve got Quadron, Brittany Bosco, a lot of R&B. I got the Usher, the LeToya. Love Regret. I like a good R&B cut. Eric Roberson, of course, Roots, telepop music. I have a lot of little things. Too many to name. I know when I walk away I’m going to remember them and wish I had mentioned them.
- GhettoJane (Neosoulville.com)


The definition of making waves: an international hit single produced by Osunlade, rotation on STL’s Hip-Hop/R&B FM station and major label courtship… that just scratches the surface.




Few of us are fortunate enough to discover our passions and talents at an early age without having to go through a trial and error process to figure out where it is that we fit in. Some of us, for one reason or another, discover our gift only to find ourselves attempting to run from the inevitable fact that we are simply destined to make a difference in this thing we call life. For singer/musician/songwriter Teresajenee music was to be her destiny.




In just three years alone, Teresajenee has opened for talents such as Eric Roberson, Anthony David, even Solange Knowles. She’s rocked stages in St. Louis, Nashville, Atlanta, North Carolina, and on campuses including University of Missouri-Columbia, Webster University, and her alma mater Tennessee State University. She was nominated two years in a row for a music award by her city’s alt-weekly newspaper, The Riverfront Times. Last winter, she was even granted her rite of passage as an artist by performing at world renowned venues, SOB’s and Village Underground, in New York City.

Not bad for a little rose from the concrete streets of Walnut Park in St. Louis, Missouri. Its not like she had much of a choice either; her father is a “sanging-guitar-strumming preacher man” and her mother used to lead sing for a soul band in the 70s before she found religion. Raised in such a creative environment, it was here her gifts in painting and music were nurtured and her affinity towards the keys and organ developed well into her adult years. Additionally, so developed her musical range which was inspired by every one from Lonestar to Lauryn Hill, Elton John to Erykah Badu, The Clark Sisters, Kim Burell, and Coldplay. Teresajenee now plays four instruments: piano, organ, clarinet, and drums.

Teresajenee is unwilling to conform–to compose music for the sole purpose of corporate radio play. Teresajenee chose to do things her way. When asked what “her way” is she describes it as, “music that is soulful, introspective, and refreshing”. Miss TJ feels that it is not her duty to let the artistry suffer for the sake of a get-rich-quick, one-hit-wonder kind of career. She instead chooses to create thought provoking, well-written music that will reach the masses worldwide. She aspires to create songs that lyrically, vocally, and musically challenge the crassness of mainstream music today. Teresajenee has accepted the lifestyle of being a true artist and in hindsight understands that she did not choose music as her medium, but rather music has chosen her to make a difference in this world.

Teresajenee released the “The Ecklectic” in August 2009, which is scheduled for re-release later this year. She produced and wrote all 11 songs on her project and composed five of those 11. The album’s first offering, “Freedom” is in rotation on her city’s Hip-Hop/R&B station Hot 104.1 FM and indie station KDHX 88.1.

For Teresajenee’s bio visit: myspace.com/teresajenee

The video for “Freedom” is buzzing throughout the blogosphere; check it out right here on SoulTrain.com.











- Terry Bello (SoulTrain.com)


The definition of making waves: an international hit single produced by Osunlade, rotation on STL’s Hip-Hop/R&B FM station and major label courtship… that just scratches the surface.




Few of us are fortunate enough to discover our passions and talents at an early age without having to go through a trial and error process to figure out where it is that we fit in. Some of us, for one reason or another, discover our gift only to find ourselves attempting to run from the inevitable fact that we are simply destined to make a difference in this thing we call life. For singer/musician/songwriter Teresajenee music was to be her destiny.




In just three years alone, Teresajenee has opened for talents such as Eric Roberson, Anthony David, even Solange Knowles. She’s rocked stages in St. Louis, Nashville, Atlanta, North Carolina, and on campuses including University of Missouri-Columbia, Webster University, and her alma mater Tennessee State University. She was nominated two years in a row for a music award by her city’s alt-weekly newspaper, The Riverfront Times. Last winter, she was even granted her rite of passage as an artist by performing at world renowned venues, SOB’s and Village Underground, in New York City.

Not bad for a little rose from the concrete streets of Walnut Park in St. Louis, Missouri. Its not like she had much of a choice either; her father is a “sanging-guitar-strumming preacher man” and her mother used to lead sing for a soul band in the 70s before she found religion. Raised in such a creative environment, it was here her gifts in painting and music were nurtured and her affinity towards the keys and organ developed well into her adult years. Additionally, so developed her musical range which was inspired by every one from Lonestar to Lauryn Hill, Elton John to Erykah Badu, The Clark Sisters, Kim Burell, and Coldplay. Teresajenee now plays four instruments: piano, organ, clarinet, and drums.

Teresajenee is unwilling to conform–to compose music for the sole purpose of corporate radio play. Teresajenee chose to do things her way. When asked what “her way” is she describes it as, “music that is soulful, introspective, and refreshing”. Miss TJ feels that it is not her duty to let the artistry suffer for the sake of a get-rich-quick, one-hit-wonder kind of career. She instead chooses to create thought provoking, well-written music that will reach the masses worldwide. She aspires to create songs that lyrically, vocally, and musically challenge the crassness of mainstream music today. Teresajenee has accepted the lifestyle of being a true artist and in hindsight understands that she did not choose music as her medium, but rather music has chosen her to make a difference in this world.

Teresajenee released the “The Ecklectic” in August 2009, which is scheduled for re-release later this year. She produced and wrote all 11 songs on her project and composed five of those 11. The album’s first offering, “Freedom” is in rotation on her city’s Hip-Hop/R&B station Hot 104.1 FM and indie station KDHX 88.1.

For Teresajenee’s bio visit: myspace.com/teresajenee

The video for “Freedom” is buzzing throughout the blogosphere; check it out right here on SoulTrain.com.











- Terry Bello (SoulTrain.com)


Some of us, for one reason or another, discover our gift only to find ourselves attempting to run from the inevitable fact that we are simply destined to make a difference in this thing we call “life.”For singer/musician/songwriter Teresajenee music was to be her destiny. Born in St. Louis, Missouri to a guitarist/preacher/vocalist (father) and an ex-70’s soul singer, turned church choir director (mother), it was only natural for TJ to have music pumping through her veins.

FREE listening and downloading http://www.thisisrealmusic.com/articles/40509/teresa_jenee-ep.php

- Terry Bello (BET/ CentricTV/ Subcentric blog)


Some of us, for one reason or another, discover our gift only to find ourselves attempting to run from the inevitable fact that we are simply destined to make a difference in this thing we call “life.”For singer/musician/songwriter Teresajenee music was to be her destiny. Born in St. Louis, Missouri to a guitarist/preacher/vocalist (father) and an ex-70’s soul singer, turned church choir director (mother), it was only natural for TJ to have music pumping through her veins.

FREE listening and downloading http://www.thisisrealmusic.com/articles/40509/teresa_jenee-ep.php

- Terry Bello (BET/ CentricTV/ Subcentric blog)


To call Teresajenee an R&B artist is somewhat of a misnomer — after all, the pint-size Walnut Park native is much more than a purveyor of honeyed slow jams, and she's worked with some of the city's best underground hip-hop artists. But like any good R&B singer, her sense of phrasing is absolutely impeccable, and her emphasis is always on getting the best possible vocal tones for the song. That's evident on her debut full-length, The Ecklectic, an album that reveals her soft-rock and gospel roots while never limiting itself to these genres. Atop gently undulating rhythms and smoothed-over keyboards and piano, Teresajenee emotes like an elegant crooner who's not afraid of having soul and sass — in other words, think the intersection between Lauryn Hill, Angie Stone and Erykah Badu. - Annie Zaleski (Riverfront Times)


To call Teresajenee an R&B artist is somewhat of a misnomer — after all, the pint-size Walnut Park native is much more than a purveyor of honeyed slow jams, and she's worked with some of the city's best underground hip-hop artists. But like any good R&B singer, her sense of phrasing is absolutely impeccable, and her emphasis is always on getting the best possible vocal tones for the song. That's evident on her debut full-length, The Ecklectic, an album that reveals her soft-rock and gospel roots while never limiting itself to these genres. Atop gently undulating rhythms and smoothed-over keyboards and piano, Teresajenee emotes like an elegant crooner who's not afraid of having soul and sass — in other words, think the intersection between Lauryn Hill, Angie Stone and Erykah Badu. - Annie Zaleski (Riverfront Times)


This past Friday, Webster University’s Annual Rock Your Roots concert featured music that was a taste of throwback by way of Solange along with a progressive appetizer served through her opening act – local singer/musician Teresa Jenee.

Jenee’s unique blend of house/progressive soul/R&B commanded the attention of the audience from start to finish.

Somewhere between “Don’t Break My Heart,” the dance tune that had the singer grooving harder than anyone in the audience and “Pushin’” brought her vocal skills back into the forefront, Jenee showcased flexibility and maturity as an artist that warrants national attention from the music industry... (cont)

- Kenya Vaughn (St. Louis American)


This past Friday, Webster University’s Annual Rock Your Roots concert featured music that was a taste of throwback by way of Solange along with a progressive appetizer served through her opening act – local singer/musician Teresa Jenee.

Jenee’s unique blend of house/progressive soul/R&B commanded the attention of the audience from start to finish.

Somewhere between “Don’t Break My Heart,” the dance tune that had the singer grooving harder than anyone in the audience and “Pushin’” brought her vocal skills back into the forefront, Jenee showcased flexibility and maturity as an artist that warrants national attention from the music industry... (cont)

- Kenya Vaughn (St. Louis American)


Teresajenee's new album, The Ecklectic, lives up to its name. The eleven-track release encompasses tender piano ballads, kicky electro-driven dance numbers, slow-burn R&B, and gospel- and string-tinged soul. What anchors the album is her expressive voice, which can coo like a new mother or wail like a church soloist. Think Lauryn Hill or Erykah Badu — and that just scratches the surface.

Like The Ecklectic, Teresajenee (given name: Jennifer Sanders) is a study in contrasts. She's a combination of sassy and elegant, edgy and traditional, a charismatic dynamo who grew up in Walnut Park surrounded by music. Her dad played guitar and listened to everything from Frank Sinatra to The Phantom of the Opera. Her mom, meanwhile, went to school for music education, and before she was married, Sanders says, "she had a band, and she was a soul-singing sister as well, from lounge to lounge, club to club." As a youngster, Sanders would fall asleep at night listening to the dulcet tones of KEZK (102.5 FM). In fact, soft rock and gospel influenced her the most — especially because, in her religious household, she wasn't allowed to listen to certain kinds of music. Naturally, her decision to become a secular artist wasn't an easy one. She credits an audition for LaFace Records with her college singing group as the experience that "motivated" her to do things her own way.

"That was the deal with the going secular — I wanted to do this on my terms," she says. "I don't have to be vulgar. Not saying there's anything right or wrong about it, everyone's entitled to their own [opinion]. But I don't have to be that way to just do music that reaches people.

"It wasn't easy," she stresses. "Coming from the family I came from, obviously if I was going to do music, I was going to do Christian music. And nothing else."

Sanders moved back to St. Louis after attending college in Nashville, and The Ecklectic came together "over a span of maybe two, three years" in local studios. Why the long genesis?

"I believe in divine timing," she says. "Things will come when it's time to come. And a lot of things fell through, a lot of problems with producers, a lot of problems with losing sessions and stuff like that. It would just be a lot of random stuff that would happen every time I would try to record this album that would completely tear it apart. It got to the point where I was like, You know what, I'm going to stop trying to force this album to come about."

Indeed, Teresajenee has kept busy in the meantime as a songwriter for other artists; she also has a collaboration with Rockwell Knuckles in the works. "To know me is to know that I'm truly an eclectic," she says. "I am a little country, I'm a little rock & roll. You know, I am a scatterbrain at times. That's just me, you know?"
- Annie Zaleski (Riverfront Times)


Teresajenee's new album, The Ecklectic, lives up to its name. The eleven-track release encompasses tender piano ballads, kicky electro-driven dance numbers, slow-burn R&B, and gospel- and string-tinged soul. What anchors the album is her expressive voice, which can coo like a new mother or wail like a church soloist. Think Lauryn Hill or Erykah Badu — and that just scratches the surface.

Like The Ecklectic, Teresajenee (given name: Jennifer Sanders) is a study in contrasts. She's a combination of sassy and elegant, edgy and traditional, a charismatic dynamo who grew up in Walnut Park surrounded by music. Her dad played guitar and listened to everything from Frank Sinatra to The Phantom of the Opera. Her mom, meanwhile, went to school for music education, and before she was married, Sanders says, "she had a band, and she was a soul-singing sister as well, from lounge to lounge, club to club." As a youngster, Sanders would fall asleep at night listening to the dulcet tones of KEZK (102.5 FM). In fact, soft rock and gospel influenced her the most — especially because, in her religious household, she wasn't allowed to listen to certain kinds of music. Naturally, her decision to become a secular artist wasn't an easy one. She credits an audition for LaFace Records with her college singing group as the experience that "motivated" her to do things her own way.

"That was the deal with the going secular — I wanted to do this on my terms," she says. "I don't have to be vulgar. Not saying there's anything right or wrong about it, everyone's entitled to their own [opinion]. But I don't have to be that way to just do music that reaches people.

"It wasn't easy," she stresses. "Coming from the family I came from, obviously if I was going to do music, I was going to do Christian music. And nothing else."

Sanders moved back to St. Louis after attending college in Nashville, and The Ecklectic came together "over a span of maybe two, three years" in local studios. Why the long genesis?

"I believe in divine timing," she says. "Things will come when it's time to come. And a lot of things fell through, a lot of problems with producers, a lot of problems with losing sessions and stuff like that. It would just be a lot of random stuff that would happen every time I would try to record this album that would completely tear it apart. It got to the point where I was like, You know what, I'm going to stop trying to force this album to come about."

Indeed, Teresajenee has kept busy in the meantime as a songwriter for other artists; she also has a collaboration with Rockwell Knuckles in the works. "To know me is to know that I'm truly an eclectic," she says. "I am a little country, I'm a little rock & roll. You know, I am a scatterbrain at times. That's just me, you know?"
- Annie Zaleski (Riverfront Times)


Discography

Remember -EP
Released Sept. 10, 2007
Yoruba Records
Genre: Dance

Osunlade's Passage
Released June 10, 2008
BBE Music
Genre:Electronic

Round N Round (Single)
Athena Sounds Music Group USA
Released June 19, 2008
Genre:R&B/Soul

Teresajenee EP
Released Nov. 18, 2008
Athena Sounds Music Group USA
Genre: Electronic/Soul
Streaming via: http://thisisrealmusic.com

The Ecklectic
Released Aug. 1, 2009
Athena Sounds Music Group USA
Genre: Alternative/Electronic/ Soul
Streaming via: http://teresajenee.bandcamp.com
http://thisisrealmusic.com

Electric Yellow
Released July 3, 2012
NSA/Athena Music Group USA
Genre:Alternative/New Wave/R&B
Streaming via: http://teresajenee.bandcamp.com
http://thisisrealmusic.com http://soulbounce.com

Photos

Bio

Few of us are fortunate enough to discover our passions and talents at an early age without having to go through a trial and error process to figure out where it is that we fit in. Some of us, for one reason or another, discover our gift only to find ourselves attempting to run from the inevitable fact that we are simply destined to make a difference in this thing we call “life.” For singer/musici...an/songwriter Teresajenee music was to be her destiny.

Teresajenee the "musician beatmaker pen" got her start as a feature on Osunlade's "Remember EP" (Yoruba Records/2007) and in just four years, she has opened for talents such as Eric Roberson, Anthony David, even Solange Knowles. She’s performed for the 2011 SXSW and International Soul Music Summit festivals, stages in St. Louis, Memphis, Atlanta, North Carolina, LA, DC, Richmond and on campuses including University of Missouri-Columbia, Webster University, and her alma mater Tennessee State University. Her city’s alt-weekly newspaper, The Riverfront Times has named her best artist in R&B female category. In 2009, she was even granted her rite of passage as an artist by performing at two world renowned venues, SOB’s and Village Underground, in New York City. Teresa has also released independently two projects, "Teresajenee EP" (2008) and "The Ecklectic" (2009).

Not bad for a little rose from the concrete streets of Walnut Park in St. Louis, Missouri. Its not like she had much of a choice either; her father is a preacher singer and guitarist; her mother used to lead sing for a soul band in the 70s. Raised in such a creative environment, it was here her gifts in art and music were nurtured and her affinity towards the keys and organ developed. In addition, her musical range, inspired by Frank Sinatra, David Bowie, Lauryn Hill, Elton John, Erykah Badu, The Clark Sisters, and Kim Burrell also flourished. Teresajenee plays four instruments: piano, organ, clarinet, and drums.

Today, unwilling to conform for the sole purpose of corporate radio play,Teresajenee instead chooses to do things her way. When asked what “her way” is she describes it as, “music that is soulful, introspective, and refreshing". Miss TJ feels that it is not her duty to let the artistry suffer for the sake of a get rich quick, one hit wonder kind of career. She instead opts to create thought provoking, well written music that will reach the masses worldwide. She aspires to create songs that lyrically, vocally, and musically challenge the crassness of mainstream music today. Teresajenee has accepted the lifestyle of being a true artist and in hindsight understands that she did not discover music as her medium, but rather music has selected her to make a difference in this world.

-M. Woodard