The Bollweevils
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The Bollweevils

Band Rock Punk

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"BOLLWEEVILS"



Chicago's Bollweevils betray their roots with a grinding, buzzsaw guitar sound, very much in the city's hardcore tradition of Naked Raygun and the Effigies. Add cascading bass riffs, rapid-fire drums, a snotty lead vocalist and plenty of speed, and this energetic and entertaining punk band can hold its own in any mosh pit in America. On Stick Your Neck Out!, the Bollweevils rely on the power of lead singer Daryl's (no last names) vocals, which are strong enough to carry the soundalike thrash anthems and supply whatever melody the songs possess. Although the lyrics generally root around familiar punk themes — friendship, loyalty, broken hearts and scene politics — they tend to be more literate than the usual pop-punk fare, especially the stark, eerie "John Doe," which examines the plight of a homeless man turned medical cadaver, wondering what kind of life ended in such squalid anonymity. A hidden bonus cover of Tommy Tutone's "867-5309/Jenny" ends the album with a bit of puckish wit.

The Bollweevils are nothing if not prolific; the group's second album collects previously released tracks from four EPs, several compilations and even a Christmas song. The recording quality varies, but not the basic formula: power-chord guitar sound and rallying vocals.

The band shows a bit of growth on Heavyweight, with more complex arrangements and the addition of rousing background vocals to augment Daryl's fiery leads. Everything still rushes along at breakneck tempos, but the lyrics tackle the more complicated, tangled emotions of post-adolescence. "There's a place I've heard of where perfection is standard," Daryl sings in "Utopia." "Where I come from, we don't know it / If you live there, overthrow it." "Major Problems" takes a poke at the legions of punk bands fleeing the indie underground for major labels: "Your music is the rage, 15 minutes it's your fame," Daryl warns angrily. The album concludes with a raveup cover of the Bad Brains' thrash classic, "Pay to Cum," followed by a 12-minute audio tour diary — a waste of time, but good for a few chuckles...once.

- Trouser Press


Discography

Stick Your Neck Out (LP)


Bottomless Pit
John Doe
Vengeance
Dehumanize
Choose Between
Icon
Happy
Suzy's Revenge
The Witness
Jenny
The Best Narcissist
The Failure Of Bill Dozer

Heavyweight (LP)


Eye To Eye
Who's To Blame?
Final Straw
Utopia
Hate
Chronic
Bulletman
Major Problems
Pay To Cum
Thanks &
20 Something
Fence Sitter
Last Laugh

History of The Bollweevils Part1 (LP)


Lost And Found
About You
Stained Glass
On My Own
American Savior
What Have We Learned
No Time
999 Stoney
Sundown
Repeat
Unrespected Peggy Sue
Finale
Talk
White Christmas
I Lie
Body Bag
Dysomnia By Design
Not My Friend
Rodney
Hold Inside
Blind
Talk
Teacher's Pet
Finale
Fast Cars

History of The Bollweevils Part2 (LP)


Pressure Cooker
7 1/2 Clicks
Keith
Trouble If You Hide
Hellbound
Hit Or Miss
Altered States
Talkpeople
Wrong From Right
Silly Girl
Delfosse
Roller Queen
Vanilla Blue
Deceptions
Railroad Coaster
Good Times
What I Do Believe
New Dreams
Blind
Holding In
Deep Inside
What You're Gonna Say
Teacher's Pet
About Who?

Weevilive (LP)

Bottomless Pit
Dysomnia By Design
Twentysomething
Unrespected Peggy Sue
Fence Sitter
The Best Narcissist
Sundown
Utopia
The Witness
Hate
Dehumanize
Bring Back Paul
The Fight!
999-Stoney
Rat Patrol
Finale Listen

Disassembler (EP)

On My Own
American Savior
What Have We Learned
No Time

Lost & Found (EP)

Lost & Found
About Yuu To Eye

Chicago (EP)

Dysomnia By Design
Not My Friend
Rodney

Ripple (EP)

999- Stoney
Sundown
Repeat
Unrespected Peggy Sue

Photos

Bio

Led by the sneering vocals of lead singer Daryl, The Bollweevils are direct inheritors of a Chicago hardcore tradition handed down from acts such as Naked Raygun and The Effigies.

Undisputed as one the finest Chicago punk outfits during the 1990s, The Bollweevils were, and still are, defined by their spirited live performances and a song catalogue that demonstrates both their roots and creative ability as a band.

Known for their connection with fans, The Bollweevils began their recording career on Underdog Records, but soon were noticed by Dr. Strange Records. And shortly thereafter, the band released the punk staple “Stick Your Neck Out,” which featured favorites such as, “Dehumanize,” “Bottomless Pit,” and “John Doe.” The album defined The Bollweevils sound, which is laced with high-paced drumming, aggressive guitar and bass workings, and witty and sometimes tongue-in-cheek lyrics. Because of this, The Bollweevils soon garnered one of the largest local audiences and became one of the preeminent bands during the 1990s Midwest punk scene.
During this time, the band began playing more shows throughout the United States and shared the stage with bands that were both influences and contemporaries, including Naked Raygun, Rancid, AFI, Pegboy, Down By Law and Youth Brigade—many of which who later appeared on the band’s album liner notes.

The Bollweevils' second album, The History of the Bollweevils, Part One, collects previously released material from EPs and compilations. 1995's new studio effort Heavyweight boasted a more mature approach, with increasingly complex arrangements and backing vocals. The album concludes not only with a cover of the Bad Brains' "Pay to Cum," but also a 10-minute-plus, audio tour-diary entry.

And although the band went through several lineup changes, The Bollweevils never lost focus on creating an everlasting effect on the Chicago punk scene. Perhaps, one of the best representations of this is their release “Weevil Live.” To see The Bollweevils live is not only an experience, but an assault on the senses and the album surely captures that spirit. The band gels on stage like very few bands can—with Daryl flying around stage and jumping on the audience, Ken and Bob shredding guitars and the fans just eating it all up.
However, like all good things, things had to come to an end and the band officially disbanded in 1996 when they announced, on the legendary Fireside Bowl stage, that they would be playing their last show. To put it simply, fans were not only stunned, but very disappointed as well. At that time, it appeared that The Bollweevils were destined only to become folklore to a new generation of punks.

But in 2003, The Bollweevils reunited for a one-off sold-out show for WLUW at The Metro with a new drummer, Pete. The show, at that time, was considered as the best Bollweevils’ performance to date and whole new generation of Chicago kids were now even more intrigued by the band.

So when the band officially reunited once again in 2006 for Riot Fest, which included Naked Raygun, The Blue Meanies and 7Seconds, there was a resounding “Hell Yes” by the punk community because unlike many bands who have come and gone, The Bollweevils’ music is as relevant today as it was when it was first written. In the upcoming months on 2007, the band plans new releases, more shows and a dedication to its fans that will be rivaled by none.
Besides the music, one of the most interesting things about this band are the "day jobs" they each hold. Ken not only plays a mean guitar but also manages to keep young children focused on education as an assisitant principal in the Chicago public school system. Dr. Daryl is just that....a physician! He balances the world of being a board certified Emergency Physician and rockstar with the greatest of ease. The staff at the hospital he works at call him "The DocStar" and it fits like a surgical glove. The Bollweevils are just what the docstar ordered. Get your perscription filled ASAP!