The Clutters
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The Clutters

Band Alternative Rock

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Music

The best kept secret in music

Press


If you’re at all tempted to tell Nashville’s The Clutters that " garage rock " is dying, if not already dead, in the eyes and ears of the hipster cognoscenti, do us both a favor and shut your big yapper.

With the windows to the whims of the trend-sucking world closed, The Clutters cloistered themselves in the old RCA Studio B with current Ben Folds bassist Jared Reynolds and came out crushing on their debut disc, T&C.

One after the other the songs on T&C break like beer bottles over your head until you are perfectly punch drunk, reveling in the unhinged rock ’n’ roll abandon of badass rock chick drummer Stephanie Fillippini and lead singer Doug Lehman’s urgent, primal yelp.

Please forget that these cats are local, because if you heard knockout songs like Clash City Girl, You’ll Never Be Famous or Rock and Roll pumping out of the speakers before a White Stripes show you’d make an immediate beeline to the record store.

The Clutters truly deserve to be one of Nashville’s biggest rock bands because they have without a doubt delivered one of the best rock records of the year.

-Jason Moon Wilkins - Nashville Rage


Discography

Oh 7"- Wrecked Em Records (2003)
T&C (CD)- Chicken Ranch Records (2005)

Photos

Feeling a bit camera shy

Bio

Nashville's The Clutters are one of the few proper rock bands playing in the city. Within seconds of seeing them live or hearing their new record, T&C, you'll know that they are a band unconcerned with the fashion of the moment. They bash out three minute nuggets of verse-chorus-verse pleasure with plenty of crunch. Between the rusty power chords, walking bass lines, and a hell of a lot of cymbals, you'll hear squeaky guitar leads and a Farfisa. It's too messy for polite company, but too fun to keep to yourself. They bash out rock 'n' roll with the glee and rebellion of '70s punk but without the posed angst. You know, it's just like good rock 'n' roll ought to be.