The Cranks
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The Cranks

Dunstable, Massachusetts, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2009 | SELF

Dunstable, Massachusetts, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2009
Band Alternative Indie

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Jul
25
The Cranks @ Center For Arts In Natick

Natick, Massachusetts, United States

Natick, Massachusetts, United States

Jun
29
The Cranks @ Gardner Ale House

Gardner, Massachusetts, United States

Gardner, Massachusetts, United States

Jun
29
The Cranks @ Hard Rock Cafe Boston

Boston, Massachusetts, United States

Boston, Massachusetts, United States

Music

Press


"The Best EP Release we've heard all year"

(please visit link) - The Metronome


"The Metronome review of "Orange" 2013"

(see link) - The Metronome


"Bands to Watch - The Cranks (USA)"

With a sound that harkens back to the early 90's, it's hard to believe all 3 members of The Cranks weren't even zygotes at that point in time. The band members are already showing their penchant for delivering punchy, powerful alt-rock grooves. They've released 2 records and show no signs of slowing down as adulthood approaches (its still a few years away, though). Marrying the sounds of The Pretenders and Pixies with Paramore and Kings of Leon, we can only imagine the impact that more life experience will have on this already accomplished trio.
- IndieMag 8/2012


"Wildy's World Review of "Downside Up""

The Cranks dish out their distinctive blend of prep-school, post-punk pop on their second CD, Downside Up. Released in May of this year, Downside Up once again highlights the distinctive voice of Haley Gowland. Backed by her twin brother Connor Gowland in drums and Greg Preston on bass, Gowland turns listeners every which way loose on Downside Up. The Cranks show growth from their debut EP, What? both as performers and in the songwriting department. Gowland's lyrics are fresh and relevant, but are losing some of that youthful feel as The Cranks traverse adolescence and enter the complicated waters of young adulthood.

Opening with "Voice Inside", The Cranks offer up a catchy number with punk energy and real pop sensibility. Haley Gowland is thoroughly engaging on "Mexico", and the rest of the Cranks raise their game in an angular style that highlights the topsy-turvy sound that pervades here. "Under Radar" is a well-written musical allegory for not being seen socially. The song is catchy as anything, and could be a breakout song for the band. "Under Radar" is the sort of song a smart music director might pick for the soundtrack of a teen comedy full of angst. "Good Guys" shows a bit of the younger feel of The Cranks' earlier work, but is well-written nonetheless; a solid album track.

"Super Secret" seems a likely allegory, perhaps for something personal, but also seems applicable to a world where so many things happen around us that we never see. Either way, the song shows a real insight into the intricacies of a world where everything is negotiated and little is ever set in stone. The highlight of Downside Up is a rough little jewel entitled "Scatterbox". Punk energy and sound meet pure pop gold in a bit of musical magic that speaks very well for the future of The Cranks. "Here I Go" keeps much of that energy and verve going in another song with real pop potential. The Cranks closes things up with the pure joy of "Pirate". If you've ever heard a song that just screamed that the band was having fun recording, then this is it.

The Cranks continue to build their sound and style, and on Downside Up have become a cohesive and mature trio, rattling off catchy and intelligent punk-influenced pop songs like afterthoughts. While the Cranks are a cohesive whole, their shining light is Haley Gowland, who is maturing into a convincing front-woman before your very ears. The Cranks have a real future. Downside Up is the proof.

Rating: 4 Stars (Out of 5)

Learn more about The Cranks at www.thecranks.com on Facebook. Downside Up is available for download from Amazon.com and iTunes. - Wildy's World


"The Cranks Downside Up"

See URL - The Metronome Magazine


"The Cranks - Downside Up: 4 of 5 stars!"

The Cranks - Downside Up
2011, The Cranks

The Cranks dish out their distinctive blend of prep-school, post-punk pop on their second CD, Downside Up. Released in May of this year, Downside Up once again highlights the distinctive voice of Haley Gowland. Backed by her twin brother Connor Gowland in drums and Greg Preston on bass, Gowland turns listeners every which way loose on Downside Up. The Cranks show growth from their debut EP, What? both as performers and in the songwriting department. Gowland's lyrics are fresh and relevant, but are losing some of that youthful feel as The Cranks traverse adolescence and enter the complicated waters of young adulthood.

Opening with "Voice Inside", The Cranks offer up a catchy number with punk energy and real pop sensibility. Haley Gowland is thoroughly engaging on "Mexico", and the rest of the Cranks raise their game in an angular style that highlights the topsy-turvy sound that pervades here. "Under Radar" is a well-written musical allegory for not being seen socially. The song is catchy as anything, and could be a breakout song for the band. "Under Radar" is the sort of song a smart music director might pick for the soundtrack of a teen comedy full of angst. "Good Guys" shows a bit of the younger feel of The Cranks' earlier work, but is well-written nonetheless; a solid album track.

"Super Secret" seems a likely allegory, perhaps for something personal, but also seems applicable to a world where so many things happen around us that we never see. Either way, the song shows a real insight into the intricacies of a world where everything is negotiated and little is ever set in stone. The highlight of Downside Up is a rough little jewel entitled "Scatterbox". Punk energy and sound meet pure pop gold in a bit of musical magic that speaks very well for the future of The Cranks. "Here I Go" keeps much of that energy and verve going in another song with real pop potential. The Cranks closes things up with the pure joy of "Pirate". If you've ever heard a song that just screamed that the band was having fun recording, then this is it.

The Cranks continue to build their sound and style, and on Downside Up have become a cohesive and mature trio, rattling off catchy and intelligent punk-influenced pop songs like afterthoughts. While the Cranks are a cohesive whole, their shining light is Haley Gowland, who is maturing into a convincing front-woman before your very ears. The Cranks have a real future. Downside Up is the proof.

Rating: 4 Stars (Out of 5) - Wildy's World


"The Cranks - Downside Up: 4 of 5 stars!"

The Cranks - Downside Up
2011, The Cranks

The Cranks dish out their distinctive blend of prep-school, post-punk pop on their second CD, Downside Up. Released in May of this year, Downside Up once again highlights the distinctive voice of Haley Gowland. Backed by her twin brother Connor Gowland in drums and Greg Preston on bass, Gowland turns listeners every which way loose on Downside Up. The Cranks show growth from their debut EP, What? both as performers and in the songwriting department. Gowland's lyrics are fresh and relevant, but are losing some of that youthful feel as The Cranks traverse adolescence and enter the complicated waters of young adulthood.

Opening with "Voice Inside", The Cranks offer up a catchy number with punk energy and real pop sensibility. Haley Gowland is thoroughly engaging on "Mexico", and the rest of the Cranks raise their game in an angular style that highlights the topsy-turvy sound that pervades here. "Under Radar" is a well-written musical allegory for not being seen socially. The song is catchy as anything, and could be a breakout song for the band. "Under Radar" is the sort of song a smart music director might pick for the soundtrack of a teen comedy full of angst. "Good Guys" shows a bit of the younger feel of The Cranks' earlier work, but is well-written nonetheless; a solid album track.

"Super Secret" seems a likely allegory, perhaps for something personal, but also seems applicable to a world where so many things happen around us that we never see. Either way, the song shows a real insight into the intricacies of a world where everything is negotiated and little is ever set in stone. The highlight of Downside Up is a rough little jewel entitled "Scatterbox". Punk energy and sound meet pure pop gold in a bit of musical magic that speaks very well for the future of The Cranks. "Here I Go" keeps much of that energy and verve going in another song with real pop potential. The Cranks closes things up with the pure joy of "Pirate". If you've ever heard a song that just screamed that the band was having fun recording, then this is it.

The Cranks continue to build their sound and style, and on Downside Up have become a cohesive and mature trio, rattling off catchy and intelligent punk-influenced pop songs like afterthoughts. While the Cranks are a cohesive whole, their shining light is Haley Gowland, who is maturing into a convincing front-woman before your very ears. The Cranks have a real future. Downside Up is the proof.

Rating: 4 Stars (Out of 5) - Wildy's World


"The Cranks - Downside Up"

The Cranks dish out their distinctive blend of prep-school, post-punk pop on their second CD, Downside Up. Released in May of this year, Downside Up once again highlights the distinctive voice of Haley Gowland. Backed by her twin brother Connor Gowland in drums and Greg Preston on bass, Gowland turns listeners every which way loose on Downside Up. The Cranks show growth from their debut EP, What? both as performers and in the songwriting department. Gowland's lyrics are fresh and relevant, but are losing some of that youthful feel as The Cranks traverse adolescence and enter the complicated waters of young adulthood.

Opening with "Voice Inside", The Cranks offer up a catchy number with punk energy and real pop sensibility. Haley Gowland is thoroughly engaging on "Mexico", and the rest of the Cranks raise their game in an angular style that highlights the topsy-turvy sound that pervades here. "Under Radar" is a well-written musical allegory for not being seen socially. The song is catchy as anything, and could be a breakout song for the band. "Under Radar" is the sort of song a smart music director might pick for the soundtrack of a teen comedy full of angst. "Good Guys" shows a bit of the younger feel of The Cranks' earlier work, but is well-written nonetheless; a solid album track.

"Super Secret" seems a likely allegory, perhaps for something personal, but also seems applicable to a world where so many things happen around us that we never see. Either way, the song shows a real insight into the intricacies of a world where everything is negotiated and little is ever set in stone. The highlight of Downside Up is a rough little jewel entitled "Scatterbox". Punk energy and sound meet pure pop gold in a bit of musical magic that speaks very well for the future of The Cranks. "Here I Go" keeps much of that energy and verve going in another song with real pop potential. The Cranks closes things up with the pure joy of "Pirate". If you've ever heard a song that just screamed that the band was having fun recording, then this is it.

The Cranks continue to build their sound and style, and on Downside Up have become a cohesive and mature trio, rattling off catchy and intelligent punk-influenced pop songs like afterthoughts. While the Cranks are a cohesive whole, their shining light is Haley Gowland, who is maturing into a convincing front-woman before your very ears. The Cranks have a real future. Downside Up is the proof.

Rating: 4 Stars (Out of 5)

Learn more about The Cranks at www.thecranks.com on Facebook. Downside Up is available for download from Amazon.com and iTunes.


Posted by Wildy at 5:00 AM 0 comments Links to this post
Labels: Haley Gowland, Kim Deal, Sheryl Crow, The Cranks
- Wildy's World


"The Cranks "What?" - 7 Song CD"

Fifteen year old twins Haley (vocals, guitar & keys) and Connor Gowland (drums) along with fourteen year old Greg Preston (bass) are the heart and soul of this hip, powerpop trio. Haley’s lead vocals sound as good, if not better, than singer’s twice her age while brother Connor boasts spot-on time keeping. Add Preston’s meticulous bass lines to the fold and you’ve got one tight sounding act. Citing influences, K.T. Tunstall and the Kings of Leon, The Cranks not only display good taste in their musical inspiration but have the chops to make things happen for themselves. Best songs include; the surf/spy savvy of “Tumble”, the moody jangle of “Long Day” and the Bangles inspired “Something from Nothing.” I'm looking forward to hearing a lot more from these talented teens. Good Stuff. [D.S.] - Metronome Magazine - Sept 2010 Issue


"June 3, 2008 Section: Today's Headlines Dunstable middle-schoolers rock like pros -- and take center stage on new 'Community Auditions' Nancye Tuttle, ntuttle@lowellsun.com"

DUNSTABLE -- Their drums, guitar, keyboard and bass emit a pounding, driving beat. Then the voice -- clear, mature, perfectly pitched -- joins in, belting out "Glitter," the Patti Smith classic. The members of the 7G Band sound like seasoned pros.
But as they bound up the stairs from their basement rehearsal space, it's clear these gifted musicians aren't grungy rockers. The real new kids on the block -- twins Haley and Connor Gowland, Jimmy Russell and Greg Preston are polite, clean-cut teens and tweens, students at Groton-Dunstable Middle School. Haley, 13, sings, plays keyboards and guitar and writes some of their music. Her twin brother, Connor, plays drums and performs backup vocals. Jimmy, 12, is lead guitarist, and Greg, 12, the newest member, plays bass. Chris Gowland, Haley and Connor's dad, is their mentor, manager, taskmaster and friend.

They've made music together since Haley, Connor and Jimmy were in fourth grade. They've won school and town talent contests and battles of the bands. They've performed at open-mike nights at Indian Hill Music in Littleton. Later this month, they'll gain regional attention on Community Auditions. The show was taped in mid-May at Mohegan Sun in Connecticut and is set to air June 27 on WSBK-TV 38.

Blessed with keen performance skills, they make it look easy. But it isn't, Haley noted. "A lot of people think what we do is so easy, but we went through a lot to get the sound we have," she said. "Until we added Greg, our sound was empty. It's been hard." Her participation makes their sound different from other kid bands. "Most other bands are all guys, so we're different," said Connor. The boys agree that Haley won't tolerate fooling around in rehearsals. "I'm the enforcer," she said, smiling.

The four are growing up in musical families. Haley and Connor went to sleep as babies hearing dad, Chris, practice with his two bands in the basement. "I remember seeing a guy in Dad's band playing a harmonica, and I thought it was awesome," said Haley. The twins started piano in first grade. Connor dropped it after a while and switched to drums. Both play in the school band's percussion section. Jimmy picked up his first guitar at age 3 and hasn't put one down since.
"I've had a guitar as long as I can remember. My dad plays, and my parents take me to concerts. I saw the Rolling Stones when I was 9 or 10 and ever since wanted to be a hard rocker," said Jimmy, who emulates Stones guitarist Keith Richards. Greg's brother tried teaching him piano, then he turned to guitar and switched to bass when he joined the band in September 2006.
The 7G band -- which takes its name from Homer Simpson's work space on The Simpsons -- got its start when Haley and Jimmy met in music class in fourth grade. "I played clarinet and Jimmy saxophone," she recalled. "Our classes merged, and we were the only people on our bus and got to know each other."

They started doing talent shows, working with Chris and practicing. Haley has written a couple of songs, including the moving "Blue," which they played on Community Auditions. That gig was unexpected, said Daphne Gowland, the twins' mom. "I was watching Community Auditions and saw a singer performing," she recalled. "I thought to myself that Haley can sing well and checked out the Web site." She sent in a video clip with an e-mail, and not long after received an e-mail from a producer saying the kids were slated for a taping. Jimmy's mom, Rose, rented a van and they took a road trip to Connecticut. The experience was exciting, tiring and nerve-wracking for the kids, who competed against adults singing with a professional house band. "They were up against a man with a good voice and an older woman who'd been on the old Community Auditions," said Daphne. But the kids loved it, for the most part. "It was fun," Jimmy said. "I felt like a celebrity." The judges, including comedian Steve Sweeney, Sib Hashian, drummer for the band Boston, and Ellee of Canadian Idol fame, "gave us nice adult criticism," said Connor.
The day after they appeared, host Lori Grande, a DJ on WKLB-102.5 FM, lauded the kids on air.
"'Watch out for this young band from Dunstable," she said. "They're on their way." "Then she told me to get them a MySpace and keep in touch," said Daphne. The band came in a close second and could even win if friends and fans send in enough online votes.

For now, they're preparing for Rock in the Common, a contest of local bands at Dunstable Town Carnival on Thursday and getting ready for a paying gig. "I love it with the people dancing in a little mosh pit and singing along," said Haley. "By the time we're in high school, I think we'll be well-known."

- Sun, The (Lowell, MA)


"CRANK IT UP!!"

I'll be blunt. As a long-time devotee of music (and a frustrated amateur musician), I have for many years noted with dismay the general impoverishment of the music industry. The evidence of this malaise is manifest: From the dominance of a few corporations that control distribution (Sony, BMG, EMI) and the demise of once thriving independent labels, to the fact that the "big news" of late is that the Rolling Stones' brilliant "Exile on Main Street," a disc recorded almost forty years ago, has been reissued.

When music is mass marketed and decisions are made on the basis of trends and focus groups, something is going to get lost in the mix. Often, what gets lost is a musical heart and soul. In today's market, the Beatles wouldn't stand a chance, and Hendrix would probably be relegated to a small blues label -- the one genre where independents still have a chance.

Fortunately, because creativity is one of those things that defies explanation, all hope is not lost. And such is the case with an ironically-named, teenaged aggregation from Massachusetts that call themselves The Cranks.

The Cranks are comprised of 15 year old twins Haley and Connor Gowland and their cohort, Greg Preston. And lest the teenaged appellation conjure up images of New Kids On The Block, Menudo or (gasp!) the Osmonds, you can get those visions right out of your head. The Cranks have won several band competitions, have a Facebook presence with close to 600 fans, and have released a self-produced album entitled “What?”

What, indeed. Because this first release by The Cranks is a breath of fresh air in the increasingly stale and derivative music scene. The songs are originals and lead singer Haley Gowland, whose vocal style reminds this listener of a cross between Joan Osborne and Gwen Stefani, is an original with some serious chops.

For instance, the song “Long Day” is a surefire hit worthy of the attention of the major labels if they can spare the time to listen. With a jangly guitar sound that evokes The Byrds at their best as well as the unjustly little known New Zealand band, The Bats (be honest, you’ve never heard of them, have you?) Haley Gowland demands that you not get in her way as she goes out the door because, “This war is for me no more.” But the song is not about angst. It is about self-worth, pride, empowerment and independence. Heady stuff when one considers the average 15 year old is more likely to be consumed by Mom or Dad taking away their iPhone and disconnecting the Wii.

This same spirit is also evidenced in the follow up song, “20 Years,” which expresses the desire of the singer to not look back in two decades on the things she did today because she “doesn’t want that burden to obey.” Those of us who have reached a certain age know, of course, that she will at some point look back with regret as we all have. But we both sympathize with and share her aspirations for herself despite its unrealizable idealism.

“My life surprises me more and more,” sings Haley in “Don’t Call It Blue.” This is the only song on the record in which the songwriter’s youthful age is obvious. There’s nothing more seductive than the joy of first discovery, and this message is supported by the understated riffs and straightforward chord progressions. Ah, yes, how different life would be if we were somehow able to retain that excitement and surprise and avoid the cynicism that comes with maturity and world-weariness.

The next song, “Tumble” is a perfect illustration of the old adage that first impressions can be profoundly deceiving. The song has all the markings of an emerging power trio. In contrast to its predecessors on the album, the lyrics take a back seat to the rhythm section of Connor Gowland and Greg Preston. The well thought out, slightly percussive bass line and nuanced drums make it clear that all three members of The Cranks have some serious musical chops.

“Something From Nothing” also puts bass and drums to the forefront as the band “takes this rhythm for a ride,” and that ride is definitely a “muscle car.” The song is infused by a sense of urgency and constant forward motion. One wishes, however, that The Cranks might have been inspired to jam a bit on this number as befits the notion of being seized by something not entirely in one’s control. While enjoyable, the song was just a touch too constrained and “safe” for this listener.

The final two songs on the record, “Almost Dark” and “Be Strong” are acoustic-tinged ballads delivered with consummate skill. It is a credit to whomever was responsible for the sequencing of this album that these two songs close the record. They are tasty morsels of both style and substance that are appropriate finishing touches to a solid debut effort.

Bottom line: The Cranks are….well….not cranks. Let’s hope we hear more from this talented and promising trio.

For more information about The Cranks, including songs from their album “Wh - By Mark S. Alper


"Young, local, band- ‘The Cranks’ to perform on “Community Auditions: Star of the Day”"

3/23/10 11 a.m.
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 24, 2010
Media contact: Allison Garrity
212-382-2044 ext. 210
aagarrity@gmail.com

Two 15 year-olds and one 13 year-old take the stage this weekend to compete for the ‘Star of the Day’. Dunstable, Mass.- Haley Gowland, Connor Gowland and Greg Preston are the performers who make up the band-”The Cranks.” This weekend they will be performing an original song called, “Long Day” that was written by the lead singer and lead guitarist Haley Gowland. She will be performing along side her twin brother Connor Gowland who will be playing the drums and Greg Preston who will be playing the bass.

Although the band is young the Cranks are not strangers to the Community Auditions stage; in 2007 the band competed for the ‘Star of the Day’ as well. This emerging band won the 2009 Indian Hill Battle of the Bands and has placed first in several other Battle of the Bands throughout the New England area.

The band enjoys listening to artists such as; Kings of Leon, Jason Mraz, Weezer, the Strokes and any other Indie rock or alternative rock musicians because they “ like reaching back into albums and finding songs that are not played constantly on the radio.”

Although lead singer Haley Gowland has a shy demeanor she enjoys playing guitar, playing sports, and doing outdoor activities such as hiking and skiing.

In five years Gowland hopes to “have the time to write and record music every day.”

This weekend The Cranks will be competing against fellow Massachusetts artist Jessica Melo and three-star winner- Adrienne Nails.

Watch Community Auditions this weekend to see if The Cranks win their first star on the Emmy Award- winning- “Community Auditions: Star of the Day” with hosts Ramiro of Jam’n 94.5 and Patriots 2009-2010 sportscaster Kristina Akra.

Now in its 42nd season on air, “Community Auditions: Star of the Day” is the longest-running entertainment series in television history. Each episode features three New England performers competing to become the “Star of the Day” and thus eligible for prizes ranging from a new Subaru to the production of their own showcase CD by Bob Johnston, who has produced million-selling albums for such artists as Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash. Contestants are rated by a three judge panel made up of radio DJs, producers and other entertainment experts. Added to their opinions are those of the studio audience and viewers at home, who can support their hometown heroes by voting online at communityauditions.com.
“Community Auditions: Star of the Day” broadcast times: Friday, 9:30 PM (WSBK TV38 Boston); Sunday, 10:30 AM (WCTX MyTV New Haven); Saturday 10:00 PM, Sunday 12 noon (WPXT-TV Portland's CW); Saturday 12:00 Mid and Sunday 12:30 AM (WBZ-TV CBS 4 Boston); Time varies (WPRI-TV); Midnight or 12:00 AM (WWLP Springfield); Saturday, 11:30AM (WNAC-TV, Providence).
-30-
For more information, visit communityauditions.com or phone Allison Garrity (212) 382-2044 ext. 210

- ARMSTRONG INTERACTIVE INC, 271 Madison Ave., 20th floor, New York, N.Y. 10016


Discography

Cute Hat (EP) - Mar 2015
Orange (full length CD) 2013
Downside Up (full length CD) 2011
What? (EP) 2010

Photos

Bio

"Cute Hat" EP - Get the unreleased song "Come Outside" and the first single here - http://www.thecranks.com/EmailSignup.html

The spirit of The Cranks can be traced back to well before the days of  “Cute Hat” (2015), “Orange” (2013), or even “Downside Up” (2011).  Twins Haley and Connor Gowland began their ambitious journey into music as brace-faced preteens, lovingly chronicled through home videos of talent show performances of Weezer and Rolling Stones covers. Over the years their passion for making music has only grown stronger. With Haley on guitar and lead vocals, Connor on drums, and the addition of the inventive Alex Markoski on bass, The Cranks have played hundreds of shows, come out on top of countless battles, won a boatload of awards, rocked festivals all over New England, and shared the stage with acts like Paramore, Fall Out Boy, and 3OH!3.

The “Cute Hat EP,” their latest release, was forged in the cruel New England winter of 2015 at Rocking Horse Studios in New Hampshire with producer Brian Coombes (New England Music Awards 2015 producer of the year). The EP’s 5 tracks saw the band honing in their signature “indie-popternative” sound through intricate bass lines, driving rhythms, captivating melodies, and vocal harmonies. The single, “Circles,” has been played on several radio stations in the New England area, including WOOL 91.5 and 106.3 Frank FM.

In order to further explore their new musical direction and to incorporate more of their recorded sound into live shows, the power-trio decided it was time to make The Cranks into a mighty-quartet. Haley introduced the band to guitarist Connor Storms, a fellow Connecticut College camel who played with Haley in the folk-rock monster, Canopy, before he graduated. Storms was welcomed into the band in the summer of 2015."

2015

>>> The Metronome calls Cute Hat the "best EP Release we've heard all year"

>>> The Cranks opened the WPI Big Spring Event for 3OH!3

>>> Cute Hat" EP and Circles video released to rave reviews.

2014

>>> The Cranks opened the Paramore and Fall Out Boy show on Meadowbrook Pavilion’s (NH) Magic Hat stage. Since then The Cranks crafted new songs for the “Cute Hat” EP recorded  at Rocking Horse Studio over 8 days in the brutal 2015 New England winter. Produced by New England Music Awards’ 2015 Producer of the Year Brian Coombes, this high energy blast of indie PopTernative originals packs the most Cranks punch of the band's 4 releases. Mastered by Dana White of Specialized Mastering (Jimmy Eat World).

>>> WINNERS OF THE 2014 RADAR award from the New England Music Awards and Pavoh for acts "on the rise" among 200 submissions.

>>> The Cranks' "Orange" - ALBUM OF THE YEAR runner up awarded by Limelight Magazine

2013

>>> The Cranks released their 3rd CD "ORANGE", and were featured on COZI TV's "The Next Great Family Band" as one of 15 bands across the country picked to be the next sibling band like Oasis, Kings of Leon.

THE SOUND

Big dynamics, real instruments and voices, gripping melodies and Haley’s distinctive vocals (often related to Chrissie Hynde, Blondie) translate to a captivating energy on stage that excites crowds across broad ages. They rock, but aren’t angry about it. 

INFLUENCES 

The Strokes, The Hush Sound, Paramore, Two Door Cinema Club, Guster.

PRESS QUOTES

"...rattling off catchy and intelligent punk-influenced pop songs like afterthoughts. The Cranks have a real future. Downside Up is the proof." Wildy's World Blog 4 of 5 stars

“The Cranks not only display good taste in their musical inspiration but have the chops to make things happen for themselves… Haley's lead vocals sound as good, if not better, than singer's twice her age …”– Metronome Magazine 9/2010

“Haley is a triple threat of great vocals, song writing and guitar playing.” - Joyce Kulhawik (arts & entertainment anchor for Boston’s WBZ-TV News) 3/2010

EARLY LIFE AND AWARDS

The Cranks spent their younger years as a cover band, and in 2009 recast themselves as an all-original 3-piece, winning their first battle of bands. It was clear they had a seed of something different to offer.

In May, 2011, The Cranks released their second CD; "Downside Up", an energetic batch of one-of-a-kind lyric themes and stick-in-your-head melodies that has been played on Boston’s WXRV 92.5 as well as several college radio stations.

2013 - Selected as one of 15 bands for the national show "The Next Great Family Band"

2012 Winner Westford Apple Blossom Festival battle of bands



Band Members