The Deer Tracks
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The Deer Tracks

Gävle, Gävleborg, Sweden | INDIE

Gävle, Gävleborg, Sweden | INDIE
Band Pop EDM

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

May
26
The Deer Tracks @ Testbed1/Doodle Bar, 33 Parkgate Rd SW11 4NP

London, None, United Kingdom

London, None, United Kingdom

May
21
The Deer Tracks @ The Waiting Room

London, England, United Kingdom

London, England, United Kingdom

May
04
The Deer Tracks @ KGB Bar & Restaurant

Stockholm, None, Sweden

Stockholm, None, Sweden

Music

Press


Amazing Radio - Record Of The Week for 'Lazarus' and an interview with Elin, on Ruth Barnes' show. "Here’s another great band to share from us here at Amazing Radio. It’s pretty obvious thatSweden and electronica seem to go hand in hand, with the likes of Makthaverskan andNONONO already making waves it may seem like there is no room to maneuver, but wait until you hear this new one from The Deer Tracks." - Amazing Radio


Amazing Radio - Record Of The Week for 'Lazarus' and an interview with Elin, on Ruth Barnes' show. "Here’s another great band to share from us here at Amazing Radio. It’s pretty obvious thatSweden and electronica seem to go hand in hand, with the likes of Makthaverskan andNONONO already making waves it may seem like there is no room to maneuver, but wait until you hear this new one from The Deer Tracks." - Amazing Radio


8/10 album review of ‘The Archer Trilogy PT.3’. “Previous records from The Deer Tracks have shown that this trilogy series isn’t a gimmicky one off project and if anything, was a chance for the band to delve deeper into their creative minds.” - Virgin Music


8/10 album review of ‘The Archer Trilogy PT.3’. “Previous records from The Deer Tracks have shown that this trilogy series isn’t a gimmicky one off project and if anything, was a chance for the band to delve deeper into their creative minds.” - Virgin Music


Last night, The Shredder and I were transported to a Swedish darkwave-electro-indie-pop fantasy land — or more simply put: we saw The Deer Tracks live at Glasslands Gallery in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. We had high expectations for the show after ravenously previewing the band’s catalog on Spotify — and those expectations were absolutely exceeded. Each song on the set list was a unique and satisfying adventure; the Tracks’ tracks were multi-layered micro-symphonies that one way or another reached an orgasmic level of sonic fury. Elin Lindfors is an elegant, hypnotic Scandinavian muse who’s just as talented instrumentally as she is vocally (we saw her wield a saw several times and an apparatus that can only be described as a talkbox scuba play keyboard). And her comprehensive grace is complemented by David Lehnberg‘s energy and savvy mastery of a sophisticated layout of synth boards and button-knobs. The duo has an impressive stage presence and an overall aesthetic that’s as cohesive as it is intriguing. The only negative is that there weren’t more fans in attendance to see an act clearly on the rise to buzz status. - Atlas Rocked


Last night, The Shredder and I were transported to a Swedish darkwave-electro-indie-pop fantasy land — or more simply put: we saw The Deer Tracks live at Glasslands Gallery in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. We had high expectations for the show after ravenously previewing the band’s catalog on Spotify — and those expectations were absolutely exceeded. Each song on the set list was a unique and satisfying adventure; the Tracks’ tracks were multi-layered micro-symphonies that one way or another reached an orgasmic level of sonic fury. Elin Lindfors is an elegant, hypnotic Scandinavian muse who’s just as talented instrumentally as she is vocally (we saw her wield a saw several times and an apparatus that can only be described as a talkbox scuba play keyboard). And her comprehensive grace is complemented by David Lehnberg‘s energy and savvy mastery of a sophisticated layout of synth boards and button-knobs. The duo has an impressive stage presence and an overall aesthetic that’s as cohesive as it is intriguing. The only negative is that there weren’t more fans in attendance to see an act clearly on the rise to buzz status. - Atlas Rocked


Whilst the opening few seconds of this track may lead you to believe that it will be some discordant guitar-driven number, it most certainly is not. Taken from the concluding part of their ‘The Archer Trilogy’ out this May, ‘Lazarus’ showcases the Swedish duo’s ability to create throbbing and enjoyable techno music. [8/10] - Shout For Music


Whilst the opening few seconds of this track may lead you to believe that it will be some discordant guitar-driven number, it most certainly is not. Taken from the concluding part of their ‘The Archer Trilogy’ out this May, ‘Lazarus’ showcases the Swedish duo’s ability to create throbbing and enjoyable techno music. [8/10] - Shout For Music


Writing and recording out of a frosty corner of Sweden, The Deer Tracks - Elin Lindfors and David Lehnberg - have drawn upon all kinds of influences to create their own, wholly undefinable, world. Vast soundscapes are created with the aid of gentle waves of synth, and drops of delicate piano fall from gathering storm clouds, and then the entire world shatters and collapses into a tiny strobe-lit room, and everybody's dancing. Ambience trades blows with Electronica, a string quartet plays in the background. A firebomb of distortion suddenly obliterates everything, and the lines that separate one genre from another don't exist any more. I sincerely apologise for the barrage of metaphor, but that's just what listening to The Deer Tracks is like. You can't describe them without being as utterly removed from reality as they are. I'm fairly certain that there's another planet somewhere, on which Bjork and Sigur Ros live next door to each other, and The Deer Tracks come over every other day for tea and unnecessarily colourful cupcakes, while everyone wears weird woolly hats.
The duo has released three albums to date, two of which - Prologue and The Archer Trilogy Pt. 1 - are a part of The Archer Trilogy. This trilogy (which should really be called a tetralogy, on account of its four parts, but nobody knows what a tetralogy is) is essentially four albums released in quick succession. The first two instalments of the trilogy were released within a week of each other, back in March, and the final part is due to be recorded in the autumn. I can't see any obvious thematic link between the albums apart from the fact that they all have The Archer Trilogy in the title, but it's an admirable feat nonetheless.
The latest episode, The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2, is better than its predecessors, because it's a perfectly weighted album. The opener, 'Meant To Be', very slowly builds tension; the synth drones and the glockenspiel pitter-patters to and fro. Elin Lindfors's icy, Scandinavian voice begins to chirp the first few lyrics, stabs of distorted guitar begin to increase in volume, and then everything suddenly unfolds - a powerful drumline bursts into life, the synths waver, and a string section succeeds in making everything sound very dramatic. As soon as it all unfolded, the track stops; the last echoes of delay fade out, and what follows is a string of instant hits.
It's a rare occasion when almost every track on an album could easily be a single, but these songs work just as well on their own as they do with each other. This is possibly because of their heavy emphasis on insanely catchy melodies at the expense of particularly deep or profound lyrics. The lyrics aren't bad at all, but nobody's going to scrutinise them too much because of everything that's happening around them - they aren't the focus of the music, but Lindfors's enchanting vocal gate certainly blends in and adds to the already rich texture of the music.
'Fro Ro Raa/Ro Ra Fraa', 'The Archer', and 'Dark Passenger' are simply brilliant, if a little glock-heavy, but that's not such a bad thing. I could write for days about the unexpectedly complex rhythms, or the captivating but also somehow poignant and sombre melodies of these songs, but there's a word limit, so I won't. Just check them out. They're the strongest consecutive sequence of songs I've heard in a long time. '1000 Vanda Kinder' does away with all of the electronics and features only a piano, with male-female vocals, which, I assume, are singing something in Swedish. It's an intriguing change of pace, and sounds unmistakeably Jonsi-esque. 'Fa-Fire' contains the lyric of the album, "I cannot help it sometimes/I want to break your neck/Just to give you a reality check", as well as an air-punchingly powerful chorus, laden with electric guitar and soaring synths.
The closer, 'U-Turn', sounds like Lindfors is drowning in a sea of distortion. Waves of electronic sound splash against each other, until any voices are inaudible, and all that's left is noise. This album deserves far more recognition than it will probably ever get. The way that The Deer Tracks are able to mix instruments like glockenspiel and spiky electric guitars with drum machines and brooding synths is strikingly reminiscent of Weekend In The City-era Bloc Party, or, thanks to the addition of female vocals, even Two Suns by Bat For Lashes. Both of these albums received relative critical acclaim, and they deserved it, and so does this. Perhaps when The Archer Trilogy is completed, people will see it for the epic piece of art that it is, and this particular part of it will certainly be a highlight.
9/10
Kris Lavin - Contact Music


Writing and recording out of a frosty corner of Sweden, The Deer Tracks - Elin Lindfors and David Lehnberg - have drawn upon all kinds of influences to create their own, wholly undefinable, world. Vast soundscapes are created with the aid of gentle waves of synth, and drops of delicate piano fall from gathering storm clouds, and then the entire world shatters and collapses into a tiny strobe-lit room, and everybody's dancing. Ambience trades blows with Electronica, a string quartet plays in the background. A firebomb of distortion suddenly obliterates everything, and the lines that separate one genre from another don't exist any more. I sincerely apologise for the barrage of metaphor, but that's just what listening to The Deer Tracks is like. You can't describe them without being as utterly removed from reality as they are. I'm fairly certain that there's another planet somewhere, on which Bjork and Sigur Ros live next door to each other, and The Deer Tracks come over every other day for tea and unnecessarily colourful cupcakes, while everyone wears weird woolly hats.
The duo has released three albums to date, two of which - Prologue and The Archer Trilogy Pt. 1 - are a part of The Archer Trilogy. This trilogy (which should really be called a tetralogy, on account of its four parts, but nobody knows what a tetralogy is) is essentially four albums released in quick succession. The first two instalments of the trilogy were released within a week of each other, back in March, and the final part is due to be recorded in the autumn. I can't see any obvious thematic link between the albums apart from the fact that they all have The Archer Trilogy in the title, but it's an admirable feat nonetheless.
The latest episode, The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2, is better than its predecessors, because it's a perfectly weighted album. The opener, 'Meant To Be', very slowly builds tension; the synth drones and the glockenspiel pitter-patters to and fro. Elin Lindfors's icy, Scandinavian voice begins to chirp the first few lyrics, stabs of distorted guitar begin to increase in volume, and then everything suddenly unfolds - a powerful drumline bursts into life, the synths waver, and a string section succeeds in making everything sound very dramatic. As soon as it all unfolded, the track stops; the last echoes of delay fade out, and what follows is a string of instant hits.
It's a rare occasion when almost every track on an album could easily be a single, but these songs work just as well on their own as they do with each other. This is possibly because of their heavy emphasis on insanely catchy melodies at the expense of particularly deep or profound lyrics. The lyrics aren't bad at all, but nobody's going to scrutinise them too much because of everything that's happening around them - they aren't the focus of the music, but Lindfors's enchanting vocal gate certainly blends in and adds to the already rich texture of the music.
'Fro Ro Raa/Ro Ra Fraa', 'The Archer', and 'Dark Passenger' are simply brilliant, if a little glock-heavy, but that's not such a bad thing. I could write for days about the unexpectedly complex rhythms, or the captivating but also somehow poignant and sombre melodies of these songs, but there's a word limit, so I won't. Just check them out. They're the strongest consecutive sequence of songs I've heard in a long time. '1000 Vanda Kinder' does away with all of the electronics and features only a piano, with male-female vocals, which, I assume, are singing something in Swedish. It's an intriguing change of pace, and sounds unmistakeably Jonsi-esque. 'Fa-Fire' contains the lyric of the album, "I cannot help it sometimes/I want to break your neck/Just to give you a reality check", as well as an air-punchingly powerful chorus, laden with electric guitar and soaring synths.
The closer, 'U-Turn', sounds like Lindfors is drowning in a sea of distortion. Waves of electronic sound splash against each other, until any voices are inaudible, and all that's left is noise. This album deserves far more recognition than it will probably ever get. The way that The Deer Tracks are able to mix instruments like glockenspiel and spiky electric guitars with drum machines and brooding synths is strikingly reminiscent of Weekend In The City-era Bloc Party, or, thanks to the addition of female vocals, even Two Suns by Bat For Lashes. Both of these albums received relative critical acclaim, and they deserved it, and so does this. Perhaps when The Archer Trilogy is completed, people will see it for the epic piece of art that it is, and this particular part of it will certainly be a highlight.
9/10
Kris Lavin - Contact Music


The Deer Tracks have announced the release of the third and final part of their Archer Trilogy, 'The Archer Trilogy Pt.3', which will be out on 24th June through Control Group.

The lead single to be taken from the album is 'Lazarus', which will be out on 17th June and the video for 'Lazarus', directed by the band's David Lehnberg, is now available online.


Following the release of their critically acclaimed debut album 'Aurora' and their debut EP 'Eggegrund', The Deer Tracks' David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors retreated to the Swedish wilderness to create their definitive statement to date. In Elin’s grandmother’s remote cabin with no phone lines, no friends and one barely working computer, The Deer Tracks wrote and recorded the first two parts of their epic 'The Archer Trilogy', which they released in 2011.

Now they're set to release the third and final segment of the trilogy. Set up in a disused pasta factory located in the small Swedish city of Gävle, The Deer Tracks wrote and recored the tracks that build up 'The Archer Trilogy Pt.3'. The tracks display the bands creative progression over the three albums by combining the sparse experimental charm of Pt.1 with the more upfront electronic sound of Pt.2.

Having already drawn comparisons to their Scandinavian counterparts The Knife, Sigur Rós and Mew, The Deer Tracks look set to continue their success with the release of this album.

The Swedish duo will be playing two London dates in May, including a special headline date at The Waiting Room on the 21st May. They will also be supporting Young Galaxy at Birthdays on the 20th May.

The Deer Tracks 2013 UK Live Dates are as follows:

20th May - Birthdays, London
21st May - The Waiting Room, London

Click Here to Compare & Buy The Deer Tracks Tickets through Stereoboard.


Source: http://www.stereoboard.com/content/view/178547/9#ixzz2SEN7pJaV - StereoBoard


The Deer Tracks have announced the release of the third and final part of their Archer Trilogy, 'The Archer Trilogy Pt.3', which will be out on 24th June through Control Group.

The lead single to be taken from the album is 'Lazarus', which will be out on 17th June and the video for 'Lazarus', directed by the band's David Lehnberg, is now available online.


Following the release of their critically acclaimed debut album 'Aurora' and their debut EP 'Eggegrund', The Deer Tracks' David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors retreated to the Swedish wilderness to create their definitive statement to date. In Elin’s grandmother’s remote cabin with no phone lines, no friends and one barely working computer, The Deer Tracks wrote and recorded the first two parts of their epic 'The Archer Trilogy', which they released in 2011.

Now they're set to release the third and final segment of the trilogy. Set up in a disused pasta factory located in the small Swedish city of Gävle, The Deer Tracks wrote and recored the tracks that build up 'The Archer Trilogy Pt.3'. The tracks display the bands creative progression over the three albums by combining the sparse experimental charm of Pt.1 with the more upfront electronic sound of Pt.2.

Having already drawn comparisons to their Scandinavian counterparts The Knife, Sigur Rós and Mew, The Deer Tracks look set to continue their success with the release of this album.

The Swedish duo will be playing two London dates in May, including a special headline date at The Waiting Room on the 21st May. They will also be supporting Young Galaxy at Birthdays on the 20th May.

The Deer Tracks 2013 UK Live Dates are as follows:

20th May - Birthdays, London
21st May - The Waiting Room, London

Click Here to Compare & Buy The Deer Tracks Tickets through Stereoboard.


Source: http://www.stereoboard.com/content/view/178547/9#ixzz2SEN7pJaV - StereoBoard


Power! With some fluke luck we finally figured out how to turn the power on at Northampton Square bandstand, and lucky for us it meant we could watch The Deer Tracks perform us some dreamy songs. Wonderful.
(See The Link Below To Watch The Videos) - Bandstand Busking (http://bandstandbusking.com)


Power! With some fluke luck we finally figured out how to turn the power on at Northampton Square bandstand, and lucky for us it meant we could watch The Deer Tracks perform us some dreamy songs. Wonderful.
(See The Link Below To Watch The Videos) - Bandstand Busking (http://bandstandbusking.com)


Power! With some fluke luck we finally figured out how to turn the power on at Northampton Square bandstand, and lucky for us it meant we could watch The Deer Tracks perform us some dreamy songs. Wonderful.
(See The Link Below To Watch The Videos) - Bandstand Busking (http://bandstandbusking.com)


Power! With some fluke luck we finally figured out how to turn the power on at Northampton Square bandstand, and lucky for us it meant we could watch The Deer Tracks perform us some dreamy songs. Wonderful.
(See The Link Below To Watch The Videos) - Bandstand Busking (http://bandstandbusking.com)


Writing and recording out of a frosty corner of Sweden, The Deer Tracks - Elin Lindfors and David Lehnberg - have drawn upon all kinds of influences to create their own, wholly undefinable, world. Vast soundscapes are created with the aid of gentle waves of synth, and drops of delicate piano fall from gathering storm clouds, and then the entire world shatters and collapses into a tiny strobe-lit room, and everybody's dancing. Ambience trades blows with Electronica, a string quartet plays in the background. A firebomb of distortion suddenly obliterates everything, and the lines that separate one genre from another don't exist any more. I sincerely apologise for the barrage of metaphor, but that's just what listening to The Deer Tracks is like. You can't describe them without being as utterly removed from reality as they are. I'm fairly certain that there's another planet somewhere, on which Bjork and Sigur Ros live next door to each other, and The Deer Tracks come over every other day for tea and unnecessarily colourful cupcakes, while everyone wears weird woolly hats.
The duo has released three albums to date, two of which - Prologue and The Archer Trilogy Pt. 1 - are a part of The Archer Trilogy. This trilogy (which should really be called a tetralogy, on account of its four parts, but nobody knows what a tetralogy is) is essentially four albums released in quick succession. The first two instalments of the trilogy were released within a week of each other, back in March, and the final part is due to be recorded in the autumn. I can't see any obvious thematic link between the albums apart from the fact that they all have The Archer Trilogy in the title, but it's an admirable feat nonetheless.

The latest episode, The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2, is better than its predecessors, because it's a perfectly weighted album. The opener, 'Meant To Be', very slowly builds tension; the synth drones and the glockenspiel pitter-patters to and fro. Elin Lindfors's icy, Scandinavian voice begins to chirp the first few lyrics, stabs of distorted guitar begin to increase in volume, and then everything suddenly unfolds - a powerful drumline bursts into life, the synths waver, and a string section succeeds in making everything sound very dramatic. As soon as it all unfolded, the track stops; the last echoes of delay fade out, and what follows is a string of instant hits.

It's a rare occasion when almost every track on an album could easily be a single, but these songs work just as well on their own as they do with each other. This is possibly because of their heavy emphasis on insanely catchy melodies at the expense of particularly deep or profound lyrics. The lyrics aren't bad at all, but nobody's going to scrutinise them too much because of everything that's happening around them - they aren't the focus of the music, but Lindfors's enchanting vocal gate certainly blends in and adds to the already rich texture of the music.

'Fro Ro Raa/Ro Ra Fraa', 'The Archer', and 'Dark Passenger' are simply brilliant, if a little glock-heavy, but that's not such a bad thing. I could write for days about the unexpectedly complex rhythms, or the captivating but also somehow poignant and sombre melodies of these songs, but there's a word limit, so I won't. Just check them out. They're the strongest consecutive sequence of songs I've heard in a long time. '1000 Vanda Kinder' does away with all of the electronics and features only a piano, with male-female vocals, which, I assume, are singing something in Swedish. It's an intriguing change of pace, and sounds unmistakeably Jonsi-esque. 'Fa-Fire' contains the lyric of the album, "I cannot help it sometimes/I want to break your neck/Just to give you a reality check", as well as an air-punchingly powerful chorus, laden with electric guitar and soaring synths.

The closer, 'U-Turn', sounds like Lindfors is drowning in a sea of distortion. Waves of electronic sound splash against each other, until any voices are inaudible, and all that's left is noise. This album deserves far more recognition than it will probably ever get. The way that The Deer Tracks are able to mix instruments like glockenspiel and spiky electric guitars with drum machines and brooding synths is strikingly reminiscent of Weekend In The City-era Bloc Party, or, thanks to the addition of female vocals, even Two Suns by Bat For Lashes. Both of these albums received relative critical acclaim, and they deserved it, and so does this. Perhaps when The Archer Trilogy is completed, people will see it for the epic piece of art that it is, and this particular part of it will certainly be a highlight.

9/10

Kris Lavin
- Contact Music


Writing and recording out of a frosty corner of Sweden, The Deer Tracks - Elin Lindfors and David Lehnberg - have drawn upon all kinds of influences to create their own, wholly undefinable, world. Vast soundscapes are created with the aid of gentle waves of synth, and drops of delicate piano fall from gathering storm clouds, and then the entire world shatters and collapses into a tiny strobe-lit room, and everybody's dancing. Ambience trades blows with Electronica, a string quartet plays in the background. A firebomb of distortion suddenly obliterates everything, and the lines that separate one genre from another don't exist any more. I sincerely apologise for the barrage of metaphor, but that's just what listening to The Deer Tracks is like. You can't describe them without being as utterly removed from reality as they are. I'm fairly certain that there's another planet somewhere, on which Bjork and Sigur Ros live next door to each other, and The Deer Tracks come over every other day for tea and unnecessarily colourful cupcakes, while everyone wears weird woolly hats.
The duo has released three albums to date, two of which - Prologue and The Archer Trilogy Pt. 1 - are a part of The Archer Trilogy. This trilogy (which should really be called a tetralogy, on account of its four parts, but nobody knows what a tetralogy is) is essentially four albums released in quick succession. The first two instalments of the trilogy were released within a week of each other, back in March, and the final part is due to be recorded in the autumn. I can't see any obvious thematic link between the albums apart from the fact that they all have The Archer Trilogy in the title, but it's an admirable feat nonetheless.

The latest episode, The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2, is better than its predecessors, because it's a perfectly weighted album. The opener, 'Meant To Be', very slowly builds tension; the synth drones and the glockenspiel pitter-patters to and fro. Elin Lindfors's icy, Scandinavian voice begins to chirp the first few lyrics, stabs of distorted guitar begin to increase in volume, and then everything suddenly unfolds - a powerful drumline bursts into life, the synths waver, and a string section succeeds in making everything sound very dramatic. As soon as it all unfolded, the track stops; the last echoes of delay fade out, and what follows is a string of instant hits.

It's a rare occasion when almost every track on an album could easily be a single, but these songs work just as well on their own as they do with each other. This is possibly because of their heavy emphasis on insanely catchy melodies at the expense of particularly deep or profound lyrics. The lyrics aren't bad at all, but nobody's going to scrutinise them too much because of everything that's happening around them - they aren't the focus of the music, but Lindfors's enchanting vocal gate certainly blends in and adds to the already rich texture of the music.

'Fro Ro Raa/Ro Ra Fraa', 'The Archer', and 'Dark Passenger' are simply brilliant, if a little glock-heavy, but that's not such a bad thing. I could write for days about the unexpectedly complex rhythms, or the captivating but also somehow poignant and sombre melodies of these songs, but there's a word limit, so I won't. Just check them out. They're the strongest consecutive sequence of songs I've heard in a long time. '1000 Vanda Kinder' does away with all of the electronics and features only a piano, with male-female vocals, which, I assume, are singing something in Swedish. It's an intriguing change of pace, and sounds unmistakeably Jonsi-esque. 'Fa-Fire' contains the lyric of the album, "I cannot help it sometimes/I want to break your neck/Just to give you a reality check", as well as an air-punchingly powerful chorus, laden with electric guitar and soaring synths.

The closer, 'U-Turn', sounds like Lindfors is drowning in a sea of distortion. Waves of electronic sound splash against each other, until any voices are inaudible, and all that's left is noise. This album deserves far more recognition than it will probably ever get. The way that The Deer Tracks are able to mix instruments like glockenspiel and spiky electric guitars with drum machines and brooding synths is strikingly reminiscent of Weekend In The City-era Bloc Party, or, thanks to the addition of female vocals, even Two Suns by Bat For Lashes. Both of these albums received relative critical acclaim, and they deserved it, and so does this. Perhaps when The Archer Trilogy is completed, people will see it for the epic piece of art that it is, and this particular part of it will certainly be a highlight.

9/10

Kris Lavin
- Contact Music


Album Review: The Deer Tracks – The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2
Swedish electronica duo “The Deer Tracks” initially set out to dispel the “books only” stereotype of the trilogy back in July. They now return with Part 2, with ghostly melodies which sound like something that would be heard echoing over a foggy wilderness in the middle of nowhere. Which is funny, because they actually prefer to be “close to nature”, taking up recording in a woodland cabin. Surrounded by something as humble and flawless as streams and beautiful trees has had a beautiful influence on the outcome of this album, which is icy and yet warming, fractured but nevertheless whole.

Their synthesised melodic combines with a breathless vocal, creating a shimmering sense of urgency. Songs are loosely structured, effortlessly drifting from one musical element to another. Not to mention the recurrence of a string instrument is fairly spooky, contributing to the chill felt throughout.

Meant To Be begins with an ethereal melody and angelic vocals, which lead into an stressed guitar riff only to be rounded of by a violin accompaniment over a heavier drum beat. Fall With Me is structured around a vocal that struggles to surface, as if choking back tears whilst singing of unrequited love. The Archer is a happy xylophone-meet-synth pop melody, whereas Dark Passenger is fuelled by a heavy bass line that ends with a wavering synth that comes at your eardrums like a boomerang.

The album closer is discomforting to say the least, with distorted radio waves interjecting when you least expect it, suddenly drawing to a close by the three minute mark after an unnerving vocal that is reminiscent of a ghost-child singing in the bathroom. Perhaps, having just watched “The Grudge”, my state of mind is stuck in “frightened” mode. Who knows? But the point is this album is both haunting and enlightening, and generally messes around with your head a bit. And although you’re not always sure who is singing or what they’re singing, it doesn’t matter; it sounds beautiful.

For more information on the band, visit their official website. Part 2 is out now.

Charlie Clarkson - Planet Notion


Album Review: The Deer Tracks – The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2
Swedish electronica duo “The Deer Tracks” initially set out to dispel the “books only” stereotype of the trilogy back in July. They now return with Part 2, with ghostly melodies which sound like something that would be heard echoing over a foggy wilderness in the middle of nowhere. Which is funny, because they actually prefer to be “close to nature”, taking up recording in a woodland cabin. Surrounded by something as humble and flawless as streams and beautiful trees has had a beautiful influence on the outcome of this album, which is icy and yet warming, fractured but nevertheless whole.

Their synthesised melodic combines with a breathless vocal, creating a shimmering sense of urgency. Songs are loosely structured, effortlessly drifting from one musical element to another. Not to mention the recurrence of a string instrument is fairly spooky, contributing to the chill felt throughout.

Meant To Be begins with an ethereal melody and angelic vocals, which lead into an stressed guitar riff only to be rounded of by a violin accompaniment over a heavier drum beat. Fall With Me is structured around a vocal that struggles to surface, as if choking back tears whilst singing of unrequited love. The Archer is a happy xylophone-meet-synth pop melody, whereas Dark Passenger is fuelled by a heavy bass line that ends with a wavering synth that comes at your eardrums like a boomerang.

The album closer is discomforting to say the least, with distorted radio waves interjecting when you least expect it, suddenly drawing to a close by the three minute mark after an unnerving vocal that is reminiscent of a ghost-child singing in the bathroom. Perhaps, having just watched “The Grudge”, my state of mind is stuck in “frightened” mode. Who knows? But the point is this album is both haunting and enlightening, and generally messes around with your head a bit. And although you’re not always sure who is singing or what they’re singing, it doesn’t matter; it sounds beautiful.

For more information on the band, visit their official website. Part 2 is out now.

Charlie Clarkson - Planet Notion


The Deer Tracks The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2 Review

The Deer Tracks’ trilogy, The Archer, is now on its second part. By some way of context, The Deer Tracks are a Swedish male-female duo who record music in a remote cabin; music that has, over time, sat comfortably in the ‘structureless ethereal ghost-noise’ box. On this collection of nine tracks, there are some bold melodies thrown into a mix ripe with hauntological glitches.

The log cabin setting is somewhat of a misnomer for how giant and accessible some of Pt. 2 sounds. The Archer is magical and melancholic, and the latter half of Fra Ro Raa / Ro Ra Fraa could easily belong to Saint Etienne. There’s little isolation in how these songs sit with Fall With Me, brittle and compressed, featuring a sugary vocal at its helm. Throughout, tracks are repeatedly beautiful, but not always rewarding.

There’s a spooky synchronicity to the voices of David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors, a welcome unifier on an album wildly varying in mood and sound: take the delicate and vast 1000 Vanda Kinder, for example, which sits just next to Fa Fire’s guitar-heavy crystalline chorus and oversized production. But perhaps against its will, the ghostly accord acts as a sedative rather than a soundscape. Dark Passenger is The Deer Tracks’ proto-Portishead number, but its industrial booms are not so much sounds we never imagined, more gorgeous and spacious noises which listeners past might have been expecting. The crashing krautrock thumps contrast particularly oddly with a rhyme about breaking someone’s neck to give them a reality check.

Song structures follow a similar chronology: loosely, each song grows from a skeleton into a gigantic string arrangement. This formula is stretched beyond belief as the album progresses, but it’s still a comfort – something for the listener to clutch on to in an otherwise vast collection of sounds. By the end, the album feels oddly familiar – the listener becomes comfortable with the discomfort, as each new development becomes less intimidating and unpredictable following opener Meant to Be’s initial punch.

This album is a delight in many places – even though it’s too sweet to be powerful and too leftfield to be pop. The songs seep in, but again this is like a background to sleep, streamed in at low-volume rather than as a soundtrack to a thought process or to action. It’s certainly redolent of a country that can spend months without daylight.

Natalie Shaw 2011-08-18
- BBC


The Deer Tracks The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2 Review

The Deer Tracks’ trilogy, The Archer, is now on its second part. By some way of context, The Deer Tracks are a Swedish male-female duo who record music in a remote cabin; music that has, over time, sat comfortably in the ‘structureless ethereal ghost-noise’ box. On this collection of nine tracks, there are some bold melodies thrown into a mix ripe with hauntological glitches.

The log cabin setting is somewhat of a misnomer for how giant and accessible some of Pt. 2 sounds. The Archer is magical and melancholic, and the latter half of Fra Ro Raa / Ro Ra Fraa could easily belong to Saint Etienne. There’s little isolation in how these songs sit with Fall With Me, brittle and compressed, featuring a sugary vocal at its helm. Throughout, tracks are repeatedly beautiful, but not always rewarding.

There’s a spooky synchronicity to the voices of David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors, a welcome unifier on an album wildly varying in mood and sound: take the delicate and vast 1000 Vanda Kinder, for example, which sits just next to Fa Fire’s guitar-heavy crystalline chorus and oversized production. But perhaps against its will, the ghostly accord acts as a sedative rather than a soundscape. Dark Passenger is The Deer Tracks’ proto-Portishead number, but its industrial booms are not so much sounds we never imagined, more gorgeous and spacious noises which listeners past might have been expecting. The crashing krautrock thumps contrast particularly oddly with a rhyme about breaking someone’s neck to give them a reality check.

Song structures follow a similar chronology: loosely, each song grows from a skeleton into a gigantic string arrangement. This formula is stretched beyond belief as the album progresses, but it’s still a comfort – something for the listener to clutch on to in an otherwise vast collection of sounds. By the end, the album feels oddly familiar – the listener becomes comfortable with the discomfort, as each new development becomes less intimidating and unpredictable following opener Meant to Be’s initial punch.

This album is a delight in many places – even though it’s too sweet to be powerful and too leftfield to be pop. The songs seep in, but again this is like a background to sleep, streamed in at low-volume rather than as a soundtrack to a thought process or to action. It’s certainly redolent of a country that can spend months without daylight.

Natalie Shaw 2011-08-18
- BBC


Hailing from the tiny Swedish town of Gavle which burns the effigy of a giant goat every Christmas, The Deer Tracks are a boy-girl duo who make melodic, intricate and otherwordly folktronica. Following a tour of Europe and Japan with their debut album Aurora, singers/multi-instrumentalists David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors holed themselves up in a remote woodland cabin to create the Archer Trilogy, the second part of which is soon to be released. Recorded on battered computer equipment with wilfully lo-fi sounds effects made by coffee mugs and forks, the record combines glitchy electronica and rich warming tunes, all infused by the elemental wildness of the surroundings. Featuring feathery, helium-high vocals, a squelching kick of a beat and a joyful pop melody, forthcoming single Fro Ro Raa/Ro Ra Fraa should stoke the flames of the pair's slowly smouldering reputation.

Amy Dawson - Metro (18 August 2011)


Hailing from the tiny Swedish town of Gavle which burns the effigy of a giant goat every Christmas, The Deer Tracks are a boy-girl duo who make melodic, intricate and otherwordly folktronica. Following a tour of Europe and Japan with their debut album Aurora, singers/multi-instrumentalists David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors holed themselves up in a remote woodland cabin to create the Archer Trilogy, the second part of which is soon to be released. Recorded on battered computer equipment with wilfully lo-fi sounds effects made by coffee mugs and forks, the record combines glitchy electronica and rich warming tunes, all infused by the elemental wildness of the surroundings. Featuring feathery, helium-high vocals, a squelching kick of a beat and a joyful pop melody, forthcoming single Fro Ro Raa/Ro Ra Fraa should stoke the flames of the pair's slowly smouldering reputation.

Amy Dawson - Metro (18 August 2011)


Releasing albums in parts is an interesting concept, done in the last few years by the likes of Robyn and Parenthetical Girls amongst others. The latest to release an album in parts, or in this case a trilogy, is Swedish electronic duo The Deer Tracks with The Archer Trilogy. The nine tracks making up this release is Part 2 of the Archer series, and is a journey through atmostpheric Postal Service style electronica.

Elin Lindfors has a soft voice resembling that of Fever Ray, and because of this the comparison to this Scandinavian counterpart is apt, but at times the music of The Deer Tracks resembles St. Vincent if Annie Clark decided to go in a more electronic direction, particular songs such as ‘Fa Fire’ and the opening track, the blistering ‘Meant to Be’.

As an album there are a variety of interesting moments, with the unexpected furious rock that drops in the middle of ‘Fra Ro Raa / Ro Ra Fraa’ cutting the tension of the twilight bleeps and atmosphere. ‘The Archer’ meanwhile starts as a childlike lullaby, before descending into Knife style electronica. The curiously titled ‘Dark Passenger’, which I took as a reference to the TV show Dexter, definitely wouldn’t sound out of place on that show: it’s eerie and unnerving with Elin’s voice as a sweet disguise, much like Dexter Morgan himself and ends with a throttling, film epic climax. And don’t get me started on ‘Tiger’, with its rollercoaster of storming guitar and … well, seemingly every single other instrument, and it falls blissfully into album closer ‘Fall With Me’.

Of course as an album it also hits some misses, as after a while the continuous stream of minimalist computerised bleeps becomes a tad irritating and choruses such as in ‘Fa Fire’ seem as arena rock desperation, or an attempt to be Editors. But other than that very minor blip, The Archer Trilogy Part 2 has quietly but assuredly made waves as potentially one of the most beautifully underrated albums to be released these past few months, and we can only hope for bigger things from them very, very soon.

Words And Thoughts Of Ollie Launn - The Whiteboard Project


Releasing albums in parts is an interesting concept, done in the last few years by the likes of Robyn and Parenthetical Girls amongst others. The latest to release an album in parts, or in this case a trilogy, is Swedish electronic duo The Deer Tracks with The Archer Trilogy. The nine tracks making up this release is Part 2 of the Archer series, and is a journey through atmostpheric Postal Service style electronica.

Elin Lindfors has a soft voice resembling that of Fever Ray, and because of this the comparison to this Scandinavian counterpart is apt, but at times the music of The Deer Tracks resembles St. Vincent if Annie Clark decided to go in a more electronic direction, particular songs such as ‘Fa Fire’ and the opening track, the blistering ‘Meant to Be’.

As an album there are a variety of interesting moments, with the unexpected furious rock that drops in the middle of ‘Fra Ro Raa / Ro Ra Fraa’ cutting the tension of the twilight bleeps and atmosphere. ‘The Archer’ meanwhile starts as a childlike lullaby, before descending into Knife style electronica. The curiously titled ‘Dark Passenger’, which I took as a reference to the TV show Dexter, definitely wouldn’t sound out of place on that show: it’s eerie and unnerving with Elin’s voice as a sweet disguise, much like Dexter Morgan himself and ends with a throttling, film epic climax. And don’t get me started on ‘Tiger’, with its rollercoaster of storming guitar and … well, seemingly every single other instrument, and it falls blissfully into album closer ‘Fall With Me’.

Of course as an album it also hits some misses, as after a while the continuous stream of minimalist computerised bleeps becomes a tad irritating and choruses such as in ‘Fa Fire’ seem as arena rock desperation, or an attempt to be Editors. But other than that very minor blip, The Archer Trilogy Part 2 has quietly but assuredly made waves as potentially one of the most beautifully underrated albums to be released these past few months, and we can only hope for bigger things from them very, very soon.

Words And Thoughts Of Ollie Launn - The Whiteboard Project


We all know the legend of ‘Justin Vernon and the Lonely Log-Cabin’, as well as the (rather good) album which it gave rise to. To me, then, when I read the press release provided with The Archer Trilogy pt.2, it seemed incredibly rash that some young Swedish upstarts called The Deer Tracks (or their PR people) had so brazenly hijacked Vernon‘s log-cabin bandwagon. Luckily for the Swedes, though, they have just about gotten away with it, as it seems that while we were all wetting ourselves over the ‘return of guitar music’ (me included), they were benefiting, as Vernon did, from the isolation of their habitat - knuckling down and doing their synth-soaked thing.

‘Synth-soaked?!?!’ I hear you Bon Iver fans cry out in despair. Yeah… I hate to break it to you, but if you’re hoping for some suitably ‘Vernon’ tunes, you’re going to be disappointed. Furthermore, I feel it is my duty to chastise you for stereotyping all log-cabin-dwelling musicians as bearded lumberjacks with acoustic guitars. The Swedish duo, David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors, are, in fact, purveyors of music electronic in nature and about as far from lumberjacks as you can get. Their tracks are enveloped in sounds - from twitching drum machines to bass beats to spiralling synths - which are surely laptop-spawned, and any time that‘s not spent composing is clearly spent experimenting with their vast - not to mention exotic - make-up collection.

Also, if you think about it really, this ‘log cabin’ they live in must be fucking space-age. I mean, these two have been practically throwing synthetic sounds all over their proverbial canvas without a care in the world. Justin Vernon of 2007 must be green with envy, cradling his battered six-string in that gammy old cabin of his. The highlight of his day is probably whipping out the trumpet at the end of For Emma.... Poor sod.

Anyway, Bon Iver and OTT make-up aside, The Archer Trilogy pt.2 is a good album, if not a great one. Lindfors’ vocals are deliciously soft whether she’s singing in Swedish or English, and the instrumentation is soaring and atmospheric, though this album is full of darker, heavier beats that give the songs more energy and purpose than those in the first instalment. Lehnberg still, however, utilises the anthemic strings that dominated the previous EP, and the tracks almost always build to climactic crashes of sound. Opener ‘Meant to Be’ buzzes into life, twinkling luxuriously as Lindfors croons, but soon builds up with crunching guitar to an inevitable string breakdown. ‘Tiger’ becomes a swirling pool of synth energy, and ‘Dark Passenger’ progresses with a striking beat, slowly building its sinister momentum until it breaks down into a swoon of strings.

In fact, you kind of get the impression that there’s a formula to these songs - they start soft and gentle, they often seem to build in up to a string breakdown and they are dominated by a need to be ‘epic’. This can be extremely frustrating at first, although as you get to know the album it‘s less apparent. The final track, ‘U-turn’ stands out from the album in this sense, revelling in the simplicity of its lo-fi lullaby, and also showcases something else rarely seen in the other songs - lyrical depth. Elin Lindfors lamenting “always making u-turns whenever I’m close to feeling the truth” almost offsets the clumsiness of many of the other lyrical conceits - for example, the pre-chorus of ‘Fa-Fire’’s ruination with : “I wanna break your neck, just to give you a reality check ”.

Now I know so many reviewers come out with ‘watch this space’, but, seriously, watch this space. Maybe The Archer Trilogy pt.3 (billed as an EP) will be a masterpiece. Maybe not. All I can tell you is that this album is good enough for me to be seriously crushing on Elin right now. And I’d like to think I don’t just crush on anyone.

Josh Suntharasivam - Drowned In The Sound


We all know the legend of ‘Justin Vernon and the Lonely Log-Cabin’, as well as the (rather good) album which it gave rise to. To me, then, when I read the press release provided with The Archer Trilogy pt.2, it seemed incredibly rash that some young Swedish upstarts called The Deer Tracks (or their PR people) had so brazenly hijacked Vernon‘s log-cabin bandwagon. Luckily for the Swedes, though, they have just about gotten away with it, as it seems that while we were all wetting ourselves over the ‘return of guitar music’ (me included), they were benefiting, as Vernon did, from the isolation of their habitat - knuckling down and doing their synth-soaked thing.

‘Synth-soaked?!?!’ I hear you Bon Iver fans cry out in despair. Yeah… I hate to break it to you, but if you’re hoping for some suitably ‘Vernon’ tunes, you’re going to be disappointed. Furthermore, I feel it is my duty to chastise you for stereotyping all log-cabin-dwelling musicians as bearded lumberjacks with acoustic guitars. The Swedish duo, David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors, are, in fact, purveyors of music electronic in nature and about as far from lumberjacks as you can get. Their tracks are enveloped in sounds - from twitching drum machines to bass beats to spiralling synths - which are surely laptop-spawned, and any time that‘s not spent composing is clearly spent experimenting with their vast - not to mention exotic - make-up collection.

Also, if you think about it really, this ‘log cabin’ they live in must be fucking space-age. I mean, these two have been practically throwing synthetic sounds all over their proverbial canvas without a care in the world. Justin Vernon of 2007 must be green with envy, cradling his battered six-string in that gammy old cabin of his. The highlight of his day is probably whipping out the trumpet at the end of For Emma.... Poor sod.

Anyway, Bon Iver and OTT make-up aside, The Archer Trilogy pt.2 is a good album, if not a great one. Lindfors’ vocals are deliciously soft whether she’s singing in Swedish or English, and the instrumentation is soaring and atmospheric, though this album is full of darker, heavier beats that give the songs more energy and purpose than those in the first instalment. Lehnberg still, however, utilises the anthemic strings that dominated the previous EP, and the tracks almost always build to climactic crashes of sound. Opener ‘Meant to Be’ buzzes into life, twinkling luxuriously as Lindfors croons, but soon builds up with crunching guitar to an inevitable string breakdown. ‘Tiger’ becomes a swirling pool of synth energy, and ‘Dark Passenger’ progresses with a striking beat, slowly building its sinister momentum until it breaks down into a swoon of strings.

In fact, you kind of get the impression that there’s a formula to these songs - they start soft and gentle, they often seem to build in up to a string breakdown and they are dominated by a need to be ‘epic’. This can be extremely frustrating at first, although as you get to know the album it‘s less apparent. The final track, ‘U-turn’ stands out from the album in this sense, revelling in the simplicity of its lo-fi lullaby, and also showcases something else rarely seen in the other songs - lyrical depth. Elin Lindfors lamenting “always making u-turns whenever I’m close to feeling the truth” almost offsets the clumsiness of many of the other lyrical conceits - for example, the pre-chorus of ‘Fa-Fire’’s ruination with : “I wanna break your neck, just to give you a reality check ”.

Now I know so many reviewers come out with ‘watch this space’, but, seriously, watch this space. Maybe The Archer Trilogy pt.3 (billed as an EP) will be a masterpiece. Maybe not. All I can tell you is that this album is good enough for me to be seriously crushing on Elin right now. And I’d like to think I don’t just crush on anyone.

Josh Suntharasivam - Drowned In The Sound


The Swedish electro-folk duo have pimped up their sound. David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors have found a longer stride with deeper bass and more strobe into their pastoral oftcinematic hues. In the past they've cruised the hushed, human and fleshy proximities that Mum or Psapp have drawn us in to. And they retain their distance; you can still feel the breath coming off their tumbling songs, which is where perhaps they are at their melancholic best. Still, nothing stays the same and maybe we wanna dance. MATTHEW BENNETT - Clash Magazine


The Swedish electro-folk duo have pimped up their sound. David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors have found a longer stride with deeper bass and more strobe into their pastoral oftcinematic hues. In the past they've cruised the hushed, human and fleshy proximities that Mum or Psapp have drawn us in to. And they retain their distance; you can still feel the breath coming off their tumbling songs, which is where perhaps they are at their melancholic best. Still, nothing stays the same and maybe we wanna dance. MATTHEW BENNETT - Clash Magazine


In the children’s nursery rhyme, the ‘Teddy Bears Picnic,’ the opening lines are; “If you go down to the woods today, you're sure of a big surprise.” Merry old England always tries to portray itself as a modern day society that intercuts with ideas of the past, looking for something quirky and bold. Whilst cute and cuddly teddy bears are our idea of a mild surprise whilst waltzing around in the forest, The Deer Tracks locked themselves away in their native Sweden with only their instruments for company. The result is an album that is hauntingly beautiful, full of ambient landscapes that are quickly torn apart by piercing synths and ferocious beats.

One of the most inspiring aspects of this album is the recording process The Deer Tracks went through. Yes, the band comprising of David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors decided to record in a remote cabin in the woods of Sweden, but they were starved of communication from the outside world. The thought of no phone, TV and worst of all, internet is something that seems obscene in our gossiping society, but The Deer Tracks took it further by relying on Mother Nature not destroying their records. Gusts of rain or bursts of rain lost entire works at times, forcing the band to sift through the wreckage, reusing what was left and crafting brand new creations from damaged fragments. Not just a daring process, but one that cause tears of pain for many bands when high tech studios go wrong.

At some point, The Deer Tracks will do what Sigur Ros did and explode in to the mainstream. Yes, Sigur Ros, Bjork and Amiina are from Iceland, but for some reason, that part of the world seems to produce the most gorgeous selection of songs, glistening in the most magical sounding melodies and throbbing in beats, switching to the fragile and delicate. Sweden must be the next country to continue this trend.
The Deer Tracks - The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2

* août 19, 2011

* The Deer Tracks - The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2
* The Deer Tracks - The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2
* The Deer Tracks - The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2

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1 of 1
Next

In the children’s nursery rhyme, the ‘Teddy Bears Picnic,’ the opening lines are; “If you go down to the woods today, you're sure of a big surprise.” Merry old England always tries to portray itself as a modern day society that intercuts with ideas of the past, looking for something quirky and bold. Whilst cute and cuddly teddy bears are our idea of a mild surprise whilst waltzing around in the forest, The Deer Tracks locked themselves away in their native Sweden with only their instruments for company. The result is an album that is hauntingly beautiful, full of ambient landscapes that are quickly torn apart by piercing synths and ferocious beats.

One of the most inspiring aspects of this album is the recording process The Deer Tracks went through. Yes, the band comprising of David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors decided to record in a remote cabin in the woods of Sweden, but they were starved of communication from the outside world. The thought of no phone, TV and worst of all, internet is something that seems obscene in our gossiping society, but The Deer Tracks took it further by relying on Mother Nature not destroying their records. Gusts of rain or bursts of rain lost entire works at times, forcing the band to sift through the wreckage, reusing what was left and crafting brand new creations from damaged fragments. Not just a daring process, but one that cause tears of pain for many bands when high tech studios go wrong.

At some point, The Deer Tracks will do what Sigur Ros did and explode in to the mainstream. Yes, Sigur Ros, Bjork and Amiina are from Iceland, but for some reason, that part of the world seems to produce the most gorgeous selection of songs, glistening in the most magical sounding melodies and throbbing in beats, switching to the fragile and delicate. Sweden must be the next country to continue this trend.



‘The Archer Trilogy Pt.2’ is the full album follow up to the 2009 debut, ‘Aurora’ which immediately The Deer Tracks a lot of fans and praise on many best of music lists. We were treated to a band that weren’t afraid to experiment; some of the instruments featured include the electric guitars, melodica, trumpet, drums, piano, synthesizers, glockenspiel and music-boxes to create a sound of contrasts. It’s difficult to pinpoint exactally where The Deer Tracks fit in genre wise, but fans of Mogwai, Explosions In The Sky, Squarepusher and 65daysofstatic will take a shine to an album.

‘Dark Passenger’ has the bubbling chaos and fizz of a Portishead track that’s barely been contained whilst ‘Fra Ro Raa Ro Ra Fraa’ is a pacey track that gets doesn’t build and build in a post rock sense, but instead leaps in with a crunchy beat, claps and explosion of horns. Ghost like vocals don’t usually add aggression into the mix, but an added sense of authority is stamped right across the albums stand out track.

As you might h - Virgin


In the children’s nursery rhyme, the ‘Teddy Bears Picnic,’ the opening lines are; “If you go down to the woods today, you're sure of a big surprise.” Merry old England always tries to portray itself as a modern day society that intercuts with ideas of the past, looking for something quirky and bold. Whilst cute and cuddly teddy bears are our idea of a mild surprise whilst waltzing around in the forest, The Deer Tracks locked themselves away in their native Sweden with only their instruments for company. The result is an album that is hauntingly beautiful, full of ambient landscapes that are quickly torn apart by piercing synths and ferocious beats.

One of the most inspiring aspects of this album is the recording process The Deer Tracks went through. Yes, the band comprising of David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors decided to record in a remote cabin in the woods of Sweden, but they were starved of communication from the outside world. The thought of no phone, TV and worst of all, internet is something that seems obscene in our gossiping society, but The Deer Tracks took it further by relying on Mother Nature not destroying their records. Gusts of rain or bursts of rain lost entire works at times, forcing the band to sift through the wreckage, reusing what was left and crafting brand new creations from damaged fragments. Not just a daring process, but one that cause tears of pain for many bands when high tech studios go wrong.

At some point, The Deer Tracks will do what Sigur Ros did and explode in to the mainstream. Yes, Sigur Ros, Bjork and Amiina are from Iceland, but for some reason, that part of the world seems to produce the most gorgeous selection of songs, glistening in the most magical sounding melodies and throbbing in beats, switching to the fragile and delicate. Sweden must be the next country to continue this trend.
The Deer Tracks - The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2

* août 19, 2011

* The Deer Tracks - The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2
* The Deer Tracks - The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2
* The Deer Tracks - The Archer Trilogy Pt. 2

Prev
1 of 1
Next

In the children’s nursery rhyme, the ‘Teddy Bears Picnic,’ the opening lines are; “If you go down to the woods today, you're sure of a big surprise.” Merry old England always tries to portray itself as a modern day society that intercuts with ideas of the past, looking for something quirky and bold. Whilst cute and cuddly teddy bears are our idea of a mild surprise whilst waltzing around in the forest, The Deer Tracks locked themselves away in their native Sweden with only their instruments for company. The result is an album that is hauntingly beautiful, full of ambient landscapes that are quickly torn apart by piercing synths and ferocious beats.

One of the most inspiring aspects of this album is the recording process The Deer Tracks went through. Yes, the band comprising of David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors decided to record in a remote cabin in the woods of Sweden, but they were starved of communication from the outside world. The thought of no phone, TV and worst of all, internet is something that seems obscene in our gossiping society, but The Deer Tracks took it further by relying on Mother Nature not destroying their records. Gusts of rain or bursts of rain lost entire works at times, forcing the band to sift through the wreckage, reusing what was left and crafting brand new creations from damaged fragments. Not just a daring process, but one that cause tears of pain for many bands when high tech studios go wrong.

At some point, The Deer Tracks will do what Sigur Ros did and explode in to the mainstream. Yes, Sigur Ros, Bjork and Amiina are from Iceland, but for some reason, that part of the world seems to produce the most gorgeous selection of songs, glistening in the most magical sounding melodies and throbbing in beats, switching to the fragile and delicate. Sweden must be the next country to continue this trend.



‘The Archer Trilogy Pt.2’ is the full album follow up to the 2009 debut, ‘Aurora’ which immediately The Deer Tracks a lot of fans and praise on many best of music lists. We were treated to a band that weren’t afraid to experiment; some of the instruments featured include the electric guitars, melodica, trumpet, drums, piano, synthesizers, glockenspiel and music-boxes to create a sound of contrasts. It’s difficult to pinpoint exactally where The Deer Tracks fit in genre wise, but fans of Mogwai, Explosions In The Sky, Squarepusher and 65daysofstatic will take a shine to an album.

‘Dark Passenger’ has the bubbling chaos and fizz of a Portishead track that’s barely been contained whilst ‘Fra Ro Raa Ro Ra Fraa’ is a pacey track that gets doesn’t build and build in a post rock sense, but instead leaps in with a crunchy beat, claps and explosion of horns. Ghost like vocals don’t usually add aggression into the mix, but an added sense of authority is stamped right across the albums stand out track.

As you might h - Virgin


Discography

2008- Aurora CD/LP/Digital
2010- Eggegrund CD/EP
2011- The Archer Trilogy Pt. 1 CD/EP/Digital
2011- The Archer Trilogy Pt.2 CD/LP/Digital
2013- The Archer Trilogy Pt.3 CD/LP/Digital

Photos

Bio

The Deer Tracks are a Northern Light Electronica duo from Sweden, and if they aren’t recording in one woodland cabin or another, they’re off-duty in their tiny hometown of Gävle, best known for burning an effigy of a goat every Christmas.

David Lehnberg & Elin Lindfors are the only two constant pieces in the always evolving puzzle of The Deer Tracks. These two versatile multi-instrumentalists and singers, handle everything from writing to recording to production and even data recovery, depending on how badly behaved their way too-old computers are being. But they aren’t worried about the bumps and detours along the way. Says David: “The universe has its own way of course connecting.”

After touring Europe and Japan, in the spring and summer of 2010 The Deer Tracks retreated to the Swedish wilderness to create their definitive statement to date. In Elin’s grandmother’s remote cabin with no phone lines, no friends and one barely working computer, The Deer Tracks wrote and recorded their epic The Archer Trilogy, now releasing as their U.S. debut in three parts: Pt. 1, a five-song EP released last March; Pt. 2: a full album to be released on July 5. And Pt. 3 - yet to be revealed as the final installment.

“We try to be close to nature,” says David. “If you’re locked up in a studio where everything is perfect and there’s no wind or rain blowing in to destroy the recording—if you don’t push the boundaries —it’s gonna sound like you’re not trying to do something that’s real. But if you lock yourself up in a cabin in the woods, things start to happen. You’ll start to find your way back to your inner core, back to life.”

For breaks, Elin would splash through a nearby stream and return soaking-wet to record. When their hard drive repeatedly crashed, David would fish through whatever digital fragments were left and stitch together brand-new songs. Cacophony and melody are their two favorite things, they say. On The Archer Trilogy, the otherworldly experimentation collides with the propulsive danceability—but then fractured and kaleidoscoped thanks to The Deer Tracks’ own unique inspirations and way of thinking about music.

We play with everything we can get our hands on!” says David. “Small music boxes, glockenspiels, forks, coffee mugs, pretty much whatever is laying around—we try to build our own instruments in a way. Take “small parts from one to put with another and make special sound. It’s like a big puzzle.”

The Deer Tracks display their signature schizophrenia on The Archer Trilogy: PT.2; Elin sings breathlessly over an anxious synthesizer melody and suddenly a hard-edged guitar riff snaps the song in two, only to fall away as strings and bass sweeps in for a soaring chorus.

Their songs often stride fearlessly into the forest primeval armed with a stuttering beat and a rattling arsenal of percussion and somehow they blend them all together with other natural found sounds and deliberately lo-fi digital artifacts that adds bristles and grit to their relentless melodies.

They don’t like to reveal too much about their lyrics, they say—They can find inspiration from books, movies, mathematicians, real life and things yet to be discovered E “Even though I can write about others’ history, in every history I can find the history of myself,” says Elin. “Every character and every situation—it’s easy to make it your own.”

“We’re always adding things and doing things differently,” says David. “We’re always changing. We’re never satisfied. Everything is unfinished!”

“But I like that,” says Elin. “I like when there’s not an ending.”