The Highway
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The Highway

Brooklyn, New York, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2014 | INDIE

Brooklyn, New York, United States | INDIE
Established on Jan, 2014
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"Set Me Free. Official Video Release"

Check out video for Brooklyn / Boston band, The Highway’s “Set Me Free.”An energetic, indie rock that has some really catchy hooks.  The video is a total trip, with a 60s style & black and white illusion graphics goes well with their guitar driven throwback rock sound that reminds me of Sweden’s garage rock band The Hives.
- Review by Music Savage


"Set Me Free. Official Video Release"

Check out video for Brooklyn / Boston band, The Highway’s “Set Me Free.”An energetic, indie rock that has some really catchy hooks.  The video is a total trip, with a 60s style & black and white illusion graphics goes well with their guitar driven throwback rock sound that reminds me of Sweden’s garage rock band The Hives.
- Review by Music Savage


"From hooky groove to madman psychedelia"

Although they describe as Led Zeppelin meets The Black Keys, this earthy putfit have more in common with a wide-ranging set of influences that span everything form crunchy jam bands and college rock to punk-jazz. Their style swings from easy breezy, folk oriented fare to high-octane swarm of razor sharp notes and experimental sound collages.

Musicianship: Venezuelan native Daniel Tortoledo's vocal glide smoothly into place, going from silky to the shirek of a million harpies. His guitar slinging likewise shifts from hooky groove to madman psychedelia-one previous show's highlight him shredding with a beer bottle. The set's ultimate anchor, though, is Ted MaInnes' essential skin pounding. Most importantly, the duo display true synchronization entertainingly feeding off each other's energy.

Performance: If nothing else, thisevening proved how much can be done done with just two performers. Despite being down a man, the pair delivered a sound that was as expansive as it was exhilirating. The Highway don't belong in an Irish bar in Harvard Square. For certain, it took some time before the audience came around. A couple of mnid-show pauses slowed this conversion further, but some awkwards banter and a rousing version of "Happy Birthday", sung to one of the vening's intoxicated celebrants mitigiated this roadblock. Yet, when they reached outer rim of weirdness, plunking away at their instruments and emoting a spoken word salad of foggy abstraction, the crwods' limits were tested. Their daring attitude paid dividends, though, when Tortoledo writhed and shrieked in an orgiastic frenzy, culminating in an emotional apex that elicited mass amounts of applause.

Summary: While delivering a fascinating experience, The Highway's strength is also its greatest weakness-what, exactly, is their sound? Their funhouse twists and turns make for an intringuing show, but how does one market what amounts to an audible art installation? A few numbers verge on memorable infectiousness, but never reach a level of poppy hummability. Maybe further shaping their vision will reveal the answer to these imponderables and allow their talent to reach a wider fan base. - Music Conection


"From hooky groove to madman psychedelia"

Although they describe as Led Zeppelin meets The Black Keys, this earthy putfit have more in common with a wide-ranging set of influences that span everything form crunchy jam bands and college rock to punk-jazz. Their style swings from easy breezy, folk oriented fare to high-octane swarm of razor sharp notes and experimental sound collages.

Musicianship: Venezuelan native Daniel Tortoledo's vocal glide smoothly into place, going from silky to the shirek of a million harpies. His guitar slinging likewise shifts from hooky groove to madman psychedelia-one previous show's highlight him shredding with a beer bottle. The set's ultimate anchor, though, is Ted MaInnes' essential skin pounding. Most importantly, the duo display true synchronization entertainingly feeding off each other's energy.

Performance: If nothing else, thisevening proved how much can be done done with just two performers. Despite being down a man, the pair delivered a sound that was as expansive as it was exhilirating. The Highway don't belong in an Irish bar in Harvard Square. For certain, it took some time before the audience came around. A couple of mnid-show pauses slowed this conversion further, but some awkwards banter and a rousing version of "Happy Birthday", sung to one of the vening's intoxicated celebrants mitigiated this roadblock. Yet, when they reached outer rim of weirdness, plunking away at their instruments and emoting a spoken word salad of foggy abstraction, the crwods' limits were tested. Their daring attitude paid dividends, though, when Tortoledo writhed and shrieked in an orgiastic frenzy, culminating in an emotional apex that elicited mass amounts of applause.

Summary: While delivering a fascinating experience, The Highway's strength is also its greatest weakness-what, exactly, is their sound? Their funhouse twists and turns make for an intringuing show, but how does one market what amounts to an audible art installation? A few numbers verge on memorable infectiousness, but never reach a level of poppy hummability. Maybe further shaping their vision will reveal the answer to these imponderables and allow their talent to reach a wider fan base. - Music Conection


"Kind words"

Earnest noodling, a steady beat and straightforward, no-frills vocals: Less is more, and that's exactly what we get with The Highway's Forest People. The local trio specializes in a modern psych rock that couples vintage rock sensibilities with skilled musicianship, leaving audiences with a palatable sound reminiscent of the classic rock standards we've come to accept as the definition of "good."
The breakdown of "Set Me Free" stands out as a highlight on Forest People for its masterful build and soulful bassline, as does the meditative quality of the album's title track. Daniel Tortoledo's effortless baritone is a solid partner for the candid percussive work of Ted MacInnes and the steady guitar stylings of Ysaac Cohen. Every once in a while, you need to return to your roots, and the Highway make a compelling case for expanding upon the foundation of rock in their own way.
- The Weekly Dig


"Kind words"

Earnest noodling, a steady beat and straightforward, no-frills vocals: Less is more, and that's exactly what we get with The Highway's Forest People. The local trio specializes in a modern psych rock that couples vintage rock sensibilities with skilled musicianship, leaving audiences with a palatable sound reminiscent of the classic rock standards we've come to accept as the definition of "good."
The breakdown of "Set Me Free" stands out as a highlight on Forest People for its masterful build and soulful bassline, as does the meditative quality of the album's title track. Daniel Tortoledo's effortless baritone is a solid partner for the candid percussive work of Ted MacInnes and the steady guitar stylings of Ysaac Cohen. Every once in a while, you need to return to your roots, and the Highway make a compelling case for expanding upon the foundation of rock in their own way.
- The Weekly Dig


"Set Me Free"

The Highway’s “Set Me Free” does this musical thing where it sort of peeks around the corner to see if the coast is clear before coming out into the open. This is a little silly, because once they make sure no one’s watching, they ever-so-gently tip-toe out into the open and then take off their pants and start setting off firecrackers.

The furtive bass-line checks out the scene and then beckons its other friends along, it’s loudest, non-pants wearing friend that gets the most attention. This friend is the chorus - incidentally the title of the song as well - and the chorus makes its indelible mark on the song and in your consciousness, within the context of the song, of course. And maybe a little afterwards. You see, it’s one of those hooky choruses, the kind where a note drones up high while the melody jumps down the stairs, landing on its feet every time.

Another thing that makes this song stand out is its arrangement - The Highway is a full-featured band and they know not only how to fill up their own space, but how to stay out of each others’ way. A standout performance on the organ adds an important level of texture to “Set Me Free” - its whirring wheels circle at the top of the octave, carving out designs in the song’s roof while the guitars churn down below. While the chorus is the nucleus of this song’s clout, the keyboard adds the extra seasoning that gives it that extra push - just to make sure. It’s like they were already winning, but the keyboard taps in the empty-net goal with seconds to spare. The crowd goes wild - and they should.

- Boston Band Crush


"Set Me Free"

The Highway’s “Set Me Free” does this musical thing where it sort of peeks around the corner to see if the coast is clear before coming out into the open. This is a little silly, because once they make sure no one’s watching, they ever-so-gently tip-toe out into the open and then take off their pants and start setting off firecrackers.

The furtive bass-line checks out the scene and then beckons its other friends along, it’s loudest, non-pants wearing friend that gets the most attention. This friend is the chorus - incidentally the title of the song as well - and the chorus makes its indelible mark on the song and in your consciousness, within the context of the song, of course. And maybe a little afterwards. You see, it’s one of those hooky choruses, the kind where a note drones up high while the melody jumps down the stairs, landing on its feet every time.

Another thing that makes this song stand out is its arrangement - The Highway is a full-featured band and they know not only how to fill up their own space, but how to stay out of each others’ way. A standout performance on the organ adds an important level of texture to “Set Me Free” - its whirring wheels circle at the top of the octave, carving out designs in the song’s roof while the guitars churn down below. While the chorus is the nucleus of this song’s clout, the keyboard adds the extra seasoning that gives it that extra push - just to make sure. It’s like they were already winning, but the keyboard taps in the empty-net goal with seconds to spare. The crowd goes wild - and they should.

- Boston Band Crush


"LP Review"

I’ll confess that I’ve looked forward to this album ever since I first shared the stage with The Highway about three years ago.  Despite the years in between, the LP doesn’t disappoint.  This rock is pure and heartfelt; every unexpected chord means as much musically as do Tortoledo’s lyrics on brotherhood and strife, oneness and differences, despair and optimism. There are expanses of psychedelia that pull you down in the spirals on the backs of your eyelids before snarled-lip riff explosions that less demand than command attention.  There are subtle (and not-so-subtle) tempo and rhythm changes that guide you all over the rock map, and even, briefly, as far away as South America and France.  Most memorable for this listener, though, are the layered vocal melodies and deep chord progressions that, for all the psychedelic spinning and rock attitude, bring something a little less expected to the genre – heart, spirit, and even beauty.

- Band Over Boston


"LP Review"

I’ll confess that I’ve looked forward to this album ever since I first shared the stage with The Highway about three years ago.  Despite the years in between, the LP doesn’t disappoint.  This rock is pure and heartfelt; every unexpected chord means as much musically as do Tortoledo’s lyrics on brotherhood and strife, oneness and differences, despair and optimism. There are expanses of psychedelia that pull you down in the spirals on the backs of your eyelids before snarled-lip riff explosions that less demand than command attention.  There are subtle (and not-so-subtle) tempo and rhythm changes that guide you all over the rock map, and even, briefly, as far away as South America and France.  Most memorable for this listener, though, are the layered vocal melodies and deep chord progressions that, for all the psychedelic spinning and rock attitude, bring something a little less expected to the genre – heart, spirit, and even beauty.

- Band Over Boston


"Forest People"

Psychedelic swirling lures, introducing Forest People with atmospheric effects, slide guitar and nebulous, distant vocals.  It builds softly before dropping dead into one crunchy, snarled-lip guitar lick.  The band kicks it aside with the verse, Daniel Tortoledo's vocals immediately in the high-register, the rhythm guitar jiving like 70's funk.  It's as hypnotizing an opener as this listener has encountered in a very long time.  But The Highway, much as the name suggests, isn't content to idle in one place.  "Frozen Sun" cruises away from a desert sunset and a troubled past; there's defeat in the lyrics, but it's accepted, calm, soothed by the breeze and the knowledge that tomorrow is a new day.  The title track reminds what a spell a well thought out chord progression and back-up vocals can weave - it's a stunning, down-tempo meditation.  "Song for the World" is utterly beautiful; if you're the type to let music touch you, this one will, and it's thanks to plumb ingenious song-writing:  An entrancingly bittersweet opening gives way to one hell of a surprising French interlude (yes, both linguistically and musically); the song loops back on itself, gaining weight and fleshing out, and by the end, you might not know whether to laugh, cry, or sing along - even though they've switched languages again, this time to Spanish.  Now, I know I'm a bit of a sap, but the raw emotionality of the record is worth noting because it's a field in which psychedelically-minded rock 'n roll rarely succeeds.  But it's rock and roll, after all, so fear not if you just want to put your fist in the air - there's attitude in abundance, sharp and edgy soloing, inspired rhythm changes; hell, there's even a sing-along drum-and-vocal break.  There's still some residue of the "rock is dead" prophesying, some grumbling that rock and roll is all, at this point, recycled goods, and that the new breed of rock is not really "rock" so much as indie, as experimental, as post-this or that-core.  Buy Forest People.  And then buy it for anyone you know who buys that sh*t.
- Cullen Corley - The Deli New England


"Forest People"

Psychedelic swirling lures, introducing Forest People with atmospheric effects, slide guitar and nebulous, distant vocals.  It builds softly before dropping dead into one crunchy, snarled-lip guitar lick.  The band kicks it aside with the verse, Daniel Tortoledo's vocals immediately in the high-register, the rhythm guitar jiving like 70's funk.  It's as hypnotizing an opener as this listener has encountered in a very long time.  But The Highway, much as the name suggests, isn't content to idle in one place.  "Frozen Sun" cruises away from a desert sunset and a troubled past; there's defeat in the lyrics, but it's accepted, calm, soothed by the breeze and the knowledge that tomorrow is a new day.  The title track reminds what a spell a well thought out chord progression and back-up vocals can weave - it's a stunning, down-tempo meditation.  "Song for the World" is utterly beautiful; if you're the type to let music touch you, this one will, and it's thanks to plumb ingenious song-writing:  An entrancingly bittersweet opening gives way to one hell of a surprising French interlude (yes, both linguistically and musically); the song loops back on itself, gaining weight and fleshing out, and by the end, you might not know whether to laugh, cry, or sing along - even though they've switched languages again, this time to Spanish.  Now, I know I'm a bit of a sap, but the raw emotionality of the record is worth noting because it's a field in which psychedelically-minded rock 'n roll rarely succeeds.  But it's rock and roll, after all, so fear not if you just want to put your fist in the air - there's attitude in abundance, sharp and edgy soloing, inspired rhythm changes; hell, there's even a sing-along drum-and-vocal break.  There's still some residue of the "rock is dead" prophesying, some grumbling that rock and roll is all, at this point, recycled goods, and that the new breed of rock is not really "rock" so much as indie, as experimental, as post-this or that-core.  Buy Forest People.  And then buy it for anyone you know who buys that sh*t.
- Cullen Corley - The Deli New England


Discography

Forest People
Released on 9/24/2010

Produced by
Ted Macinnes and Daniel Tortoledo
Engineered by Mathew Scheinner
Mastered by Jeremy Loucas

Additional Musicians
David Kaye- Pedal Steel, Guitars
Alex Kovacs- Keys
Luis Peroza- Background Vocals
Jess Riley- Background Vocals

All You Do (Single)
Released on 7/2/2013

Produced by
Ted Macinnes and Daniel Tortoledo
Mastered and Engineered Jeremy Loucas

Daniel Tortoledo (Vocals and Bass)
Ted Macinnes (Drums and BG Vocals)
Ysaac Cohen (Guitar and BG Vocals)
Victor Cruz (Guitar, Percussion, BG Vocals)

Photos

Bio

The New York-based psychedelic rock band The Highway came into being nearly a decade ago. Daniel Tortoledo (vocals and bass), Ted MacInnes (drums) Griffin McMahon, Adam Douglass (Guitar) Jay Rice (Bass)  connected over shared influences, both earthly and intangible: Philosophy. Perspective. The vastness of outer space. Mysticism. Hitchcock’s psychological mindfucks. Grassy fields and dense forests. Color. The expansiveness of the United States.
The result of their collaboration is a singular sound—one that has the ability to completely take you over.
Within the cacophonous, but highly orchestrated, rock trances is a writing process steeped in tradition. The Highway adheres to the mantra of less is more, and there is order here in the chaos of sound. Starting with simple chords, the band creates a spacious structure in which to elaborate.
Adding psychedelic arrangements and soulful lyrics (sung with fervor by Daniel Tortoledo) they infect with potent nostalgia. They elicit a feeling of having discovered something entirely new. Their songs ebb and flow, often building to a riot—a well-crafted wall of sound, punctuated by the tweaked out echoes of dreams and philosophical spoken lyrics.
In September 2010, The Highway released their first album: Forest People. And after a month-long winter 2012 tour of the US, The Highway returned home with the basis for their sophomore album. In July, they will lay down their new tracks at a Converse-sponsored studio in NYC.


Band Members