The Hiser Brothers
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The Hiser Brothers

El Dorado Springs, Missouri, United States | SELF

El Dorado Springs, Missouri, United States | SELF
Band Jazz Blues

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"The Hiser Brothers (May, 2008)"

No matter what type of music you
enjoy, you are bound to hear something
you like when the Hiser Brothers perform
at the Gillioz Theatre as part of the Gigs
at the Gillioz Concert Series.
On May 27, Kane and Jacob Hiser will
perform music from a variety of genres,
including rock, blues, country, classical,
jazz, and bluegrass. The Hiser Brothers
have been performing for parties, weddings,
churches, and festivals for 10
years. During that time they have shared
the stage with the Amazing Rhythm
Aces, Buddy Miles, Anthony Gomes, and
Don Shipps.
The brothers, now in their late teens,
started their musical journey at a young
age. At the age of 5, Jacob began taking
violin lessons. He started taking piano lessons
when he was 7. Kane began playing
the piano when he was 7, and has since
started playing the electric bass six years
ago, and the upright bass four years ago.
“I knew they were capable of great
things musically,” their father, John Hiser,
said. “I knew they were capable of anything
from the time they were born.”
It’s their ability to capture so many
styles that sometimes causes a problem
for the Hiser Brothers.
“Whether it’s a two hour show or a
four hour show, I always feel like there’s
something we didn’t do; that we didn’t
give the audience everything we can
offer,” John said. “But, I guess you have
to leave the audience wanting more.”
To learn more about the Hiser Brothers,
and to hear a sample of their music,
check out their Web site www.thehiserbrothers.
com. - Kara Hartfield, Community Free Press of Springfield, MO


"July, 2000 Jam-n-Picnic"

"How many times do we get to listen to true talent...live? (Not enough in this world, as far as I'm concerned.) Okay. Now. How many times do you get to see the possibility of a legend in the making? These guys [the Hiser Brothers] are 9 and 11! You do the math. Where will they be in 10 years...20...30? It is totally awesome to think what could be ahead for two very talented young men doing something that so many can enjoy. Jacob (featured in our June newsletter after having blown us away with his expertise on the keyboard) came back with his electric violin (wow!) and older brother, Kane, on the keyboard. They wailed together! What a treat!" - Blues Society of the Ozarks Newsletter


"July, 2000 Jam-n-Picnic"

"How many times do we get to listen to true talent...live? (Not enough in this world, as far as I'm concerned.) Okay. Now. How many times do you get to see the possibility of a legend in the making? These guys [the Hiser Brothers] are 9 and 11! You do the math. Where will they be in 10 years...20...30? It is totally awesome to think what could be ahead for two very talented young men doing something that so many can enjoy. Jacob (featured in our June newsletter after having blown us away with his expertise on the keyboard) came back with his electric violin (wow!) and older brother, Kane, on the keyboard. They wailed together! What a treat!" - Blues Society of the Ozarks Newsletter


"Beatin' Old Man Winter with the Blues (January, 2003)"

But the surprise of the event [Winter Blast of Blues] were the Hiser Brothers. Twelve year old Jacob on the fiddle and Kane, almost 14, on keyboards had the audience alternately subdued with low-key, gentle numbers and clapping time to rousing bluegrass renditions.
They even played a couple of instrumentals written by Jacob, who also played keyboard on a song he had written for his father. These two boys have a bright future in the music world, and people should keep an ear tuned for them. - Thomas Garret, Bulletin City Editor


"Beatin' Old Man Winter with the Blues (January, 2003)"

But the surprise of the event [Winter Blast of Blues] were the Hiser Brothers. Twelve year old Jacob on the fiddle and Kane, almost 14, on keyboards had the audience alternately subdued with low-key, gentle numbers and clapping time to rousing bluegrass renditions.
They even played a couple of instrumentals written by Jacob, who also played keyboard on a song he had written for his father. These two boys have a bright future in the music world, and people should keep an ear tuned for them. - Thomas Garret, Bulletin City Editor


"The Future of Music (2003)"

"With exceptional stage presence and timing for someone so young, Jacob captured the hearts of the considerable and attentive crowd. The songlist ran from Eric Clapton to Bob Dylan to B.B. King and Jacob was right there, everytime. In an untrained but melodic voice, he even treated the crowd to a taste of his growing talent as he sang a couple of his own songs. " - Lake of the Ozarks Blues Society Newsletter


"The Future of Music (2003)"

"With exceptional stage presence and timing for someone so young, Jacob captured the hearts of the considerable and attentive crowd. The songlist ran from Eric Clapton to Bob Dylan to B.B. King and Jacob was right there, everytime. In an untrained but melodic voice, he even treated the crowd to a taste of his growing talent as he sang a couple of his own songs. " - Lake of the Ozarks Blues Society Newsletter


"Moulin Musique St. Patrick's Day Party at Missouri Theater (March, 2004)"

"After another set with Planet Jazz, the evening concluded, as usual, with a jam session featuring all the performers of the evening. And here is where the real surprise happened. In the audience were The Hiser Brothers: Kane, a bassist and Jacob, a thirteen year old keyboardist who blew everybody away. "Trading eights" (musical term for an eight bar solo), this kid very easily kept up with Sutu! It was quite a treat!" - ComoMusic Show Reviews


"Moulin Musique St. Patrick's Day Party at Missouri Theater (March, 2004)"

"After another set with Planet Jazz, the evening concluded, as usual, with a jam session featuring all the performers of the evening. And here is where the real surprise happened. In the audience were The Hiser Brothers: Kane, a bassist and Jacob, a thirteen year old keyboardist who blew everybody away. "Trading eights" (musical term for an eight bar solo), this kid very easily kept up with Sutu! It was quite a treat!" - ComoMusic Show Reviews


"Ozark Jubilee (December, 2004)"

[Don] Evans says, "They're going to see some old-timers, but we've got some new ones in there like the Hiser Brothers."
The Hiser Brothers are adolescents but play with the skill and confidence of musicians 3 times their age...
- Michael Brothers, Springfield News-Leader


"Brotherly Song (January, 2005)"

Having so few boundaries is what sets the Hiser apart from other talented kids their age, older musicians say.
Advanced youngsters who play blues guitar or classical piano are exceptional, says Dr. Larry Dissmore, conductor of the Springfield Youth Symphony, but it is rare to find students like the Hisers who are equally comfortable playing classical music, improvising jazz solos and writing country songs.
"They're multi-talented," says Quintin Bridges, a 39-year-old Fair Grove man who writes songs with the Hisers. "They blow me away." - Michael Brothers, Springfield News-Leader


"Ozark Jubilee (December, 2004)"

[Don] Evans says, "They're going to see some old-timers, but we've got some new ones in there like the Hiser Brothers."
The Hiser Brothers are adolescents but play with the skill and confidence of musicians 3 times their age...
- Michael Brothers, Springfield News-Leader


"The Next Generaton Finds Its Blues (December 1, 2005)"

If you’ve been reading the Blues press for the last few years, you’ve taken in much discussion about how the Blues World is changing. Though there are more Blues festivals, the Blues club scene is generally shrinking. Older Blues fans don’t go out as much as they used to and young people (with a few exceptions) aren’t as interested in playing or enjoying Blues music as their parents were. The resulting lack of a scene where young Blues musicians can develop may mean that when another generation or two of Blues musicians and fans have passed, Blues as we know it will be “history.”
The only hope in the future for Blues – performed and recorded by musicians who are both carrying on Blues tradition and making their own contribution – is in the “exceptions” I mentioned parenthetically above: the young, talented musicians who will carry on Blues music their own way.
I had a great time playing at the King Bis-...uh, “Arkansas Blues and Heritage Festival” a few weeks ago, but I was so busy with my three sets that I couldn’t check out the “Emerging Artists” stage. I would have loved to see who is indeed emerging and at least I got to hear young Colorado Bluesman John-Alex Mason play some very accomplished deep Delta Blues on the main stage just before I filled in on bass with Diunna Greenleaf’s Blue Mercy band.
But it was at Pinetop Perkins’ Annual Homecoming at Hopson Plantation, just south of Clarksdale, Mississippi, on the Sunday after the festival – ironically as traditional a place and player as exists - that I had a chance to look much further on up the road at what may be the future of Blues music twenty-five to fifty years from now. When I arrived, Pinetop’s manager Pat Morgan introduced me to The Hiser Brothers – Jacob, 15 and Kane, 16 - who had played on the Emerging Artists stage at the festival and were at the party to jam as much as possible. Jacob was playing some very advanced solo Blues piano when I came in and Kane was carrying in a real upright bass.
Hearing them jam that day showed me that they were already very developed players and I could hear what they had listened to and been influenced by already in their young lives. They accompanied older musicians with professional competence and experience. They knew both how to play Old School Blues and modern styles, and I could tell that their musical background was not limited to Blues. When Jacob picked up his electric violin, sound engineer Dawn Hopkins thought his tone reminded her of electric Blues harp. I didn’t hear that, though he functioned musically as a harp does in a Blues band. I thought he had an interesting electronically-enhanced tone that wasn’t exactly like anything traditional, but was musically exciting. It was Jacob Hiser finding and playing his own Blues, already with more originality than any other musician in the house that day.
I smile just thinking about all the good music these young men are going to play. I knew I wanted to tell you about them in BluesWax, and I wanted to ask them for us: Musician/writers like me often talk about what “young folks” are or are not doing and where they’re coming from about Blues – how about letting them tell you themselves:

Bob Margolin for BluesWax: Do you intend to become professional musicians – to make a career from playing?

Kane Hiser: Yes.

Jacob Hiser: I certainly do.

BW: Do you think you would like to be a professional Blues musician specifically, or not be limited by style?

Kane: I don't want to be limited by any genre. There are a lot of other great genres out there. But Blues will always be a part of our lives. It's what's been paying the bills and keeping us going.

Jacob: It won't be primarily Blues. I also enjoy playing Jazz, Rock, Bluegrass...everything, pretty much.

BW: How are your parents encouraging you?

Kane: They spend money on the music gear we need, drive us to our gigs, and make time for us to practice our instruments.

Jacob: Dad also home schools us so we have more time for our music.

BW: How did you become interested in Blues – it’s certainly unusual for your age?

Jacob: When we were little, Dad ran sound for a band called Blues Illusion. They rehearsed at our house, so we were always listening. Dad also played fiddle and mandolin a lot. We were always listening to Rock and Blues albums.

BW: Tell us about your musical background, so our readers will know where you’re coming from.

Kane: I started playing the piano at seven. As a pianist I have played Classical music for the most part, but I can play other styles as well. I picked up the bass when I was twelve. First it was just electric bass, then, about three years ago, I decided I would try out the acoustic. Ever since I started, I have loved playing the bass.

Jacob: I started taking Classical violin lessons at five years old and piano at seven. My brother and I started playing at our local Blues society's [Blues Society of the Ozarks] monthly jam a - Bob Margolin, Blues Wax E-zine


"The Next Generaton Finds Its Blues (December 1, 2005)"

If you’ve been reading the Blues press for the last few years, you’ve taken in much discussion about how the Blues World is changing. Though there are more Blues festivals, the Blues club scene is generally shrinking. Older Blues fans don’t go out as much as they used to and young people (with a few exceptions) aren’t as interested in playing or enjoying Blues music as their parents were. The resulting lack of a scene where young Blues musicians can develop may mean that when another generation or two of Blues musicians and fans have passed, Blues as we know it will be “history.”
The only hope in the future for Blues – performed and recorded by musicians who are both carrying on Blues tradition and making their own contribution – is in the “exceptions” I mentioned parenthetically above: the young, talented musicians who will carry on Blues music their own way.
I had a great time playing at the King Bis-...uh, “Arkansas Blues and Heritage Festival” a few weeks ago, but I was so busy with my three sets that I couldn’t check out the “Emerging Artists” stage. I would have loved to see who is indeed emerging and at least I got to hear young Colorado Bluesman John-Alex Mason play some very accomplished deep Delta Blues on the main stage just before I filled in on bass with Diunna Greenleaf’s Blue Mercy band.
But it was at Pinetop Perkins’ Annual Homecoming at Hopson Plantation, just south of Clarksdale, Mississippi, on the Sunday after the festival – ironically as traditional a place and player as exists - that I had a chance to look much further on up the road at what may be the future of Blues music twenty-five to fifty years from now. When I arrived, Pinetop’s manager Pat Morgan introduced me to The Hiser Brothers – Jacob, 15 and Kane, 16 - who had played on the Emerging Artists stage at the festival and were at the party to jam as much as possible. Jacob was playing some very advanced solo Blues piano when I came in and Kane was carrying in a real upright bass.
Hearing them jam that day showed me that they were already very developed players and I could hear what they had listened to and been influenced by already in their young lives. They accompanied older musicians with professional competence and experience. They knew both how to play Old School Blues and modern styles, and I could tell that their musical background was not limited to Blues. When Jacob picked up his electric violin, sound engineer Dawn Hopkins thought his tone reminded her of electric Blues harp. I didn’t hear that, though he functioned musically as a harp does in a Blues band. I thought he had an interesting electronically-enhanced tone that wasn’t exactly like anything traditional, but was musically exciting. It was Jacob Hiser finding and playing his own Blues, already with more originality than any other musician in the house that day.
I smile just thinking about all the good music these young men are going to play. I knew I wanted to tell you about them in BluesWax, and I wanted to ask them for us: Musician/writers like me often talk about what “young folks” are or are not doing and where they’re coming from about Blues – how about letting them tell you themselves:

Bob Margolin for BluesWax: Do you intend to become professional musicians – to make a career from playing?

Kane Hiser: Yes.

Jacob Hiser: I certainly do.

BW: Do you think you would like to be a professional Blues musician specifically, or not be limited by style?

Kane: I don't want to be limited by any genre. There are a lot of other great genres out there. But Blues will always be a part of our lives. It's what's been paying the bills and keeping us going.

Jacob: It won't be primarily Blues. I also enjoy playing Jazz, Rock, Bluegrass...everything, pretty much.

BW: How are your parents encouraging you?

Kane: They spend money on the music gear we need, drive us to our gigs, and make time for us to practice our instruments.

Jacob: Dad also home schools us so we have more time for our music.

BW: How did you become interested in Blues – it’s certainly unusual for your age?

Jacob: When we were little, Dad ran sound for a band called Blues Illusion. They rehearsed at our house, so we were always listening. Dad also played fiddle and mandolin a lot. We were always listening to Rock and Blues albums.

BW: Tell us about your musical background, so our readers will know where you’re coming from.

Kane: I started playing the piano at seven. As a pianist I have played Classical music for the most part, but I can play other styles as well. I picked up the bass when I was twelve. First it was just electric bass, then, about three years ago, I decided I would try out the acoustic. Ever since I started, I have loved playing the bass.

Jacob: I started taking Classical violin lessons at five years old and piano at seven. My brother and I started playing at our local Blues society's [Blues Society of the Ozarks] monthly jam a - Bob Margolin, Blues Wax E-zine


Discography

"A Little Bit of Fiddlin'" - 2002
"You Gave Everything" - 2005
"Drivin' The Blues" - 2006

Photos

Bio

The Hiser Brothers are Kane and Jacob. Kane plays bass, guitar, and piano. Jacob plays violin, piano, mandolin, percussion, and sings. We have over 10 years of experience playing weddings, funerals, parties, restaurants, churches, festivals, and sharing the stage with musicians such as the Amazing Rhythm Aces, Buddy Miles, Bernard Allison, Bob Margolin, and Pinetop Perkins. We perform all styles, from rock to classical, jazz to bluegrass. Three CD's are now available: "Drivin' The Blues" (released Oct. 2006) presents a variety of blues originals. "You Gave Everything" offers originals in blues, country, rock, and modern classical styles. "A Little Bit of Fiddlin'" holds a mixture of fiddle music including bluegrass, cajun, Scotch/Irish, blues, and one Jacob Hiser original.