The JPC
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At the age of twenty-eight, when most jazz musicians are still in the process of sorting out influences and making tentative steps in developing their own voice, trumpeter Jason Palmer is already playing at a level that merits close attention. Informal recordings of some recent live performances in the Boston area reveal an emerging style based on the language of bebop, including a number of fundamental elements that bode well for the future. During several medium-to-up tempo tracks he plays solos in the 4 to 6 minute range. While such stretching out can be an indication of youthful exuberance rather than significant things to say, Palmer is seldom at a loss for ideas or direction. (Palmer has signed to make a recording as a leader in 2005 for the respected independent label, Fresh Sound New Talent. It will be interesting to hear how he responds to the tighter, somewhat more rigid confines of a commercial recording date.)
Palmer’s solos are not filled with pyrotechnics; rather, in his own thoughtful way he’s strong and decisive. He consistently creates melodically oriented improvisational lines, mostly in the horn’s middle register, that make perfect sense. There’s no fat or excess in what he does. He rarely reaches for emotional peaks or crowd-pleasing climaxes, yet the listener is invited into each solo. There’s nothing labored or strained about his playing, and he swings without exaggeration or struggle. He’s not afraid of silence and allows the music to breathe. Palmer’s time is excellent, and he’s good at riding the bassist and drummer’s pulse while establishing a rhythmic momentum of his own. Very seldom does a phrase sound incomplete, isolated, or broken off. He has a knack for reworking and knitting together similar phrases before moving on to the next sequence.
I’m looking forward to hearing Jason Palmer again in the near future and following his music and career in the years to come.


- All About Jazz


At the age of twenty-eight, when most jazz musicians are still in the process of sorting out influences and making tentative steps in developing their own voice, trumpeter Jason Palmer is already playing at a level that merits close attention. Informal recordings of some recent live performances in the Boston area reveal an emerging style based on the language of bebop, including a number of fundamental elements that bode well for the future. During several medium-to-up tempo tracks he plays solos in the 4 to 6 minute range. While such stretching out can be an indication of youthful exuberance rather than significant things to say, Palmer is seldom at a loss for ideas or direction. (Palmer has signed to make a recording as a leader in 2005 for the respected independent label, Fresh Sound New Talent. It will be interesting to hear how he responds to the tighter, somewhat more rigid confines of a commercial recording date.)
Palmer’s solos are not filled with pyrotechnics; rather, in his own thoughtful way he’s strong and decisive. He consistently creates melodically oriented improvisational lines, mostly in the horn’s middle register, that make perfect sense. There’s no fat or excess in what he does. He rarely reaches for emotional peaks or crowd-pleasing climaxes, yet the listener is invited into each solo. There’s nothing labored or strained about his playing, and he swings without exaggeration or struggle. He’s not afraid of silence and allows the music to breathe. Palmer’s time is excellent, and he’s good at riding the bassist and drummer’s pulse while establishing a rhythmic momentum of his own. Very seldom does a phrase sound incomplete, isolated, or broken off. He has a knack for reworking and knitting together similar phrases before moving on to the next sequence.
I’m looking forward to hearing Jason Palmer again in the near future and following his music and career in the years to come.


- All About Jazz


"Jason Palmer may be an unheralded trumpet player, but, if his music is allowed to do the talking, it won't be for very long. His dexterity and precision in Herbie Hancock's "Sorcerer," a favorite of the pianist's most notorious employer, Miles Davis, cuts and burns like a white-hot scalpel. Other tunes, particularly Palmer originals such as "The Rundown" and more soft "Eye of the Beholder," summon familiar echoes of classic be-bop, hard-bop, and post-bop Blue Note sessions. To lift a familiar media phrase, Jason Palmer is a trumpet talent deserving wider recognition."
- All About Jazz


"Jason Palmer may be an unheralded trumpet player, but, if his music is allowed to do the talking, it won't be for very long. His dexterity and precision in Herbie Hancock's "Sorcerer," a favorite of the pianist's most notorious employer, Miles Davis, cuts and burns like a white-hot scalpel. Other tunes, particularly Palmer originals such as "The Rundown" and more soft "Eye of the Beholder," summon familiar echoes of classic be-bop, hard-bop, and post-bop Blue Note sessions. To lift a familiar media phrase, Jason Palmer is a trumpet talent deserving wider recognition."
- All About Jazz


Discography

I have a cd scheduled for release in the Fall of 2007. It's entitled Songbook and it will be released on the Ayva Musica Label. The cd features 9 of my original compostions and includes guest appearances by Ravi Coltrane and Greg Osby.

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Bio

For the past two years, trumpeter Jason Palmer has been performing with Blue Note recording artist Greg Osby and his group The Greg Osby Five. With this group, Jason has performed at major jazz festivals in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Switzerland, France, Malta, Netherlands, as well as two stints at the Village Vanguard in New York City. Jason is also currently working with alto saxophonist Matana Roberts (of the AACM out of Chicago), performing at venues in NYC (the Jazz Gallery and Tonic) as well as the Moers Jazz Festival (Germany). In January of 2007, Jason Palmer had the great opportunity to perform with hip-hop artist Common on the Tonight Show with Jay Leno. He is set to release his first album as a leader in July of 2007 entitled "Songbook" on the Ayva Musica label. The album is comprised of nine original compositions and shall feature Greg Osby (alto), Ravi Coltrane (tenor), Leo Genovese (piano), Matt Brewer (bass), Warren Wolf (vibes), and Tommy Crane (drums). Jason is currently performing in Sofia Koutsovitis's Octet and Kendrick Oliver's New Life Jazz Orchestra. As a member of the NLJO, Jason has performed at the Newport Jazz Festival, Tanglewood Jazz Festival, Marblehead Jazz Festival, Berks Jazz Festival, Sculler's Jazz Club, Regattabar Jazz Club, as well as Blues Alley (Washington D.C.). He has also worked as a sideman with Ravi Coltrane and David Gilmore. Jason was also a finalist in the 2003 Carmine Caruso International Jazz Solo Trumpet Competition held in Orlando, Florida. He leads a quintet that has served as the house band at Boston's historical Wally's Jazz Café for the past six years. His quintet has performed three times on WGBH radio's "Eric in the Evening", presented concerts at Emmanuel Church in Boston as a part of First Night Boston, the Highland Jazz Series in Needham, Mass., and has performed club dates at the Good Life, Les Zygomates, the Lily Pad, and the Jazz Standard in New York City

During his time in Boston, Jason has been fortunate to share the stage with Roy Haynes, Wynton Marsalis, Benny Golson, Lewis Nash, Billy Pierce, Roy Hargrove, and Tim Warfield. Jason was a resident at the 2000 Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz at Aspen Snowmass in Aspen, CO, the 2003 Betty Carter Jazz Ahead program, as well as the 2003 Steans Institute for Young Artists at the Ravinia Festival in Chicago. While attending these programs, he was able to study and perform with jazz legends such as Herbie Hancock, Joshua Redman, Brian Blade, Christian McBride, Jimmy Smith, James Moody, Rufus Reid, Winard Harper, and Fred Wesley.

As a teacher, Jason is a faculty member of the Aquinas College Jazz Camp (Grand Rapids, MI) as well as the trumpet faculty in the Preparatory Division at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston for the past seven years.