the peachbones

the peachbones

BandRockAlternative

rock and roll with meaning, depth, and feeling. hard to describe, but you know it when you hear it. hard-hitting and subtle, pop sensible and different.

Biography

In their 10 years of playing music together, Ron Copenhaver, Matthew Hoover, and Donne Copenhaver have changed their band name almost as many times as the band have altered their distinct sound. The Peachbones, as they’ve been known for about 5 years, have crafted a work of rock music influenced more by their own imaginations rather than the rock and roll fads they’ve seen come and go since their inception in 1994. Ron and Matthew met at Ashland University in 1994. They soon began writing songs together, Ron playing guitar and Hoover singing. Donne, twin brother of Ron, became the drummer, and the search for a band was on. After years of playing in Columbus in an attempt to earn money for a debut album, the band longed for another change. But before they would do so, they recorded Big, Ohio, their first full-length album. The album received good reviews in the Columbus media. Many of the band’s influences became evident on the album: Hoover’s love of old country, along with the Copenhavers’ allegiance to harder rocking modern bands like Pearl Jam and Rage Against the Machine, and then-bassist Vern Miller’s discovery of Wilco and Son Volt all contributed to the rock sound of Big, Ohio. This diversity of influence, along with a general love of classic rock from the 60’s and 70’s, made up the Peachbones trademark sound. Instruments like pedal steel guitars, pianos, accordions, and mandolins deftly made their way onto the album, providing an alternative country texture to their songs. Once Big, Ohio was behind them, the band began writing new material. The band once again underwent a personnel change, departing with Vern Miller in 2002. Enter Andrew Ditlevson, a much needed spark to the band’s creativity and direction. Andrew’s presence opened doors of creativity for the band, allowing many ideas and concepts to develop that an earlier version of the band might have prevented. A new style of rock had emerged. Their sophomore album Revenant showcases this new sound, offering up both more contemplative and intense rock. Slower, darker songs find their way onto their second effort, yet the rock offerings eclipse even the hardest heard on Big, Ohio. More experimental guitar sounds and synthesizers aid in distinguishing this batch of songs from those on Big, Ohio, but the core of the Peachbones sound—booming drums, driving bass, melodic vocals, and superb guitar tone—makes this album a quintessential Peachbones work. Revenant is now available for purchase. See the Blogs for details, or visit www.thepeachbones.com. With the release of Revenant, the band hopes that it will serve as the foundation of a committment of artistic growth and integrity and foreshadows the future of making great music.

Discography

Big, Ohio - 2002
Singles from Big, Ohio: If You Call, All Eyes On You, White K., and Big, Ohio
Revenant - 2005
Singles: Scattered, Ten Feet Tall, Call Back

Set List

We do a mix of everything: songs from Big, Ohio, most of the songs from Revenant, and anything new we're working on that's ready for the live show. We tend to tailor the sets based on the type of venue we're playing. For example, if we play a small, intimate coffeehouse-type of venue, we don't bring the big amps! We do a few covers, but we don't do them often. We've played "Words" by Neil Young, "Moonshiner" by Bob Dylan/Uncle Tupelo, and "Mrs. Robinson" by Simon & Garfunkel, and "Effigy" by Uncle Tupelo. Again, in a year's worth of shows, we may only play these songs half a dozen times or less.
Our setlist:
Still Waiting
Backlash
Big Like The Sea
Ghosts
Daydream Listening
Island
Ten Feet Tall
All Eyes On You
Scattered
White K.
Been Had
Short Year
Call Back

Our sets vary in length depending on how much we improvise on stage. We're not a jam band or anything, but we do tend to let the music take us places on a few songs. Our recorded version of Call Back is over