The Polymorphines
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The Polymorphines

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Band Rock Blues

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Oct
28
The Polymorphines @ Bovine Sex Club

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Oct
22
The Polymorphines @ Cameron House

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Oct
16
The Polymorphines @ Babylon

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

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This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


Ladies and Gentleman, this is Rock and Roll. An echo of Blues-infused Garage Rock, The Polymorphines Transistor Sistor (Get Bent Records) makes you think the band has got to have a few of The Who and Led Zeppelin’s albums kicking around in their van. Complete with lyrics from the “anti-establishment” and “women who have done me wrong” categories of the Blues Rock repertoire, The Polymorphines successfully hit Rock and Roll bang-on. I guess that makes Axl Rose a bit Bluesy too – bear with me.

SOUNDS LIKE: Jet trying to get The Rolling Stones to like them.

Right off the top the album shows the ability of Jordan Potechin on drums, who does everything a Rock and Roll drummer can be asked to. The traps are tight, they’re loud, and they don’t slow down. Noisy guitars lead most of the way with dirty, hard-hitting chords and quick bluesy licks you can’t miss among tracks like “Goodbye Kiss”. Others, such as “Double Down” feel like the group is proudly paying some dues to the Stones hit, “Sympathy for the Devil”.

When asked about the band’s discography, vocalist Jeremy Brisebois said “[we have] no previous releases we’d like to remember.”

Suffice to say, there’s got to be some pressure on Transistor Sistor to show Canada what The Polymorphines can produce.

To effect, the band shows a certain level of talent and capability with an instrumental breakdown and impressive guitar work in the second track “Bring Your Love Back Home”. Believe me… It’s by all means the sort of thing you’ll hope they play for at least five and a half minutes live. It’s a strong start to the eleven track album, but after what may be the best performance on the record, what follows seems to be redundant until some serious, killer harmonica makes itself known – but with only a few minutes remaining on the record. Could just be a matter of decision making when it comes to track ordering, but listening to the album for the second time, it was harder to get into the record knowing that talent was missing in a number of songs. That’s a compliment. The Polymorphines raucous garage rocking product is there for you to hear in its entirety on Transistor Sistor. Don’t be shy, crank it up. - NxEW


Uniting the worlds of trashy garage rock with a deeper interest in indie rock's more appealing melodies and approach to craftsmanship, Ottawa, ON's Polymorphines create an ingeniously hook-filled and inspiring affair with the grammatically-insulting Transistor Sistor. In traditional fashion, an influx of harmonica, slightly off-key, nasal vocals and pawn shop guitars played through twangy Fender amplifiers is the main thrust behind that garage feel, while the greater attention to pace and dynamics gives them a punk/rock'n'roll aura reminiscent of Tricky Woo, without so much James Brown, a less-aggressive Gaza Strippers or even Rocket From The Crypt jamming with Jay Reatard, were he not six-feet under. Capping off at 11 songs in 35 minutes, Transistor Sistor isn't exactly short or to the point, but it's certainly entertaining. When the band embrace a particularly inspired groove, such as that found in "Bring Your Love Back Home," it's amusingly forgivable. This is fun and bouncy without seeming too airy or mindless. (Get Bent) - Exclaim!


Ottawa based Polymorphines return with a new 4 track EP, Split the Difference. Although unsigned, this five piece has been plugging away for the past few years, mixing their blend of garage and classic rock into a fast paced sound. While their first long play came across as a revved up version of 90’s alt rockers Cracker, the 4 tracks on Split the Difference draw far more from the classic rock of the 1970’s. Power chords reminiscent of AC/DC and song structures dipping into rockin’ Black Crowes territory drive all 12 minutes and 35 seconds that make up this EP. Their sound leans heavily on frontman Jeremy Brisebois’ history of substance indulgence and his road to respectable living. Alas, this isn’t a health lesson, it’s a music review.
Sounding off with “Black Sky”, the first track ignites fierce drumming and guitar laden licks which follow throughout the EP. The tin can vocals are a little distracting but otherwise, the tune rocks. The canned vocals continue on “Constant Reminder” which has a strong intro with killer guitar riffs that sound like something Long Gone John would admire over at Sympathy for the Record Industry.
“Call of the Sparrow” leans back into the Polymorphines garage rock sound. Clocking in at just under 3 minutes, the vocals are cleaned up and contribute to the foot stompin’ pace. “Wicked Woman” rounds out the Split the Difference EP. The 24 second intro borrows from early Von Bondies (which is a good thing) but a distracting harmonica enters the fray. The tune chugs along but at 2 minutes 29 seconds, seems to end abruptly.
The Split the Difference EP marks a stronger classic rock direction for the Polymorphines. They have some work to do but are well on their way. If their live show is as good as people say, these lads won’t remain unsigned for long. Rawk on Ottawa. Rawk on! - !Earshot Magazine


The Polymorphines' Transistor Sistor is a '70s-style sonic incarnation of loose, dirty sex and Saturday night fun. What could be Ottawa's best rock'n'roll band, this quintet wanks out a frenetic, energetic power-packed album with straight-up balls-out rock that'll get you smiling mile-wide, shakin' your shag and singing along. Greasy vocals, killer guitar licks, bluesy bass lines and thundering percussion reminiscent of Led Zeppelin and the Stones but original enough in its arrangement not to be imitation. Here's an album backed by killer live performances - Ottawa, these are your rock stars. - Hour.ca


Here’s the sad truth: bands like the Polymorphines don’t really exist anymore.

There are a few here and there still dishing out original hard rock, but most groups that sound like this are rehashing the tired old Zeppelin and AC/DC covers in places like the sad wreck of what once was Barrymore’s. But the Ottawa-based combo is creating new material, fresh energetic rock that is a far cry from simply aping the old masters.

I’m not sure a lot of people still listen to music like this, outside of live venues, although there are several instances I can think of where the Polymorphines’ new Transistor Sistor would be appropriate. For example, while hanging off the side of a 747 in mid flight, or being chased down the tracks by a runaway locomotive; or, say, parachuting into a VietCong encampment during the Tet Offensive, circa 1968. Those kind of special occasions.

Then again, this is the kind of group that, once they start playing, all notions of stylistic pigeon-holing disappear.

They produce sweaty, riff-driven hard rock without the pretension of much mid-to-late 70’s fare (even Zeppelin was guilty of this). There are no 25-minute keyboard solos, no flowery lyrics about hobbits and wizards and magical stairways, but the band kicks up a solid groove and keeps it going throughout the record. Transistor Sister has a remarkably consistent feel from start to finish.

Like a lot of 70s rock, their music is heavy on guitar, drums and a particularly fluid bass, but there is a unique feel to the recording that sounds like a cross between a church basement and Shea Stadium.

The band lists Led Zeppelin, the Rolling Stones, Black Sabbath and Neil Young among their influences and they’ve absorbed and synthesized elements from all of them.

Outside of standard blues-rock groups, not many rock acts have tried to incorporate a harmonica player. Aerosmith does it once in a while when they’re trying to revive their flagging rock cred. Mick Jagger fooled around with it in the early years before discarding the harmonica in favour of sexually ambiguous gyrating. There are a few scorching harp solos on this record that will make your ears burn.

The Polymorphines make it work, too. Transistor Sistor, is a full-length collection of high-powered rock songs that evoke sweaty bars, mosh pits and beer-fueled dance marathons. It sounds like a live album from the studio floor and is tastefully underproduced by Dave Dudley; the group is tight and obviously very used to one another, which is why the record sounds like they stepped right off the stage and into the booth.

A major highlight is “Dirty Cop”, which is one of the funnier tracks on the album, a tongue-in-cheek skewering of overstuffed authority figures. There’s a lengthy harmonica solo on this one and a cool beat. “Goodbye Kiss” woudn’t sound out of place on a Black Sabbath record, circa 1970, only this is even heavier and the band seems more concerned with sound than image. “Black Sky” has one of the hottest opening guitar licks you’ll hear in this day and age.

Another high point is “Wicked Woman”, where the beat momentarily slows down and they channel the ghosts of early-70s Santana. (Santana’s not technically dead, but the music sure is.)

In the end – and without denigrating the studio effort in any way – this is a band that will make its reputation through live performances. What the album gives you is a keyhole glimpse into what must be an amazing stage show.

You get that chance March 20th at Babylon for their CD release party.

Listen to The Polymorphines here: http://www.myspace.com/thepolymorphines - Ottawa Tonite


Ottawa, Ontario’s The Polymorphines are holding down the fun tent as part of Canada’s criminally under-appreciated gonzo garage rock scene. Their first album, Transistor Sistor is an unabashedly trashy rocking ode to joy, speed and sex that blissfully shakes a greasy tambourine in the faces of the jaded.

The Polymorphines walk a fiery but well worn path of explosive guitar based rawk, yet there is a rawness and immediacy that will always prevail. When it comes down to it, sometimes there ain’t nothin but a good time… enter The Polymorphines.
Surprising hooks and lo-rez rockers adorn this debut, with every song a powder keg, some tracks stay with you for a long time like the incredible “Main Street Jimmy” and the uber-catchy and dark “Call of the Sparrow”. These are some completely upbeat garage jams that situate themselves between the raunchy swagger of the New York Dolls , the teenage fuzz stomp storytelling of The Gruesomes and the epic psych/punk vibe of Television . Live, the band is a must-see, a rolling party of five very extremely talented musicians whos chemistry can turn any room into a frenzied dance party. You can taste the waste for yourselves as The Polymorphines are on tour in Canada’s maritime provinces now until the end of August. - The Big Takeover


"Long live the greasy, stretching guitar solo. If you agree with the past statement, do yourself a favour and get into the Polymorphines, a crashing, swirling quintet out of Ottawa that take about as much time to give you a head and heart rush as a line of Colombia’s finest white. Drawing heavy influence from Iggy and the Stooges, there’s a certain swagger and presence on Transistor Sistor. This album clicks in all the right places, punching through with fuzzed-out ‘70s riffs while also lending themselves to equally fuzzy sonic tangents, such as on the wandering but intoxicating 'Bring Your Love Back Home'." - PopMatters


"Great set at The Silver Dollar. The finest distillation of scorching 70's classic rock in all it's glory, with dirty riffs, breakneck energy, and a fierce attitude. Like a Harley whipping up dust, for those about to rock, we salute you..." - Lonely Vagabond


"...Sounding off with 'Black Sky', the first track ignites fierce drumming and guitar laden licks which follow throughout the EP. ...If their live show is as good as people say, these lads won’t remain unsigned for long. Rawk on Ottawa. Rawk on!" - !Earshot Magazine


For the Polymorphines, the chaotic nature of the day seemed to fuel their performance. Their noisy, raucous garage rock, inspired by the likes of Keith Richards and Lou Reed, was made even more thrilling by the Ozzy-like theatrics of the long-haired, tattooed band members. With the lightning flashing in the background, it was a thoroughly entertaining rawk show, complete with the element of danger by impending lightning strike.

By Lynn Saxberg - June 16, 2008 - The Ottawa Citizen


Discography

EP: "The Slip" - (Latest release):
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- Songs from this EP can be heard at http://thepolymorphines.bandcamp.com/.

- EP charts across Canada on University/College radio stations.

LP: "Transistor Sistor" - First release.
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- Has received fantastic reviews in both Canada and the U.S.

Photos

Bio

BIOGRAPHY:

The Polymorphines are a four piece garage-rock band influenced by '60s and early '70s Rock N' Roll. This band is for those who love the TWANGY AND the JANGLY! A sonic and visual incarnation of everything that is cool about Rock N' Roll and that seems lost in current music trends.

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING:

"Uniting the worlds of trashy garage rock with a deeper interest in indie rock's more appealing melodies and approach to craftsmanship, Ottawa, ON's Polymorphines create an ingeniously hook-filled and inspiring affair with the grammatically-insulting 'Transistor Sistor'."
- Keith Carman - Exclaim! Magazine

"The Polymorphines' Transistor Sistor is a '70s-style sonic incarnation of loose, dirty sex and Saturday night fun. What could be Ottawa's best rock'n'roll band, this quintet wanks out a frenetic, energetic power-packed album with straight-up balls-out rock that'll get you smiling mile-wide, shakin' your shag and singing along. Greasy vocals, killer guitar licks, bluesy bass lines and thundering percussion reminiscent of Led Zeppelin and the Stones but original enough in its arrangement not to be imitation. Here's an album backed by killer live performances - Ottawa, these are your rock stars."
-Sylvie Hill - The Xpress; The Hour

"Ladies and Gentleman, this is Rock and Roll. ...Right off the top the album shows the ability of Jordan Potechin on drums, who does everything a Rock and Roll drummer can be asked to. The traps are tight, they’re loud, and they don’t slow down. Noisy guitars lead most of the way with dirty, hard-hitting chords and quick bluesy licks you can’t miss among tracks like “Goodbye Kiss”. Others, such as “Double Down” feel like the group is proudly paying some dues to the Stones hit, 'Sympathy for the Devil'."
- Gregg Clarke - NxEW

"...Sounding off with 'Black Sky', the first track ignites fierce drumming and guitar laden licks which follow throughout the EP. ...If their live show is as good as people say, these lads won’t remain unsigned for long. Rawk on Ottawa. Rawk on!"
- Christopher Veit - !Earshot Magazine

"If you come to Rancho with any sort of consistency, you've likely heard the Polymorphines blasting out over the PA. Theirs is one of my favourite albums to play during a show, and they are one of the best live bands going in Ontario right now. It's rock, it's blues, it's punk and it is all balls while being catchy as hell -- and even something you can dance to. The Polymorphines truly are the evil love child of the Golden Hands Before God and the Job."
-Dan Wolovick - Two Way Monologues

"Great set at The Silver Dollar. The finest distillation of scorching 70's classic rock in all it's glory, with dirty riffs, breakneck energy, and a fierce attitude. Like a Harley whipping up dust, for those about to rock, we salute you..."
- Lonely Vagabond - www.lonelyvagabond.com/wpmu/

RECOMMENDED IF YOU LIKE:
The Mooney Suzuki; MC5; The White Stripes; The Sonics; The Stooges.