The Reliques
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The Reliques

Waco, Texas, United States | SELF

Waco, Texas, United States | SELF
Band Folk Americana

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Sep
30
The Reliques @ Baylor BYX Island Party

Waco, Texas, USA

Waco, Texas, USA

Aug
26
The Reliques @ The Stafford

Bryan, Texas, USA

Bryan, Texas, USA

Jul
30
The Reliques @ Momo's

Austin, Texas, USA

Austin, Texas, USA

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This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


In a bustling coffee shop in downtown Austin, a long-haired blonde sips her iced chai while her wavy-haired friend crunches on sea salt chips and Thai tea, both discussing what it meant to bare their souls to an audience with unabashed emotion.

These are The Reliques (pronounced relics), composed of Sarah Dossey and Sarah Monteen, two old souls offering their hearts through their music. Beneath their youthful, lithe exteriors lie jaded spirits crying out to be heard in an increasingly chaotic world.

These sirens of Texas folk make music spilling over with intimacy and real emotional gravitas — a result, they say, of their Christian faith.

“But at the same time, we wouldn’t want to be pigeonholed as a ‘Christian band,’” Monteen said. “We happen to be Christians, we are in a band and we write about our lives — and yes, that includes Christianity sometimes. Our goal is to not be super overt or preachy. We just want to be ourselves.”

Dossey said the reason the religious aspect of their music is often overlooked is because of their intimacy with their audiences.

“I think people appreciate us baring our souls,” she said. “I feel like at yesterday’s show, for example, people enjoyed our songwriting and someone being honest with them.

While the Sarahs are quick to voice their beliefs when asked, they maintain that their songs are neither overtly nor exclusively Christian — a formula that garners appeal from believers and nonbelievers alike. They affirmed their band name stemmed from a need to separate themselves from purveyors of inflexible contemporary music.

“We like to think of ourselves as grassroots,” Monteen said. “The Reliques could mean something old and antiquated, and I guess being in a folk band, we want to talk a lot about struggle, hardships, keeping your faith. We want to be real and raw and something unlike today.”

Dossey agreed with her bandmate and said that the name was also influenced by their Christian roots.

“The reason we wanted to go with the word ‘relics’ was because it has a special quality — relics are the remnant of something great,” Dossey said. “We want to be a representation of something great, too.”

After meeting a little more than eight months ago — Dossey was a freshman and Monteen a senior at UT — the two put together their solo projects after their friends suggested it.

“The first real memory I have of Sarah [Monteen] was when we were at a retreat and someone yelled, ‘Guitar girls! Play together!’” Dossey said, laughing and looking at Monteen for endorsement.

The two began playing each other’s songs in and around Austin afterward, accumulating local awards and critical acclaim on the strength of their debut EP Peacock Wood, which was released in March.

The Reliques’ sound is immediately recognizable: the lilting sound of Dossey’s mandolin over Monteen’s acoustic guitar, overlapping vocals reminiscent of Fleetwood Mac, the sparse arrangements chugging along trainlike and persistent. On Peacock Wood opener “Reconciled,” the two harmonize sweetly, layering their voices with Jewel-like fragility.

The following track, “Why Do You Love Me,” expresses remorse with optimism throughout the lyrics, asking “why do you even care?” with genuine shame. But the implicit repentance throughout Peacock Wood validates the two, making for a bittersweet listening experience.

“We’ve been listening to a lot of Dolly Parton lately,” Dossey said with a laugh when asked about The Reliques’ influences. “For me, I love great songwriting. I love Christian songwriters like Derek Webb, but I also like Conor Oberst, Ryan Adams, Fleetwood Mac.”

For now, the two plan to continue writing new songs in hopes of eventually releasing a full-length album at a national level, all while maintaining a close bond with their fan base, which is growing every day as they tour around the Hill Country.

“A part of who we are — I mean, our music is about deeper things, you know?” Monteen said. “I feel like music is a really cool, powerful thing. What would the purpose of playing music be if there wasn’t a real meaning behind it? We need to encourage people. I think it’d be pointless if we didn’t.”

Peacock Wood EP is available now at CDbaby.com/reliques and on iTunes.

- Daily Texan - DT Weekend


In a bustling coffee shop in downtown Austin, a long-haired blonde sips her iced chai while her wavy-haired friend crunches on sea salt chips and Thai tea, both discussing what it meant to bare their souls to an audience with unabashed emotion.

These are The Reliques (pronounced relics), composed of Sarah Dossey and Sarah Monteen, two old souls offering their hearts through their music. Beneath their youthful, lithe exteriors lie jaded spirits crying out to be heard in an increasingly chaotic world.

These sirens of Texas folk make music spilling over with intimacy and real emotional gravitas — a result, they say, of their Christian faith.

“But at the same time, we wouldn’t want to be pigeonholed as a ‘Christian band,’” Monteen said. “We happen to be Christians, we are in a band and we write about our lives — and yes, that includes Christianity sometimes. Our goal is to not be super overt or preachy. We just want to be ourselves.”

Dossey said the reason the religious aspect of their music is often overlooked is because of their intimacy with their audiences.

“I think people appreciate us baring our souls,” she said. “I feel like at yesterday’s show, for example, people enjoyed our songwriting and someone being honest with them.

While the Sarahs are quick to voice their beliefs when asked, they maintain that their songs are neither overtly nor exclusively Christian — a formula that garners appeal from believers and nonbelievers alike. They affirmed their band name stemmed from a need to separate themselves from purveyors of inflexible contemporary music.

“We like to think of ourselves as grassroots,” Monteen said. “The Reliques could mean something old and antiquated, and I guess being in a folk band, we want to talk a lot about struggle, hardships, keeping your faith. We want to be real and raw and something unlike today.”

Dossey agreed with her bandmate and said that the name was also influenced by their Christian roots.

“The reason we wanted to go with the word ‘relics’ was because it has a special quality — relics are the remnant of something great,” Dossey said. “We want to be a representation of something great, too.”

After meeting a little more than eight months ago — Dossey was a freshman and Monteen a senior at UT — the two put together their solo projects after their friends suggested it.

“The first real memory I have of Sarah [Monteen] was when we were at a retreat and someone yelled, ‘Guitar girls! Play together!’” Dossey said, laughing and looking at Monteen for endorsement.

The two began playing each other’s songs in and around Austin afterward, accumulating local awards and critical acclaim on the strength of their debut EP Peacock Wood, which was released in March.

The Reliques’ sound is immediately recognizable: the lilting sound of Dossey’s mandolin over Monteen’s acoustic guitar, overlapping vocals reminiscent of Fleetwood Mac, the sparse arrangements chugging along trainlike and persistent. On Peacock Wood opener “Reconciled,” the two harmonize sweetly, layering their voices with Jewel-like fragility.

The following track, “Why Do You Love Me,” expresses remorse with optimism throughout the lyrics, asking “why do you even care?” with genuine shame. But the implicit repentance throughout Peacock Wood validates the two, making for a bittersweet listening experience.

“We’ve been listening to a lot of Dolly Parton lately,” Dossey said with a laugh when asked about The Reliques’ influences. “For me, I love great songwriting. I love Christian songwriters like Derek Webb, but I also like Conor Oberst, Ryan Adams, Fleetwood Mac.”

For now, the two plan to continue writing new songs in hopes of eventually releasing a full-length album at a national level, all while maintaining a close bond with their fan base, which is growing every day as they tour around the Hill Country.

“A part of who we are — I mean, our music is about deeper things, you know?” Monteen said. “I feel like music is a really cool, powerful thing. What would the purpose of playing music be if there wasn’t a real meaning behind it? We need to encourage people. I think it’d be pointless if we didn’t.”

Peacock Wood EP is available now at CDbaby.com/reliques and on iTunes.

- Daily Texan - DT Weekend


In our faltering economy, every little step toward your career goals needs to make an impact.

Fortunately, the people at Grammy University Network are here to help you make those steps.

For aspiring musicians and those looking to break into the music business, Grammy U offers its members invaluable opportunities to network with established people in the field.

“It’s mostly directed toward students in the music industry but also music lovers and anybody who is just interested in the business,” said Grammy U ambassador Emily Brandt. “Without it, I wouldn’t be in the industry or enter it with the confidence to network. Even if you don’t want to break in the music industry but you want to be able to go to member-only events and to have the confidence go out, it’s still really beneficial.”

This weekend, Grammy U will host a summit with an array of internship opportunities, seminars and workshops.

“Grammy U is offering opportunities for internships and networking with C3 Presents, Atlantic Records and MusicWorld,” said Theresa Jenkins, executive director of the Recording Academy-Texas Chapter. “The summit is like a career day, so we have folks in different genres come in to have meetings with record labels and students.”

Among the seminars are “Advanced Recording and Digital Technology,” which aims to help artists better critique their demos, and “Composing and Arranging Music for Media,” which will focus on creative workflow and strategies.

To cap off the day, Grammy U is also hosting a battle-of-the-bands style showcase of college musicians with Driver F and The Reliques, among others. Michael “5000” Watts, the DJ who founded the highly influential Swishahouse Records label, will emcee the event, and the showcase winner will win an opportunity to record in the studio with the highly esteemed and Grammy-nominated producer Frenchie Smith.

Juan Lopez, trumpet player for the Austin pop rock band Driver F, hopes his group will be voted to the top of the showcase.

“I’m really excited to see what Frenchie Smith can do for us, and I think it’s going to be really good if we can win this,” Lopez said. - The Daily Texan


In our faltering economy, every little step toward your career goals needs to make an impact.

Fortunately, the people at Grammy University Network are here to help you make those steps.

For aspiring musicians and those looking to break into the music business, Grammy U offers its members invaluable opportunities to network with established people in the field.

“It’s mostly directed toward students in the music industry but also music lovers and anybody who is just interested in the business,” said Grammy U ambassador Emily Brandt. “Without it, I wouldn’t be in the industry or enter it with the confidence to network. Even if you don’t want to break in the music industry but you want to be able to go to member-only events and to have the confidence go out, it’s still really beneficial.”

This weekend, Grammy U will host a summit with an array of internship opportunities, seminars and workshops.

“Grammy U is offering opportunities for internships and networking with C3 Presents, Atlantic Records and MusicWorld,” said Theresa Jenkins, executive director of the Recording Academy-Texas Chapter. “The summit is like a career day, so we have folks in different genres come in to have meetings with record labels and students.”

Among the seminars are “Advanced Recording and Digital Technology,” which aims to help artists better critique their demos, and “Composing and Arranging Music for Media,” which will focus on creative workflow and strategies.

To cap off the day, Grammy U is also hosting a battle-of-the-bands style showcase of college musicians with Driver F and The Reliques, among others. Michael “5000” Watts, the DJ who founded the highly influential Swishahouse Records label, will emcee the event, and the showcase winner will win an opportunity to record in the studio with the highly esteemed and Grammy-nominated producer Frenchie Smith.

Juan Lopez, trumpet player for the Austin pop rock band Driver F, hopes his group will be voted to the top of the showcase.

“I’m really excited to see what Frenchie Smith can do for us, and I think it’s going to be really good if we can win this,” Lopez said. - The Daily Texan


Discography

Peacock Wood (Demo: March 2009)
To Feel and Be Loved (EP: March 2011)
Christmas Sampler I (November 2012)
Leaving Montgomery (TBR October 2013)

Photos

Bio

In the words of The Reliques, “Music is a shortcut to the soul.”

With each new EP, the folk duo weaves stories that cut straight to our commonplaces, stories each of us have seen played out in our own lives and communities.

Making music gives Sarah Dossey and Sarah Monteen the space to be honest about their life experiences. Says Dossey, “We want to be transparent with our music and write songs that stir hearts. We want to impact our community in Austin, to grow with them and tell their stories.”

Pronounced “relics”, the band grew out of a friendship that began at the University of Texas. The first EP, Peacock Wood, is a five-song introduction to the band’s heartstrings. The songs seamlessly blend Monteen’s strong, smoky voice with Dossey’s nightingale sweet soprano and attests to years honing their timing and musicianship. Following the release, the band was featured on KISS FM-96.7 and The River 102.3, won The River’s Austin Artist Showcase, and have appeared on the front pages of The Daily Texan’s DT Weekend and Austin Christian Family Magazine. In Dec. 2010, they were featured on News 8 Austin’s “Songs of the Season”.

In an April 2009 issue of the Daily Texan's DT Weekend, editor Francisco Marin, writes:
"These sirens of Texas folk make music spilling over with intimacy and real emotional gravitas...The Reliques' sound is immediately recognizable: the lilting sound of Dossey's mandolin over Monteen's acoustic guitar, overlapping vocals reminiscent of Fleetwood Mac, the sparse arrangements chug along, trainlike and persistent.”

Collectively, their musical influences range from Mumford & Sons to Paul Simon and even include such female vocalists as Jewel and the Dixie Chicks. The Reliques have opened for nationally touring acts Shane and Shane, Phil Wickham and Derek Webb. Their live show is where The Reliques really shine, rotating adeptly through several instruments and matching each other’s voices in strong, sure harmonies.

Their newest EP was recorded by Caedmon’s Call’s own Josh Moore. To Feel and Be Loved is a lively jam session featuring a cavalcade of eclectic instruments such as mandolin, banjo and accordion in addition to electric and acoustic guitar. The six songs live up to Dossey and Monteen’s storytelling aspirations. Whether heartbreaking or resounding this new creation is alive with stories which tumble out one after another, wrapping around guitar strings and bursting forth triumphant, raw and gleaming, belted out in waves of carefully constructed lyrics.

Though they are the ones spinning tales on their guitar strings, both girls urge their fans to find their own meanings in the songs - so what was a song of loss can transform into a song of empathy and encouragement. They hope to take that “shortcut to the soul” to “build people up amidst all the realities of life, whether it’s the joy or sorrow of life.”

Says Monteen, “We do music because it’s in our souls and we can’t help but do it. This is what God has put in us— we just hope when the music hits people they are stronger because of it.”

Band Members