The Standards
Gig Seeker Pro

The Standards

Band Rock

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


"Raising The Standards"

Thankfully, in a world of musical platitudes, Matt and the boys (and girl) are raising the standards. After going it alone, and succeeding, they are taking their sound to the UK on a tour designed to see if a Thailand-based band can “compete with the big boys”. Listen to the sounds on their Facebook page to hear what The Standards are all about.
The history of popular music in Thailand has been a pretty woeful affair. Twenty-five years ago, it was Asanee Wasan that were credited with bringing Thai music into the modern era. For someone stepping off a plane in what was then the post-punk era, Asanee Wasan’s soaring power chords and painfully slow rock ballads equated more with ancient history than anything contemporary. Fortunately though, things did change – at least for a while.

Thailand’s ‘New Wave’ happened about 15 years after the fact, but it was worth the wait… Bands like Modern Dog, Clash, Silly Fools and Paradox emerged to offer something a bit different alongside the nation’s usual fare. It got to the point where an ex-member of Suede was in a band in Thailand (Futon). And they were all pretty decent bands… Modern Dog for example opened for Radiohead’s visit to Bangkok, toured extensively world-wide, and in 2006 blew bands like Franz Ferdinand off the stage at Bangkok 100 (even though they were on earlier in the day). Grunge, Indie, Punk, New Wave, Death Metal, Hip Hop, House – whatever the musical style someone, somewhere, was experimenting… But unfortunately the momentum didn’t carry.

As with elsewhere in the world, Thailand’s music industry adapted and survived. Slowly, but surely, “alternative” was tamed, packaged and brought into the mainstream. Today, the kingdom’s music scene is, to say the least, predictable – a steady and sure product of similar sounds generating an equally steady source of revenue. The time is right for a new ‘Modern Dog’ to shake things up a bit. Perhaps ‘The Standards’ are the band we are looking for.
The Standards are a musical oddity. They have been around for about 4 years and their lineup includes 2 foreigners and 3 Thais. Front man Matt Smith provides the vocals while Nay Voravittayathorn hits the drums, Manasnit Setthawong (nickname Nit) provides keyboards, Paul Smith plays lead guitar and Sithikorn Likitvoarchaui (nickname Mc) plays bass.

A chirpy Cockney from Woolwich in South London, front man Matt certainly has the front man look (ala Damon Albarn). He played in a couple of bands in the UK, most noticeable being Foxtail, a London-based band with ‘Mod’ overtones. Despite lots of concerts and coverage in the NME, nothing ever got to vinyl. After moving to Thailand he missed being in a band and he very quickly helped pull The Standards together.
Unlike other Thai bands, they don’t have the promotional weight of a mega-corporation behind them, and despite this – perhaps because of this – they are doing the business. Considering the context they are working in, The Standards have a very unique look and sound. They’ve played most major venues in Thailand (including club Culture near Khao San Road, and Immortal, which used to be on Khao San Road until a couple of years ago), their music videos are played on MTV, they've played live on MTV, and they supported megastars “The Charlatans” who played Bangkok in 2010.

"It’s easier to get your music out to an audience these days,” suggested Matt when we spoke to him. “Back in the day it cost 600 or 700 quid an hour to record in a decent studio, but these days you can do everything on a Mac.” That flexibility led to the band putting together “Well, Well, Well”, a three-track EP on CD and “Nations”, a full-blown album which sits nicely amongst the racks of CDs by foreign artists found in record stores around Siam Square. “We tried working with some of the local producers, but it didn’t work out. We wanted more of a live sound. At the time we have a regular event called Popscene at Bangkok Rocks on Sukhumvit 19, and we recorded everything there. The owner just let us use the place afterhours and we did things like record the vocals in the toilet so we could get the right sound.”

The band’s big sound and attention to detail has translated into a powerful live act which soon amassed a solid following of locals (20%) and expats (80%). In the short time they have been together, they have toured extensively – they did an Asian tour with 9 concerts in Singapore, Borneo, Malaysia, and a three day festival in the Philippines. More recently they played CAMA in Hanoi. Quite an achievement in its own right, but all the more impressive when you consider they manage themselves.

“The fact that we manage ourselves means we can do what we want”, added Matt. “The Thai alternative sound is more like British music in the 80’s, but our sound is more influenced by bands like Kasabian and Arcade Fire. It’s very different from what people are used to here. If we really wanted to make something of ourselves in Thailand we’d - KoSanRoad.com


"Raising The Standards"

Thankfully, in a world of musical platitudes, Matt and the boys (and girl) are raising the standards. After going it alone, and succeeding, they are taking their sound to the UK on a tour designed to see if a Thailand-based band can “compete with the big boys”. Listen to the sounds on their Facebook page to hear what The Standards are all about.
The history of popular music in Thailand has been a pretty woeful affair. Twenty-five years ago, it was Asanee Wasan that were credited with bringing Thai music into the modern era. For someone stepping off a plane in what was then the post-punk era, Asanee Wasan’s soaring power chords and painfully slow rock ballads equated more with ancient history than anything contemporary. Fortunately though, things did change – at least for a while.

Thailand’s ‘New Wave’ happened about 15 years after the fact, but it was worth the wait… Bands like Modern Dog, Clash, Silly Fools and Paradox emerged to offer something a bit different alongside the nation’s usual fare. It got to the point where an ex-member of Suede was in a band in Thailand (Futon). And they were all pretty decent bands… Modern Dog for example opened for Radiohead’s visit to Bangkok, toured extensively world-wide, and in 2006 blew bands like Franz Ferdinand off the stage at Bangkok 100 (even though they were on earlier in the day). Grunge, Indie, Punk, New Wave, Death Metal, Hip Hop, House – whatever the musical style someone, somewhere, was experimenting… But unfortunately the momentum didn’t carry.

As with elsewhere in the world, Thailand’s music industry adapted and survived. Slowly, but surely, “alternative” was tamed, packaged and brought into the mainstream. Today, the kingdom’s music scene is, to say the least, predictable – a steady and sure product of similar sounds generating an equally steady source of revenue. The time is right for a new ‘Modern Dog’ to shake things up a bit. Perhaps ‘The Standards’ are the band we are looking for.
The Standards are a musical oddity. They have been around for about 4 years and their lineup includes 2 foreigners and 3 Thais. Front man Matt Smith provides the vocals while Nay Voravittayathorn hits the drums, Manasnit Setthawong (nickname Nit) provides keyboards, Paul Smith plays lead guitar and Sithikorn Likitvoarchaui (nickname Mc) plays bass.

A chirpy Cockney from Woolwich in South London, front man Matt certainly has the front man look (ala Damon Albarn). He played in a couple of bands in the UK, most noticeable being Foxtail, a London-based band with ‘Mod’ overtones. Despite lots of concerts and coverage in the NME, nothing ever got to vinyl. After moving to Thailand he missed being in a band and he very quickly helped pull The Standards together.
Unlike other Thai bands, they don’t have the promotional weight of a mega-corporation behind them, and despite this – perhaps because of this – they are doing the business. Considering the context they are working in, The Standards have a very unique look and sound. They’ve played most major venues in Thailand (including club Culture near Khao San Road, and Immortal, which used to be on Khao San Road until a couple of years ago), their music videos are played on MTV, they've played live on MTV, and they supported megastars “The Charlatans” who played Bangkok in 2010.

"It’s easier to get your music out to an audience these days,” suggested Matt when we spoke to him. “Back in the day it cost 600 or 700 quid an hour to record in a decent studio, but these days you can do everything on a Mac.” That flexibility led to the band putting together “Well, Well, Well”, a three-track EP on CD and “Nations”, a full-blown album which sits nicely amongst the racks of CDs by foreign artists found in record stores around Siam Square. “We tried working with some of the local producers, but it didn’t work out. We wanted more of a live sound. At the time we have a regular event called Popscene at Bangkok Rocks on Sukhumvit 19, and we recorded everything there. The owner just let us use the place afterhours and we did things like record the vocals in the toilet so we could get the right sound.”

The band’s big sound and attention to detail has translated into a powerful live act which soon amassed a solid following of locals (20%) and expats (80%). In the short time they have been together, they have toured extensively – they did an Asian tour with 9 concerts in Singapore, Borneo, Malaysia, and a three day festival in the Philippines. More recently they played CAMA in Hanoi. Quite an achievement in its own right, but all the more impressive when you consider they manage themselves.

“The fact that we manage ourselves means we can do what we want”, added Matt. “The Thai alternative sound is more like British music in the 80’s, but our sound is more influenced by bands like Kasabian and Arcade Fire. It’s very different from what people are used to here. If we really wanted to make something of ourselves in Thailand we’d - KoSanRoad.com


"The Standards - Duly Hoisted"

Bangkok's calls of distress during the violence of the red spring echo through "Nations", the debut album by the Standards, a rock band comprised of three Thais and two Britons.

You can hear bombs exploding in the background, and the roar of riots. The stories come from the bars and streets, authentic noise accentuating the reality and fuelling the imagination.

The Standards were playing in khao san Road pubs when they were recruited by Mind the Gap, the concert promoter, for festivals and smaller gigs across Asia.

A hit on the indie circuit, these guys are, for many, knights in shining armour come to rescue what's become a bleak, mundane Thai music scene.

The Standards are launching their first album tonight at Bangkok Rocks, and here's what singer Matt Smith, a Londoner, has to say about it.

What's with the band's name?

That's what we're doing - setting a standard.

Tell us about your music backgrounds.

I was very much a part of the '60s Mod, Northern Soul scene, as well as getting stuck into a belting good indie night. I was always at gigs and festivals growing up.

Why is the album called "Nations"?

We made it during the red-shirt protests. In fact, if you listen hard enough, you can hear an explosion that got picked up on one of the tracks while we were recording in a nightclub on Sukhumvit.

"Nations" is not only a poignant word from our song "Espinosa", it just seemed to fit the moment, sort of bringing it all together to see things from a different perspective.

You were recording in a club?

No one seemed up to the job, or could seem to get 'round to recording us like they wanted to - apparently so badly - so we did it all ourselves.

The drums were recorded live along with a midi track in a nightclub. The vocals were done in various-shaped rooms and toilets to get natural reverb and different effects. And the bass, guitar and keys were done live through monsters of amps.

It's our music, made our way.

So the riot effects were pure coincidence.

It wasn't out of choice! We'd set aside the time to record way before any of the trouble started.

When we kicked off the process, things were a bit tense on the streets, but nobody had actually died, and I don't think anyone expected it to all suddenly turn the way it did.

Then, a week and a half later, things went from bad to worse. We carried on as usual, though, just as the rest of the city tried to - life shouldn't come to a complete stop, and we, along with everyone else, had work to do.

What do you think of the Thai music scene?

To be honest, I don't think much of it at all. I've always said it isn't the artists' fault that the scene isn't up to any kind of recognition - it's the people at the top of the big record companies and the big festivals who are to blame.

At the end of the day it's all about business. There isn't ever anything different - it's always the same old bands doing the same old shit. You'd never see the same bands playing two years in a row at Glastonbury or Reading [Britain's top music festivals].

Why should new, different bands really try and make a go of their tunes when they know they're never going to play any gigs? Where is the true inspiration supposed to come from if young musicians never get to watch new music?

What we see year in and year out at the [Thai] festivals are the same bands, playing the same songs, and it's very, very boring. It's time for a change. Some risks need to be taken.

You guys certainly never stay in one place for long. Where are you off to next?

The next thing for us is the Baybeats festival in Singapore. This will be our seventh gig in Singapore. - The Nation


"This indie Thai-British band proudly carves their own path, making their own album without studio support"

heir riotous
live shows
have
attracted a
cult-like following and led
to gigs all over Thailand, as
well as in the Philippines,
Malaysia, Singapore, and
elsewhere. They describe
their music as somewhere
between Blur, Kasabian and
Chas‘n’Dave.
“We’ve got Thai
members, but we’re not
a Thai band, because I
see Thai bands as being
very different to us. But
then we’re not an English
band because we’re not
in England, but two of our
members are English,” says
vocalist Matt Smith.
Four years ago, Smith left
England for Bangkok with a
plan to stay for six months
and see what happened. After
becoming a familiar face at
indie nights around the city, a
drunken meetup with another
Brit, Paul Smith, led to the boys
forming The Standards with
three Thai musicians to play a
single raucous gig in 2007. Matt
then went back to London to
Up Close
PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAELA GILES
The Standards
This indie Thai-British band proudly carves their own path, making their
own album without studio support. Matt Crook reports from Bangkok
T
spend an agonizing six months
wondering what could have
been in Bangkok. Soon enough,
he was back on a plane and
chasing his dream with Paul
Smith on lead guitar, Sithikorn
“Mac” Likitvorachai on bass,
Ayu Charuburana on drums
and Manasnit Setthawong, the
band’s lone female member, on
keyboard.
De?ning the band is clearly
no easy task. “Our sound is
very British, and I don’t think
our sound could come from
anywhere else. It’s not really
in?uenced by anywhere else.
It’s in?uenced by British
bands, but we’re neither an
English band or a Thai band.
We’re just a good band.”
Tired of a stale music
industry plagued by recordlabel bureaucracy and bands
unsure of themselves, The
Standards aren’t afraid to
say what’s on their minds.
“The music industry here
is sort of what it was like 50
years ago in England where
massive corporate people
THEIR RIOTOUS LIVE SHOWS HAVE
ATTRACTED A CULT-LIKE FOLLOWING tiger tales nov-dec
32
the buzz lifestyle
POPSCENE
This club night pops
up in various incarnations
and has already become
one of the city’s most
popular indie parties. It’s
a good spot to hear new
local bands and mingle
with the scenesters. www.
popscene.asia
CLUB CULTURE
Veterans of the
Bangkok party scene, the
Smells like Indie Spirit
MATT SMITH FROM THE STANDARDS GIVES HIS TOP PLACES TO PARTY IN BANGKOK
folks behind Club Culture have
boogied from venue to venue
over the years, ?nally settling
down in what is essentially a
three-room, warehouse-like
nightclub chock full of musical
goodness. The city’s top indie
and pop socials regularly
host events at Club Culture
and there is always plenty of
tomfoolery. Ratchadamnoen
Klang Rd, tel: +66 089 497
8422, www.club-culture-bkk.
com
COSMIC CAFÉ
Located on the same
strip as booming hip hop clubs,
Cosmic Café offers a lively place
to drink, dance and knock back
copious amount of Thai liquor
or beer with local indie kids who
know how to party. A long-time
favourite for pre-club drinks, it’s
a great place to socialise before
venturing out into the Bangkok
night. Royal City Avenue (RCA),
Zone C Royal City Avenue, Huai
Khwang, tel: +66 2641 5619
*
*
*
were at the top of it, telling
people what they should
and shouldn’t listen to,”
says Smith.
When record labels
started noticing the hype
around The Standards,
talks soon broke down over
the direction of the band’s
music. Instead of caving in
to label demands, the band
pushed ahead on their own.
Their debut album Nations
was released in June. “We
locked ourselves away,
we stopped gigging and
stopped playing in different
countries and decided
to just make the album,”
says Smith. “We recorded
it ourselves, produced it
ourselves, engineered it
ourselves, everything,”
says Smith. “We made our
album sound exactly how
we wanted it to sound.”
INSTEAD OF CAVING IN TO RECORD
LABEL DEMANDS, THE BAND PUSHED
AHEAD ON THEIR OWN
THE COMMON
GROUND
A hip spot in a converted
shophouse where the latest
fashions are paraded and
where a slew of bands belt
out everything from reggae
and ska to indie and rock.
Nothing out of the ordinary,
but strangers are welcomed
with open arms and once
the drinks start ?owing, the
fun really begins. Samsen
Soi 1, near Khao San Road.
“When the album was
?nished, it was like I could
breathe again,” says bassist
Sithikorn “Mac” Likitvorachai.
Like Smith, Mac too was is sick
of seeing so many of Thailand’s
most promising bands have
their creativity stunted in a sea
of corporate demands. “I think
actually a lot of Thai bands, they
have potential, but the labels
control what you should do, how
you should move.”
For The Standards now,
the plan is to continue gigging
around Thailand and SouthEast As - Tiget Tales - Tiger Airways in flight magazine


"This indie Thai-British band proudly carves their own path, making their own album without studio support"

heir riotous
live shows
have
attracted a
cult-like following and led
to gigs all over Thailand, as
well as in the Philippines,
Malaysia, Singapore, and
elsewhere. They describe
their music as somewhere
between Blur, Kasabian and
Chas‘n’Dave.
“We’ve got Thai
members, but we’re not
a Thai band, because I
see Thai bands as being
very different to us. But
then we’re not an English
band because we’re not
in England, but two of our
members are English,” says
vocalist Matt Smith.
Four years ago, Smith left
England for Bangkok with a
plan to stay for six months
and see what happened. After
becoming a familiar face at
indie nights around the city, a
drunken meetup with another
Brit, Paul Smith, led to the boys
forming The Standards with
three Thai musicians to play a
single raucous gig in 2007. Matt
then went back to London to
Up Close
PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAELA GILES
The Standards
This indie Thai-British band proudly carves their own path, making their
own album without studio support. Matt Crook reports from Bangkok
T
spend an agonizing six months
wondering what could have
been in Bangkok. Soon enough,
he was back on a plane and
chasing his dream with Paul
Smith on lead guitar, Sithikorn
“Mac” Likitvorachai on bass,
Ayu Charuburana on drums
and Manasnit Setthawong, the
band’s lone female member, on
keyboard.
De?ning the band is clearly
no easy task. “Our sound is
very British, and I don’t think
our sound could come from
anywhere else. It’s not really
in?uenced by anywhere else.
It’s in?uenced by British
bands, but we’re neither an
English band or a Thai band.
We’re just a good band.”
Tired of a stale music
industry plagued by recordlabel bureaucracy and bands
unsure of themselves, The
Standards aren’t afraid to
say what’s on their minds.
“The music industry here
is sort of what it was like 50
years ago in England where
massive corporate people
THEIR RIOTOUS LIVE SHOWS HAVE
ATTRACTED A CULT-LIKE FOLLOWING tiger tales nov-dec
32
the buzz lifestyle
POPSCENE
This club night pops
up in various incarnations
and has already become
one of the city’s most
popular indie parties. It’s
a good spot to hear new
local bands and mingle
with the scenesters. www.
popscene.asia
CLUB CULTURE
Veterans of the
Bangkok party scene, the
Smells like Indie Spirit
MATT SMITH FROM THE STANDARDS GIVES HIS TOP PLACES TO PARTY IN BANGKOK
folks behind Club Culture have
boogied from venue to venue
over the years, ?nally settling
down in what is essentially a
three-room, warehouse-like
nightclub chock full of musical
goodness. The city’s top indie
and pop socials regularly
host events at Club Culture
and there is always plenty of
tomfoolery. Ratchadamnoen
Klang Rd, tel: +66 089 497
8422, www.club-culture-bkk.
com
COSMIC CAFÉ
Located on the same
strip as booming hip hop clubs,
Cosmic Café offers a lively place
to drink, dance and knock back
copious amount of Thai liquor
or beer with local indie kids who
know how to party. A long-time
favourite for pre-club drinks, it’s
a great place to socialise before
venturing out into the Bangkok
night. Royal City Avenue (RCA),
Zone C Royal City Avenue, Huai
Khwang, tel: +66 2641 5619
*
*
*
were at the top of it, telling
people what they should
and shouldn’t listen to,”
says Smith.
When record labels
started noticing the hype
around The Standards,
talks soon broke down over
the direction of the band’s
music. Instead of caving in
to label demands, the band
pushed ahead on their own.
Their debut album Nations
was released in June. “We
locked ourselves away,
we stopped gigging and
stopped playing in different
countries and decided
to just make the album,”
says Smith. “We recorded
it ourselves, produced it
ourselves, engineered it
ourselves, everything,”
says Smith. “We made our
album sound exactly how
we wanted it to sound.”
INSTEAD OF CAVING IN TO RECORD
LABEL DEMANDS, THE BAND PUSHED
AHEAD ON THEIR OWN
THE COMMON
GROUND
A hip spot in a converted
shophouse where the latest
fashions are paraded and
where a slew of bands belt
out everything from reggae
and ska to indie and rock.
Nothing out of the ordinary,
but strangers are welcomed
with open arms and once
the drinks start ?owing, the
fun really begins. Samsen
Soi 1, near Khao San Road.
“When the album was
?nished, it was like I could
breathe again,” says bassist
Sithikorn “Mac” Likitvorachai.
Like Smith, Mac too was is sick
of seeing so many of Thailand’s
most promising bands have
their creativity stunted in a sea
of corporate demands. “I think
actually a lot of Thai bands, they
have potential, but the labels
control what you should do, how
you should move.”
For The Standards now,
the plan is to continue gigging
around Thailand and SouthEast As - Tiget Tales - Tiger Airways in flight magazine


"The Standards"

Three years ago, Matt Smith found his way from southeast London to Bangkok. Shortly thereafter he launched Club Soma, a new indie night featuring a rotating list of DJs and indie band performances. Paul Smith, a fellow Brit, was also a regular at Club Soma and the two Smiths decided to put their musical talent and mutual love for indie music to good use and started The Standards.

A local drummer, keyboardist and bassist came on board to join Matt on lead vocals and Paul on guitar to create what they call a ‘Thai fusion band’. “We were all in bands before and missed it. Paul and I didn’t think living in Thailand should make any difference to that,” says Matt. The Standards soon gained popularity and took their show on the road to places like Nepal, the Philippines and Singapore. Although modest in their exposure to the music market thus far, they’re confident in their abilities, especially when it comes to their competition in Thailand.

“A lot of the bigger Thai bands aren’t good,” he says. But this opens the door for The Standards to make their mark on the local scene. “There’s not much influence here. The young indie kids aren’t looking up to anyone and going ‘I want to sound like that’. That’s our advantage. That’s where we’re a little bit different. That’s why we can sound better than anyone else.”

Matt Smith is quick to banish myths about The Standards’ expat advantage. “I don’t think our success is because Paul and I are English and white. I think it’s because we’re a good band and we have deep influences.” Those influences are likely drawn from the two Smiths’ home country, as The Standards’ brand of danceable indie rock with a touch of garage-rock revival could have easily come straight from the stages of Blighty.

The Standards will represent the Thai contingent at this fortnight’s Asian Agenda, where they’ll flex their musical muscle alongside bands from Beijing, Macau and Hong Kong to give local indie kids some welcome inspiration. - Time Out


"The Standards"

Three years ago, Matt Smith found his way from southeast London to Bangkok. Shortly thereafter he launched Club Soma, a new indie night featuring a rotating list of DJs and indie band performances. Paul Smith, a fellow Brit, was also a regular at Club Soma and the two Smiths decided to put their musical talent and mutual love for indie music to good use and started The Standards.

A local drummer, keyboardist and bassist came on board to join Matt on lead vocals and Paul on guitar to create what they call a ‘Thai fusion band’. “We were all in bands before and missed it. Paul and I didn’t think living in Thailand should make any difference to that,” says Matt. The Standards soon gained popularity and took their show on the road to places like Nepal, the Philippines and Singapore. Although modest in their exposure to the music market thus far, they’re confident in their abilities, especially when it comes to their competition in Thailand.

“A lot of the bigger Thai bands aren’t good,” he says. But this opens the door for The Standards to make their mark on the local scene. “There’s not much influence here. The young indie kids aren’t looking up to anyone and going ‘I want to sound like that’. That’s our advantage. That’s where we’re a little bit different. That’s why we can sound better than anyone else.”

Matt Smith is quick to banish myths about The Standards’ expat advantage. “I don’t think our success is because Paul and I are English and white. I think it’s because we’re a good band and we have deep influences.” Those influences are likely drawn from the two Smiths’ home country, as The Standards’ brand of danceable indie rock with a touch of garage-rock revival could have easily come straight from the stages of Blighty.

The Standards will represent the Thai contingent at this fortnight’s Asian Agenda, where they’ll flex their musical muscle alongside bands from Beijing, Macau and Hong Kong to give local indie kids some welcome inspiration. - Time Out


"The Standards Evoke Culture Collide Nostalgia In “Wake Up Dead” Video"

Over the years, you come to terms with the fact that your favorite bands will never love you as much as you love them. However, every once in a while, you find out that they do and it's actually not a sick joke, but a beautiful truth.

So who are we referring to exactly? The English/Thai quintet, The Standards, who performed at this year's Culture Collide back in October and included that footage in their new music video for "Wake Up Dead"; your first taste of their sophomore album due for release in early 2013.

Edited by The Standards' synth/keys wiz, Manasnit Setthawong, this video features live footage of the band's unforgettable sets at TAIX's front lounge, plus low-key moments during their trip to Los Angeles like cruising on the freeway and walking up and down Sunset Blvd.



Based on this track--full of wailing guitar and pounding drums--it's safe to say that this forthcoming record will be just as energetic and killer as The Standards' live performances. Keep tabs on the band via their official website. - Filter Magazine


"The Return Of The Standards"

It’s been an ongoing joke that if it weren’t for the Mayan predictions of 2012, a number of international acts wouldn’t be heading toward this side of the world to stage some of their ‘last’ shows. But, before Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, Death Cab for Cutie and The Pains of Being Pure at Heart grace us with their presence and prep us for the apocalypse, Manila was first wowed by the comeback of Brit-Thai indie quintet, The Standards.
Their noteworthy performances at the 2010 A*FEST (a mini Asian music festival organized by Joff Cruz of Kindassault Records) left a lasting impression, and many have awaited their return. In fact, they’ve dedicated two songs from their debut album, “Nations,” to the country. The pop tune, “It’s Nothing,” was written a few days before they first arrived in Manila, while the heartfelt anthem, “Espinosa”, was inspired by the heroic story of Aris Canoy Espinosa, the 13 year old Filipino Boy Scout who sacrificed his life by covering a hand grenade with his own body to save his friends. As guitarist Paul Smith says, “There’s so much respect and enthusiasm for what musicians do in Manila that’s it’s always a joy to play here.” And what better way to commence their 2012 Asia tour than by kicking it off right here in the “City of Our Affections”.
A night out at B-SIDE last January 21 was definitely money well spent. Two hundred bucks was enough to give you an aural pot belly. The appetizers included savory tunes from local synth-driven pop rock group, Paranoid City, and ‘dangerous’ all-star electro-punk gang, Pedicab. Seasoned to taste, the main entrée was a delectable fifty(ish)-minute set of raw energy served by The Standards. Taking influence from bands like Primal Scream, Kasabian and Blur, their songs exude classic Britpop lavishness blended into layers of contemporary goodness.


As lead singer, Matt Smith’s vocal prowess and stage presence are very reminiscent of a late 90’s Damon Albarn (set aside the skinny pants). With his signature fedora hat, the towering Paul (no relation to Matt) and his heavy yet swift guitar riffs are certainly hard to miss. The lass of the lot, keyboardist Nit Setthawong, adds charm to each song with thrilling synthesizer tones. Mac Likitvorachai stands in the background, but his funky bass lines barely make him a wallflower. The ‘superstar’ that is Nay Voravittayathorn lives up to his title as he delivers the beats that keep the band bangin’. But the audience shouldn’t be misled. Behind the “funky beats and dancing feet” lies a collection of elegantly composed lyrics that are angst-y and cutthroat, “You’ve got your daddy’s eyes and your mother’s lies” (Walk of Shame), “You broke my heart, I took your soul” (Don’t Save My Soul), and “Don’t touch me, I’m not moving” (This Blood Won’t Rise). A few minutes before their gig was over, a sweaty Matt made an announcement in his authentic Cockney accent, “People think that there’s a big music scene in Bangkok, but they’re all wrong ‘cause it’s right ‘ere in Manila.” Well, of course, “It’s more fun in The Philippines.”
When I initially pitched this article for Atthewomb.com, the editor said, “I’ve never heard of [The Standards]. Have they got a following?” Well, after two successful visits to the country, The Standards have certainly earned themselves a solid set of local fans. - At The Womb


"Culture Collide Recap"

The Standards: I was still reeling from Marit’s performance when the Thai-British indie band, The Standards, just totally floored me. Despite the tight quarters, this band performed as if they were at The Garden. I knew I was in for a treat when guitarist, Paul Smith, belted out “F**k the soundcheck! Let’s get started!” The lead singer, Matt Smith, was just a ball of energy and charisma. There wasn’t a moment he wasn’t dancing, jumping, joking or emphasizing his fun filled week in the LA. He topped it all off by slipping on an “I love LA” t-shirt over his sweat-soaked suit and sported some Blues Brothers shades. The Standards are pure rock and roll adrenaline and know how to command a stage. “Songs to dance to. Songs to fight to. Songs to f**k to” just says it perfectly. - SO Magazine


Discography

Never Go Home - 2013 - single
Official MV
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQvcNn1_U_c

Wake Up Dead - 2012 - single
Official MV
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bq8NrkKp794

The Fall - 2012 - single (MV shown nightly on Channel [V])
Official MV
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acMI0ffeeLc

Where You Go - 2012 - single (played on BBC Radio 6, MV shown nightly on Channel [V])
Official MV
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASgOCHu9uxk

Nations - 2010 - LP

It's Nothing - 2012 - single (MV shown nightly on Channel [V], played on Fat Radio, Bangkok)
Official MV
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhddvunXzjg

Well Well Well - 2009 - EP

Photos

Bio

A British-Thai fusion band, banging out belting alternative indie rock and roll.
The Standards have been playing the alternative music scene across the world for the past 4 years. Matt and Paul Smith (not related) hail from London and Nit, Mc and Nay are from Bangkok. Having met through the clubs and pubs of Bangkok they set about setting new musical highs and to bring alternative music to the forefront. With a loyal following, this gave The Standards the support to go forth and record the songs that they have been playing live.
Following on from their successful EP, ‘Well, Well, Well’ in 2008, which included their first single, The Proposition, The Standards have gone on to make their debut album, Nations. A raw, edgy record, Nations is full of stories and undertones from the pubs clubs and streets of the cities they’re from, live and breathe. A year later, new singles ‘The Fall’, ‘Where You Go’ and ‘Wake Up Dead’ have been given viral releases and impressive MVs to sit The Standards where they belong.
Familiar faces on the touring circuit, their biggest live dates include two shows in Los Angeles, a seven date tour of England which included BBC Introducing and two tours of Asia. They’ve shared stages with Thee Oh Sees, The Charlatans, Of Montreal, The Subways, DZ Deathrays, The Skints, The Wombats, The Big Pink, Young Knives, Blood Red Shoes, The Selector, Tribes and many more. They’ve played the biggest Asian festivals including Big Mountain, CAMA and Culture One. They launched club KOKO in Asia, been on national radio in four different parts of the world, played MTV and a whole host of other big events and TV slots. Always on fire live and doing it just for the love of music, The Standards never fall short of providing their audience with an awesome, pumping, belting performance. Just ask the 1000s who have already seen it!

LINKS TO VIDEOS HERE>>>
LINKS TO VIDEOS HERE>>>

'Never Go Home' Official MV
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQvcNn1_U_c&feature=c4-overview&list=UUjPkUiuuOh7qBRz3k4qkAvQ

‘The Fall’ Official MV
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acMI0ffeeLc

‘Where You Go’ Official MV
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASgOCHu9uxk

‘It’s Nothing’ Official MV
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhddvunXzjg

‘Wake Up Dead’ Official MV
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bq8NrkKp794