The StereoFidelics
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The StereoFidelics

Asheville, North Carolina, United States | INDIE

Asheville, North Carolina, United States | INDIE
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At a glance, comparisons to the White Stripes are inevitable for the StereoFidelics. A male guitarist, a female drummer, and rock-n-roll gusto to spare – like their influences before them, Chris Padgett and Melissa McGinley can’t be contained within a single genre – a fact that their latest release, You Are Having A Wonderful Time, only serves to cement.

Unlike the Whites, Padgett simultaneously plays guitar and bass (with his feet) and Melissa can truly play drums, sing, kick ass on the fiddle, and do all three at roughly the same time.

If you think the title is presumptuous, think again. A throwback to virtuoso guitar greats of the 60s and 70s, Padgett casually breathes new life into what feels like a familiar, yet forgotten friend. Meanwhile, McGinley captivates the listener, laying down a groove that would leave the likes of John Bonham bobbing his head, while piercing your ears with the power and finesse of an Etta James.

For a mesmerizing musical journey that seemingly encompasses everything the StereoFidelics represent, look no further than the title track. What starts with Padgett’s laid back descent into a chemical stream of consciousness ends six minutes later in the unbridled frenzy that is McGinley’s electric violin… and when she promises she will “haunt you,” you have no choice but to believe.

From beginning to end, you’ll find that the StereoFidelics offer one musical gem after the next, ranging from the hypnotic tension of A Round to the happy-go-lucky playfulness of You Know I Would. And when McGinley sings, “I bet you’d love me if I gave you the world,” you have to admit, even if the world isn’t hers to give, You Are Having A Wonderful Time. - 'Round Magazine


Love for music and innovation are perhaps two of the most important attributes of the bands that played last weekend at Duffy's Tavern as part of Lincoln Calling Music Festival.
A white girl that sings with the powerful and seasoned voice of a black jazz-soul singer; a guy who plays electric guitar and a foot-operated synth bass as an extension of his own body; a passionate young woman; a young man who shows his soul when he sings rock, blues and funk with eyes shut and a girl who plays drums with rocker raw power or jazz finesse depending on the mood of the tune.
This might sound like a five-member band just doing their job, but surprisingly only two people are capable of creating this unique and complex sound. Their names are Melissa McGinley and Chris Padgett. Their band is called The Stereofidelics, they are from Asheville, N.C., and the people who saw their show last Saturday were completely overwhelmed by their virtuosity.
Very few souls were near the stage when The Stereofidelics started to play, but, as soon as they did, the audience began to grow and grow.
When they played their modified version of the jazz standard "Summertime," McGinley belted out the lyrics, while Padgett played his guitar with mastery.
"Las Manzanas?" caused a lot of jaw dropping from audience members when they listened to Padgett playing his instrument and making distortions with his foot-operated synth bass, while McGinley played her drums with so much energy that the stage was shaking.
Some people were impressed and used their cell phones to record videos of the band when McGinley played her violin and drums at the same time, while the duo performed "Yahawt."
In "A Round" they combined sweet mellow harmonies with noisy distortions and some excited people started to yell.
McGinley played her violin moving dramatically and stomping the floor with her feet as an angry robot, when they performed "Psycho," the last song of their show. When they finished playing, people clapped, smiled and yelled. They wanted more, but it was the turn of another band.
Stereofidelics will play again in Duffy's Tavern next Sunday, Oct. 23, and promised they will perform different songs.
- Daily Nebraskan


I had the great pleasure of catching this captivating duo at live show at Founder’s Brewing in Grand Rapids, MI while I was in town visiting some friends. I went out that night to enjoy a beverage or two with some of my favorite midwestern folks, and had no idea what kind of bands would be playing. Luckily for me, Chris Padgett and Melissa McGinley (aka The StereoFidelics) were enjoying a midwestern jaunt within their never-ending tour schedule. Based in Asheville, NC, the duo first caught my attention due to the petite and gorgeous McGinley (I am such a sucker for adorable female musicians), who was wearing some sort of strapless party dress on her way to sit down behind the drumset. Ok, a hot girl drummer is a good start, and it turns out she sings with a sometimes jazzy/ sometimes bluesy style with power that belies her small frame. If that was the extent of the impression then I would probably still be scrambling quickly to find some other band to write about, but luckily there was more to be found. In addition, Padgett is a pretty quick guitar player with a nice smooth voice, which made for a great guy-girl vocal combo. As the first song went on, I listened closely and started grooving with the bass line…then I looked onstage and re-noticed the lack of a bass player…and looked down at Padgett’s feet, where all I could see were foot-like blurs. This guy is able to play some killer guitar, all the while his feet are tapping some funky bass licks on a set of organ pedals. As soon as I picked up my jaw from the floor, they were doing a musical segue between songs and our heavenly lady drummer had picked up her violin, which she played with a well-practiced skill, while holding the beat with her feet. At that point I had to go to the bar to grab some more fuel from my blown mind.

If you can read this article about this 2-person band and not be curious or intrigued enough to listen to them, then I can say without any doubt that you hate music and freedom. The rest of you awesome folks need to click one of these links and go download the dozen or so free songs they have available on their website. If you aren’t sure yet and that seems like a big commitment to you, then you probably need some therapy for the commitment-phobia, but feel free to distract yourself with these next couple videos. - PopFilter (yourpopfilter.com)


Probably the best thing about Musikfest besides the good headline concerts is when you discover great bands you didn’t previously know about.

The StereoFidelics at ArtsQuest Center

My top discovery so far this year (admittedly the festival’s only three days old, but I’m not sure I’ll like a new band better) is The StereoFidelics, who played a free show Saturday inside the ArtsQuest Center, and were scheduled to play a later show on the Town Square.

The young husband-and-wife team from Asheville, N.C., channeled the energy and make-up of Matt & Kim: Not as punky, but equally as jaunty and poppy.

And quirky, with female drummer/violinist Melissa McGinley dressed in a party dress and singing in a chirpy voice and male keyboardist/guitarist Chris Padgett playing foot-pedal bass barefoot while wailing on intricate, riffy, throwback guitar.

Much of the music in their early set was sonic and orchestral, but also moved into R&B.

And they even did what Padgett introduced as “an interesting cover”: Led Zeppelin’s “No Quarter,” McGinley whipping her head as she drummed and Padgett playing Jimmy Page-ish guitar.

Keep an eye on them. They deserve to get a lot of attention.


Sunday’s Festplatz set by Lancaster party funk band Funky Fontana, who lived up to it name with a horn-infused a set of Stevie Wonder’s “Those Days” and “Superstition,” Red Hot Chili Peppers’ “Give It Away,” and more.

People in the Festplatz tent were dancing up a storm, despite humidity in which you could swim – and certainly sweat.

Singer Chris Higgins came deep into the crowd to sing. The horns players jumped. The bassist whipped his long blonde hair, matted with sweat.

And it all was a total delight.

The band ended its set with Higgins saying, “We want to slow it down,” then jumping into a hyper version of Wild Cherry’s “Play That Funky Music.” A total delight.

Perhaps my biggest disappointment so far was Philly-based Hymn For Her, which played two Main Street Bethlehem sets Saturday – its second set in the pouring rain (the band was under a small tent).

The duo had come highly touted as having punk underlyings, but I didn’t see it. It was more bluegrass, blues and cacophonic rock – sometimes in the same song -- mixed with The Beatles before it slipped into self-indulgent psychedelia.

Lucy Tight played a cigar-box and broom handle guitar/bass with a slide on her finger, and Wayne Waxing played drums, banjo, harmonica and cymbals – sometimes all at the same time.

They, too, played a Led Zeppelin cover: “Bron-Y-Aur Stomp” mashed up with “Black Dog.”

But StereoFidelics’ was far, far better. Hymn For Her was interesting for a song or two, but it quickly got old, especially as they played sound for sound’s sake, foregoing melody.

On top of that, while the audience stood in the pouring rain, Hymn For Her stopped playing for an inordinately long time to take a picture of the crowd getting wet watching them.

I thought they were the ones being paid to perform.
- Morning Call -- Lehigh Valley Music Blog


Probably the best thing about Musikfest besides the good headline concerts is when you discover great bands you didn’t previously know about.

The StereoFidelics at ArtsQuest Center

My top discovery so far this year (admittedly the festival’s only three days old, but I’m not sure I’ll like a new band better) is The StereoFidelics, who played a free show Saturday inside the ArtsQuest Center, and were scheduled to play a later show on the Town Square.

The young husband-and-wife team from Asheville, N.C., channeled the energy and make-up of Matt & Kim: Not as punky, but equally as jaunty and poppy.

And quirky, with female drummer/violinist Melissa McGinley dressed in a party dress and singing in a chirpy voice and male keyboardist/guitarist Chris Padgett playing foot-pedal bass barefoot while wailing on intricate, riffy, throwback guitar.

Much of the music in their early set was sonic and orchestral, but also moved into R&B.

And they even did what Padgett introduced as “an interesting cover”: Led Zeppelin’s “No Quarter,” McGinley whipping her head as she drummed and Padgett playing Jimmy Page-ish guitar.

Keep an eye on them. They deserve to get a lot of attention.


Sunday’s Festplatz set by Lancaster party funk band Funky Fontana, who lived up to it name with a horn-infused a set of Stevie Wonder’s “Those Days” and “Superstition,” Red Hot Chili Peppers’ “Give It Away,” and more.

People in the Festplatz tent were dancing up a storm, despite humidity in which you could swim – and certainly sweat.

Singer Chris Higgins came deep into the crowd to sing. The horns players jumped. The bassist whipped his long blonde hair, matted with sweat.

And it all was a total delight.

The band ended its set with Higgins saying, “We want to slow it down,” then jumping into a hyper version of Wild Cherry’s “Play That Funky Music.” A total delight.

Perhaps my biggest disappointment so far was Philly-based Hymn For Her, which played two Main Street Bethlehem sets Saturday – its second set in the pouring rain (the band was under a small tent).

The duo had come highly touted as having punk underlyings, but I didn’t see it. It was more bluegrass, blues and cacophonic rock – sometimes in the same song -- mixed with The Beatles before it slipped into self-indulgent psychedelia.

Lucy Tight played a cigar-box and broom handle guitar/bass with a slide on her finger, and Wayne Waxing played drums, banjo, harmonica and cymbals – sometimes all at the same time.

They, too, played a Led Zeppelin cover: “Bron-Y-Aur Stomp” mashed up with “Black Dog.”

But StereoFidelics’ was far, far better. Hymn For Her was interesting for a song or two, but it quickly got old, especially as they played sound for sound’s sake, foregoing melody.

On top of that, while the audience stood in the pouring rain, Hymn For Her stopped playing for an inordinately long time to take a picture of the crowd getting wet watching them.

I thought they were the ones being paid to perform.
- Morning Call -- Lehigh Valley Music Blog


This is indie rock, and it is unusual in its field for its possession of a particular characteristic. It is funnnn-kay. Soulful, hard groovin’ and hard rockin’, it makes you do semi-voluntary rhythmic body movements. And everybody loves to do semi-voluntary rhythmic body movements. What’s more it has violin in it, and appears to be performed by just two musicians. On every count then, it is a thing you need. Get some. - LIVE Unsigned


This is indie rock, and it is unusual in its field for its possession of a particular characteristic. It is funnnn-kay. Soulful, hard groovin’ and hard rockin’, it makes you do semi-voluntary rhythmic body movements. And everybody loves to do semi-voluntary rhythmic body movements. What’s more it has violin in it, and appears to be performed by just two musicians. On every count then, it is a thing you need. Get some. - LIVE Unsigned


The StereoFidelics do not sound like The White Stripes, The Kills, White Mystery, The Fiery Furnaces or the half-dozen or so other mixed-gender pairings that produce heavy, straightforward, garage-oriented music. Comparisons to other guy/girl groups may be inevitable, but the duo of Chris Padgett and Melissa McGinley, by contrast, creates sophisticated, melodic and groove-laden songscapes. In listening to the band’s music, one might guess that the group comprises at least one or two other members, but the pair achieves its sound by each playing multiple instruments. Padgett plays guitar and uses a foot-controlled bass synthesizer, and McGinley is responsible for drums and electric violin, and each shares lead-vocal duties.

Mastery of compound instruments is an impressive feat, and the talented musicians proved their mettle in laying down tracks for The StereoFidelics’ excellent 2010 album, You Are Having a Wonderful Time. But while they excel in the studio, the band truly thrives in a live environment. Focused and passionate, they play with zeal, a fact to which anyone who has ever witnessed a concert performance can attest. Constant touring has resulted in precision and riveting interplay that are a joy to behold. - Blank News


KALAMAZOO — The StereoFidelics are returning to Kalamazoo for a performance at Bell’s Eccentric Café with the duo’s own brand of unconventional, multi-instrumental indie rock.

Touring for the release of their second album, “You Are Having a Wonderful Time,” Chris Padgett and Melissa McGinley look forward to showing audiences a solid display of genres — possibly while barefoot.

Bored of playing “pre-approved, digested” music in local bars, McGinley made a bet with Padgett that she could play the drums and the violin at the same time.

“I said, ‘prove it.’ And she did,” Padgett said from the pair’s hometown of Asheville, N.C.

It was the birth of The StereoFidelics’ signature as a multi-tasking duo.

“At first it was kind of rigid, but pretty soon it actually started to feel pretty good,” Padgett said. “The sound now speaks for itself.”

Padgett, 27, plays the bass with his feet using organ pedals, guitar and synthesizer and sings lead and backup.

McGinley, 26, sings lead and backup and plays the drum kit and violin.

The two have been known to perform sans shoes, but consistently put on a high-energy performance.

The title track of their new album, “You Are Having a Wonderful Time,” is somewhat poppy, yet low-key tune that lets Padgett’s guitar plucking skills shine and displays how well the couple’s vocals blend.
IF YOU GO
StereoFidelics
What: Folk-rock duo from North Carolina
When: 9:30 p.m. July 29
Where: Bell’s Eccentric Café, 355 E. Kalamazoo Ave.
Cost: $5
Contact: 269-382-2332, bellsbeer.com

CONNECT
www.stereof.com



The band’s more soulful side comes through in a track called “Zombie Foot,” which sounds a bit like the love child of Erykah Badu and Janis Joplin backed up by a blues-funk-jazz fusion band.

“A Round” begins with a Celtic-style violin riff and evolves into a harder electronica style, but the song remains grounded in McGinley’s impressive violin skills and is accented by Padgett on the guitar.

Padgett said at every show they try to play a blend of genres to keep things interesting and keep people engaged.

“There needs to be more of that diversification of music, and not just in music in general, but for bands,” Padgett said. “When you come to a show, you deserve to get entertained. Everyone has a little different taste, so if you don’t like one song, you might like the next.”

Padgett and McGinley discovered their musical compatibility as they were stuck waiting for an elevator while both were attending Indiana University. Padgett wouldn’t comment on the duo’s relationship status, but did mention he’s a great admirer of McGinley.
“She’s kind of like my mentor in music,” Padgett said. - Kalamazoo Gazette


KALAMAZOO — The StereoFidelics are returning to Kalamazoo for a performance at Bell’s Eccentric Café with the duo’s own brand of unconventional, multi-instrumental indie rock.

Touring for the release of their second album, “You Are Having a Wonderful Time,” Chris Padgett and Melissa McGinley look forward to showing audiences a solid display of genres — possibly while barefoot.

Bored of playing “pre-approved, digested” music in local bars, McGinley made a bet with Padgett that she could play the drums and the violin at the same time.

“I said, ‘prove it.’ And she did,” Padgett said from the pair’s hometown of Asheville, N.C.

It was the birth of The StereoFidelics’ signature as a multi-tasking duo.

“At first it was kind of rigid, but pretty soon it actually started to feel pretty good,” Padgett said. “The sound now speaks for itself.”

Padgett, 27, plays the bass with his feet using organ pedals, guitar and synthesizer and sings lead and backup.

McGinley, 26, sings lead and backup and plays the drum kit and violin.

The two have been known to perform sans shoes, but consistently put on a high-energy performance.

The title track of their new album, “You Are Having a Wonderful Time,” is somewhat poppy, yet low-key tune that lets Padgett’s guitar plucking skills shine and displays how well the couple’s vocals blend.
IF YOU GO
StereoFidelics
What: Folk-rock duo from North Carolina
When: 9:30 p.m. July 29
Where: Bell’s Eccentric Café, 355 E. Kalamazoo Ave.
Cost: $5
Contact: 269-382-2332, bellsbeer.com

CONNECT
www.stereof.com



The band’s more soulful side comes through in a track called “Zombie Foot,” which sounds a bit like the love child of Erykah Badu and Janis Joplin backed up by a blues-funk-jazz fusion band.

“A Round” begins with a Celtic-style violin riff and evolves into a harder electronica style, but the song remains grounded in McGinley’s impressive violin skills and is accented by Padgett on the guitar.

Padgett said at every show they try to play a blend of genres to keep things interesting and keep people engaged.

“There needs to be more of that diversification of music, and not just in music in general, but for bands,” Padgett said. “When you come to a show, you deserve to get entertained. Everyone has a little different taste, so if you don’t like one song, you might like the next.”

Padgett and McGinley discovered their musical compatibility as they were stuck waiting for an elevator while both were attending Indiana University. Padgett wouldn’t comment on the duo’s relationship status, but did mention he’s a great admirer of McGinley.
“She’s kind of like my mentor in music,” Padgett said. - Kalamazoo Gazette


There are times during shows that Chris Padgett wants to abandon his chair to stand up and rock out, but it's just too difficult.

While he's jamming on his electric guitar as a member of the Asheville, N.C.-based indie duo The StereoFidelics, he's playing the bass licks with his feet.

To get a stronger, more full-band sound, Padgett and bandmate Melissa McGinley learned to play more than one instrument on stage.

“We could hire some more musicians to play drums and bass, or we could just do it ourselves while still playing our primary instruments,” Padgett said.

The musicians went with playing multiple instruments, as Padgett plays a synth bass on a keyboard with his feet and McGinley plays drums as well as violin. There are some songs when McGinley will put down her drum sticks mid-song, continue to tap the high hat and bass drum with foot pedals and start playing the violin.

The StereoFidelics will play a free show at 6 p.m. Saturday at French Broad Brewing Co. in Asheville. The show is what Padgett considers a “hybrid” show, as they will play with full instrumentation but also play some straight acoustic songs.

When they first began playing together a little more than three years ago, after meeting while at school at Indiana University, they were a bluegrass and jazz duo on acoustic guitar and violin.

“We were having some good success playing around here in Buncombe, Henderson and Polk counties, and we got to the point where we were playing here and only here, and we wanted to take it out on the road,” Padgett said.

“We thought we needed to do something a little different, especially around here, where acoustic duos and acoustic performers are in mass abundance. Even though we were pretty good at what we do, artistically we wanted to do something a little different.”

There are challenges to being an alt-rock band with just two members, though a group like the White Stripes certainly did well at it. Padgett and McGinley have to learn to write songs around which instruments they were playing.

“It makes it a bit of a challenge, but it makes songwriting interesting,” Padgett said.

Most fans loved the new sound, but some were disappointed in the new direction.

Since the transition, Padgett and McGinley have played festivals like the Mountain Stage Festival in California and Vermont's Northeast Kingdom Festival and Solar Fest.

“I'm glad we did it, because we're starting to get to the place we want to be,” Padgett said, “and we might not have gotten there if we had stuck with the original sound.” - Herald-Journal


Two dynamic instruments, two dynamic voices and a record of relentless touring have earned the Stereofidelics their reputation as a superb live act. With two LPs to their credit, the duo of Chris Padgett and Melissa McGinley are bringing their ferocious storm of guitar and electric violin to Lincoln's Bourbon Theatre on Thursday night.
The Daily Nebraskan caught up with guitarist and vocalist, Chris Padgett to discuss the Stereofidelics' upcoming tour and his thoughts on the band's sophomore album, "You Are Having a Wonderful Time."
Daily Nebraskan: Have you guys ever toured through Nebraska before?
Chris Padgett: Yeah, we used to play quite a bit at Box Awesome back in 2008 and 2009 and we've been making some stops in Omaha for the last year and a half.
DN: Why do you keep coming back?
CP: We've really found a sort of connection with a lot of fans in that particular area. The people that have come out are supportive and really appreciative. It's great to see because we'll go into a lot of other urban areas and people will kind of take the music for granted. They're just not as enthusiastic. So, it makes total sense for us to come back to Lincoln and Omaha.
DN: I noticed you have about 20 or so shows coming up. Are you just starting this tour? Anything you're particularly looking forward to?
CP: It just started yesterday. It's a 35-day tour with 28 shows, which is actually pretty light for us. We normally do no less than 40, but the latter half of this tour is a little more scattered because we submitted to South by Southwest, so we're keeping that time open. Honestly, I'm just excited about touring in the spring. It's been our identity to be a hard-core road band. So heading back out there is like getting our identity back and getting back into what we do best.
DN: I was just about to bring that up. You and Melissa have gained a lot of notoriety for near constant touring and your intensity on the stage. But that's all just what other people have said; what do you and Melissa try to bring to the shows?
CP: We basically try and bring something that is unique and different from what every other band is doing, which is a lofty goal since it seems that everything and has been done. You see bands resorting to ridiculous non sequitur stuff trying to be different. But that's what we try to do and to some extent I think we're achieving it. We try not to make it gimmicky, but you could close your eyes and listen and when you open them, you'll see limbs flying over the place and it's all done live. It's a good way to earn some really hard-core, devoted fans.
DN: Any challenges in avoiding the sophomore slump with the second album ("You Are Having a Wonderful Time"), or did it come pretty easily?
CP: This album came through extremely easily compared to the first one. The song writing felt much more natural and much more together; we felt more collective. I felt the first album was slightly schizophrenic in the sense that we were trying to cover all these different genres and it just came out as a sort of mush. But "You Are Having a Wonderful Time" was a very pleasant experience to record and write. These songs are a better representation of what we're trying to do and achieve.
DN: I have to ask you about the guitar riff on the title track of "You Are Having a Wonderful Time." I very much like it. How did that come to you?
CP: It's groovy, man. I appreciate that a lot. It comes from one of the many types of music that Melissa and I listen to: bebop, like Charlie Parker or Dizzie Gillespie or Sonny Rollins. The riff is heavily inspired by that, but a more consonant version and with a minor seventh. It's very snaky.
DN: I think the funky undertones in your music definitely made the transition from "Only Sleeping" to the second album. But how do you see your sound as having evolved?
CP: Like I said, I think we're not so schizophrenic. It's evolved into something that's slightly funky, slightly rock and slightly indie, but more cohesive. Hopefully it's becoming something that we can continuously grow from and fall back on as who we are. And hopefully we'll only continue to progress in that manner.
chancesolem-pfeifer@dailynebraskan.com
If you go:
The Stereofidelics w/Climates, SFS and Stonebelly
When: Thursday, Feb. 24 – 8 p.m.
Where: Bourbon Theatre – 1415 ‘O' Street
How much: $5 for 21+, $7 for 18-20 - Daily Nebraskan


Two dynamic instruments, two dynamic voices and a record of relentless touring have earned the Stereofidelics their reputation as a superb live act. With two LPs to their credit, the duo of Chris Padgett and Melissa McGinley are bringing their ferocious storm of guitar and electric violin to Lincoln's Bourbon Theatre on Thursday night.
The Daily Nebraskan caught up with guitarist and vocalist, Chris Padgett to discuss the Stereofidelics' upcoming tour and his thoughts on the band's sophomore album, "You Are Having a Wonderful Time."
Daily Nebraskan: Have you guys ever toured through Nebraska before?
Chris Padgett: Yeah, we used to play quite a bit at Box Awesome back in 2008 and 2009 and we've been making some stops in Omaha for the last year and a half.
DN: Why do you keep coming back?
CP: We've really found a sort of connection with a lot of fans in that particular area. The people that have come out are supportive and really appreciative. It's great to see because we'll go into a lot of other urban areas and people will kind of take the music for granted. They're just not as enthusiastic. So, it makes total sense for us to come back to Lincoln and Omaha.
DN: I noticed you have about 20 or so shows coming up. Are you just starting this tour? Anything you're particularly looking forward to?
CP: It just started yesterday. It's a 35-day tour with 28 shows, which is actually pretty light for us. We normally do no less than 40, but the latter half of this tour is a little more scattered because we submitted to South by Southwest, so we're keeping that time open. Honestly, I'm just excited about touring in the spring. It's been our identity to be a hard-core road band. So heading back out there is like getting our identity back and getting back into what we do best.
DN: I was just about to bring that up. You and Melissa have gained a lot of notoriety for near constant touring and your intensity on the stage. But that's all just what other people have said; what do you and Melissa try to bring to the shows?
CP: We basically try and bring something that is unique and different from what every other band is doing, which is a lofty goal since it seems that everything and has been done. You see bands resorting to ridiculous non sequitur stuff trying to be different. But that's what we try to do and to some extent I think we're achieving it. We try not to make it gimmicky, but you could close your eyes and listen and when you open them, you'll see limbs flying over the place and it's all done live. It's a good way to earn some really hard-core, devoted fans.
DN: Any challenges in avoiding the sophomore slump with the second album ("You Are Having a Wonderful Time"), or did it come pretty easily?
CP: This album came through extremely easily compared to the first one. The song writing felt much more natural and much more together; we felt more collective. I felt the first album was slightly schizophrenic in the sense that we were trying to cover all these different genres and it just came out as a sort of mush. But "You Are Having a Wonderful Time" was a very pleasant experience to record and write. These songs are a better representation of what we're trying to do and achieve.
DN: I have to ask you about the guitar riff on the title track of "You Are Having a Wonderful Time." I very much like it. How did that come to you?
CP: It's groovy, man. I appreciate that a lot. It comes from one of the many types of music that Melissa and I listen to: bebop, like Charlie Parker or Dizzie Gillespie or Sonny Rollins. The riff is heavily inspired by that, but a more consonant version and with a minor seventh. It's very snaky.
DN: I think the funky undertones in your music definitely made the transition from "Only Sleeping" to the second album. But how do you see your sound as having evolved?
CP: Like I said, I think we're not so schizophrenic. It's evolved into something that's slightly funky, slightly rock and slightly indie, but more cohesive. Hopefully it's becoming something that we can continuously grow from and fall back on as who we are. And hopefully we'll only continue to progress in that manner.
chancesolem-pfeifer@dailynebraskan.com
If you go:
The Stereofidelics w/Climates, SFS and Stonebelly
When: Thursday, Feb. 24 – 8 p.m.
Where: Bourbon Theatre – 1415 ‘O' Street
How much: $5 for 21+, $7 for 18-20 - Daily Nebraskan


The StereoFidelics are a rock, alternative band from Asheville, North Carolina. The sound is definitely alternative, and very unique, but addictive. The songs are constructed in a way that draws the listener in, and it is easy to hear the amount of craftsmanship that went into every note. In some ways they seem like a new wave punk band because they have dynamic changes in their songs, but they float seamlessly. Although the mood of the song can tend toward being upbeat, the subject matter will force you to listen twice. The StereoFidelics are a duet with multiple instrument talents, which allows them to perform a full sound for the ears while their improve attitude provides for the eyes and mind. In many ways this sound can be described as being mood setting. It is transforming where the lyrics take the picture in you mind and weave them together with sweet and sour memories.

Songs I like are "Only Sleeping," and "Nice neighborhood." Check out more on them at their website: - The Independent Music Scene


The Stereofidelics’ impressive live show is a completely different experience than listening to the studio albums. The full sound that you hear on the albums is reproduced and expanded upon in person with the duo often playing several instruments simultaneously. With high energy, great crowd interaction, and a presence that demands attention and respect. The movement and sounds are as much performance art as live music.

All the dynamic elements and influences in their music are clearly represented in their song “Only Sleeping.” It starts slow and sweet, picks up to a danceable fun speed, falls into a trance, and builds to a stunning climax while being constantly in flux. The physical motion is just as compelling as the music. Melissa starts off on drums, goes into a fantastic vocal scat, and picks up violin while continuing on the drums with her feet and tapping the symbols with her bow. Meanwhile, Chris carries the gutsy rhythm on guitar and petals to blend layers of jazz, funk, Latin, and a variety of other styles and emotions. Music is about change, and the StereoFidelics offer a live show that builds on itself, unexpected and highly entertaining. - Richard Graves - Dead Air


The Stereofidelics: You Are Having a Wonderful Time
By David Maine 6 December 2010

Talented duo keeps things surprising

The Stereofidelics consist of Chris Padgett on guitar and vocals and Melissa McGinley on drums and vocals. Despite obvious similarities to The White Stripes, The Stereofidelics mine a more funky, soulful vein, with Padgett’s snaky guitar lines and array of effects in sharp contrast to Jack White’s garage tendencies. McGinley sings better than Meg, too, and there are plenty of other sounds rounding out the mix.

You Are Having a Wonderful Time opens with the humping, growling bass line of “Zombie Foot,” a song that introduces McGinley’s languid vocals and Padgett’s effects-laden guitar playing. Other tunes carry these qualities even further; “Nice Neighborhood” features skittering guitar chords and strong dual vocals, while the mini-epic “You Are Having a Wonderful Time” shifts from angsty introspection to uptempo, dance-friendly poly-rhythms to emo arena-rock crescendos—all in six minutes. At their best, the songs’ eclecticism works well, and the musicians are adept enough to inhabit the changes convincingly.

Some songs fall flat, as in the old-timey rag of “You Would Know,” or the solo guitar instrumental “Let’s Make a Record.” Overall, though, there is much more good than bad here, and enough intriguing musicianship to leave the listener wondering where the band will go next.
- David Maine - PopMatters


Two people, five instruments, and the girl plays drums.....what's not to like? This Asheville, NC duo makes catchy rock featuring boy-girl vocals with occasional fuzzy guitars, and electric violin. Sometimes delving into jam band territory, they never get far before the vocals creep in to bring it back home. This is easy-to-listen-to, radio-friendly stuff. Rebecca Ruth - WYCE Music Journal


You Are Having A Wonderful Time (2010) is the second full album by the Asheville, NC based StereoFidelics, and this indie retro-rock duet has only improved since their first great release, Only Sleeping (2008). Members Chris Padgett (Electric/Acoustic Guitar, Keyboard, Vocals) and Melissa McGinley (Drums, Violin, Vocals) have refined their sound to the point so you could never tell that they aren't at least a five-piece ensemble. It's not just studio magic, either—their live shows (which are amazing, by the way) sound exactly the same, and their albums greatly capture that frantic energy that the two have during their live shows, in which they constantly switch instruments in inventive ways. It's difficult to ascribe an exact sound to the pair (but then again, what good groups make it easy?); they blend elements of folk, indie, rock ‘n’ roll, and blues into a mix that sounds so familiar, yet different than anything other group.



The highlights of the album song wise would probably be the titular “You Are Having a Wonderful Time,” which highlights Padgett's technical skill on guitar and later McGinley's violin (a sound that is conspicuously absent on many of these recordings, which is a shame); “Nice Neighborhood,” a rock-organ driven, almost funk piece which has some great duet vocal work; as well as “Everything Was Fine Until You Showed Up” and “You Know I Would,” a pair of songs, the former sung by Padgett and the latter by McGinley. “Everything” is an acoustic piece which shows a more subdued side of the group's sound and showcases Padgett's smooth, dusky vocals; while “You Know I Would” is upbeat (almost desperately so) and the perfect vehicle for McGinley's wonderful old-fashioned drawl and violin. There's a story behind the pair, but, well, I won't spoil it. Listen to it yourself and find out (or read the liner notes with the album, if you're lazy.)



It’s rare that a group—and especially a duet like this—manages to capture the same sort of sound both in studio recording and live performance, but You Are Having a Wonderful Time absolutely nails it. See the StereoFidelics live if you ever have the chance, because they put on one hell of a show, but if you can't, this album is the next best thing. - The Woove - Peter Tesh


THE DEAL: The StereoFidelics, a full instrumental duet from Asheville, N.C., releases its second studio album.

THE GOOD: The StereoFidelics is an indie-alt-rock band who weave reggae, jazz, '70s funk, American rock and jive talking — to name a few — into its organic instrumental choreography. Both performers juggle several instruments at a time but avoid sounding like a satirical one-man band. To fully encompass the artistry of the CD, you must understand the premeditated vision behind the heading of each track. The title track is intended to be satirical while embodying the track's mordant nature. The track is autobiographical of the calamities the band has endured while on tour, as depicted by the lyrics — an explanation of what it is like being inebriated from high-doses of administered pain-killers. The CD is driven by syncopation and sporadic artistic influence. Each track title and concept is either determined by the lyrics or the instrumental timbre — both teeter between autobiographical experience such as the title track and its creative influence, such as "Zombie Foot" — named accordingly for its repetitive baseline.

THE BAD: "The bad" is based on whether or not your aural pallet has acquired a taste for such an assorted flavor on one album.

THE VERDICT: This is some good stuff. You might experience mild mind-altering delirium from the eclectic groove of the album. Compulsive nodding and foot-tapping has also been associated with exposure to this album. Keep out of reach of children. - Creative Loafing - Nicole Pietrantonio


Although the music created by the Asheville, N.C., band the StereoFidelics is impressive in and of itself—with a retro-rock vibe, tight rhythms and sinuous vocals—more impressive is the fact that this sound is created by just two people. Performing on seven instruments between the two of them, Chris Padgett and Melissa McGinley create the rich sound of at least a five-piece band. - Flagstaff LIVE! Hot Picks


"Stunning players"
"Together they. . . do the proverbial in creating something greater than the sum of its parts." - Dave Carter on Studio One


With Abercrombie looks and folksy charm, Asheville-based duo The Stereofidelics pour over new tracks at the French Broad Brewery on Fairview Road on Friday night.

The Indiana-formed twosome featuring Chris Padgett and Melissa McGinley met at college and moved south with guitar and violin in hand to try for a career in music. We talked to Padgett about life in the biz so far.

Question: The name of this band is a little mysterious. Your music is more folk than hi-fi.

Answer: It’s a bit lugubrious for just the two of us, but it really makes sense. It gives us something to grow into. Playing the acoustic guitar and violin tends to peg us into the folksy, roots world, and we love that. But we’re trying to grow out of that and into something else, more pop and electric.

These days music just seems to be what it is. Why constrict us? We want to go a little heavier. Melissa also plays drums and sometimes she plays the violin and the drums at the same time.

Q: How does she manage that?

A: She just keeps moving her feet. She’ll put down the sticks and pick up the violin. We’ve got some video of it out there on the Internet.

Q: You kind of have to multitask with just two people, but what are the advantages to so few players?

A: We have more creative control. I’ve sat back and let someone else make the decisions in other bands we both have. They decided how we were going to play, and I always felt bad for not having more say in it. I like the minimalist movement these days, too. Being on the road, we are able to support ourselves much more adequately than bigger bands.

Plus it’s challenging. It takes total concentration to fill in a lot of sound with just two of us.

Q: You both sing and write. Do you do only original tunes?

A: We like to be as original as possible but we know that you have to bring in songs that are familiar to people. So even if we do a cover we’ll put our own spin on it.

Neither of us are divas. We just try to incorporate as much harmony as possible. We both carry the load.

Q: You’ve released two tracks via the Internet from a new album. When is that due for release?

A: The album, “Only Sleeping,” should be out this summer. It’s up to us because we have the studio and mixing equipment. Those first two finished tracks are representative of the album — it’s all the instruments we play.

The subject matter is important to me. I’m a big dork when it comes to reading and “Only Sleeping” is kind of a reference to writers Jack Finney and Kurt Vonnegut, two of my favorites. What writers do best is capture a theme without coming out and saying it. That’s what we’re trying to do on this disc.

Amy Jones writes about music for the Citizen-Times. Email her at ajontheair@hotmail.com.

- Take5--Asheville Citizen-Times


MUSICIANS TO WATCH FOR:

The StereoFidelics

We here at the RED BANANA thrive on all that is indie. Exposing our readers to new ideas, delivered to us by relatively unknown artists, is our ultimate goal. When I was introduced to the StereoFidelics, I knew I would have to write something on them. Self run, self produced, self promoted- this group is the definition of indie.




Who are the StereoFidelics, you ask?


They are a brilliant duo out of Asheville, NC, comprised of Chris Padgett and Melissa McGinley. McGinley can be heard on violin, drums, and vocals, while Padgett covers 6 and 12 string guitars, electric guitar, loops, vocals, and keyboard.


First known as the Quick Sixers in 2006, they began playing under their current name in October of 2007. They are my favorite type of band, because it is virtually impossible to label them as a specific genre. Their music crosses a multitude of style lines, fusing everything from rock, classical, jazz, and world music, into one. Perhaps the most fascinating thing about the StereoFidelics is that the two of them play all of their own instruments. Simple, right? Wrong. All kinds of musicians put out records where they cover several parts in each track, but how many pull this off live? Somehow Padgett and McGinley have developed a rhythm in the orchestration of their songs, that enables their live performances to exhibit the same instrumental richness as their recordings. Because of their amazing talents on multiple instruments, and their keen ear for musical texture, their small size allows them additional artistic freedom, while other bands would be hunting for additional members.

One of my favorite tunes by this duo is "Spanish Radio". Although this is not the greatest example of their multi-instrumental acheivements, their level of instrumental skill is made quite clear. I absolutely love how the violin is showcased in this piece, and the level of emotional dedication that pours out of the music is extraordinary.

Their debut album, Only Sleeping, is set to be released in September of this year. If the tracks I was sent are any indication of what is to come, I assure you this record will be golden. It is difficult for me to realise that I was only sent 2 tracks. I have been listening to them on repeat for a few weeks now, and they have yet to grow old. You can purchase your own copy of the singles here:


the StereoFidelics store


The first track is "Black Elephants". Underneath the dark meaning of the lyrics, you can feel the music infiltrating your body and spreading through your veins. McGinley's work on drumset locks into a groove that hooks the listener immediately, while the honest vocals Padgett produces work magically to tell the story. The second track, "Me, You, And Everyone We Know", is a self-described homage to the Invasion of the Body Snatchers. This has easily become one of my current iTunes favorites. Everything in the song fits together perfectly, and works to create a phenomenal music experience. I encourage you to listen to this track through headphones, because you will feel as if you are floating in a sea of musical bliss. You will be completely surrounded by various instruments, swirling with harmonic fever. I love that the vocals add to the music, rather than distract us. I also love hearing the fiddle/violin enter into the soundwaves(of course).

The StereoFidelics have recently embarked on their second independently booked national tour. This 50-day run will include stops from coast to coast, so if there is a show scheduled in a city near you, I highly recommend checking it out! Sadly the one area not covered is the Northeast, which means there are no shows around us to cover! We will keep you up to date on the happenings of this dynamic indie force, and hopefully after the tour we will be able to steal some time with the band to discuss what is sure to be an incredible debut record.
- Red Banana - Lindsay Van Osten


The Stereofidelics - who will come all the way from Asheville, N.C., for a Feb. 22 show at Brainerd's Eclectic Cafe - are in the vein of Minnesota jam bands like Niobium and Sight Like December.

The difference is the Stereofidelics only have two members, guitarist Chris Padgett and fiddler Melissa McGinley. But as videos on their Web site (www.myspace.com/thestereofidelics) indicate, they've got the energy of a full band.
The duo put out a seven-song, self-titled EP in 2007 in preparation for a proper album later this year. It's a rough recording - the four live tracks actually sound better than the three studio cuts - but it's a good taste of an emerging talent.

The most intriguing track is "Both Sides of the Glass," which suggests the duo could have a bright future in film scoring. At first, McGinley's resonant strings seem to be playing over a moody scene from a Hitchcock flick, then - 3:23 into the track - Padgett's electric guitar jumps in, as if a Bruckheimer-style car chase is breaking out.
The main course is still to come, but this EP is a decent appetizer.

JOHN HANSEN, entertainment editor. - The Brainerd Dispatch


When guitarist Chris Padgett and violinist Melissa McGinley established their duo Stereofidelics nearly two years ago, their repertoire consisted primarily of bluegrass and classical-tinged numbers, demonstrating their proficiency on their respective instruments.

"That didn't come easily," says Padgett from his Asheville, N.C.-based "speakeasy," where the group is recording its debut full-length album. "At first, it was just guitar and violin and we were playing bluegrass, jazz and classical stuff. But we're avant-garde fans that appreciate modern, progressive music and we were looking for an opportunity to expand ourselves more liberally."

Rather than adding band members, Padgett and McGinley looked inward, matching their organic talents (which include seductive vocal harmonies) with technology.

Padgett added keyboards and loops to the mix while McGinley began to display her virtuosity on the drums.

The traditional aspects of Stereofidelics remained to some degree, but percussive, off-the-wall sounds also found their way onto the set list.

"We wanted to keep the group small to make it easier to travel, and by keeping it small, it puts us in a unique situation," says Padgett, who along with McGinley will perform on Thursday at Farm 255. "Even though travel isn't cheap, we've been able to do it and get our music out there. We're steadily becoming more versatile, creating a bigger sound without sounding pretentious. We're energetic and we can produce quite a bit of sound."

Surrounded by several guitars, Padgett sits behind an electronic keyboard capable of providing looped melodies and a subtle bass backing while McGinley moves frequently from the front of the stage to behind a drum kit, often playing violin, drums and singing at the same time.

Padgett, an Indiana native, and McGinley, who hails from West Virginia, met at Indiana University in Bloomington when both were involved in other bands.

"At that time, I was playing in a bluegrass band and a jam band," recalls Padgett. "We met at the music school when one of my bands was doing a recording project. We bumped into each other and started talking, and before too long we were playing together. I was really excited by the possibilities and Melissa felt the same way, so we decided to start a band. Melissa is really an incredible musician - she's been playing the violin for 20 years and was a music performance major at Indiana."

On stage, Stereofidelics can summon the spirits of Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grappelli, but can delve into Zappa-inspired madness, arena-rock riff magic or Latin-tinged surprises at a moment's notice.

Padgett and McGinley take their "on the road" ethic seriously, having performed some 35 shows since their mid-April appearance at the Melting Point.

The duo has a coast-to-coast itinerary scheduled for the summer, which may make it difficult to complete work on its planned album, which Padgett says has an early September release date.

"We're only about 40 percent of the way done," he says, adding the band has already released two EPs, comprised primarily of live performances. "I was up until 4 this morning working on it. But we have deadlines and it will be out in early September. Other than borrowing somebody's bass guitar, this album is just us playing all the instruments. We wanted to represent what we do on stage but we also wanted to make it more of a listener experience more so than a live performance."

Stereofidelics made its Athens debut at Borders and has also played Tasty World and performed at the April Hoot (sponsored by the Athens Folk Music and Dance Society) at the Melting Point.

"We love Athens because it's a great music town and it's close to home," says Padgett. "We're excited to continue to develop an audience there. We've got some new stuff we're excited to play - hopefully people will get excited about us and enjoy what we do."

- Athens Banner-Herald


KALAMAZOO -- I just finished listening to ``Spanish Radio'' off Asheville, N.C., duo The StereoFidelics' debut album, ``Only Sleeping,'' and boy are my ears spent.

The track opens with Chris Padgett's acoustic guitar and Melissa McGinley's violin trying to one-up each other in an ultra-hyper flamenco-like showdown. As it advances, the song feels like a soundtrack of young lovers in the early days of a whirlwind romance -- there's intensity, passion and a little drama. It's a powerful sound to come from four hands.

Padgett said during a tour stop in Omaha, Neb., last week that ``Spanish Radio'' was inspired by the couple's month-long vacation backpacking and sightseeing in the Southwest shortly after they met more than two years ago.

``I was really inspired by the area and the culture,'' Padgett said. ``I had that taste in my mouth, really, when I was writing it.

``I think of it as an acoustic rock `n' roll song that happens to sound south of the border.''

The StereoFidelics, which will have a CD-release show at 9 p.m. today at The Corner Bar, 1030 E. Vine St., met in March 2005 at Indiana University. McGinley was studying classical violin, and Padgett was an environmental science and public affairs major. He played in a jam/funk/bluegrass group and was recording a song for a compilation of the best Bloomington bands when he crossed McGinley's path. Padgett said she had just left a contentious meeting with a professor. Somewhat unhappy with the program, McGinley was intrigued by the guitar, mandolin and banjo Padgett's band carted around. It didn't take long for Padgett and McGinley to spark a musical friendship, and later, a little more.

``We formed a bond with music. That took first fiddle,'' Padgett said. ``Everything else fell in place from there.''

They're not some cute couple playing cheese-ball songs and gazing into each other's eyes. Padgett said people tend to look at them as if they'll perform folk standards ``and then she'd step and shred on her violin.'' This is where The StereoFidelics shine -- live, Padgett said. In the past year, they've added more instruments to complement their influences of bluegrass, Latin, jazz and rock. Padgett has added keys and loops, and McGinley will play drums with her feet while playing the violin. Their interchangeable parts lead to improv on stage.

It also gives them the chance to expand their sound. They've been playing around with their song, ``That's Why,'' by adding a ``porno, funk element'' Padgett called ``a sign of things to come.''

``We're definitely trying to expand our horizons,'' he said.

FOR MORE:

www.thestereofidelics.com.

- Kalamazoo Gazette


Discography

- "Live From Binghamton" Rubberneck Records
released May 10, 2011

- "You Are Having A Wonderful Time" Rubberneck Records
released June 2010

- "Only Sleeping" Rubberneck Records
released December 2008

- Singles from "Only Sleeping"
Black Elephants
Me, You, and Everyone We Knew
released March 2008

- The EP
self-released 2007

Photos

Bio

Four instruments, two dynamic voices, and a record of relentless touring have earned virtuosic, funky indie rock duo the StereoFidelics their reputation as a superb, high-energy live act.

Imagine you’re back in time enjoying the groove and virtuosity of a 70’s art-rock band, then hurled decades forward, colliding with the energy and intensity of today’s indie rock scene. There’s unexpectedly powerful jazzy female vocals intertwined with a strong, satin-smooth male voice. Thumping synth basslines and popping, funky drumbeats drive the skillfully intricate guitar playing and explosions of electric violin string-shredding. Reflecting their influences of past and present (including Frank Zappa, Led Zeppelin, the Talking Heads, Arcade Fire, and the White Stripes), the StereoFidelics avoid performing with loops, computers, and digital effects in favor of the more organic approach of using Moog Taurus pedals, scat vocal solos, and multi-instrumentalism. You see, the fast-fingered guitar player (Chris Padgett) keeps the basslines pounding through a one-octave floor keyboard, the tiny female vocalist (Melissa McGinley) is also the drummer; he sings too, and she plays violin. They perform with a natural passion and synchronicity that not only dispels any association with the herky-jerky one-man-band cliché, but post-performance, leaves their audience sympathetically exhausted and dripping with sweat.

Known for booking their own tours, designing album covers, screen printing tour t-shirts, and even making some of their onstage clothing, the StereoFidelics are a do-all whirlwind of creative energy. Relentless touring of the US and calling their van home for much of the time (performing around 200 shows per year) has gained the StereoFidelics a dedicated following around the country. Their recent studio release, You Are Having a Wonderful Time, receives solid airplay from college and community radio stations coast-to-coast. The StereoFidelics have performed at clubs and festivals with Love Tractor, Future Man, Donna the Buffalo, Enter the Haggis, Rubblebucket,, That 1 Guy, and Jackyl among others.

---

"Talented duo keeps things surprising...Despite obvious similarities to The White Stripes, The Stereofidelics mine a more funky, soulful vein, with Padgett’s snaky guitar lines and array of effects in sharp contrast to Jack White’s garage tendencies. McGinley sings better than Meg, too, and there are plenty of other sounds rounding out the mix."
--popmatters.com, David Maine

"Ok, a hot girl drummer is a good start, and it turns out she sings with a sometimes jazzy/ sometimes bluesy style with power that belies her small frame. If that was the extent of the impression then I would probably still be scrambling quickly to find some other band to write about, but luckily there was more to be found. In addition, Padgett is a pretty quick guitar player with a nice smooth voice, which made for a great guy-girl vocal combo. As the first song went on, I listened closely and started grooving with the bass line…then I looked onstage and re-noticed the lack of a bass player…and looked down at Padgett’s feet, where all I could see were foot-like blurs. This guy is able to play some killer guitar, all the while his feet are tapping some funky bass licks on a set of organ pedals. As soon as I picked up my jaw from the floor, they were doing a musical segue between songs and our heavenly lady drummer had picked up her violin, which she played with a well-practiced skill, while holding the beat with her feet. At that point I had to go to the bar to grab some more fuel for my blown mind."
--yourpopfilter.com, Lynz Floren

"A white girl that sings with the powerful and seasoned voice of a black jazz-soul singer; a guy who plays electric guitar and a foot-operated synth bass as an extension of his own body; a passionate young woman; a young man who shows his soul when he sings rock, blues and funk with eyes shut and a girl who plays drums with rocker raw power or jazz finesse depending on the mood of the tune.
This might sound like a five-member band just doing their job, but surprisingly only two people are capable of creating this unique and complex sound. Their names are Melissa McGinley and Chris Padgett. Their band is called TheStereofidelics, they are from Asheville, N.C., and the people who saw their show last Saturday were completely overwhelmed by their virtuosity."
--Daily Nebraskan, Gabriel Medina-Arenas

"Although the music created by the Asheville, N.C., band the StereoFidelics is impressive in and of itself—with a retro-rock vibe, tight rhythms and sinuous vocals—more impressive is the fact that this sound is created by just two people. Performing on seven instruments between the two of them, Chris Padgett and Melissa McGinley create the rich sound of at least a five-piece band."
--Flagstaff LIVE, Hot Picks

"...this indie retro-rock duet has only improved since their first great release, On