The Vespers
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The Vespers

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | INDIE

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | INDIE
Band Americana Folk

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"The Fourth Wall chosen by AOL as one of the Best Americana Albums of 2012 (so far)"

Two brothers and two sisters have created the sweetest -- and most haunting -- record of the year thus far. A spiritual odyssey that's refreshingly organic and strikingly beautiful at every turn, there are also some lighthearted tunes that prove the most memorable. The best of those, the reggae-tinged "Flower Flower" and the bouncy "Jolly Robber," are delightful earworms of the highest order, making the Vespers the band to watch. - AOL


"The Vespers On Their New Album, Joining Forces With Siblings & More"

Good things can happen when two pairs of musical siblings join forces. For Callie and Phoebe Cryar and Bruno and Taylor Jones, a great thing happened: The Vespers. Soon after the band’s formation, the young musicians took to the road where they started to develop their sound and live show through trial and error, all in front of an audience. Read on to learn about how their new album “The Fourth Wall” came together, the role that faith plays in their music, and where they’re headed. And catch them on tour now if you can!

Without using any “conventional” genre words, describe your sound.
(Bruno) We’ve started calling it “Indiecana” here and there, but the coolest I’ve heard would probably be “Appalachian Rock.”

Congrats on your new album, The Fourth Wall, that just hit stores this month! How did this album come together?
(Bruno) Well, the band had enough songs written (most of which we were already playing in our live shows in 2011) to throw another album together. So we went for it. We worked with two extremely talented friends of ours, Anderson East and Daniel Scobey, in a 6-man tag team co-production effort. We tracked the first half in May 2011, went on tour a bunch, then recorded the other half in August of 2011 during some time off from touring in Nashville. The guys also mixed the record, and it was ready to be pressed by Christmas!

What kind of marketing/promotion did you do leading up to the release?
(Bruno) We crowd sourced (Kickstarter) a little budget to put towards the marketing and promotional side, and essentially built a team of folks to “work” the record. Two publicists and a radio promoter were brought in, and we teamed up with an Indy distro/sales company. We released two music videos, a mini documentary on our band, and some other performance videos prior to the release. We encouraged our fans to spread the word online and repost/share content about our band, among other DIY (aka Low Budget) strategies.

Has your sound evolved since your first album?
(Callie) It has. The banjo has become a lead instrument on this record, whereas the first record was almost banjo-less. Taylor, our drummer, plays a lot of mandolin in the group now. My sister’s and my vocal performances have gotten more moody. More soulful/powerful here, more sad/mournful there, and at times more joyful and fearless. The songwriting feels more mature and vulnerable as well, and we’ve all gotten a little more capable on our instruments—lots of growth. I would say this record is more intimate than our first record, a musical representation of where our personalities are at this point in our lives.


The family element of your band is really unique. How does this affect the dynamic of the band?
(Bruno) Ha. It makes things really convenient actually. With one text message we can relay word to everyone fairly easily. As far as the sound goes, my brother and I have been playing together for about 7 years now and the girls have been singing together since they were children. It’s like we combined their chemistry with our chemistry (which were, and still are, complete opposites of each other) to create a new chemistry. My brother and I are very alike and it’s the same for the girls. When we’re on stage each one of us can tell where our sibling is going next. It’s pretty gnarly.

Did you face any challenges when the two pairs of siblings joined forces?
(Callie) Yes there were some. I guess you could say their were big differences in our lifestyles that we had to weave through. My sister and I were brought up waaay differently than Taylor and Bruno. We were homeschooled and perfectionists, and they were a little more coarse and unceremonious. We had to learn to not judge each other. Long story short, we were all young and very green, but looking back now we see we were put together for a reason. We learned a lot from them, they learned a lot from us. It broadened our different ways of thinking, musically and in our individual liv - Tunecore


"Much more press found here"

Google "The Vespers" - Google


"Album Review: The Vespers - "The Fourth Wall" (Black Suit)"

Do not, I repeat, DO NOT judge a book by its cover. The fresh-faced young musicians who comprise the Nashville band known as The Vespers play and sing way beyond their years. There is, however, an experienced professional element present here, as lead singers (and sisters) Callie and Phoebe Cryar (21 and 19 respectively), cut their musical teeth singing background vocals on Music Row.

The Cryar sisters' vocals are as hair-raisingly sibling-close as the Louvin Brothers, the Avett Brothers, and the Secret Sisters (Laura and Lydia Rogers), but it wasn't until they met brothers Bruno and Taylor Jones at a campfire jam that The Vespers became fully formed.

“We all grew up listening to a little bit of everything, but roots music didn't come in until more recently,” says Bruno. “Folk and roots music tend to draw from spiritual themes. We don’t run away from our faith when writing, because that's where our hearts are planted.” On “Lawdy,” the song starts out sounding like a swampy old mountain tune before growing into a full-bodied Sunday morning spiritual. “We were originally playing it really fast with drums,” says Callie, “but we slowed it down to be more bluesy. I wanted to hear that sound of Johnny Cash’s “God’s Gonna Cut You Down.'”

The album's title references the invisible wall between performers and audiences, mirroring the band's experience on the road as they honed their collective songwriting chops before live audiences. “Our music reflects that," says Callie. "We decided to go on tour shortly after we joined forces and we really learned what our band was all about while playing to the people at our early shows. It shaped us and that’s how we really became ‘The Vespers.’ It's all about connecting with people and breaking down that invisible wall."

The Vespers make no attempt to hide their Christian faith, but it is certainly not an in-your-face attitude. The opener, "Better Now," is a modern take on the New Testament parable of the blind man made to see by Jesus, a miracle no one believes. A stronger metaphor for faith there never was.


"Got No Friends" is an infectious and wholly original song about the path to salvation. In the hands of The Vespers, the path flows from the mailbox to the sidewalk to the arms of Jesus himself. It is a gorgeous tribute to faith and God (and faith in God). Jesus is well represented on this album. There is also a valiant attempt at a Son House cover, "Grinnin' In Your Face" that puts a new face on the old blues classic.

The miracle of The Vespers is their ability to meld youthful energy with a spiritual background that can be traced to gospel tunes of The Carter Family. In fact, they have as much in common with that famous family as they do with the Louvin Brothers, as well as contemporaries like the Avett Brothers and Mumford & Sons -- the Vespers are just that good.

The only dud on the album is the importunate "Footprints In The Snow," a number that, at its genesis, begins as a pulsating and insistent instrumental, but steadily descends into pop music territory with a repetitiveness that eventually becomes tiresome.

An absolute gem, however, is Callie Cryar's "Winter," an emotionally wrought portrait of obsessive love and a heartbreakingly beautifully ode that tells the tale of a passenger on a train who is haunted by a lost lover's icy grip which she is desperate to escape.

On the whole, The Fourth Wall features the glistening vocals and expert instrumentals of a very mature band. The sound is clear and precise without sounding too highly produced.

I highly recommend you check out The Fourth Wall. If you're up for a live show, the band is currently on an extensive North American tour.
- No Depression - The Roots Music Authority


"The Vespers Are on the Verge of Breaking Through The Fourth Wall"

A pair of sisters met a pair of brothers and became four of a promising kind. Known as The Vespers, this grounded group of homegrown musicians have Nashville in their blood but down-to-earthier ideals in their souls.

Blessed with humble spirits, and songs with such emotional depth and intricate harmonies, it makes you wonder how they can be so under the radar. This sister/brother act doesn't even have a manager -- or a Wikipedia page.

That's all about to change. With the release of their superb second album, The Fourth Wall, on April 3, the Vespers -- Callie and Phoebe Cryar, Taylor and Bruno Jones -- better get ready to lead a life less normal. As long as they're ready and willing, it's hard to fathom a better collection of unsigned, indie artists in the 19-22 age bracket capable of breaking through that wall.

Neither totally shy nor gregarious, the Cryar sisters are confident and outspoken enough to know what they want in their music, yet still open to outside ideas. Before a video shoot in their hometown last week, they graciously shared thoughts about the origin of the Vespers, The Fourth Wall, their Nashville upbringing and what they want out of all this.

Sister act

"Callie and I have been singing together for so long, it's more of a natural thing," said Phoebe, who proudly calls her older sister "a vocal powerhouse." Callie's bluesy delivery on Son House's "Grinnin In Your Face," the lone cover on the album, is proof positive of that.

The Cryar twosome (Callie, far right, and Phoebe in the "Flower Flower" video) share so many pretty physical traits that many have mistaken them for twins. While splitting lead vocals and playing a number of instruments (Callie: guitar, ukulele, banjo and electric bass; Phoebe: mostly banjo and guitar, some ukulele and an occasional mandolin and accordion), they admittedly remain competitive with each other (Phoebe: "Very"; Callie: "Extremely."). But their contrasting personalities are soon detectable, with Phoebe-speak coming quickly and quietly while a candid Callie pauses more often but is always "telling it like it is," her younger sibling reveals.

"We're definitely sisters, so we have our little spats here and there," Phoebe added. "But at the same time we understand each other very well."

While mostly in agreement during this almost hourlong conversation, the Cryars did have a difference of opinion about their songwriting abilities:

Phoebe: "I usually lean towards melodies, and her lyrics, she usually puts a lot more thought into hers and they're usually very powerful and they can stand on their own. But my lyrics are a lot more simple, I think. And I usually lean on the music more."

Callie: "I've got to correct you there."

Phoebe (expressing mock outrage): "What!"

Callie: "I think the reason I put more thought into my lyrics is because it's more of a struggle for me to just naturally come up with good lyrics. ... I don't like writing a song unless I'm proud of the lyrics and so it takes me longer and takes me studying harder to make lyrics that I like. Maybe that's why it seems like I'm better at lyrics, but I'm not. I just have to put more time into it to get a good grade, basically."

While Phoebe's higher-range vocals may be more delicate and her words less complex, her songs can be just as affecting -- and effective.

And when I do you wrong
Sin pushes me away
It always takes so long
For me to stop askin

Phoebe's touching performance of "Will You Love Me," that swells to a stunning conclusion as the two repeatedly sing those four little words in harmony while turning a question into a plea, is one of the album's highlights, taking what could be an ordinary love song to deeper, spiritual heights.

"In reality, it's kind of written for my relationship with Christ," Phoebe said. "I'm always finding myself worrying that I don't ever measure up and I can't attain to God's perfection. And it's hard for me to just even talk to God becau - The Huffington Post


"Chemistry"

So THAT’s what the buzz is about. I’d seen the Civil Wars on YouTube and enjoyed their album, and it all sounded really good. But it was hard to glean what exactly had shot them on the rocket ride they’re enjoying. There’s abundant great rootsy singing and songwriting out there in Americana, and it so often seems like the good stuff reaches the converted but has a hard time cracking music’s glass ceiling. But the Civil Wars are gonna be on the Tonight Show this week after just two or three years together. Fans swarmed to the Barn to see them. They left a Ryman audience rapturous not long ago. And now, having seem them live, I know why. Chemistry. Pure, unadulterated communication and empathy. Joy Williams and John Paul White gaze at each other and take incredibly subtle cues from each other. They aren’t a couple, but people project a bit of wishful thinking about that on them, and that’s okay. It’s just wildly compelling - and yes, romantic - to see two superb singers in dialogue, projecting energy and commitment through elegantly woven lines, bold, rushing dynamics and exciting phrasing.

And this was just one act of five! The Barn last night was all about chemistry, from Jonathan Edwards’s intimate rapport with the audience to the barn-burning Cherryholmes finale. It was packed and happy, substantive and fun. Just the way we like it.

It was a great treat to meet Jonathan Edwards, who looked so fit and lean and young that it was hard to believe he was a major musical figure from the late 60s. With his brush cut hair and bare feet, he looked like a bit of a musical shaman. And from the first notes of his career-making hit “Sunshine,” he imparted good, healing energy. He’s been persuading audiences to engage with him for a long time, so no surprise he went over great, but we see a lot of solo performers and few who seem so confident and aware of their listeners. Oh yeah, he also has a wonderful, visceral voice, and it sounded great on material new and old, especially his set-closing stoner classic “Shanty.”

The Vespers followed, and it’s been really exciting to watch them develop their music and presence. We’ve enjoyed them every time they’ve come by, but last night was the first time I thought, “Whoa, baby. Bonnaroo.” The twinned voices of Callie and Phoebe were charming and persuasive as always, really shining on the reggae-inflected song “Flower Flower,” which got the kids dancing up front. But it was “Close My Eyes” that shook me up. The song built to a dizzying climax, made full with electric bass and drums. It rocked but remained rooted. The Barn erupted. Standing O. Much bigger stages await.

David Vandervelde proved to be quite the rocker too. But a decidedly melodic one with great skills on the guitar. Woozy electric lap steel really lit up his anthem to “Beer,” and of course I heartily endorsed the message of the song. The Civil Wars I told you about, though I might also note the effectiveness of their stark stage presence, she in a black dress, he in a tux-like ensemble. It doesn’t hurt that he looks a bit like Johnny Depp and she a bit like Liv Tyler, but hey, the music is more than all there and one can’t put a price on “compelling.”

Finally, that brought us to our historic finale. The surprising, enthralling family band Cherryholmes is calling it quits after about 12 years and millions of miles. They sure made their mark, and it was awesome to have Ricky Skaggs make a surprise appearance on stage to thank them for their time on his record label and present a plaque with their Billboard bluegrass chart history. They played a nice long set, featuring their intense brand of bluegrass. I sure love their twin fiddle instrumental “Tallahassee” and I may have to refer back to our Livestream archive from time to time to get my fix of that tune. They also of course anchored our Loveless Jam, which featured the bluegrass version of “Sitting On Top of the World.” I think that’s how everybody felt, so why not sing it?

Craig H
- Criag Havigurst, String Theory Media


"Fresh and Infectious"

"The Vespers are fresh and infectious. The sisters ethereal look and sound is grounded by the brothers tight and creative rythym section. I've seen them mesmerize audiences live several times and look forward to having them back. "
- Todd Mayo - Music City Roots


"Fresh and Infectious"

"The Vespers are fresh and infectious. The sisters ethereal look and sound is grounded by the brothers tight and creative rythym section. I've seen them mesmerize audiences live several times and look forward to having them back. "
- Todd Mayo - Music City Roots


"There's Hope for Nashville Yet"

"I was just about knocked off my stool by the vocals of the Cryar sisters. "Born and raised in Nashville." I really couldn't believe it. I was tickled at the irony of a true Nashville band not being a true Nashville band. If you like Nickel Creek, The Wailin Jennys, The Be Good Tanyas, Black Prairie, or The Duhks, you should enjoy the Vespers." - Angie Santiago - No Depression


"Avett Bros in NC - The Vespers in Nashville"

"North Carolina has the Avett Brothers, Texas has Cadillac Sky, Boston has Crooked Still & we are lucky here in Nashville to have The Vespers."
- Brad Fields - Music City Interactive


"Honey Sweet Sound"

"Their ghostly harmonies and haunting lyrics are magnificently unforgettable. Their honey-sweet sound is reminiscent of hearing the words “I love you” for the first time. "
- The Thump


"New band alert: The Vespers are recording their first album"

I have got great news for all you acoustic folk lovers and the origin of these news is located in Nashville, Tennessee. There you find a young band called The Vespers consisting of Callie Cryar, Phoebe Cryar, Bruno Jones and Taylor Jones. And as far as I can tell their music will hit the scene with great impact.

By now they are recording their first full-length album which will be released at the beginning of 2010 and if you listen to the tracks included in this post, I’m sure you’ll be as facinated as I am. Their sound is somehow unique and classical at once. The beautiful and bleary piano in “No,” He Said is just one aspect of the music they play. Listen to Eyes Wide Open and you’ll hear a first class acoustic guitar driven folk song telling a sad and personal story about grandfather’s last words.

The symbiosis of Callie’s and Phoebe’s voices with the rest of the instrumentation sounds heavently and a feeling will creep over you that two angels are singing and whispering their tales right into your ears. The themes of their voices vary widely wherefore they cover a large spectrum of different timbres – and this makes the music rich and colorful.

If you want to hear more of this amazing music visit The Vespers’ MySpace page and enjoy six more songs. 2010 will be a good year, be prepared.

- Common Folk Meadow


"We're Not Kidding: A Tribute to Barry Louis Polisar"

The first thing I did was compare the different versions of "All I Want Is You," the song from Juno above (and, yes, Polisar's use of the title predates U2 by quite a while). The Vespers start out the entire album with an amazing rendition, possibly if I dare say it better than Polisar's own: the twangyness and harmonica which give the original much of its flavor is gone in favor of discrete harmonies between the female singers, lending it an air of Alison Krauss singing "Down to the River to Pray" on that other Grammy-winning soundtrack from O Brother, Where Art Thou?. (I was intrigued enough by this number to quickly go to the second disc to hear them sing the more up-tempo "Barnyard Stomp," and they carried that off equally well. - Red Balloon


"The Vespers - Eyes Wide Open"

...they are sure to garner tons of national attention if they deliver the goods. - Call It Folk


"Music City Roots - Olympians"

I think I may be saying this band’s serene name with reverence before long. These guys are great. Their CD debut arrives in two weeks, and they’re inviting EVERYBODY to their release party at the wonderful and large Belcourt Theater on March 11 at 8 pm. I feel a strong need to be there, because I will get to hear “Not So Nice” again, with its bewitching ukulele and the sibling harmonies of the Cryar sisters. This quartet, a duo of sibling duos actually, is kicking out songs that are catchy but not predictable, and they’ve got a cool sense of structure. “Pick A Fight” somehow morphed from a droning modal awesome thing into an a cappella gospel clap-along. They finished with their title cut: “Tell Your Mama,” and they’re entering big time tell everyone mode. We wish them luck and want them back.
- Craig Havighurst with WSM Radio


"Music City Roots - Olympians"

I think I may be saying this band’s serene name with reverence before long. These guys are great. Their CD debut arrives in two weeks, and they’re inviting EVERYBODY to their release party at the wonderful and large Belcourt Theater on March 11 at 8 pm. I feel a strong need to be there, because I will get to hear “Not So Nice” again, with its bewitching ukulele and the sibling harmonies of the Cryar sisters. This quartet, a duo of sibling duos actually, is kicking out songs that are catchy but not predictable, and they’ve got a cool sense of structure. “Pick A Fight” somehow morphed from a droning modal awesome thing into an a cappella gospel clap-along. They finished with their title cut: “Tell Your Mama,” and they’re entering big time tell everyone mode. We wish them luck and want them back.
- Craig Havighurst with WSM Radio


"News + Review! The Vespers – Tell Your Mama. Recording is finished, listen to the first three singles here!"

It’s done, dear CFM readers. The Vespers (we talked about them earlier very enthusiastically) finished recording their debut record Tell Your Mama and have sent out the CDs for pressing. Along with this they aired the first three singles which you can find in this very post. I was really, really curious and eager to finally hear and spread the news about it, because the early recordings, just featuring the female side of the band, were just great and I said beforehand, that the debut record will have good changes to be one of the best folk records of 2010 – I know, maybe it was a bit early to say so judging from only a hand full demos, but I think I had a very good feeling with this guess.

I can’t tell you for sure, but listening to the three songs available, this is certainly a big fish The Vespers landed. Not So Nice, the opener of the album, was really great in the past, as it still was work in progress so to say, and now, as a full song, is still great, but in a more complex way. The first things you’ll notice listening will be the presence of a rhythm section with Bruno Jones on upright bass and Taylor Jones on drums. Both really provide some dynamics to the songs and the former folksy only atmosphere is now replaced by a slightly more folk pop orientated one. I won’t adjudicate if this is better or worse, this too much depends on personal taste. I for myself like the “old” Vespers (old…really??…come on, they just released their debut!, there isn’t quite an old sound. I know…) and I certainly like the “new” ones.

But back to Not So Nice. I said it still sounds great and this is what it does. It got a really nice nu-folk kick to it (I assure you, I myself really don’t know what nu-folk means) and is, though calm, forward driven especially because the drums and the bass really deliver a good drive to it. This forwardness is also the reason I call the sound more folk pop than just folk. The voices and the guitars and ukes are very pretty cool too, especially the angel-like harmony between Callie and Phoebe – man do I love this interaction of voices. Really good opener, clearly showing the enormous potential of the band.

Next track in line is the title track of the album, Tell Your Mama, and the character is different from the first track, more reflected and more serious – in a musically way. The vocal parts are more traditional and even more pop orientated. This isn’t meant in a negative way, but the whole structure of the song points that way. I think the fact that they’ve chosen this one as the title track shows, that the combination of folk and pop is intended and should give a first picture of what the complete album will sound like. Me, again, likes it very much.

Last single from the upcoming album, which, by the way, will hit the road March 11th and you really should pre-order that CD right now…yes…and back to the last single, Cottonfield. Fans of the early Iron & Wine will certainly discover some serious similarities to his overwhelming The Creek Drank The Cradle – and this sure is a very good sign! Cottonfield comes without drums and is a reminiscence to the demos I spoke of above – a gentle heart-warming folk song featuring only acoustic guitars and the voices of Phoebe and Callie.
And so these three singles really give a wonderful overview on the musical range of this record. From nu-folk(?) to folk pop and straight ahead to old school acoustic folk with only vocals and guitars – great selection, great music, what else to say?

As much as I would have loved it to say nothing negative about the tracks, one thing, for truth’s sake, must be mentioned. As much as I love the songwriting, the voices and even the integration of the rhythm section (I was a bit skeptical about it in the past), I don’t think the mastering of the record is the really best. I listened to all the tracks on two different (good) stereos and two times I really felt that there was too much bass on the bass drum. Doesn’t seems to be a big deal, and maybe it isn’t, but it doesn’t support the gentleness those lovely tracks inherit. But maybe this is just the modern sound of folk music one of the self-declared busiest music nerds of the internet, Anthony Fan-Fan-Fantano from the fantastic The Needle Drop, spoke about in his very good review for Midlake’s The Courage Of Others (for their sound is much too old school, he says – and by the way I don’t share this opinion). So, maybe it’s just me and I’m not quite prepared for the new sound of folk…but honestly, check out on your own.

Sooooooo, I hope you like the music and all of you instantly head over to The Vespers MySpace and pre-order a copy of their soon to be released debut record Tell Your Mama…because if you won’t, I will find out and I will—

p.s. some words about the full release follow as soon as I got hold of it!
- Common Folk Meadow


"News + Review! The Vespers – Tell Your Mama. Recording is finished, listen to the first three singles here!"

It’s done, dear CFM readers. The Vespers (we talked about them earlier very enthusiastically) finished recording their debut record Tell Your Mama and have sent out the CDs for pressing. Along with this they aired the first three singles which you can find in this very post. I was really, really curious and eager to finally hear and spread the news about it, because the early recordings, just featuring the female side of the band, were just great and I said beforehand, that the debut record will have good changes to be one of the best folk records of 2010 – I know, maybe it was a bit early to say so judging from only a hand full demos, but I think I had a very good feeling with this guess.

I can’t tell you for sure, but listening to the three songs available, this is certainly a big fish The Vespers landed. Not So Nice, the opener of the album, was really great in the past, as it still was work in progress so to say, and now, as a full song, is still great, but in a more complex way. The first things you’ll notice listening will be the presence of a rhythm section with Bruno Jones on upright bass and Taylor Jones on drums. Both really provide some dynamics to the songs and the former folksy only atmosphere is now replaced by a slightly more folk pop orientated one. I won’t adjudicate if this is better or worse, this too much depends on personal taste. I for myself like the “old” Vespers (old…really??…come on, they just released their debut!, there isn’t quite an old sound. I know…) and I certainly like the “new” ones.

But back to Not So Nice. I said it still sounds great and this is what it does. It got a really nice nu-folk kick to it (I assure you, I myself really don’t know what nu-folk means) and is, though calm, forward driven especially because the drums and the bass really deliver a good drive to it. This forwardness is also the reason I call the sound more folk pop than just folk. The voices and the guitars and ukes are very pretty cool too, especially the angel-like harmony between Callie and Phoebe – man do I love this interaction of voices. Really good opener, clearly showing the enormous potential of the band.

Next track in line is the title track of the album, Tell Your Mama, and the character is different from the first track, more reflected and more serious – in a musically way. The vocal parts are more traditional and even more pop orientated. This isn’t meant in a negative way, but the whole structure of the song points that way. I think the fact that they’ve chosen this one as the title track shows, that the combination of folk and pop is intended and should give a first picture of what the complete album will sound like. Me, again, likes it very much.

Last single from the upcoming album, which, by the way, will hit the road March 11th and you really should pre-order that CD right now…yes…and back to the last single, Cottonfield. Fans of the early Iron & Wine will certainly discover some serious similarities to his overwhelming The Creek Drank The Cradle – and this sure is a very good sign! Cottonfield comes without drums and is a reminiscence to the demos I spoke of above – a gentle heart-warming folk song featuring only acoustic guitars and the voices of Phoebe and Callie.
And so these three singles really give a wonderful overview on the musical range of this record. From nu-folk(?) to folk pop and straight ahead to old school acoustic folk with only vocals and guitars – great selection, great music, what else to say?

As much as I would have loved it to say nothing negative about the tracks, one thing, for truth’s sake, must be mentioned. As much as I love the songwriting, the voices and even the integration of the rhythm section (I was a bit skeptical about it in the past), I don’t think the mastering of the record is the really best. I listened to all the tracks on two different (good) stereos and two times I really felt that there was too much bass on the bass drum. Doesn’t seems to be a big deal, and maybe it isn’t, but it doesn’t support the gentleness those lovely tracks inherit. But maybe this is just the modern sound of folk music one of the self-declared busiest music nerds of the internet, Anthony Fan-Fan-Fantano from the fantastic The Needle Drop, spoke about in his very good review for Midlake’s The Courage Of Others (for their sound is much too old school, he says – and by the way I don’t share this opinion). So, maybe it’s just me and I’m not quite prepared for the new sound of folk…but honestly, check out on your own.

Sooooooo, I hope you like the music and all of you instantly head over to The Vespers MySpace and pre-order a copy of their soon to be released debut record Tell Your Mama…because if you won’t, I will find out and I will—

p.s. some words about the full release follow as soon as I got hold of it!
- Common Folk Meadow


Discography

"The Fourth Wall" - April 2012
"Tell Your Mama" - March 2010

Photos

Bio

The Vespers are one of those young bands that have built an extensive underground following simply through word of mouth and heavy touring. The band is uniquely made up of two sibling duos; the Cryar sisters, and the Jones brothers. The four have distinguished their sound with an arsenal of acoustic instruments and harmonies only siblings can create. Their showmanship generates a roller coaster of sight, sound, and emotion and their inherent chemistry and instrumental versatility continues to set them apart.

The band has independently released two full-length records and left a reputable impression on both Americana and Christian audiences. They have toured all over the United States in their short 3 years, playing all different environments from colleges and festivals to listening rooms and theaters.

SiriusXM’s Top 10 New Folk Albums of 2012

Huffington Post’s Best Concerts of The Year (which included Wilco, The Civil Wars, and Jack White)

“The Vespers are on the verge of breaking through The Fourth Wall. The Vespers better get ready to lead a life less normal.”
- Huffington Post

“The miracle of The Vespers is their ability to meld youthful energy with a spiritual background that can be traced to gospel tunes of The Carter Family. In fact, they have as much in common with that famous family as they do with the Louvin Brothers, as well as contemporaries like the Avett Brothers and Mumford & Sons — the Vespers are just that good.”
- Awaiting The Flood

“they can — and do — appeal almost as much to a bunch of good old boys out in a bluegrass-festival cow pasture as to a hip urban audience.”
- Nashville Scene, Jon Weisberger

“If you enjoy The Decemberists, The Be Good Tanyas, Iron and Wine, Avett Brothers, Mumford & Sons…your dreams just came true.”
- Brite Revolution

“North Carolina has the Avett Brothers, Texas has Cadillac Sky, Boston has Crooked Still & we are lucky here in Nashville to have the Vespers.” – Music City Interactive

“I was just about knocked off my stool by the vocals of the Cryar sisters. The Vespers are refreshing, have impeccable musicianship, and the vocals are enchanting. ” – No Depression

“The Vespers are fresh and infectious. The sisters ethereal look and sound is grounded by the brothers tight and creative rythym section. I’ve seen them mesmerize audiences live several times and look forward to having them back.” – Todd Mayo, Music City Roots