The Zach Heath
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The Zach Heath

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"The Zach Heath impresses music fans of all genres"

Issue date: 1/30/08

"I don't care if 85 percent of the people here don't really 'hear' us," brooded Django Greenblatt Seay, frontman for the Omaha band, The Zach Heath, as he picked at his chicken finger basket provided courtesy of Maya Jane's bar.

"As long as we like (our music), it's awesome."

The band played to a crowded room at Maya Jane's Jan. 18.

Apparently, the view from the stage was a lot different than the view from the floor.

"These guys are really good," said Brandon Bjerrum, a Vermillion resident in attendance of the show.

"I normally listen to punk or country, but I'm actually digging this."

Bjerrum's opinion on the band seemed to be shared by the rest of the crowd, who were more than responsive to The Zach Heath's acoustic onslaught.

The band was in town for the most fleeting of moments on their way to play the Safari Lounge in Brookings, rounding out their South Dakota experience.

The Zach Heath, formerly The Zach Heath Band, came together through a friendship between Seay and drummer Zach Heath, who generously lent his name to the collective group of musicians.

"Django called me up when I first moved to Omaha," Heath said, "and he was like, 'we should start up a band again.'"

The two had played in a band previously while both living in the Norfolk area.

"I said, 'Sure, man, but I'm the frontman.' He didn't like that idea, but he compromised with our name," Heath joked.

No matter what they called themselves, the duo was onto something.

Seay's frantic lyrical style and guitar abilities, when coupled with Heath's precise drumming (including the use of a double-bass pedal on a suitcase - that's right, a suitcase), created a sound reminiscent of early Modest Mouse-meets-Bright Eyes acoustic fury.

The band decided to record some of what they had written, and entered Omaha's Bassline Studio (owned by Tim Kasher, frontman for Cursive and the Good Life) last summer to record their debut EP, "It's the Quits."

To plug some proverbial holes, the Zach Heath recruited friends and family to fill in on bass, harmonica and viola to round out the record.

Lyrically, "It's the Quits" mostly focuses on a problematic relationship that Seay carried on primarily through e-mail while working at his job. The result is a very well put-together package of songs featuring mature songwriting and acoustic prowess.

However, the two friends realized that what they had, albeit promising, wasn't enough to create the live sound that they were looking for.

Only two months ago, The Zach Heath welcomed bass player Brent Peekerschneider, also known as PB Jams, into the mix. To properly initiate PB, Seay took him on a "great western adventure," sans the namesake drummer (strangely enough), including playing gigs in Las Vegas, Albuquerque and Loma Linda, Calif.

Upon their return, The Zach Heath added yet another element to their ever-developing sound.

Keyboard player Stephani Hanson joined the group just three weeks ago, and the Maya Jane's show was one of her first as part of the lineup.

Despite all the recent personnel changes, The Zach Heath were a force to be reckoned with that night, tearing through an all too brief setlist that highlighted songs from their EP, and also from their planned full-length album, which will most likely be recorded this year.

Material from "It's the Quits" can be heard on the band's MySpace page, and the band also promises to send fans a copy of the CD (donations are welcomed, but not necessary).

"I'll send a CD to anyone who takes the time to ask," Seay said, pouring more ketchup onto his fries. "That suitcase is full of them."

Check out Myspace.com/thezachheath to learn more about the band. - The Volante (USD college paper)


"The Zach Heath impresses music fans of all genres"

Issue date: 1/30/08

"I don't care if 85 percent of the people here don't really 'hear' us," brooded Django Greenblatt Seay, frontman for the Omaha band, The Zach Heath, as he picked at his chicken finger basket provided courtesy of Maya Jane's bar.

"As long as we like (our music), it's awesome."

The band played to a crowded room at Maya Jane's Jan. 18.

Apparently, the view from the stage was a lot different than the view from the floor.

"These guys are really good," said Brandon Bjerrum, a Vermillion resident in attendance of the show.

"I normally listen to punk or country, but I'm actually digging this."

Bjerrum's opinion on the band seemed to be shared by the rest of the crowd, who were more than responsive to The Zach Heath's acoustic onslaught.

The band was in town for the most fleeting of moments on their way to play the Safari Lounge in Brookings, rounding out their South Dakota experience.

The Zach Heath, formerly The Zach Heath Band, came together through a friendship between Seay and drummer Zach Heath, who generously lent his name to the collective group of musicians.

"Django called me up when I first moved to Omaha," Heath said, "and he was like, 'we should start up a band again.'"

The two had played in a band previously while both living in the Norfolk area.

"I said, 'Sure, man, but I'm the frontman.' He didn't like that idea, but he compromised with our name," Heath joked.

No matter what they called themselves, the duo was onto something.

Seay's frantic lyrical style and guitar abilities, when coupled with Heath's precise drumming (including the use of a double-bass pedal on a suitcase - that's right, a suitcase), created a sound reminiscent of early Modest Mouse-meets-Bright Eyes acoustic fury.

The band decided to record some of what they had written, and entered Omaha's Bassline Studio (owned by Tim Kasher, frontman for Cursive and the Good Life) last summer to record their debut EP, "It's the Quits."

To plug some proverbial holes, the Zach Heath recruited friends and family to fill in on bass, harmonica and viola to round out the record.

Lyrically, "It's the Quits" mostly focuses on a problematic relationship that Seay carried on primarily through e-mail while working at his job. The result is a very well put-together package of songs featuring mature songwriting and acoustic prowess.

However, the two friends realized that what they had, albeit promising, wasn't enough to create the live sound that they were looking for.

Only two months ago, The Zach Heath welcomed bass player Brent Peekerschneider, also known as PB Jams, into the mix. To properly initiate PB, Seay took him on a "great western adventure," sans the namesake drummer (strangely enough), including playing gigs in Las Vegas, Albuquerque and Loma Linda, Calif.

Upon their return, The Zach Heath added yet another element to their ever-developing sound.

Keyboard player Stephani Hanson joined the group just three weeks ago, and the Maya Jane's show was one of her first as part of the lineup.

Despite all the recent personnel changes, The Zach Heath were a force to be reckoned with that night, tearing through an all too brief setlist that highlighted songs from their EP, and also from their planned full-length album, which will most likely be recorded this year.

Material from "It's the Quits" can be heard on the band's MySpace page, and the band also promises to send fans a copy of the CD (donations are welcomed, but not necessary).

"I'll send a CD to anyone who takes the time to ask," Seay said, pouring more ketchup onto his fries. "That suitcase is full of them."

Check out Myspace.com/thezachheath to learn more about the band. - The Volante (USD college paper)


"Forever Is For Good"

By Jeremy Buckley
12.6.07

When Django Greenblatt-Seay was a child, his parents would take him and his brother along for studio sessions of their folk band the Whole Wheat Quintet.

Greenblatt-Seay recalled those early studio experiences as he recorded The Zach Heath's debut EP, It's the Quits.

"It helped me understand what being in the studio was like," Greenblatt-Seay said by phone while organizing press kits. "It made it more comfortable for me to be in the studio with a larger group of people."

Greenblatt-Seay's parents, Deborah Greenblatt (viola) and David Seay (harmonica), along with Whole Wheat bassist Jon Bleicher, joined the acoustic/indie/folk band at Bassline Studio this summer. Deborah Greenblatt played with the Omaha Symphony in the late-'70s. The couple run Greenblatt & Seay Publications, a recording/publishing business, in Avoca, Neb.

"They were very laid-back during the whole process for It's the Quits," Greenblatt-Seay said of his parents. "They basically just said 'tell me what to do and I'll do it,' and that they did."

Greenblatt-Seay plays guitar and sings with Zach Heath on the drums. Bassist Brent Peekenschneider and keyboardist Stephani Hanson joined the band after the recording.

As evident by the album's name, the concept is pretty straightforward: Boy meets girl; boy dates girl; girl breaks boy's heart.

Greenblatt-Seay said his parents, who home-schooled him until high school, are the happiest married couple he knows.

"Sure, it would be nice to have something as special as what my parents share. But if I did, I wouldn't have much to write about," he said.

For coming from such a frustrating place, the songs are surprisingly upbeat.

Greenblatt-Seay said recording the album helped him make peace with a failed relationship, and it doesn't look like it took him long. The six songs on the EP clock in at about 15 minutes.

As Greenblatt-Seay croons in "Forever is For Good": "This is not about you. This is not about anybody. This is about getting better and I'm about to be through." - The Reader (Omaha)


"Forever Is For Good"

By Jeremy Buckley
12.6.07

When Django Greenblatt-Seay was a child, his parents would take him and his brother along for studio sessions of their folk band the Whole Wheat Quintet.

Greenblatt-Seay recalled those early studio experiences as he recorded The Zach Heath's debut EP, It's the Quits.

"It helped me understand what being in the studio was like," Greenblatt-Seay said by phone while organizing press kits. "It made it more comfortable for me to be in the studio with a larger group of people."

Greenblatt-Seay's parents, Deborah Greenblatt (viola) and David Seay (harmonica), along with Whole Wheat bassist Jon Bleicher, joined the acoustic/indie/folk band at Bassline Studio this summer. Deborah Greenblatt played with the Omaha Symphony in the late-'70s. The couple run Greenblatt & Seay Publications, a recording/publishing business, in Avoca, Neb.

"They were very laid-back during the whole process for It's the Quits," Greenblatt-Seay said of his parents. "They basically just said 'tell me what to do and I'll do it,' and that they did."

Greenblatt-Seay plays guitar and sings with Zach Heath on the drums. Bassist Brent Peekenschneider and keyboardist Stephani Hanson joined the band after the recording.

As evident by the album's name, the concept is pretty straightforward: Boy meets girl; boy dates girl; girl breaks boy's heart.

Greenblatt-Seay said his parents, who home-schooled him until high school, are the happiest married couple he knows.

"Sure, it would be nice to have something as special as what my parents share. But if I did, I wouldn't have much to write about," he said.

For coming from such a frustrating place, the songs are surprisingly upbeat.

Greenblatt-Seay said recording the album helped him make peace with a failed relationship, and it doesn't look like it took him long. The six songs on the EP clock in at about 15 minutes.

As Greenblatt-Seay croons in "Forever is For Good": "This is not about you. This is not about anybody. This is about getting better and I'm about to be through." - The Reader (Omaha)


Discography

It's the Quits (2007)

Airplay:
"Forever is For Good" on KIWR 89.7 The River
"Girl's Night Out" on KIWR 89.7 The River
"Stephen Hawking" on KIWR 89.7 The River
"Stephen Hawking" on KZUM 88.7
"Girl's Night Out" on KZUM 88.7
"Stephen Hawking" on 91.9 The Cat

Photos

Bio

The Zach Heath is currently writing their first full-length to be recorded in the winter of 2008. Demos for the new album will be recorded at Suitcase Recordings in Omaha.

The band's EP, "It's the Quits" was recorded with Tim Cich at Bassline Studio in Omaha in 2007. Greenblatt-Seay's mother, Deborah (viola) and father, David (harmonica) contributed to the record.

After adding Brent Peekenschneider (Bass) and Stephani Hanson (keys) to the permanent line-up, the band now leans more toward the "rock" in "folk/rock."