Tim Easton
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Tim Easton

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | MAJOR

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | MAJOR
Band Americana Singer/Songwriter

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Mar
20
Tim Easton @ SXSW

None, Louisiana, USA

None, Louisiana, USA

Feb
21
Tim Easton @ Folk Alliance Conference

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Jan
18
Tim Easton @ Private Show

None, None, USA

None, None, USA

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


TIM EASTON: On the Money



There are plenty of routes an artist could take to elevate his album to limited edition status. Add a few bonus tracks, maybe a 24-page booklet or DVD. Then again, if uniformity’s not an issue, and he doesn’t mind a little added labor, he could always, say, hand-paint the cover art on each and every copy. And that’s precisely what Joshua Tree-based singer/songwriter Tim Easton did with the Porcupine 500, a special limited edition vinyl series of his new album, Porcupine, which is also available in a standard version.
Doing the album jackets in his arid California carport was the furthest thing from regimented mass-production: “Some of them blow away into the desert, blow away down my yard and get covered in sand.” Besides that, he made each one slightly different on purpose, varying his application of wood stain, spray paint, and cut-outs of guitars and porcupines.
Needless to say, Easton’s textured, one-of-a-kind LPs run a low risk of being lost or tossed aside like so much jewel-cased rubbish, which-in addition to a rejuvenated love for painting-is why he made them in the first place.
“I did it to have another way to package my music, because there’s so much music out there that CDs have become pieces of garbage on the your floor of your car,” he explains. “You wouldn’t put the White Album on the floor of your car and have someone jump in the car and just step on it and break it.”
Not that Easton simply plucked the idea from the ether. He cites the vinyl packaging of the Black Swans’ album Change! as a conceptual influence (theirs were painted by developmentally disabled adults) and Ohio-based outsider artist Rick Borg’s uninhibited renderings as a stylistic one.
The Porcupine 500 LPs are being treated as bona fide folk art. Easton isn’t just selling them at shows, but in galleries, too, like Yard Dog in Austin. That means they’re accessible to show-goers and art collectors alike (of course, the latter pay more, since galleries take a cut).
Porcupine’s 12 tracks-none of them hidden or bonus-lend themselves to packaging that’s meant to be seen and felt. Easton’s last three albums were based in folk with a mostly acoustic palette and a lighter touch. This one’s got sharper sonic edges: serrated guitar licks, bristly vocals and roiling grooves. It’s the closest thing to a rock band he’s had behind him in a good long while.
“I guess the packaging mirrors the sound as well, because it’s a rough sound and falling-off-the-hinges sound,” ventures Easton. “I don’t get upset when I’m painting and something drips off the side and or there’s a splash or something.”
Easton started on the LP covers with a vague inkling that some in his audience might appreciate the personal touch. “I thought about what maybe I would like to get from an artist,” he says. “It’s more about putting your heart into the art, and then, as it turns out, when you start thinking about what people might want-you know, consumers, music-lovers-it turns out to be the best idea.”
But here’s a practical question for someone who makes his living as a musician (and who bought the materials out of his own pocket): how are they selling?
“I’m really shocked at the amount of people that are buying vinyl from me,” Easton confesses. “I wouldn’t have thought that my audience was on par with buying vinyl as much as, say, the college-age hipsters are doing it. I’m thinking already to the future, of what I’m going to do with my next record.”
“The project has paid for itself and has proven to be um well…hot cakes. One word-hotcakes.”
HOMETOWN: Akron, Ohio ??FAVORITE SONGWRITERS: Joni Mitchell, Townes Van Zandt, Mark Eitzel, Randy Newman and Neil Young.
- American Songwriter


TIM EASTON: On the Money



There are plenty of routes an artist could take to elevate his album to limited edition status. Add a few bonus tracks, maybe a 24-page booklet or DVD. Then again, if uniformity’s not an issue, and he doesn’t mind a little added labor, he could always, say, hand-paint the cover art on each and every copy. And that’s precisely what Joshua Tree-based singer/songwriter Tim Easton did with the Porcupine 500, a special limited edition vinyl series of his new album, Porcupine, which is also available in a standard version.
Doing the album jackets in his arid California carport was the furthest thing from regimented mass-production: “Some of them blow away into the desert, blow away down my yard and get covered in sand.” Besides that, he made each one slightly different on purpose, varying his application of wood stain, spray paint, and cut-outs of guitars and porcupines.
Needless to say, Easton’s textured, one-of-a-kind LPs run a low risk of being lost or tossed aside like so much jewel-cased rubbish, which-in addition to a rejuvenated love for painting-is why he made them in the first place.
“I did it to have another way to package my music, because there’s so much music out there that CDs have become pieces of garbage on the your floor of your car,” he explains. “You wouldn’t put the White Album on the floor of your car and have someone jump in the car and just step on it and break it.”
Not that Easton simply plucked the idea from the ether. He cites the vinyl packaging of the Black Swans’ album Change! as a conceptual influence (theirs were painted by developmentally disabled adults) and Ohio-based outsider artist Rick Borg’s uninhibited renderings as a stylistic one.
The Porcupine 500 LPs are being treated as bona fide folk art. Easton isn’t just selling them at shows, but in galleries, too, like Yard Dog in Austin. That means they’re accessible to show-goers and art collectors alike (of course, the latter pay more, since galleries take a cut).
Porcupine’s 12 tracks-none of them hidden or bonus-lend themselves to packaging that’s meant to be seen and felt. Easton’s last three albums were based in folk with a mostly acoustic palette and a lighter touch. This one’s got sharper sonic edges: serrated guitar licks, bristly vocals and roiling grooves. It’s the closest thing to a rock band he’s had behind him in a good long while.
“I guess the packaging mirrors the sound as well, because it’s a rough sound and falling-off-the-hinges sound,” ventures Easton. “I don’t get upset when I’m painting and something drips off the side and or there’s a splash or something.”
Easton started on the LP covers with a vague inkling that some in his audience might appreciate the personal touch. “I thought about what maybe I would like to get from an artist,” he says. “It’s more about putting your heart into the art, and then, as it turns out, when you start thinking about what people might want-you know, consumers, music-lovers-it turns out to be the best idea.”
But here’s a practical question for someone who makes his living as a musician (and who bought the materials out of his own pocket): how are they selling?
“I’m really shocked at the amount of people that are buying vinyl from me,” Easton confesses. “I wouldn’t have thought that my audience was on par with buying vinyl as much as, say, the college-age hipsters are doing it. I’m thinking already to the future, of what I’m going to do with my next record.”
“The project has paid for itself and has proven to be um well…hot cakes. One word-hotcakes.”
HOMETOWN: Akron, Ohio ??FAVORITE SONGWRITERS: Joni Mitchell, Townes Van Zandt, Mark Eitzel, Randy Newman and Neil Young.
- American Songwriter



Monday, March 2, 2009 – Rootsy musician Tim Easton will be back with his fifth album, "Porcupine," April 28 on New West Records. The Joshua Tree, Cal. resident's sound is rooted in blues, rock and. Easton will be on the road with a band, including a stop in Austin for South By Southwest.
Easton returned to Alex The Great and Club Roar studios in Nashville to work with Brad Jones and Robin Eaton who produced his debut album, Special 20. He wanted to "make some noise and get that jagged, midwestern rock and roll sound again" so he hand-picked the Ohio-based rhythm section - Sam Brown on drums (Gaunt, New Bomb Turks, RJD2) and Matt Surgeson on bass and backing vocals (he also played on Easton's "Special 20"). Guitarist Kenny Vaughn, who Easton met playing in Lucinda Williams' band for her Car Wheels tour, played second guitar.

As for the title, Easton said, "I thought the physical animal called the porcupine was a perfect symbol for the sound of this record in that it appears to be a gentle and harmless creature from a distance but up close it is in fact sharp and potentially dangerous."

Easton previously released 3 albums on New West: "The Truth About Us" (2001), "Break Your Mother's Heart" (2003) and "Ammunition" (2006). He has toured with label mates John Hiatt and The Flatlanders, as well as with The Jayhawks and Lucinda Williams. Living in the village of Joshua Tree between tours has made more time available for other creative endeavours such as painting and writing. "There's not much else to do out here," he said, "so going for long hikes with my dogs or making music, paintings, and stories is what fills my average day at home." A series of 500 individually painted vinyl album jackets will be part of the "Porcupine" release, and the New West CD release will feature Easton's art on the cover.

Tour dates include:
March 18-21 - South By South West including:
Pop Culture Press day party (March 18 at The Dog and Duck Pub)
New West Records day party (March 19 at Club Deville)
Sin City Social Club day party (March 20 at Maria's Tacos)
Ground Control Touring showcase (March 20 at Habana Bar Backyard)
Monday April 27 Fort Wayne, Ind. Brass Rail
Thursday April 30 Chicago, IL The Hideout
Friday May 1 Columbus, Ohio The Rumba Cafe
Saturday May 2 Whitesburg, Ky. Summit City
Sunday May 3 Charleston, West Va. Mountain Stage at Cultural Center Theater
Tuesday May 5 Arlington, Va. IOTA Club and Cafe
Wednesday May 6 New York, The Mercury Lounge 8pm
Thursday May 7 Philadelphia, Johnny Brendas
Friday June 5 Los Angeles, The Mint
- Country Standard



Monday, March 2, 2009 – Rootsy musician Tim Easton will be back with his fifth album, "Porcupine," April 28 on New West Records. The Joshua Tree, Cal. resident's sound is rooted in blues, rock and. Easton will be on the road with a band, including a stop in Austin for South By Southwest.
Easton returned to Alex The Great and Club Roar studios in Nashville to work with Brad Jones and Robin Eaton who produced his debut album, Special 20. He wanted to "make some noise and get that jagged, midwestern rock and roll sound again" so he hand-picked the Ohio-based rhythm section - Sam Brown on drums (Gaunt, New Bomb Turks, RJD2) and Matt Surgeson on bass and backing vocals (he also played on Easton's "Special 20"). Guitarist Kenny Vaughn, who Easton met playing in Lucinda Williams' band for her Car Wheels tour, played second guitar.

As for the title, Easton said, "I thought the physical animal called the porcupine was a perfect symbol for the sound of this record in that it appears to be a gentle and harmless creature from a distance but up close it is in fact sharp and potentially dangerous."

Easton previously released 3 albums on New West: "The Truth About Us" (2001), "Break Your Mother's Heart" (2003) and "Ammunition" (2006). He has toured with label mates John Hiatt and The Flatlanders, as well as with The Jayhawks and Lucinda Williams. Living in the village of Joshua Tree between tours has made more time available for other creative endeavours such as painting and writing. "There's not much else to do out here," he said, "so going for long hikes with my dogs or making music, paintings, and stories is what fills my average day at home." A series of 500 individually painted vinyl album jackets will be part of the "Porcupine" release, and the New West CD release will feature Easton's art on the cover.

Tour dates include:
March 18-21 - South By South West including:
Pop Culture Press day party (March 18 at The Dog and Duck Pub)
New West Records day party (March 19 at Club Deville)
Sin City Social Club day party (March 20 at Maria's Tacos)
Ground Control Touring showcase (March 20 at Habana Bar Backyard)
Monday April 27 Fort Wayne, Ind. Brass Rail
Thursday April 30 Chicago, IL The Hideout
Friday May 1 Columbus, Ohio The Rumba Cafe
Saturday May 2 Whitesburg, Ky. Summit City
Sunday May 3 Charleston, West Va. Mountain Stage at Cultural Center Theater
Tuesday May 5 Arlington, Va. IOTA Club and Cafe
Wednesday May 6 New York, The Mercury Lounge 8pm
Thursday May 7 Philadelphia, Johnny Brendas
Friday June 5 Los Angeles, The Mint
- Country Standard



Tim Easton
Break Your Mother's Heart Hear it Now
RS:4OF 5 STARS
2003
View Tim Easton's page on Rhapsody
Alterna-country strummer Tim Easton is a storyteller through and through, but he's also a student of classic pop songcraft willing to interrupt a weighty narrative with an undeniable hook. Those contrasts transform his observations about shattered lives ("John Gilmartin"), types of love ("Amor Azul") and unfriendly places ("Lexington Jail") into songs that are doubly blessed -- with memorable musical nuances and a novelist's sense of humanity.
- Rolling Stone Magazine



Tim Easton
Break Your Mother's Heart Hear it Now
RS:4OF 5 STARS
2003
View Tim Easton's page on Rhapsody
Alterna-country strummer Tim Easton is a storyteller through and through, but he's also a student of classic pop songcraft willing to interrupt a weighty narrative with an undeniable hook. Those contrasts transform his observations about shattered lives ("John Gilmartin"), types of love ("Amor Azul") and unfriendly places ("Lexington Jail") into songs that are doubly blessed -- with memorable musical nuances and a novelist's sense of humanity.
- Rolling Stone Magazine



One singer-songwriter, but many, many styles
4/28/2009, 11:59 a.m. EDT The Associated Press
(AP) — By Glenn Gamboa
Newsday
(MCT)
Tim Easton switches singer-songwriter personalities as casually (and nearly as often) as most guys change their socks. And why not? He handles them all remarkably well on his latest album "Porcupine" (New West).
Easton weaves a Dylan-esque tale in "Burgundy Red" and brews a Greg Dulli-ish sense of danger on the entrancing "Get What I Got." There's a big fat rock riff in the middle of "Broke My Heart" that makes it sound like Everclear, while the title track bristles like John Mellencamp in his most-rebellious days. It's a broad spectrum, but Easton spans it effortlessly with clever lyrics and a warm delivery.
- AP Syndicated/Newsday



One singer-songwriter, but many, many styles
4/28/2009, 11:59 a.m. EDT The Associated Press
(AP) — By Glenn Gamboa
Newsday
(MCT)
Tim Easton switches singer-songwriter personalities as casually (and nearly as often) as most guys change their socks. And why not? He handles them all remarkably well on his latest album "Porcupine" (New West).
Easton weaves a Dylan-esque tale in "Burgundy Red" and brews a Greg Dulli-ish sense of danger on the entrancing "Get What I Got." There's a big fat rock riff in the middle of "Broke My Heart" that makes it sound like Everclear, while the title track bristles like John Mellencamp in his most-rebellious days. It's a broad spectrum, but Easton spans it effortlessly with clever lyrics and a warm delivery.
- AP Syndicated/Newsday


Music Connection.com
Some memorable songwriting and arresting turns of phrase arranged with an accordian here or a slide guitar there. Easton approaches every song with a fresh ear and with a voice that can shift mood, making this collection a satisfying album experience. Her can be folk-swampy ("The Young Girls"), irresistibly catch ("Broke My Heart") and, on the most affecting number (the sad, elegy to alcohol, "Stones Throw Away"), altogether moving. Easton can rock out, but it's his intimate, soulful numbers that might rock your world.
-Mark Nardone

It's a versatile artist who feels he's no longer confined to any one particular style and subsequently allows himself to infuse more disparate elements into his sound. So give credit to Tim Easton with breaking the Americana mold on this, his fifth album, and expanding his parameters into realms of Blues, R&B and other traditional templates. Whether or not its title was intended to reflect the temperament remains a matter of conjecture, but suffice it to say this is a somewhat, um, prickly outlay in terms of tone and treatment. "Burgundy Red," the crazed rockabilly rave-up that jumpstarts the album, suggests something's askew early on, and with the cool cat shuffle of "Stormy," the dark, descending chords of "Get What I Got" and the swampy bluesy snarl that shades "The Young Girls," Easton's manic attitude is vented in full view.
That's not to say Easton doesn't seize on sentiment. His parched vocals leave an indelible impression on "Broke My Heart" ("There's only two things left in this world/Love and the lack thereof"), while the easy saunter of "7th Wheel" and "Baltimore" indicate he hasn't abandoned his heartland instincts altogether. Ultimately, it's the bittersweet aftertaste of "Goodbye Amsterdam" that mellows the mood and mitigates some of those edgier elements that created such a commotion. - Music Connection


Music Connection.com
Some memorable songwriting and arresting turns of phrase arranged with an accordian here or a slide guitar there. Easton approaches every song with a fresh ear and with a voice that can shift mood, making this collection a satisfying album experience. Her can be folk-swampy ("The Young Girls"), irresistibly catch ("Broke My Heart") and, on the most affecting number (the sad, elegy to alcohol, "Stones Throw Away"), altogether moving. Easton can rock out, but it's his intimate, soulful numbers that might rock your world.
-Mark Nardone

It's a versatile artist who feels he's no longer confined to any one particular style and subsequently allows himself to infuse more disparate elements into his sound. So give credit to Tim Easton with breaking the Americana mold on this, his fifth album, and expanding his parameters into realms of Blues, R&B and other traditional templates. Whether or not its title was intended to reflect the temperament remains a matter of conjecture, but suffice it to say this is a somewhat, um, prickly outlay in terms of tone and treatment. "Burgundy Red," the crazed rockabilly rave-up that jumpstarts the album, suggests something's askew early on, and with the cool cat shuffle of "Stormy," the dark, descending chords of "Get What I Got" and the swampy bluesy snarl that shades "The Young Girls," Easton's manic attitude is vented in full view.
That's not to say Easton doesn't seize on sentiment. His parched vocals leave an indelible impression on "Broke My Heart" ("There's only two things left in this world/Love and the lack thereof"), while the easy saunter of "7th Wheel" and "Baltimore" indicate he hasn't abandoned his heartland instincts altogether. Ultimately, it's the bittersweet aftertaste of "Goodbye Amsterdam" that mellows the mood and mitigates some of those edgier elements that created such a commotion. - Music Connection


Minneapolis Star Tribune
Underrated Americana singer/songwriter Tim Easton has knocked out his fifth in a series of loosely recorded but deeply inspired discs for New West Records, "Porcupine." It's prickly, pointed and utterly Dylanesque folk-rock -- and more rocking than previous records. "There's only two things left in this world: love, and the lack thereof," the raspy troubadour sings in the stand-out cut, "Broke My Heart." Watch out: Easton's stuff will do just that. - Minneapolis Star Tribune


Minneapolis Star Tribune
Underrated Americana singer/songwriter Tim Easton has knocked out his fifth in a series of loosely recorded but deeply inspired discs for New West Records, "Porcupine." It's prickly, pointed and utterly Dylanesque folk-rock -- and more rocking than previous records. "There's only two things left in this world: love, and the lack thereof," the raspy troubadour sings in the stand-out cut, "Broke My Heart." Watch out: Easton's stuff will do just that. - Minneapolis Star Tribune


U-Weekly
by Don Allred
Tim Easton attended OSU, rode with the Columbus-based Kosher Spears and Haynes Boys, then sang in European streets. Easton's fifth solo album, "Porcupine," tests quills, chills and guitar slides with two other Cowtown vets, bassist-vocalist Matt Surgeson and drummer Sam Brown (of the New Bomb Turks, Haynes Boys and Gaunt). They're pacemakers and jumper cables for Easton's compulsively mobile characters, who mostly fear getting "too cold to sweat the dark out" (his own confession). As Easton says of Amsterdam, "Porcupine" is for "anyone with all eyes open."
- U-Weekly


U-Weekly
by Don Allred
Tim Easton attended OSU, rode with the Columbus-based Kosher Spears and Haynes Boys, then sang in European streets. Easton's fifth solo album, "Porcupine," tests quills, chills and guitar slides with two other Cowtown vets, bassist-vocalist Matt Surgeson and drummer Sam Brown (of the New Bomb Turks, Haynes Boys and Gaunt). They're pacemakers and jumper cables for Easton's compulsively mobile characters, who mostly fear getting "too cold to sweat the dark out" (his own confession). As Easton says of Amsterdam, "Porcupine" is for "anyone with all eyes open."
- U-Weekly


Discography

http://newwestrecords.com/TimEaston

Photos

Bio

The music has been described as Americana, or in the genre of singer-songwriter, but that's just the tip of the sound scape. After an educational stint as a street musician in Europe, Tim Easton returned to the States to make rock and roll records-some of them rough and wild and others more acoustic and folk based. He is comfortable in either sound and can entertain a festival crowd as a solo artist or as the leader of a band.
Recently relocated from Joshua Tree to East Nashville, in January 2013 Tim recorded the album "NOT COOL" which was released on August 20th through THIRTY TIGERS/RED.

Touring will continue through Europe, Japan, Canada, Alaska, Texas, and the lower 48 states all through 2013.