Tim Harwill
Gig Seeker Pro

Tim Harwill

| INDIE | AFM

| INDIE | AFM
Band Americana Singer/Songwriter

Calendar

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


"Alberta’s Tim Harwill cooks up some flavourful ‘Catfish’"

Publish Date: Edmonton Journal, May 2, 2012 by Roger Levesque

Being true to yourself doesn’t always make for an easy career. Ask Tim Harwill, a Thorsby-based singer-songwriter who admits he sounds a bit different each time he hits the studio.

“I play the music that moves me and I don’t think too much about where it’s going to fit,” he says. “I suppose that’s one reason more people don’t know who I am.”

Harwill’s publicity material dubs him the “12-string troubadour.” You can hear elements of folk, country, rock and blues in the five albums he’s put out since 1998, pointing to that industry catch-all, Americana.
While his new disc, A Tribute To Catfish John, leans more toward country, it’s not without other influences, like a take on the jazz standard All Of Me. Blame it on “Catfish” John Peterson, Harwill’s late sideman, friend and mentor who inspired the album.

“He had a tremendous effect on my life and career and really changed how I view music. He gave me a greater appreciation for what my job was when I was wandering down the highway. He taught me a greater respect for the traditions I was a part of and the audiences I played to, and to exercise some care for my own talent.

Peterson was a bassist, guitarist and singer who had already been performing some 30 years when he joined Harwill as a sideman in 2002.
Over the next four years, they criss-crossed Western Canada, playing well over 400 gigs together. Peterson died of cancer in 2009, and has been missed by Edmonton’s music community since.

It was Peterson who introduced Harwill to the 12-string guitar — which has become the singer’s regular axe — to the harmonica and to jazz standards like All Of Me.

Harwill’s love of roots music goes back to his rural Manitoba upbringing when he was raising on country, blues and rock. He had his first band at 15 and made his first recording with a trio called Harwill after his move to Alberta in the early 1990s.

The latest album features his regular band with bassist Fred Larose and drummer Paul Martineau and guests like fiddler Alfie Myhre. Guitarist Mike Beley will backup Harwill for the CD release show on Thursday at Jeffrey’s Cafe & Wine Bar, 9640, 142 street.
The cover charge is $10.

You can find Harwill’s music at iTunes or get copies of the limited edition CD at the gig.
- Edmonton Journal


"Alberta’s Tim Harwill cooks up some flavourful ‘Catfish’"

Publish Date: Edmonton Journal, May 2, 2012 by Roger Levesque

Being true to yourself doesn’t always make for an easy career. Ask Tim Harwill, a Thorsby-based singer-songwriter who admits he sounds a bit different each time he hits the studio.

“I play the music that moves me and I don’t think too much about where it’s going to fit,” he says. “I suppose that’s one reason more people don’t know who I am.”

Harwill’s publicity material dubs him the “12-string troubadour.” You can hear elements of folk, country, rock and blues in the five albums he’s put out since 1998, pointing to that industry catch-all, Americana.
While his new disc, A Tribute To Catfish John, leans more toward country, it’s not without other influences, like a take on the jazz standard All Of Me. Blame it on “Catfish” John Peterson, Harwill’s late sideman, friend and mentor who inspired the album.

“He had a tremendous effect on my life and career and really changed how I view music. He gave me a greater appreciation for what my job was when I was wandering down the highway. He taught me a greater respect for the traditions I was a part of and the audiences I played to, and to exercise some care for my own talent.

Peterson was a bassist, guitarist and singer who had already been performing some 30 years when he joined Harwill as a sideman in 2002.
Over the next four years, they criss-crossed Western Canada, playing well over 400 gigs together. Peterson died of cancer in 2009, and has been missed by Edmonton’s music community since.

It was Peterson who introduced Harwill to the 12-string guitar — which has become the singer’s regular axe — to the harmonica and to jazz standards like All Of Me.

Harwill’s love of roots music goes back to his rural Manitoba upbringing when he was raising on country, blues and rock. He had his first band at 15 and made his first recording with a trio called Harwill after his move to Alberta in the early 1990s.

The latest album features his regular band with bassist Fred Larose and drummer Paul Martineau and guests like fiddler Alfie Myhre. Guitarist Mike Beley will backup Harwill for the CD release show on Thursday at Jeffrey’s Cafe & Wine Bar, 9640, 142 street.
The cover charge is $10.

You can find Harwill’s music at iTunes or get copies of the limited edition CD at the gig.
- Edmonton Journal


"Musician on way to city Monday"

Publish Date: August 28, 2012, by Yorkton This Week, Author: Calvin Daniels, Used By Permission.

Tim Harwill came into music through family.

"I learned to sing and play at the feet of my elder brothers Val and Barney, with brother Val encouraging me to learn to write while brother Barney did his best to teach me to play guitar and sing," said Harwill who was born in Winnipeg, MB. to a family of eight siblings growing up in the Postal District of Harwill, located approximately three hours north of the 'Peg on his family's homestead where his father raised cattle and horses. "They in turn had been influenced (and encouraged) by our uncles Ricky and Louis Thomas, who earned their living playing country music and traveled in road bands throughout most of their lives.

"My first band was formed when I was 15, and we played some pretty desperate rock 'n roll for kids, but my voice was so country that most of our friends told us to go play it.

"I spent some years working for a living while refining my talent and developing the skills necessary to put on a show with an assortment of country bands that crisscrossed the prairies trying to make ends meet until finally stepping out full-time as a touring singer/songwriter in 2001."

While on the road as a performer, Harwill plays at 5th Avenue Cup and Saucer in Yorkton Monday, Aug. 13, he said writers are really who he looks to in terms of influence.

"I count songwriters such as Steve Young, James Talley and Warren Zevon among my primary influences, while stylistically I'm located somewhere between Outlaw Country and Americana music, depending on the size of the crowd and the type of venue," he said. "Having grown up listening to my Dad's radio, where the music of Waylon, Willie, Kris, Hank and Johnny dominated the dial I guess to me that's not much of a surprise.

"I also credit the great aboriginal singer/songwriter Errol Ranville, leader of the C-Weed Band, among my biggest influences, as I spent many nights studying his stage moves as an underage teen in the bars of Winnipeg, and owe him as much as anybody else for my music and this life."

While on the road a lot, Harwill has made his way to the recording studio too, his most recent release being 'A Tribute to Catfish John'

"I began working on the 'A Tribute to Catfish John' album when my good friend, mentor, and brother of the road Catfish John Peterson became fatally ill in the summer of 2009, while I was recording my critically-acclaimed-and-to-be-released-in-2009 album 'The Wander Man Revisited'," he said.

Harwill said the tribute album was a bit of an unusual project, and one deeply personal to him.

"The idea to do a 'tribute' album for a guy that basically nobody outside of the small circle that he had worked with on stage and in the studio had ever heard of seemed pretty crazy at first, but the more that I discussed it with mutual friends and colleagues the more sense it seemed to make," he said. "At least it did to me, and after kicking it around for a year or so after he had passed I was fortunate enough to hit upon a couple of melodies that seemed to fit a few of the many words that had passed between us, and before I knew it I had a few songs written.

"I'm not sure if it was catharsis or gratitude that drove the creation of the songs but as a songwriter I was thrilled with them, however after another half-year of editing I became convinced that I ought to extend the tribute to include John and the generation of musicians responsible for my own career as a working musician by including some of the music that they had played six-nights-a-week-and-four-sets-a-night on stages across the continent. Within six-months after that we had completed recording and only a few months later - February 29, 2012 - we released 'A Tribute to Catfish John' (which I consider to be my finest work so far) on The Sterling Label."

The album is also one where Harwill took greater control of the overall project.

"This was the third album that I've recorded at least partially here in my studio at Thorsby, however it's the first to be recorded entirely here," he said. "As producer and engineer of the recordings the sessions were also some of the most fun that I've ever had, although having been touring primarily solo for the past several years the live-off-of-the-floor recording sessions with the rhythm section were a good bit more crowded than I'm used to.

"Seriously, the biggest difference with the sessions for the 'Tribute' album was the reverence with which the musicians approached their individual parts, as each person on the production delivered a performance that not only rings true but pays tribute to the people who made our lives in music possible."

The dedication the musicians paid to the album makes it special and Harwill said that shows.

"I'm more pleased with 'A Tribute to Catfish John' than I have been with anything else that I've done in music to date," he said. "Compari - Yorkton This Week


"Industry Quotes..."

12-string troubadour Tim Harwill delivers an authentic sound...hillbilly soul stylings and warm personality much enjoyed by his audiences. - Queen Charlotte Islands Arts Council, 2006

'All I Really Need' - a wonderful CD...creative country music alongside superb lyrical dialogue!...soothing vocals juxtaposed with picturistic storytelling...beautiful harmony, great backgrounds!...Bryan Farrish Radio Promotion, Santa Monica, CA, 2006

'Tim Harwill - All I Really Need' - songs honest and heartfelt...that classic style of country music that millions of Americans enjoy!" - Shut Eye Records, Atlanta, GA, 2006

Tim Harwill...a change well received by our audience, staff, and volunteers alike...thanks for contributing your talent and hard work...we are proud to call you a friend and supporter. - The Edmonton Works Festival, 2003

Tim Harwill was a pleasure to work with...very professional and talented...his performances were well received at both the 46th Annual Jaywalker's Jamboree and our Canada Day celebrations. - Camrose Arts Society, 2003
- Comments graciously provided by industry & media professionals...


"Authentic outlaw country coming to Stage"

Publish Date: Stony Plain Reporter, March 23, 2012, by Brandi Morin

Outlaw country music singer/songwriter Tim Harwill is stopping by the Early Stage Saloon this Friday evening for a special show.
Harwill and his band, The Legends, will be performing songs from his new studio release ‘A Tribute to Catfish John’.
The late Catfish was a veteran in the Alberta country music scene with a gig as a professional musician stemming all the way back to 1969.
“Johnny was a great guy,” said Harwill, whom for many years travelled the road performing almost 600 shows together, “I got a tremendous benefit out of being on the road with the guy.”
Catfish taught Harwill what it meant to be a professional musician and this is Harwill’s way of expressing his gratitude and paying back his mentor whom passed away from cancer in 2009.
“This album is a tribute to a guy who most people would not of heard about because he was a guy that played music in the honky-tonks. He started out in the business when guys were playing six nights a week and could make a living at it.”
Included on the tribute album are originals as well as classic country songs that honour the true history of the genre such as the “greats” like Kris Kristofferson and Merle Haggard.
Harwill grew up listening to the raw, rebel, steel guitar honky-tonk tunes and started playing music coming out of high school.
“It touched something inside of me. The music of Waylon, Nelson and Cash, I was weaned on that stuff! It was something I heard as a young kid, the rhythm of it got me and it never let me go. The music chooses you, it’s not necessarily your choice. What comes out of you just comes out of you.”
Raised in Manitoba, now living in Thorsby, Harwill has spent his entire recording career in Alberta and now considers it home.
When it comes to writing Harwill considers himself a “slice of life” kind of an author.
“In terms of the style of it, I’m not calculated I guess. For me it’s 90 per cent inspiration and 10 per cent craft.”
On A Tribute to Catfish Harwill was joined by an all-star cast of legendary Alberta country musicians including Richard Chernesky on electric guitar and Alfie Myhre on fiddle.
The album was recorded at his home studio with a focus on the experience of musicians and life on the road and showcasing that lifestyle.
“Touring is how I make my living. I’m pretty much on the go all the time,” said Harwill.
With a Canada wide tour set in place the band is off to Newfoundland in April where they have developed a strong following.
He first played the Early Stage back in 2006 and is looking forward to coming back to the authentic country atmosphere.
The music starts at 8 p.m. and tickets are available at the door.
“It’s a chance for outlaw country fans to come out and enjoy some real country music,” finished Harwill.
- Stony Plain Reporter


"Authentic outlaw country coming to Stage"

Publish Date: Stony Plain Reporter, March 23, 2012, by Brandi Morin

Outlaw country music singer/songwriter Tim Harwill is stopping by the Early Stage Saloon this Friday evening for a special show.
Harwill and his band, The Legends, will be performing songs from his new studio release ‘A Tribute to Catfish John’.
The late Catfish was a veteran in the Alberta country music scene with a gig as a professional musician stemming all the way back to 1969.
“Johnny was a great guy,” said Harwill, whom for many years travelled the road performing almost 600 shows together, “I got a tremendous benefit out of being on the road with the guy.”
Catfish taught Harwill what it meant to be a professional musician and this is Harwill’s way of expressing his gratitude and paying back his mentor whom passed away from cancer in 2009.
“This album is a tribute to a guy who most people would not of heard about because he was a guy that played music in the honky-tonks. He started out in the business when guys were playing six nights a week and could make a living at it.”
Included on the tribute album are originals as well as classic country songs that honour the true history of the genre such as the “greats” like Kris Kristofferson and Merle Haggard.
Harwill grew up listening to the raw, rebel, steel guitar honky-tonk tunes and started playing music coming out of high school.
“It touched something inside of me. The music of Waylon, Nelson and Cash, I was weaned on that stuff! It was something I heard as a young kid, the rhythm of it got me and it never let me go. The music chooses you, it’s not necessarily your choice. What comes out of you just comes out of you.”
Raised in Manitoba, now living in Thorsby, Harwill has spent his entire recording career in Alberta and now considers it home.
When it comes to writing Harwill considers himself a “slice of life” kind of an author.
“In terms of the style of it, I’m not calculated I guess. For me it’s 90 per cent inspiration and 10 per cent craft.”
On A Tribute to Catfish Harwill was joined by an all-star cast of legendary Alberta country musicians including Richard Chernesky on electric guitar and Alfie Myhre on fiddle.
The album was recorded at his home studio with a focus on the experience of musicians and life on the road and showcasing that lifestyle.
“Touring is how I make my living. I’m pretty much on the go all the time,” said Harwill.
With a Canada wide tour set in place the band is off to Newfoundland in April where they have developed a strong following.
He first played the Early Stage back in 2006 and is looking forward to coming back to the authentic country atmosphere.
The music starts at 8 p.m. and tickets are available at the door.
“It’s a chance for outlaw country fans to come out and enjoy some real country music,” finished Harwill.
- Stony Plain Reporter


"This Week’s Disc Review"

Publish Date: Red Deer Advocate, March 19, 2010, by Donald Teplyske

Tim Harwill & Friends

The Wander Man Revisited

Self-released

Thorsby troubadour Tim Harwill’s third collection of life-infused country music has arrived.

Harwill, a veteran of the taverns and halls that make up the North American honky tonk circuit, has recorded an album that should appeal to all looking for the homespun essence of country and roots music.

Harwill’s voice isn’t especially dramatic, but it is personable and gently identifiable with a stylistic catch in his voice and a lurch in his rhythm.

Traveling toward a dream with resulting isolation is a theme that recurs across the album. Only in a finely crafted song is it not only accepted but expected that a fella will act like a jerk, break a few windows, and yet still be sympathetic enough for listeners to care that he’s “lonesome, heartbroke and then some,” which is the case in Barely Alive.

Harwill’s vocal phrasing is terrific, effective and distinctive on songs such as No TV Show. He mixes some southern country soul into his presentations, causing Larry Jon Wilson, Eddie Hinton, and Mel Street to come to mind.

The Alberta-based instrumentalists shine with harmonica punctuating The Road Less Traveled and the insistent drumming of Sittin’ in a Hotel Room serving a similar function. Vocal guests Steve Young (yes, that Steve Young), James Talley, Tim Hus, and Delores Hershey make memorable contributions.

Harwill’s manner lends a simple sophistication to words, less poetic than Ian Tyson perhaps, more workmanlike that those of Guy Clark, but insightful and revealing of the truths long withheld. Whether autobiographical or not, the album’s title track provides a back story that could flesh-out a secondary Crazy Heart character.

Harwill is scheduled to appear at the Memorial Centre March 26.

Donald Teplyske is a local freelance writer who contributes a twice-monthly column on roots music; visit fervorcoulee.wordpress.com for additional reviews. If you know a roots music event of which he should be aware, contact him at fervorcoulee@shaw.ca. - Red Deer Advocate


"This Week’s Disc Review"

Publish Date: Red Deer Advocate, March 19, 2010, by Donald Teplyske

Tim Harwill & Friends

The Wander Man Revisited

Self-released

Thorsby troubadour Tim Harwill’s third collection of life-infused country music has arrived.

Harwill, a veteran of the taverns and halls that make up the North American honky tonk circuit, has recorded an album that should appeal to all looking for the homespun essence of country and roots music.

Harwill’s voice isn’t especially dramatic, but it is personable and gently identifiable with a stylistic catch in his voice and a lurch in his rhythm.

Traveling toward a dream with resulting isolation is a theme that recurs across the album. Only in a finely crafted song is it not only accepted but expected that a fella will act like a jerk, break a few windows, and yet still be sympathetic enough for listeners to care that he’s “lonesome, heartbroke and then some,” which is the case in Barely Alive.

Harwill’s vocal phrasing is terrific, effective and distinctive on songs such as No TV Show. He mixes some southern country soul into his presentations, causing Larry Jon Wilson, Eddie Hinton, and Mel Street to come to mind.

The Alberta-based instrumentalists shine with harmonica punctuating The Road Less Traveled and the insistent drumming of Sittin’ in a Hotel Room serving a similar function. Vocal guests Steve Young (yes, that Steve Young), James Talley, Tim Hus, and Delores Hershey make memorable contributions.

Harwill’s manner lends a simple sophistication to words, less poetic than Ian Tyson perhaps, more workmanlike that those of Guy Clark, but insightful and revealing of the truths long withheld. Whether autobiographical or not, the album’s title track provides a back story that could flesh-out a secondary Crazy Heart character.

Harwill is scheduled to appear at the Memorial Centre March 26.

Donald Teplyske is a local freelance writer who contributes a twice-monthly column on roots music; visit fervorcoulee.wordpress.com for additional reviews. If you know a roots music event of which he should be aware, contact him at fervorcoulee@shaw.ca. - Red Deer Advocate


"Music the one constant in Harwill's life"

Publish Date: Calgary Sun, November 1, 2010, by Lisa Wilton

Tim Harwill has felt the lure of the open road as far back as he can remember.

The outlaw country singer grew up poor in the rural Interlake district of Manitoba. His family's home had no running water and no electricity.

“We didn't have a television,” he recalls.

“I read a lot and I was really inspired by the music I was listening to and exposed to. The world seemed like such a wide open, exciting and romantic place compared to where I was living.”

Harwill's desire to see the world, or at least different parts of Canada, resulted in him leaving home at 15.

For the next several years, Harwill worked in construction, spent time as a professional boxer, managed restaurants and nightclubs and even went back to school. The only constant in his life was his love of music.

“When I had a day job I usually had a gig going on at night,” says Harwill, who's called Winnipeg, Vancouver, Edmonton and Calgary home.

“I had uncles who were professional musicians. They travelled around a lot. I was jealous of those guys. I wanted to live like that.”

The Metis musician got his wish and spends much of his year playing his emotionally riveting, dusty Americana music across Canada and the United States.

“I find the road to be a very good place for me,” he says.

“When I'm touring, it seems to help the songwriting process for me. I write about life and the people I've met along the way ... I want to travel and see where other people and how other people live. Trying to appreciate what other people go through is at the heart of the matter for me.”

Harwill has been based in the small town of Thorsby, located an hour southwest of Edmonton, for the past 10 years.

It's the longest amount of time he's stayed in one place since he was a child.

“I spent a lot of time playing in the small towns of Alberta, so it feels like home for me,” he says.

“You can take the boy out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the boy, as they say.”

Tim Harwill plays The Ironwood Stage Tuesday night. A portion of the proceeds will go to the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Southern Alberta.

lisa.wilton@sunmedia.ca - Calgary Sun


"Music the one constant in Harwill's life"

Publish Date: Calgary Sun, November 1, 2010, by Lisa Wilton

Tim Harwill has felt the lure of the open road as far back as he can remember.

The outlaw country singer grew up poor in the rural Interlake district of Manitoba. His family's home had no running water and no electricity.

“We didn't have a television,” he recalls.

“I read a lot and I was really inspired by the music I was listening to and exposed to. The world seemed like such a wide open, exciting and romantic place compared to where I was living.”

Harwill's desire to see the world, or at least different parts of Canada, resulted in him leaving home at 15.

For the next several years, Harwill worked in construction, spent time as a professional boxer, managed restaurants and nightclubs and even went back to school. The only constant in his life was his love of music.

“When I had a day job I usually had a gig going on at night,” says Harwill, who's called Winnipeg, Vancouver, Edmonton and Calgary home.

“I had uncles who were professional musicians. They travelled around a lot. I was jealous of those guys. I wanted to live like that.”

The Metis musician got his wish and spends much of his year playing his emotionally riveting, dusty Americana music across Canada and the United States.

“I find the road to be a very good place for me,” he says.

“When I'm touring, it seems to help the songwriting process for me. I write about life and the people I've met along the way ... I want to travel and see where other people and how other people live. Trying to appreciate what other people go through is at the heart of the matter for me.”

Harwill has been based in the small town of Thorsby, located an hour southwest of Edmonton, for the past 10 years.

It's the longest amount of time he's stayed in one place since he was a child.

“I spent a lot of time playing in the small towns of Alberta, so it feels like home for me,” he says.

“You can take the boy out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the boy, as they say.”

Tim Harwill plays The Ironwood Stage Tuesday night. A portion of the proceeds will go to the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Southern Alberta.

lisa.wilton@sunmedia.ca - Calgary Sun


"Tim Harwill Brings Country Roots Revival to Wawa"

Publish Date: The Algoma News, July 28, 2010, by Chris Plecash

From the outset, I probably wasn’t the best choice for covering Tim Harwill’s performance at the Wawa Motor. The extent of my country music collection is two Johnny Cash albums, and my pre-interview research consisted of reading the concert poster at the post office. I expected a no-nonsense Albertan with little patience for my ill-informed line of questioning. Instead I got schooled in the roots of country by a self-proclaimed ‘vegetarian atheist in a cowboy hat’.

Setting up an interview with Harwill wasn’t too difficult, since I found him interviewing country music loving locals in the parking lot when I arrived at the Motor last Thursday night. He seemed genuinely interested in everyone’s story – about what was happening in our community and how we’re getting by, all that. It was clear from the conversation that Harwill understood what’s been going on, not only in Wawa, but across the country. This insight comes in part from him having performed more than 800 shows in the past five years.

Our discussion shifts from Canadiana to musical influences, and then on to the new country style that dominates the genre today. “People who like it… OK, cool,” Harwill says, “But I need the roots. Real people singing real songs, that’s how I try to keep it… I’m trying to write music I believe in.”

I’m skeptical at first – authenticity is scarce these days, especially in music. I try to get a better sense of what makes his songs any more sincere than ‘Save a Horse, Ride a Cowboy’. Tim tells me how roots country reveals the singer-songwriter’s own personal philosophical outlook.
“So what’s your philosophy?” I ask.
“Your heart doesn’t go where money is, your heart goes where it wants to go. That’s my philosophy,” he replies.

Everyone returns inside as Harwill picks up his harmonica and Taylor 12-string to play another set. Nowadays he’s touring songs from his latest album, Wander-man Revisited; an album he collaborated on with country music pioneers like James Talley and Steve Young. He starts playing that signature old-school country rhythm that sounds like a locomotive picking up steam, and before long everybody’s into it. I have my reservations at first, but somewhere between hearing Harwill rip into corporate greed in 'No T.V. Show' and deliver a raucous rendition of Cash's 'Folsom Prison Blues', I start to appreciate what he was saying out in the parking lot. Roots country doesn't try to sell you Pepsi during the Super Bowl. It talks about real issues and it's played with conviction. The crowd responded that night - by the end of the show the dance floor was packed and calling for an encore. - The Algoma News


"Tim Harwill Brings Country Roots Revival to Wawa"

Publish Date: The Algoma News, July 28, 2010, by Chris Plecash

From the outset, I probably wasn’t the best choice for covering Tim Harwill’s performance at the Wawa Motor. The extent of my country music collection is two Johnny Cash albums, and my pre-interview research consisted of reading the concert poster at the post office. I expected a no-nonsense Albertan with little patience for my ill-informed line of questioning. Instead I got schooled in the roots of country by a self-proclaimed ‘vegetarian atheist in a cowboy hat’.

Setting up an interview with Harwill wasn’t too difficult, since I found him interviewing country music loving locals in the parking lot when I arrived at the Motor last Thursday night. He seemed genuinely interested in everyone’s story – about what was happening in our community and how we’re getting by, all that. It was clear from the conversation that Harwill understood what’s been going on, not only in Wawa, but across the country. This insight comes in part from him having performed more than 800 shows in the past five years.

Our discussion shifts from Canadiana to musical influences, and then on to the new country style that dominates the genre today. “People who like it… OK, cool,” Harwill says, “But I need the roots. Real people singing real songs, that’s how I try to keep it… I’m trying to write music I believe in.”

I’m skeptical at first – authenticity is scarce these days, especially in music. I try to get a better sense of what makes his songs any more sincere than ‘Save a Horse, Ride a Cowboy’. Tim tells me how roots country reveals the singer-songwriter’s own personal philosophical outlook.
“So what’s your philosophy?” I ask.
“Your heart doesn’t go where money is, your heart goes where it wants to go. That’s my philosophy,” he replies.

Everyone returns inside as Harwill picks up his harmonica and Taylor 12-string to play another set. Nowadays he’s touring songs from his latest album, Wander-man Revisited; an album he collaborated on with country music pioneers like James Talley and Steve Young. He starts playing that signature old-school country rhythm that sounds like a locomotive picking up steam, and before long everybody’s into it. I have my reservations at first, but somewhere between hearing Harwill rip into corporate greed in 'No T.V. Show' and deliver a raucous rendition of Cash's 'Folsom Prison Blues', I start to appreciate what he was saying out in the parking lot. Roots country doesn't try to sell you Pepsi during the Super Bowl. It talks about real issues and it's played with conviction. The crowd responded that night - by the end of the show the dance floor was packed and calling for an encore. - The Algoma News


"ALT-512's Monthly Album Reviews & Recommendations"

"The next record that caught my ear was Tim Harwill's The Wander Man Revisited (buy). Harwill's tag on his site is "too folk for country, too country for rock 'n roll." That tagline really sets the tone for his music. The whole time I listened to this record, I was trying to determine who or what it was reminding me of. There are lots of elements, musical and thematic, that remind of a less country version of Merle Haggard or Dwight Yoakam. The thing that it most reminded me of was a full fledged country version of Jimmy Buffett. Imagine if Jimmy Buffett has stayed on his country path and never gone to Key West with Jerry Jeff back when. I imagine it sounds a lot like this. Having just seen Crazy Heart (and listened to the soundtrack), it strikes me that many of these songs would fit right into Bad Blake's catalog. Get this record. For now, I gotta go order Tim Harwill's other records"
- Alt-512 Music Musings


"ALT-512's Monthly Album Reviews & Recommendations"

"The next record that caught my ear was Tim Harwill's The Wander Man Revisited (buy). Harwill's tag on his site is "too folk for country, too country for rock 'n roll." That tagline really sets the tone for his music. The whole time I listened to this record, I was trying to determine who or what it was reminding me of. There are lots of elements, musical and thematic, that remind of a less country version of Merle Haggard or Dwight Yoakam. The thing that it most reminded me of was a full fledged country version of Jimmy Buffett. Imagine if Jimmy Buffett has stayed on his country path and never gone to Key West with Jerry Jeff back when. I imagine it sounds a lot like this. Having just seen Crazy Heart (and listened to the soundtrack), it strikes me that many of these songs would fit right into Bad Blake's catalog. Get this record. For now, I gotta go order Tim Harwill's other records"
- Alt-512 Music Musings


"'The Wander Man Revisited' album review"

"The next record that caught my ear was Tim Harwill's The Wander Man Revisited (buy). Harwill's tag on his site is "too folk for country, too country for rock 'n roll." That tagline really sets the tone for his music. The whole time I listened to this record, I was trying to determine who or what it was reminding me of. There are lots of elements, musical and thematic, that remind of a less country version of Merle Haggard or Dwight Yoakam. The thing that it most reminded me of was a full fledged country version of Jimmy Buffett. Imagine if Jimmy Buffett has stayed on his country path and never gone to Key West with Jerry Jeff back when. I imagine it sounds a lot like this. Having just seen Crazy Heart (and listened to the soundtrack), it strikes me that many of these songs would fit right into Bad Blake's catalog. Get this record. For now, I gotta go order Tim Harwill's other records"
— Alt 52 Music Musings/Texas - Alt-512 Music Musings


"'The Wander Man Revisited' album review"

"The next record that caught my ear was Tim Harwill's The Wander Man Revisited (buy). Harwill's tag on his site is "too folk for country, too country for rock 'n roll." That tagline really sets the tone for his music. The whole time I listened to this record, I was trying to determine who or what it was reminding me of. There are lots of elements, musical and thematic, that remind of a less country version of Merle Haggard or Dwight Yoakam. The thing that it most reminded me of was a full fledged country version of Jimmy Buffett. Imagine if Jimmy Buffett has stayed on his country path and never gone to Key West with Jerry Jeff back when. I imagine it sounds a lot like this. Having just seen Crazy Heart (and listened to the soundtrack), it strikes me that many of these songs would fit right into Bad Blake's catalog. Get this record. For now, I gotta go order Tim Harwill's other records"
— Alt 52 Music Musings/Texas - Alt-512 Music Musings


"'Thru The Bottom Of A Glass' album review - Summer 2005"

“Thru The Bottom Of A Glass” is just full of acoustic roots country flavored tunes that Tim Harwill delivers with a winning vocal performance. Lots of flat-top guitar pickin and some very smooth harmonica playing on several of the cuts on this CD. Tim’s style varies with each song. Some of his delivery is up front and in your face and a few are melodic and tender. Over all this is a very personal sounding album that is full of great music and great songwriting. - RMR Editorial Review


- Roots Music Report


"'Thru The Bottom Of A Glass' album review - Summer 2006"

Tim Harwill is originally from the Manitoba Lake District but is now based in Alberta. Both his songwriting and his singing strongly reflect a sense of prairie-country roots. He’s a pretty good 12-string troubadour, but his strength is the vulnerability of his vocals. He has that quavery-rhythmic, high, lonely, soulful, somewhat strangled sound that Sammy Bodean displayed on the best of The Bodeans songs. His songwriting is strong, too. Plough Boy Blues, Thru the Bottom Of A Glass, Finer Place, Match Made In Heaven, and Still Singin’ are all fine examples of his craft. Catfish John Peterson adds harmony vocals and some fine harmonica work to a disc that tries to capture Harwill’s live sound and succeeds pretty well. - Barry Hammond, Penguin Eggs Magazine - Penguin Eggs Magazine


"Independent music awards for Tim Harwill, October 16, 2007"

Toronto Exclusive Magazine is pleased to announce that touring Alberta true country singer/songwriter Tim Harwill has been named 'Best Independent Male Country Artist' for 2007 in addition to winning 'Best Independent Country Album' for his latest CD release 'All I Really Need' in the provincial category at the 1st annual Toronto Exclusive Magazine awards! Featuring categories and artists from across Canada, Toronto Exclusive Magazine presented awards in a diverse array of genres from Jazz thru Classical, including R&B, Hip Hop, Blues and Country categories, at celebrations held in Toronto on October 16, 2007. Currently touring rural Alberta with his non-stop 'Neverending Highways Tour' for additional information and his detailed touring schedule we invite friends and fans to visit the official web site located at www.tfpmusic.com today! - Toronto Exclusive Magazine


"'Thru The Bottom Of A Glass' album review - Summer 2006"

Tim Harwill is originally from the Manitoba Lake District but is now based in Alberta. Both his songwriting and his singing strongly reflect a sense of prairie-country roots. He’s a pretty good 12-string troubadour, but his strength is the vulnerability of his vocals. He has that quavery-rhythmic, high, lonely, soulful, somewhat strangled sound that Sammy Bodean displayed on the best of The Bodeans songs. His songwriting is strong, too. Plough Boy Blues, Thru the Bottom Of A Glass, Finer Place, Match Made In Heaven, and Still Singin’ are all fine examples of his craft. Catfish John Peterson adds harmony vocals and some fine harmonica work to a disc that tries to capture Harwill’s live sound and succeeds pretty well. - Barry Hammond, Penguin Eggs Magazine - Penguin Eggs Magazine


"'All I Really Need' album review - September 2006"

With Tim Harwill's new CD, All I Really Need, you get all you really need in the form of good country music. This CD is another fine piece of work from Harwill and gives the listener that good old, deep down soulful, country sound. The songs tend to whisk you back to a less-complicated, but harder time, and you can feel the passion in his delivery. Harwill is a gifted songwriter who creates well-crafted stories. He combines rhythmic vocals and insightful lyrics to captivate the listener and create vivid images that linger long after the song is over. His authentic acoustic sound is uniquely his and you will want to listen to this CD again and again. - Herb Barbee, RMR Staff Reviewer - Roots Music Report


Discography

Tim Harwill & The Legends: A Tribute to Catfish John 2012 - CD

Somethings Old, New, Borrowed & True: Tim Harwill Live @ Reba's Cafe 2011 - CD (live concert recording)

Tim Harwill & Friends: The Wander Man Revisited 2009 - CD

Tim Harwill: All I Really Need 2006 - CD

Tim Harwill Pruden: Thru The Bottom Of A Glass 2005 - CD

Harwill: Spinner Of Tales 1998 - CD (as 1/3 of folk/roots trio Harwill)

Photos

Bio

A performing songwriter heavily influenced by the old school of country music, I’ve been earning my daily bread making my own brand of Americana music since the dawn of the 21st century. I’m a Metis-Canadian and spent my younger days misbehaving while fronting a country/rock cover band that toured the saloon circuit primarily in Manitoba, the province in Canada where I was born. I was also the songwriter and lead vocalist of the Alberta folk/roots recording trio Harwill through the roaring 90’s. There’s a lot more to the story but as a westerner I value my privacy and I’m not much for blowing my own horn. Nowadays I spend as much time as demand permits on the road with the Tim Harwill Band playing live music for the people who want to hear it and doing my best to keep the roof over my head.

An addiction to dancing to my own tune has imposed a lifetime of musical independence upon me, and I’m grateful to have been able to release 6 CD’s of critically praised recordings of my music (so far) without the assistance of either a major label or a government grant. I’ve been greatly assisted throughout my solo career by the angelic and committed support of a small group of friends and investors who have chosen to remain nameless, and to whom I’m eternally indebted. I now produce and record my music on behalf of The Sterling Label, an Edmonton, Alberta, based ‘micro label’ operated by my business manager.

My latest recording is titled “A Tribute to Catfish John by Tim Harwill & The Legends” and features a band of country music legends from Alberta. Available on iTunes or off-of-the-stage, the ‘comp-free’ and ‘live-off-the-floor’ album was produced-and-engineered by yours truly on my 24-bit digital recording facility at Thorsby, Alberta. I’m both pleased with and proud of this record, which was mixed-and-mastered by my friend and colleague Mark Ripp, at Toronto, Ontario, and released February 29, 2012.

In spite of a life-long battle with stage fright, performing my music live for an audience has been the great love of my life. My repertoire is extensive and includes titles that span my recording career as well as covers of my favorite Outlaw Country and Americana songwriters. After 10 years of touring mainly solo and acoustic since early 2013 I’ve been working on stage with talented compadres in the Tim Harwill Band, an electrified outfit scheduled for recording sessions in 2014.

A transplanted Albertan for the majority of my adult life, I’m a lacto-ovo vegetarian and atheist. I’m also a member of a family that counted 8 siblings and have been blessed with children (and now a grandson!) of my own, for whose love I’m ever grateful. I live with my best friend and canine traveling companion Koko, in the picturesque village of Thorsby, Alberta, in western Canada.