Timothy Welbeck
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Timothy Welbeck

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2014

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Established on Jan, 2014
Solo Hip Hop Soul

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Feb
15
Timothy Welbeck @ Temple University

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Jan
16
Timothy Welbeck @ Temple University

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Nov
03
Timothy Welbeck @ Philadelphia University

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Music

Press


"Inspirational Professor Timothy Welbeck raps his lectures at Temple University"

Published on Mar 1, 2017
Timothy Welback, a legendary and inspirational professor, from Temple University raps his lectures to his students. Erin Simon and REVOLT present an exclusive interview with the Timothy Welback.

For More:

Timothy Welbeck is an attorney, Lecturer of African American Studies, and contributing writer. As an attorney, Timothy's legal practice has primarily focused on medical malpractice, personal injury, family law, entertainment law, and corporate liability. To that end, Timothy has successfully represented or participated in the representation of dozens of individuals and organizations, including, but not limited to: a health-care based nonprofit that provides in-home, skilled nursing to the elderly and disabled, nurses and attorneys accused of malpractice, multiple individuals diagnosed with terminal cancer, national recording artists, and the executive producer of the soundtrack for a major motion picture.

As a professor, Timothy presently instructs "Hip-Hop and Black Culture," and "Mass Media and the Black Community" in the African American Department at Temple University, "Rap, Hip-Hop and Society," and "Race and Hip-Hop" in the Sociology Department at Widener University, and "The African American Experience" in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Philadelphia University. His scholarly work focuses on contemporary African and African American cultural transmissions, retention, expressions and evolution, hip-hop as a microcosm of the African American experience, contemporary issues of racial identity in America, in addition to the intersection of racial classification and the law within the American context. Accordingly, Timothy has lectured and/or presented at symposiums, conferences, and esteemed institutions nationally and internationally, including: Magdalen College of Oxford University, Villanova University, Temple University, University of California, Northridge, Widener University, Philadelphia University, et al. Timothy's work as an attorney and scholar has allowed him to contribute to various media outlets, such as the BBC Radio 4, The Philadelphia Inquirer, NPR, The International Business Times, etc. - REVOLT TV


"Christian emcee/professor Timothy Welbeck raps in lectures to students"

Revolt TV recently published a feature on Christian rapper Timothy Welbeck, a professor at Temple University and Philadelphia University, who uses his ability on the mic in class.

"From its inception, hip hop has been a voice for the voiceless," Welbeck said. "And when you think about it, the artists, they didn't necessarily have to sing. They're now saying that I can communicate music without having the ability to hold a note. And then the people making the music didn't have to play an instrument. You could take what used to be a music player and turn it into a musical instrument.

"[Hip hop has] offered opportunities for people to speak when they often didn't have an opportunity to speak. It's perfectly positioned to talk about social issues, to talk about mass incarceration or police brutality or urban neglect, and so a lot of millennials find their voice in their favorite hip-hop artist because they see themselves in the artist."

Welbeck teaches "Hip-Hop and Black Culture" and "Mass Media and the Black Community" at Temple, as well as "The African American Experience" and "Political Subcultures" at Philadelphia University. Watch Revolt TV's interview with him below.

Welbeck also just released a single called "May You Ever" from his next album, No City for Young Men.

Tone Jonez produced "May You Ever", which "seeks to affirm the beauty, dignity, brilliance, and accomplishments of iconic women, both past and present, as a means to encourage women to live up to their God-given calling," a press release reads. - Rapzilla


"Watch Timothy Welbeck’s “May You Ever” Video"

“The most disrespected person in America is the black woman.”

-Malcolm X

At the funeral of Ronald Stokes, a man killed outside a mosque by the LAPD on April 27, 1962, Malcolm X delivered one of his more well regarded speeches, aptly entitled—Who Taught You to Hate Yourself. In it, Malcolm X asked, “Who taught you to hate the texture of your hair? Who taught you to hate the color of your skin Who taught you to hate to hate shape of your nose and the shape of your lips?” He continued by describing how one has to be taught not to cherish the basic parts of self. In the speech, he later said, “The most disrespected person in America is the black woman.”

Malcolm X’s speech spoke to an unfortunate truth, “For as long as the African woman has been in America, she has endured a barrage of stimuli that sought to dehumanize her and deny her beauty. Her entire existence, and all of its physical manifestations—the hue of her skin, the plump of her lip, the kink in her hair, the fullness of her curves—were all stigmatized as their antithesis was normalized.” Moreover, as the Oscar-nominated film Hidden Figures demonstrated, history routinely omits the accomplishments of black women.

Attorney, professor, and hip-hop artist, Timothy Welbeck wants to change the narrative and combat the historic denigration of black women. In his song, May You Ever, he celebrates the legacy of iconic black women past and present, including: Sojourner Truth, Michelle Obama, Coretta Scott King, Harriet Tubman, Venus and Serena Williams, Nina Simone, etc. In the Tone Jonez produced song, he raps, “May you ever, sojourn for the truth like Isabella, be regal the way Michelle does/May you ever, raise up kings like Coretta/Be courageous like Harriet was.” He even alludes to the problem Malcolm X observed, by rapping, “The kink of your hair, the plump of your lips/Is seen as a reason to stare, not a wondrous gift/But no thing compares to the circumference of your hips/When all of humanity has come birthed from within …” It makes for a powerful statement, one with a beautiful video to accompany it. As Black History Month concludes, and with Women’s History month slated to begin tomorrow, the timing of the song could not be more fitting. You can check out Timothy’s video below. - Respect Magazine


""MAY YOU EVER" CHANNELS INNER GREATNESS IN WOMEN""

TIMOTHY WELBECK HAS INTERJECTED POSITIVITY INTO HIP-HOP BY DISPLAYING A MESSAGE OF WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT IN HIS LATEST OFFERING, MAY YOU EVER.

On the Tone Jonez produced record, he sets forth to encourage woman by signaling iconic women throughout our nation, past and present, namely: Sojourner Truth, Michelle Obama, Coretta Scott King, Harriet Tubman, Venus and Serena Williams, Nina Simone, etc. In evoking these names and their towering legacies, Timothy encourages women to continue into their example. Particularly, he raps:

"MAY YOU EVER, SOJOURN FOR THE TRUTH LIKE ISABELLA/BE REGAL THE WAY MICHELLE DOES/MAY YOU EVER, RAISE UP KINGS LIKE CORETTA/BE COURAGEOUS LIKE HARRIET WAS … MAY YOU EVER, BREAK GROUND LIKE VENUS AND SERENA/SING OF FREEDOM LIKE LENA/MAY YOU EVER, INSPIRE LIKE SEPTIMA/BRING THE FIRE LIKE NINA"
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The song seeks to not only use the examples of influential women, but it also seeks to combat societal norms that objectify and demean women, particularly black women. In describing the song, Timothy said, “The entire idea was to leverage the power of hip-hop to convey the intrinsic value, beauty, brilliance, and poise of women, particularly black women. I make specific reference to black women, not as a means to exclude others (all who find encouragement in this, please do), but to specifically affirm a group whose worth is routinely questioned, and whose contributions are regularly overlooked. It is as my friend Ekemini Uwan often says, “Change the narrative.’” In his self-directed video to accompany the song, he features his wife and two daughters, along with other accomplished women from his local Philadelphia area as a means to celebrate the remarkable achievements of everyday women. - Hype Fresh Magazine


"TIMOTHY WELBECK “MAY YOU EVER” FROM THE NO CITY FOR YOUNG MEN ALBUM"

Timothy Welbeck is an attorney, university professor, hip-hop artist, and contributing writer who has crafted a stirring brand of music that is thought-provoking and relevant, honest and life-changing.

His work as an attorney and scholar has allowed him to contribute to various media outlets, such as the BBC Radio 4, The Philadelphia Inquirer, NPR, The Huffington Post, REVOLT TV, The International Business Times, 900 WURD AM, et al, and present at universities nationally and internationally. He also blogs for The Huffington Post, in addition to several online and print publications (i.e. Hype Fresh Magazine, Respect Magazine, et al) that offer editorials, reviews and analysis of hip-hop culture. As a hip-hop artist, he has released two full length recordings, to critical acclaim, shared the stage with national and international acts (Janelle Monae, Jidenna, EPMD, Dead Prez, Canton Jones, Phanatik, Immortal Technique, et al), won songwriting contests (Session 1 Grand Prize in 2010 John Lennon Songwriting Contest), garnered high compliments from hip-hop legends, industry taste-makers (Mtv Correspondent Sway) and record executives (VP of A&R at Def Jam, Lenny S). - Rep Da King Magazine


"PREMIERE: TIMOTHY WELBECK - "THE SOULS OF BLACK FOLK""

"How does it feel to be a problem?" W.E.B. Du Bois asked more than a century ago. Today, attorney, university professor, and emcee Timothy Welbeck asks the same question. On the two-year anniversary of the “heartbreaking” death of Michael Brown, Timothy Welbeck releases the visual for his song The Souls of Black Folk.

The Tone Jonez produced song, which is a captivating fusion of hip-hop, gospel, jazz, and spoken word, chronicles the collective plight of African Americans facing centuries of systematic injustice in the US. It draws much of its inspiration from W.E.B. Du Bois’ signature work, and James Weldon Johnson’s Lift Ev’ry Voice. It all amounts to a powerful statement, with a powerful visual compliment.

In the hypefresh sponsored video, Timothy Welbeck plays the pastor of a small church "whose building is bombed by people incensed by the pastor's community activism." In a moving display of courage, he demonstrates the resolve to rebuild in the face of stark adversity. In many ways, it shows the resilience of African Americans to overcome adversity on the road to progress and racial uplift. In light of racial tensions in the nation, and persistent attacks on traditional black churches, the video is quite timely. - Hype Fresh Magazine


"Timothy Welbeck Releases “The Souls of Black Folk” Video"

Today marks the two year anniversary of Michael Brown’s death. His “heartbreaking” demise sparked a series of protests around the world, launched the “Black Lives Matter” movement into the national spotlight, and served as a difficult reminder that America still deals with “the problem of the color line”, as W.E.B. Du Bois observed 113 years ago. In other words, Michael Brown fundamentally changed the way American sees itself in its supposed “post-racial” era. It would seem as though we have received constant reminders of this reality since Michael Brown’s fatal encounter with Darren Wilson. Attorney, university professor, and hip-hop artist Timothy Welbeck has captured the angst of African Americans navigating America’s painful racial injustices in his latest work, The Souls of Black Folk. Part spoken word, part Gospel, part jazz, yet all hip-hop, the Tone Jonez produced song, which is inspired by W.E.B. Du Bois groundbreaking book with the same title, functions as a rap version of Lift Ev’ry Voice.

The song’s video depicts a small church “whose building is bombed by people incensed by the pastor’s community activism.” In a word, it is powerful. Considering the simmering racial tensions our nation currently experiences, the song and its video is quite timely.

Video filmed, edited and directed by team hypefresh. - Respect Magazine


"Video: Timothy Welbeck - The Souls of Black Folk ft. Dozzy Daniel"

Pennsylvania-based artist Timothy Welbeck released a W.E.B. Du Bois inspired music video and single called "The Souls of Black". The song titled after Du Bois' seminal work of the same name will be on Timothy's forthcoming album No City for Young Men. - Rapzilla


"Watch: Timothy Welbeck Tiny Desk-Style performance"

Each year, Bob Boilen of NPR‘s All Songs Considered sponsors a Tiny Desk contest for independent artists to appear on the fabled NPR show. The show, which places performers at Boilen’s desk in NPR offices (hence the name “Tiny Desk”), has featured performers like Common, John Legend, Robert Glasper, Anthony Hamilton, Anderson.Paak, Rapsody, Oddisee, T Pain (sans auto tune) and a host of others. The Tiny Desk contest draws thousands of submissions, because the winner of the Tiny Desk concert will join the ranks of those celebrated names. University professor, attorney, and emcee, Timothy Welbeck has decided to enter, and teamed with Hype Fresh to film a Tiny-desk style performance at Temple University (where he teaches Hip-Hop and Black Culture and “No City for Young Men: Hip-Hop and the Narrative of Marginalization”). You may find his performance below:


For those unfamiliar, Timothy Welbeck is an attorney, university professor, hip-hop artist, and contributing writer who has crafted a stirring brand of music that is thought-provoking and relevant, honest and life-changing. His work as an attorney and scholar has allowed him to contribute to various media outlets, such as the BBC Radio 4, The Philadelphia Inquirer, NPR, The Huffington Post, The International Business Times, 900 WURD AM, et al, and present at universities nationally and internationally. He also blogs for The Huffington Post, in addition to several online and print publications (i.e. Hype Fresh Magazine, Respect Magazine, et al) that offer editorials, reviews and analysis of hip-hop culture. As a hip-hop artist, he has released two full length recordings, to critical acclaim, shared the stage with national and international acts (Janelle Monae, Jidenna, EPMD, Dead Prez, Canton Jones, Immortal Technique, et al), won songwriting contests (Session 1 Grand Prize in 2010 John Lennon Songwriting Contest), garnered high compliments from hip-hop legends, industry tastemakers (Mtv Correspondent Sway) and record executives (VP of A&R at Def Jam, Lenny S). You can see his submission from last year below. - Respect Magazine


"'RAP AND BALL 2.0' TOUCHES ON BLACK COMMUNITY ISSUES"

"Rap and Ball 2.0" is the compelling second single from Timothy Welbeck's forthcoming album entitled, "No City for Young Men". The song, produced by the incomparable Tone Jonez, challenges children and young people alike to pursue their dreams, yet to fortify that pursuit with expectations that the transcend the desire for fame. In essence, he raps about the perils of only aspiring to "rap" and "play ball". In the video, Timothy makes his directoral debut, and demonstrates why he did not pursue a career in professional basketball.

And to be quite honest, Welbeck's approach is quite distinguished in it's own right. Though not sonically perfect (in terms of audio engineering) the message runs deep, which every inner city, concrete jungle community would instantly identify with. Why are our future generations limited to just a few options? Is it by design? Or maybe just a mere coincidence? This record reveals hidden truths that demand more attention from the Black community. Solutions are needed, or the next up is lost, without cause. - Hype Fresh Magazine


"Music: Timothy Welbeck - Nobody ft. Tomeka Carroll & Domonique Wilson"

"'Nobody" is a gripping single by Timothy Welbeck that chronicles the harrowing details of the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin in addition to the fatal shooting of Oscar Grant III. With the use of chilling piano chords, snapping snare drums, winding electric guitar riffs and remarkable guest appearances from Tomeka Carroll and Domonique Wilson, Timothy paints a vivid picture of the two tragedies, remarks on their unfortunate frequency, the unjust application of law and how hip-hop and urban culture contribute to the stereotyping of African American men. Sadly, the song, produced by David P. Stevens, has become more timely in recent months." - Rapzilla


"Red Baron appears on Drop t he R"

Philadelphia, PA’s Red Baron has made his sophomore studio album, entitled Shades of Grace, available for free download. Shades of Grace is the natural progression of Red Baron’s critically-acclaimed debut, Paint the Town Red. The album has been described as “a masterpiece” and “Hip Hop in its purest form”. The music itself has heavy fusions of Gospel, Jazz, Blues, Soul, Rock and yet still rings true of Hip Hop. It’s content wrestles with some of the more compelling issues of our day-conversion, the intersection of race and faith, the search for love, satisfaction and purpose…all neatly packed into one incredible CD.

Red Baron is an attorney and college professor (Hip-Hopcrisy: Hip Hop and Black Culture at Temple University) who has crafted a stirring brand of music that is thought-provoking and relevant, honest and life-changing. His music has been described as “what a beautiful painting sounds like”. He has garnered high compliments from Hip Hop legends (EPMD, DJ Scratch), industry tastemakers (MTV Correspondent Sway) and record executives (VP of A&R at Def Jam, Lenny S), in addition to having won the Session 1 Grand Prize in the Hip Hop Category for the 2010 John Lennon Songwriting Competition; all of which has quickly made Red Baron one of rap music’s best kept secrets. Be on the lookout for more from him, and enjoy this new project below.

DOWNLOAD: Red Baron – “Shades of Grace” - Drop the R


"Red Baron featured in Beats and Lyrics Magazine"

Section 1:

What project are you currently promoting?
At the moment I’m actively promoting my sophomore album, Shades of Grace. Shades of Grace is the natural progression of my debut, Paint the Town Red. The music itself has heavy fusions of gospel, jazz, blues, soul, rock and yet still rings true of hip-hop. Its content wrestles with some of the more compelling issues of our day--conversion, the intersection of race and faith, the search for love, satisfaction and purpose--all neatly packed into one incredible cd. You may preview and download Shades of Grace in its entirety for free by visiting: http://redbaron.bandcamp.com.

What is your thought process when working on new music?
I approach each new song with a mind to create a timeless piece of art that speaks to people. I want to make music worthy of your time, music you will enjoy that will challenge and inspire you, music that will encourage you to share with others. That’s the goal.

What inspires your music?
Life itself is ripe with inspiration. Each day greets us with new possibilities, new hope, new adventures and the like. It merely takes the presence of mind to pause long enough to observe them. Besides, the fact that the true and living God, Who created the Heaven and earth, desires to spend time with me, with us, is sufficient inspiration to last all eternity.

How would you classify your music?
The producer I work with said my music is “what a beautiful painting sounds like.” My former manager describes it as “hip-hop/soul,” because, in his words, I am making “more than just rap music.” I believe those are apt descriptions. More specifically, I describe my music as authentic, because it’s real.

I talk about genuine issues I encounter. I’m an adult (I’m 30) so I make music for grown ups. I actually get up and go to work, then come home and spend time with my wife and children (unless of course I’m on the road). I’m a follower of Jesus Christ. My music reflects all of that, and if you find those things boring, you probably won’t like what I rap about. In terms of my sound, my music blends the music I heard as a child, yet still rings true of hip-hop. Just listen, and you’ll know all you need to . . .

How would you describe yourself as an artist?
I like to tell people, imagine if Jay-Z and Lauryn Hill had a love child, raised him in the church and only let him listen to gospel and the classics of soul. That person's music would sound like mine. In short, my music is what a beautiful painting sounds like.

What sets your music apart from others in your genre?
My perspective, my content, my lyrical abilities, my sound all give my music potency that sets it apart from that of others. It centers on my faith and how I fulfill my role as a husband, father, attorney and college professor, all set to the tune of great music. Who else does that?

When you are working on a new song… Do you already have a concept in mind or do you rather write on top of music/beats?
Each of my songs has its own story, but they all begin with a concept (e.g. marriage, fatherhood, appreciating life, the search for satisfaction, my upbringing, balancing my legal career with my musical career), and a corresponding moment of inspiration. From there, the idea evolves and develops further.

Typically, I write to an instrumental of a song that captures the mood I want to convey (it also serves as a good starting point when I talk to my producer about making music) if I do not have music already. At that point, I generally write small portions (e.g. four to six bars) of the song at a time, then arrange it in the most fitting way, though some times I write the whole verse/song in a brief moment of inspiration. I usually prefer to literally write my verses (put pen to pad or put fingers to keys), but there have also been several occasions, where I had a long road trip, or was just riding in the car and would place an instrumental on repeat while I mumbled the eventual lyrics to myself, you know the whole not writing my lyrics down thing.

What are some of your musical influences?
Ironically, to be a rapper I did not grow up listening to much rap, and do not listen to as much as one would suspect now. I didn’t begin listening to rap until my early teenage years, because my parents’ introduction to rap music came from the musings of 2 Live Crew. Naturally they said, “If that is what rap is, there will be none of it in our house.” So, I drifted towards their collections of old gospel albums (really old stuff like Mahalia Jackson) and the classics of soul as a small child: Marvin, Aretha, James, Bob, Stevie, Michael, you name them. Additionally, my mom wanted me to learn to play the violin as a child. She would often say, “You never see little black boys playing the violin. I want to see you play in Carnegie Hall one day,” so it was a foregone conclusion I would play. That’s why I often say by the time I encountered rap I - Beats and Lyrics Magazine


"Red Baron featured in Beats and Lyrics Magazine"

Section 1:

What project are you currently promoting?
At the moment I’m actively promoting my sophomore album, Shades of Grace. Shades of Grace is the natural progression of my debut, Paint the Town Red. The music itself has heavy fusions of gospel, jazz, blues, soul, rock and yet still rings true of hip-hop. Its content wrestles with some of the more compelling issues of our day--conversion, the intersection of race and faith, the search for love, satisfaction and purpose--all neatly packed into one incredible cd. You may preview and download Shades of Grace in its entirety for free by visiting: http://redbaron.bandcamp.com.

What is your thought process when working on new music?
I approach each new song with a mind to create a timeless piece of art that speaks to people. I want to make music worthy of your time, music you will enjoy that will challenge and inspire you, music that will encourage you to share with others. That’s the goal.

What inspires your music?
Life itself is ripe with inspiration. Each day greets us with new possibilities, new hope, new adventures and the like. It merely takes the presence of mind to pause long enough to observe them. Besides, the fact that the true and living God, Who created the Heaven and earth, desires to spend time with me, with us, is sufficient inspiration to last all eternity.

How would you classify your music?
The producer I work with said my music is “what a beautiful painting sounds like.” My former manager describes it as “hip-hop/soul,” because, in his words, I am making “more than just rap music.” I believe those are apt descriptions. More specifically, I describe my music as authentic, because it’s real.

I talk about genuine issues I encounter. I’m an adult (I’m 30) so I make music for grown ups. I actually get up and go to work, then come home and spend time with my wife and children (unless of course I’m on the road). I’m a follower of Jesus Christ. My music reflects all of that, and if you find those things boring, you probably won’t like what I rap about. In terms of my sound, my music blends the music I heard as a child, yet still rings true of hip-hop. Just listen, and you’ll know all you need to . . .

How would you describe yourself as an artist?
I like to tell people, imagine if Jay-Z and Lauryn Hill had a love child, raised him in the church and only let him listen to gospel and the classics of soul. That person's music would sound like mine. In short, my music is what a beautiful painting sounds like.

What sets your music apart from others in your genre?
My perspective, my content, my lyrical abilities, my sound all give my music potency that sets it apart from that of others. It centers on my faith and how I fulfill my role as a husband, father, attorney and college professor, all set to the tune of great music. Who else does that?

When you are working on a new song… Do you already have a concept in mind or do you rather write on top of music/beats?
Each of my songs has its own story, but they all begin with a concept (e.g. marriage, fatherhood, appreciating life, the search for satisfaction, my upbringing, balancing my legal career with my musical career), and a corresponding moment of inspiration. From there, the idea evolves and develops further.

Typically, I write to an instrumental of a song that captures the mood I want to convey (it also serves as a good starting point when I talk to my producer about making music) if I do not have music already. At that point, I generally write small portions (e.g. four to six bars) of the song at a time, then arrange it in the most fitting way, though some times I write the whole verse/song in a brief moment of inspiration. I usually prefer to literally write my verses (put pen to pad or put fingers to keys), but there have also been several occasions, where I had a long road trip, or was just riding in the car and would place an instrumental on repeat while I mumbled the eventual lyrics to myself, you know the whole not writing my lyrics down thing.

What are some of your musical influences?
Ironically, to be a rapper I did not grow up listening to much rap, and do not listen to as much as one would suspect now. I didn’t begin listening to rap until my early teenage years, because my parents’ introduction to rap music came from the musings of 2 Live Crew. Naturally they said, “If that is what rap is, there will be none of it in our house.” So, I drifted towards their collections of old gospel albums (really old stuff like Mahalia Jackson) and the classics of soul as a small child: Marvin, Aretha, James, Bob, Stevie, Michael, you name them. Additionally, my mom wanted me to learn to play the violin as a child. She would often say, “You never see little black boys playing the violin. I want to see you play in Carnegie Hall one day,” so it was a foregone conclusion I would play. That’s why I often say by the time I encountered rap I - Beats and Lyrics Magazine


"Red Baron featured in the New Music You Should Know Section of Bro Bible"

Apparently this guy isn’t just a hip hop artist, he’s also an attorney and a college professor. This album has an old school feel with tastes of gospel, jazz, blues, soul, and rock. - Bro Bible


"Red Baron listed as one of 50 Christian Artists That Provide Hope for the Future"

This post was inspired by a lack of knowledge about the genre that I fell in love with back in 2000. I gravitated to Christian Hip-Hop after I became a Christian and I listened to everything ranging from Ambassador, LPG, Tunnel Rats, Mars ILL, New Breed, The Remnant, Cross Movement, Shai Linne, Braille, Sho Baraka, Nomadic the Journeyman, and many more.

Years went by and I started to distance myself from Christian Hip-Hop, I was tired of the same thing! I felt that the artists were not sharing their full testimony. I felt that honesty was being replaced by an overbearing message. I felt like the fire and brimstone message was not connecting with the masses (out of sight, out of mind).

Now over the years I have seen a resurgence in lyrical quality, artists such as Trip Lee, Da Truth, Viktory, Jin, Giano, Bizzle, Andy Mineo, and more provide lyrics that are applicable to life. I still thought that the production was super par...

I also felt like the primary focus was on feeding Christians as opposed to reaching those that were at a cross road. Yesterday, I had the opportunity to listen to a monumental mixtape from Houston based emcee Lecrae called Church Clothes.

The mixtape has already produced a large buzz based on the step up in terms of production (the project boasts features from 9th Wonder, Boi-1da, S1 and more). The reach potential for this project is what gravitated me towards checking it out (I will admit that I am not the biggest Lecrae fan yet he gained a new fan yesterday!).

The mixtape caused me to ponder about the state of Christian Hip-Hop, most importantly who or whom the torch bearers should be. Humble Beast, Illect and Reach Records have rosters full of gospel based talent.

I am not a gospel or CHH aficionado so I asked for assistance from my homie Kellus from the DaSouth.com in terms of putting together this list. He provided some incredible leads and exposed me to artists I have never heard before. This list is comprised of artists that have the quality or qualities to reach a vast majority of people. - Praverb.net


"Red Baron appears in the Artist 2 Watch Section of Skope Magazine"

Red Baron
http://www.sonicbids.com/RedBaron

How does it feel to be an A2W artist @ Skopemag.com?
Red Baron: I count it an honor. It’s always humbling for a reputable publication such as Skopemag to recognize what I do. You have covered some of the greats, I’m glad to be in the number.

Skope: Besides fortune & fame what draws you to music and being an artist?
Red Baron: Truth be told, the allure of fortune and fame has never been a motivating factor for me. The two merely represent a potential byproduct of success. The music draws me because of the way it speaks to people. It speaks to me. I suppose I’m blessed to say God has graced me with a gift to use it to speak to others. In so doing, I can impact the lives of others while doing something I love. It is as I say in one of my songs, entitled This Music, “We pause from breathing for speaking meaning sacred is prose/So in the last ten years I have been placed in these shows/I’ve been placing my life on hold for the saving of souls.”

Skope: What are you currently promoting the most via an album, tour, single etc?
Red Baron: At the moment I am still actively promoting my sophomore album, Shades of Grace. Shades of Grace is the natural progression of my debut, Paint the Town Red. The music itself has heavy fusions of gospel, jazz, blues, soul, rock and yet still rings true of hip-hop. Its content wrestles with some of the more compelling issues of our day–conversion, the intersection of race and faith, the search for love, satisfaction and purpose–all neatly packed into one incredible cd. You may preview and download Shades of Grace in its entirety for free by visiting: http://redbaron.bandcamp.com.

I am also prepping for the release of a new single entitled Nobody. Nobody chronicles the harrowing details of the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman in addition to the fatal shooting of Oscar Grant III by former Oakland transit officer Johannes Mehserle. The song paints a vivid picture of the two tragedies, remarks on their unfortunate frequency, the unjust application of law and how hip-hop and urban culture contribute to the stereotyping of African American men.

It is slated to appear on the official mixtape for the Spike Lee executive produced film You’re Nobody, ’til somebody kills you. The Michael Pinckney directed film, is a gritty, action-packed tale of two New York City homicide detectives, Detective Charles Johnson and Detective Joseph Francelli, who are hurled into the high-stakes world of the hip-hop industry when a series of rap superstars are mysteriously killed.

Skope: How much time per week do you devote to music and do you work/school as well?
The short answer is not enough. I’m married with two small children (my daughter is two, my son is about eight months). I’m also an attorney and college professor (Hip-Hopcrisy: Hip-Hop and Black Culture at Temple University). My course at Temple meets twice a week, and I am typically at my law office or at home with my family when not there. Suffice to say, much of my day is filled with plenty of activity that draws my attention away from the music. Nevertheless, I make it a point to regularly set apart specific time to write, record, perform, conduct interviews, et cetera. That’s how we’re talking now.

Skope: Have you been able to earn money from music and if so how?
Red Baron: I have earned money from my music, but not enough to leave my day job. I have earned money from some of the more traditional revenue within the industry: album sales and digital downloads, performance fees (show money) song writing contests, artist showcases, et cetera. I have also earned money by providing counsel for artists and companies within the entertainment industry.

Skope: What person has been the most encouraging & supportive of your music?
Red Baron: My wife is undoubtedly my biggest supporter. Her encouragement is invaluable. I could not do this without her help.

Skope: What is coming up for you & where you at online?
Red Baron: Aside from promoting Shades of Grace and prepping for the release of Nobody, I am in the process of writing my next album, entitled The Cost of Living. I also have enough songs in the works to act as a promotional project to release prior to The Cost of Living. Additionally, I am working on a single, which may turn into an ep, with a colleague who is an emcee and physician. Lastly, I have a few contributing articles in the works for online publications and/or my own blog. Updates for all will appear on my site: http://paintedred.net.

Speaking of which, you may learn more about what I do by visiting: http://paintedred.net. You can follow me on Twitter @thetrueredbaron. I am also on Facebook (http://facebook.com/The.Red.Baron.1) and blog at http://thepaintedone.wordpress.com. - Skope Magazine


"Vents Magazine Interview"

1. What's the meaning behind the band's name?

The moniker “Red Baron” means” the baron painted red with the blood of Christ.” There is a scripture in the Bible where Jesus says, “And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all men unto me.” During British nobility, a baron’s job was to add to his king’s kingdom (e.g. annex new land and/or obtain other forms of wealth for the kingdom). Rather than extending the boundaries of a given territory as barons of old, I desire, to exalt the name of Jesus with my music and with the life I live. In so doing, I add to my king’s kingdom.

2. How the band started??

While in high school, I went to the mall with a friend on a Saturday afternoon. We bought a cd single of a popular song on the radio while there (do they still sell those things?). When we got back to the house, we listened to the song. When it ended, the instrumental began to play. My friend said, “Hey, let’s freestyle.” I reluctantly agreed, he liked what I said, and decided we should start a group that day. We worked together for several months, and disbanded after he moved to a different area. I continued rapping, and the rest is as they say . . .

3. What's the message to transmit with your music??

I oftentimes begin my set by telling the audience that hip-hop and my car have a great deal in common. Aside from making far too much noise at times, both are vehicles. I typically further the point in saying the fact that my car brought me to the evening’s venue does not make it good or bad, it simply makes my car a vehicle. Likewise, hip-hop is not good or bad; it’s a vehicle, that when used correctly, can transport the listener to a greater understanding of this life we live, this life as it should be and the God I serve. That is my aim, to use my music to transport the listener to a place where he/she can see there is a better way.

4. What's your method at the time of writing a song??

Each of my songs has its own story as to how it came to be, so I do not have a standard formal for writing. Notwithstanding, all of my songs begin with a concept (e.g. appreciating life, the search for satisfaction, my upbringing, balancing my legal career with my musical career), and then begin to evolve as the idea develops. Typically, I write to an instrumental of a song that captures the mood I want to convey (it also serves as a good starting point when I talk to my producer about making music). At that point, I generally write small portions (e.g. four to six bars) of the song at a time, then arrange it in the most fitting way.

I actually enjoy writing rather than composing verses in the studio (though I have done that on occasion), because I have the opportunity to better collect my thoughts and ensure the lyrics are of the utmost quality. During the writing process, I tweak and revise the lyrics until I record them. Presumably, I developed this habit in part because studio time was a luxury for me early in my career, so I had little time to waste when I went to record. Even though I have more consistent access to the studio, I tend come to the studio with the song near completion. Once I record the song, I consider it complete.

5. [Who are] your [biggest] music influences??

Ironically, I did not begin listening to rap until my early teenage years, primarily because my parents’ introduction to rap music came from the musings of 2 Live Crew. Naturally they forbid rap in their house, so I drifted towards their collections of the classics of soul as a small child: Marvin, Aretha, James, Bob, Stevie, Michael, you name them. Additionally, my parents also ensured that I learned to play the violin and piano at a young age, so by the time I actually encountered rap, my musical stylings were more influenced by Bach than ‘Pac, more Mozart than Mos Def.

Once I started listening to rap, I initially hung off every word of any emcee that said something that demonstrated skill. For example, Talib Kweli is one of those rare artists that never ceases to make me say, “Wow.” Eventually others would prove influential (e.g. ‘Pac’s versatility, Jay’s wit, Nas’ lyricism, Big’s delivery, The Roots’ chemistry, Common’s perspective, Outkast’s artistry, etc.).

Later, one of the more instrumental influences in shaping the music I make and helping me find my voice as an artist just so happens to be three great friends of mine that I went to college with—The Remnant. They taught me how to balance lyrical dexterity with relatability. In essence, they showed me how to be myself and not compromise my message. They helped me learn how not to lose sight of me when presenting the message.

6. What plans do you guys have for the future??

I am presently nearing the completion of my second album, entitled, Shades of Grace. The album is the natural progression of my debut in terms of content and instrumentation. The music itself includes a deft fusion of jazz, blues, soul, rock an - Vents Magazine


"Album Review: Red Baron - "Paint The Town Red""

Categories:
Beats: 4
Rhymes: 4
Quality: 4
Content: 4
Consistency:4
Overall: 4

Open your text books turn to chapter seven and you will find a man invading the streets of Atlanta college campuses with a red paint brush. This man is Red Baron with his debut album, Paint The Town Red on Strange Fruit Productions. WARNING: This album contains 13 tracks chock full of God's Word, dope lyrics, and cinematic production.

The album's opening song is "One" in which he tells of how there is one God and we are one in Christ. "Beautiful" is a song describing and encouraging a women's true beauty. "HipHopcrisy" talks about how Hip Hop has been perverted by money and self glorification. Red Baron spits, "Now our kids are starving cause we've been feeding 'em garbage, we produced it we rapped it and then we bought it, we call these neo pimps and hustlers artists, gave them awards when their thoughts are Godless".

Red Baron spits about how financial aid payments, no food, and parking tickets won't take away his praise on “I Still Got This Praise". He also gives you a descriptive tale of the day our savior was crucified on the album's closing song, properly titled, "The Cross".

This album's standout tracks are "Long Kiss Goodbye" and "Eyes Wide Shut" (my favorite). "Long Kiss Goodbye" talks about the relationship between a man and the women we were once faithful to, the world. Red Baron spits about how he had to end this relationship due to the pull away from God that the world so strategically cast upon us. "Eyes Wide Shut" features The Remnant (shouts out to Fan Club). The production on this song will place you into a movie setting as these four mc's talk about those walking and leading blindly. Lyrically and conceptually the best song on the album.

The only weak points of Paint The Town Red are the songs, "Red Baron" and "Paint The Town Red", though good songs, they just don't measure up to the rest of the album. Other than that this album is a straight banger. Please cop three and don't front. Be sure and lookout for more Red Baron projects, this is only the beginning for this bright emcee.

For more info and to cop the album and see Red Baron log onto:
www.paintedred.net and www.sonicbids.com/redbaron.

Peace Until Next Time!

Double
- BYOBB


"What Others Have Had to Say About Red Baron"

What do others have to say about you?

In a time where being comfortable is preferred over honesty and truth suffers at the hands of convenience, Red Baron offers an album that looks to effect change in the hearts of men and women alike. Transporting poignant observations on an eager lyrical soundscape, Red Baron will sure be to have the listening public in a frenzy.
-Adan Genesis of the Remnant-

The Red Baron has used his gift for holy hip-hop to tend the sheep of God, which so many have left behind. My life has been blessed, my viewpoint has been changed, and my understanding of God's word has been transformed by the ministry of this 'mighty man of valor.
-Courtney Clayton (HIP4HOP Ministries, President/ Founder)-

[Red] is able to speak the words of life in a new era with a passion for the truth. This is what makes his talent and rap a bridge for a generation to cross over into a place where peace surpasses all understanding.
-Tony Rocker (Morehouse College Bonner Scholar Program, Assistant Program Director)-

What it means to be a Red Baron truly inspired me to do the best I can I adding to my Father’s kingdom.
-Jaketa Stoudemire (Spelman College ’06)-

[A] unique[ly] powerful experience with the Truth that is God’s Word and the reality that we as believers face in the world that we are in but not of
-Karla Gurley (Bayshore Christian Ministries, TeenWorks Assistant)-

Red Baron,
His passion ignites a flame in those when he delivers. What we do remember the most about Red is his humbleness. God’s word said that He would exalt those that are humble. His spirit and readiness to serve has inspired us to continue to run this race with patience and boldness. We need examples in our society, role models, and Red isn’t ashamed to put his name on the line for the one that died on the cross for our sins.
-Ricardo Flo of Platinum Souls-

His cool and unique style has soothed our souls throughout the years—exemplifying truth, honor, and pure hip-hop! We appreciate knowing that he too represents winning 1 million souls and more!
-Ty Scott of Platinum Souls-

Red Baron’s stage presence is amazing, and the insight and message within his music is inspiration to people from all different types of faith… The first time I saw [Red] perform my mouth dropped. This brother was spittin’ to Get By, and it was just raw… The line that got me was, “But it’s really hip, hip-hopcrisy, it’s gotta be more than [hot] beats and misogyny…” [Red] brings a very unique wisdom and energy to the art that shows wisdom beyond his years.
-Smalleyez-

The first time I heard [Red] perform, I was reminded of the vital role of music in social change. [Red’s] powerful lyrics and passionate performance carry the gospel vision of generations before him and will renew any listener’s belief in a better, more hopeful tomorrow.
-Christa Mazzone (Call to Renewal, Field Organizer)-

Red Baron’s rhyme scheme has the ability to reach you on both a spiritual and intellectual level. While his style is still unique, his delivery attracts the average listener, and what’s more, it’s hot!
-Lyric-

The Red Baron brings the truth with tight beats and meaningful lyrics. His message exposes the dangers of hip-hop, yet encourages young people to get excited about a relationship with God.
-Ericka Dorsey (Spelman College ’04)-

The Red Baron's poetic style and hip-hop gospel message are a true reflection of his character. The words that are spoken from his lips are the words that resonate from his heart. He is truly passionate about the message that he brings.
- Michelle Tyree(Fellowship of Christian Athletes/Georgia Tech, Program Assistant)-

[His] ministry is blessed, I truly know God uses [him] because [he] has spoken to my spirit and life's situations on several accounts. [Red] you are the best. Thank you for being obedient :)
-Tara Taylor (Spelman College ’04)-

Besides the creativity that he labors after, the clever lyrics he waves, and the energetic show he offers, the Red Baron is above all transparent. He is completely honest. There is no pretense in him. There is no fronting in him. He is a person of impeccable character. In a musical genre where protection of ego and pride are almost pre-requistes, Red is a blinding light of humility. His relationship with God glows from him. STOP SLEEPING AND GO TO HIS SHOW NOW!!!
-Alex Trackstar-

Red Baron is an audacious musician whose vocal instrumentation and lyricism combined with his passion for Christ, captures the very essence of God’s heart. A true minister of the Gospel…I’m honored to call him friend
-Tomeka "Epiphany" Carroll-

[Red] is a musical genius! His ability to create music that speaks to today’s generation is incredible. I have heard some of the tracks from his upcoming release and they are blazin’ hot. Trust me when you buy this CD you will not be disappointed!
-Reverend Derrick Hill (Ray of Hope Christian Church, Youth Pastor)- - Paintedred.net


"Red Baron: The Road Less Traveled: "Paint the Town Red" Album Review"

Red Baron: The Road Less Traveled:
In the effort of full disclosure, I have to admit I am not a fan of Christian rap, or Holy hip hop (all apologies if that is considered a derogatory term). My issues have nothing to do with the message. It’s a matter of preference, likely from my realm of church socialization of music; I prefer to hear my spiritual songs in the ilk of John P. Kee and others. Beyond that, my issue with spiritually based rap that I’ve heard on the radio is that the production quality is poor, the lyrics are not limber enough to stretch beyond the weight of the message, and the delivery typically sounds like someone is trying to preach, speak and rap all in the same breath. My experiences have been so consistent, I was wary when I received a CD from Atlanta-based artist Red Baron. I can say unequivocally, that Red Baron is a true hip hop artist, whose subject matter happens to be uplifting the Christ and that he shatters all of my preconceived notions about widespread viability of this segment of the art form.

Blame me on not providing you a more well-rounded backgrounder for Red Baron. My schedule during my review period didn’t provide time for an in-depth interview. Had I had time to visit with him, I would have wanted to really politick with him about his track “Hip Hopcrisy”, featuring a beat that sounds like a Jay-Z layover about the music industry pushing a legacy of terrible music almost like an agenda. I would have asked him more about the production of the track, “One” which felt like early Wu-Tang production, a la “36 Chambers”, with the haunting background strings. I would have pressed him on the track “Red Baron” with the resident artist going on an ego trip, powered by the Spirit, saying, “Can we change our ways/in these last and urgent days?” I think we would have had some interesting discussions about “Long Kiss Goodbye” a tale about being young and in love, including being (too) young in the spirit. Two of my favorites would be “As In the Days of Noe”, with xylophones reminiscent of early ‘90’s Native Tongues production and “I Still Got this Praise.”

What separates Red Baron from others I’ve heard is not simply the subject matter, but the lyricism and the delivery. The album is both hopeful and direct about redemption and all of the opportunities for redemption through the spirit. It doesn’t profess an easy road to salvation, but a realistic look at the world and the behaviors the someone on the path exhibits. Red Baron’s voice sounds like an American version of Kardinal Official. The production here is strong. There are strings, violins and guitars, reminiscent of Fishbone in their heyday. There are a few missteps in my mind, including the mic levels which, at times frustrated me as much as Bahamadia’s. Also, the vocal support from guest vocalist Epiphany is much stronger on “If this Sense were Common” than “”Long Kiss Goodbye.” But, these are minor items on a solid outing.

Now LD Fam, this does not mean that you now need to flood the LowDown office mailbox with much more. If I am provided bluegrass, heavy metal, whatever I likely will review it once and then move back to my wheelhouse, evidenced on other albums I’ve covered here.

As for Red Baron, the album is well worth the listen, the burn and all of that. I enjoyed it thoroughly. You can find Red’s album at most of the local record stores here, as well as on his site: http://www.paintedred.net .

My name is Kinetic and I approve this album.

- Atlanta Low Down


"Preach Pastor Interview"


DJ Worship More: Red Baron first of all I would like to say thank you and thank you again for the privilege to air your music on our station. Red you are an artist of many accomplishments in the industry and you are NOT a stranger by any means to rap and Hip Hop scene.

Tonight we will be discussing your new single Have Plenty feat. Tomeka Carroll from new your sophomore album Shades of Grace.

Before we discuss your new album, many of our readers/listeners would like to know about the stage name Red Baron.

(Question #1) DJ Worship More: Red please inform us, why did you decide to give yourself the title of the Red Baron.

(Answer #1) Red Baron: In all honesty, I didn’t first choose my name considering all of symbolism of the title—I simply liked how it sounded. After the passing of my grandfather, whom I closely resemble, people began calling me “Red” to emphasize how much we looked alike (he was called “Carpenter Red”). Meanwhile, some of my friends began calling me “Red “because of my complexion. Shortly after I began rapping, I chose Red Baron because the moniker “Red” had already stuck, and I also thought “Red Baron” sounded cooler and more distinctive than “Red.”

Now the moniker “Red Baron” means” the baron painted red with the blood of Christ.” In John 12:32 Jesus says, “And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all men unto me.” During British nobility, a baron’s job was to add to his king’s kingdom (e.g. annex new land and/or obtain other forms of wealth for the kingdom). Rather than extending the boundaries of a given territory as barons of old, I desire, to exalt Jesus with my music and with the life I live. In so doing, I add to my king’s kingdom.

DJ Worship More: Red you are the [Session 1 Grand Prize Winner in the Hip-Hop Category of the John Lennon Songwriting Competition]. That is an awesome accomplishment by a Christian rapper; to me it’s no surprise after hearing your music and ability to flip a metaphor.

(Question #2) Question DJ Worship More: Were you surprised to taken this honor as the 2010 winner in this category and as a Christian rapper do you think that this is new door the God has opened for you and other Christian rappers to present music that is accepted by the secular world with a power spiritual message?

(Answer #2) Red Baron: First, I appreciate your kind words on Have Plenty. To answer your question, winning the John Lennon Songwriting Competition was humbling. The selection committee is an assemblage of some the more notable names within the music industry, and to have them think so highly of the record is an honor.

You’re also correct about God using this opportunity to open new doors. One of the more formidable obstacles for “Christian Music” reaching nonbelievers is Christian music incorporating contemporary genres (e.g. rock, rap, R&B) has traditionally paled in comparison to its secular counterparts. On an episode of King of the Hill, the show’s main character, Hank, stumbled across a lackluster Christian rock band. He approached them and simply said, "you're not making Christianity better, you're making rock and roll worse." I believe people would be more willing to hear what we have to say if we presented it in a more compelling fashion. For Christians who make music, that starts by allowing God to use them to make great music.

With every song I write, I strive to make timeless music that conveys God’s eternal truth. As a believer in the living God, I should strive for nothing less, and rely on Him to guide the process. Winning this competition is yet another medium God has used to offer legitimacy to what I do with my music, and prayerfully for those who come after me.

DJ Worship More: I would like to take a quote from you when you wrote that, “Music you hear is the organized noise that clutters your ears, and is soon forgotten. Music that you listen to captures your attention, resonates within your spirit, touching your soul in ways that you often lack the ability to describe. In hearing the
Red Baron, you are compelled to listen to him; and if you’ll just listen, you'll know all you need to...”

That quote is exactly how I felt when I first heard you new release Have Plenty and to use a quote of my own the message is in the music!

Red Baron: Praise the Lord. That is a high compliment.

(Question #3) DJ Worship More: Love the single Have Plenty, please tell me about Shades of Grace what is the meaning behind the title?

(Answer #3) Red Baron: Thank you. In one of my songs I say, “A friend says, ‘God is a painter and the sky is His canvas’/I say, ‘Man is painted in the hue of His grandness/And it’s enchanting, how God stands and/Colors our struggles with the beauty of His planning‘. . . ” Basically, we see the shades of God’s grace with the passing of everyday. At times believers obsess over the black and white letters of the law and fail to see the blood of Christ within the shades of gre - Preach Pastor.com


"AJ&DBS Interview"

Q. How did the project come into existence?
A. I began this project as I neared the completion of my second year of law school (yeah I’m a lawyer). Naturally the pace of my music slowed considerably while there, but I managed to begin writing and recording when I could, then completed the bulk of it upon graduation. ·

Q. Who are the members of the band if any and please tell us about it?
A. I’m a solo artist, but I perform with a live band when possible. They are Anthony Forrest (keys), Dave Stevens (guitar) Brian Lomax (bass) and Tracy Smith (drums).

Q. How would you describe your sound/genre?
A. The producer I work with says my music is “what a beautiful painting sounds like.” I believe that’s an apt description. More specifically, I describe my music as authentic hip-hop, because it’s real.

My content addresse genuine issues I encounter. I’m an adult (I’m much closer to 30 than I am to 20) so I make music for grown ups. I actually get up and go to work every morning. In the evening, I come home and spend time with my wife and daughter (unless of course I’m on the road). I’m a follower of Jesus Christ. My music reflects all of that, and if you find those things boring, you probably won’t like what I rap about.

In terms of my sound, my music blends the music I heard as a child, yet still rings true of hip-hop. By way of comparisons, imagine if Jay-Z and Lauryn Hill had a love child, raised him in the church and only let him listen to gospel and the classiscs of soul. That person would make music that sounds like mine. Just listen, and you’ll know all you need to . . .

Q. What formal training or previous experience do any of the members have?
A. As a smaller child I received classical training in the violin and piano. I didn’t appreciate it then, so I stopped as a teenager. As a result, I don’t play any more.

Q. Are you working w/ a producer on your upcoming album?
A. Yes, I am working with David P. Stevens to put this album together. He’s an extraordinary musician and composer.

Q. Who would you say has been the biggest influence on the bands sound or that you have used as inspiration for your music?
A. It’s difficult to pinpoint one person or group, particularly within rap, because I did not listen to much rap until my teenage years. My parents’ introduction to rap music came from the musings of 2 Live Crew. Naturally they forbid rap in their house, so I drifted towards their collections of the classics of soul as a small child: Marvin, Aretha, James, Bob, Stevie, Michael, you name them. Additionally, my parents also ensured that I learned to play the violin and piano at a young age, so by the time I actually encountered rap, my musical stylings were more influenced by Mozart than Mos Def.

Once I started listening to rap, I initially hung off every word of any emcee that said something that demonstrated skill. Some of those who would prove influential included ‘Pac, Jay, Nas, Big, The Roots, Outkast and Common.

Later, one of the more instrumental influences just so happens to be three great friends of mine that I went to college with—The Remnant. They taught me how to balance lyrical dexterity with relatability. In essence, they showed me how to be myself and not compromise my message.

Q.What advice would you give to others starting out?
A. Make sure this you know this is what you are supposed to do. One of the foremost advantages of the Information Age is that artists can disseminate their music more broadly and more easily, hence consumers are inudated with more music than ever before. Consequently, there is an enormous amount of awful music out, and there is no need for others to contribute to it.

Q. Where can people go to learn more about you and hear your music?
A. Anyone interested in learning more about my music may do so by visiting my site: www.paintedred.net, or by visiting my electronic press kit. You may also read my thoughts on some of the compelling issues of our day at my blog, Kind of Red. I am also on Facebook and Myspace. Lastly, I regularly send out an electronic newsletter with updates about my music. All those interested in receiving it should send an e-mail to contact@paintedred.net, and I will have them added to the e-mail list.

Q. If you could play anywhere in the world or with anyone you wanted where and who would it be with?
A. I would love to do a show on every inhabited continent, and venture into any country that would have me, but I have a particular affinity for Ghana (where my father is from), France (I studied French in high school and college), India (I love the culture), China (it’s China) and Australia (arguably one of the coolest places on the planet). I’d love to share the stage with Stevie Wonder, Lauryn Hill, Norah Jones, India.Arie and Israel Houghtin.

Q. What has been your greatest experience so far either individually or as a whole?
A. This year’s been a blessing. I - AJ&DBS


"Next Music Blog Interview"

Why or how did you choose your bandname?

In all honesty, I didn’t first choose my name considering all of the hidden metaphors and symbolic nature of such a title—I simply liked how it sounded. After the passing of my grandfather, whom I closely resemble, people began calling me “Red” to emphasize how closely my features mirrored his (he was called “Carpenter Red”). Shortly after I began rapping, I chose Red Baron because the moniker “Red” had already stuck, and I also thought “Red Baron” sounded cooler and more distinctive than “Red.” Once I shifted the focus of my music, I began calling myself the baron painted red with the blood of Christ. When I researched the title baron, I discovered as with so much of our destiny, God had predestined what I initially deemed a mere coincidence.

Essentially, during the time of British nobility, a baron’s job was to add to his king’s kingdom. Rather than extending the boundaries of a given territory as barons of old, I lifts up the name of Jesus, that He might draw all men unto Him (John 12:32). In so doing, I add to my King’s kingdom.


What inspired you to pursue a music career?

I never intended to pursue a music career initially. Moreover, as a young man, my parents pushed me to find a respectable profession rather than gallivanting around with these songs of mine (I guess that is part of the reason I am an attorney today). Even when I expressed my creative impulses early on, I originally envisioned myself pursuing a career as a visual artist because I have been drawing since before I could write. In terms of the music, I was not even listening to rap for more than a year and a half before I started rapping myself. Yet something happened when I started listening. It’s as I said in my song This Music, “This was music, like I had heard through the grapevine/Percussion, base lines, people used to create rhymes/It changed lives, from that day it changed mine/I was in love, fighting only would waste time.” When I stopped fighting the music’s hold on me, I began to see my purpose in it. Again, in This Music I say:


But I kept rhyming/I kept writing, I kept fighting/Looking for a purpose in this, praying that I’d find it/And that’s when I gave God glory in all that I did/Flowing in His name/Knowing it wasn’t my gift/So I obeyed saying that I would do it in faith/And at each place they would say, “What must I do to be saved?”/And that’s when I would say I knew that my influence was great/I would preach this Gospel, I would do what it takes/I couldn’t do this any more to rock an audience/I’m held accountable when all of the applauses end


Can you recall any particular moment or experience that may have moved you to pursue a music career? If so, please explain:

In the fall of 2002, Clark Atlanta University’s Homecoming Committee invited me to participate in the school’s Homecoming Gospel Concert, scheduled to take place in the James P. Brawley Student Center. The organizer placed me at the close of the concert, in part because her unfamiliarity with my brand of music left her few other options. On that afternoon I presented a song I had recently written called, As in the Days of Noe. The song is based on a scripture (Matthew 24:37) where Jesus compared His second coming to the days of Noe (Noah).

The concert took place on beautiful fall afternoon. When it started, there was not a cloud in the sky. Most of the attendants took note of the picturesque weather because the Student Center had large windows that provided a good view of the campus. As I proceeded through the song, I glanced out of the window on occasion, and began to see storm clouds forming outside. Shortly after I concluded the song with the final line, “Because looking in the sky, it looks like rain to me,” the clouds seemed to burst, and the area had begun to receive a torrential downpour. The rain fell with such force that it compelled all of the concert’s attendants to wait indoors for the rain to cease, and all who were outdoors to seek shelter from the unexpected deluge. From that day forward, I knew this is what I am supposed to do.


What or who are your biggest musical influences (past or present)?

Surprisingly enough I did not begin listening to rap until my early teenage years, primarily because my parents’ introduction to rap came from the musings of 2 Live Crew. Naturally they forbid rap in their house, so I drifted towards their collections of the classics: Marvin, Aretha, James, Bob, Stevie, Michael, you name them. They also ensured that I learned to play the violin and piano at a young age, so by the time I actually encountered rap, my musical stylings were more influenced by Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Otis Redding, Booker T & the MGs, Wilson Pickett, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder and Michael Jackson than any particular rapper.
In regards to rappers, initially, I hung off every word of any emcee that said something of quality—someo - Next Music Blog


"AJ&DBS"

Q. How did the project come into existence?
A. I began this project as I neared the completion of my second year of law school (yeah I’m a lawyer). Naturally the pace of my music slowed considerably while there, but I managed to begin writing and recording when I could, then completed the bulk of it upon graduation. ·

Q. Who are the members of the band if any and please tell us about it?
A. I’m a solo artist, but I perform with a live band when possible. They are Anthony Forrest (keys), Dave Stevens (guitar) Brian Lomax (bass) and Tracy Smith (drums).

Q. How would you describe your sound/genre?
A. The producer I work with says my music is “what a beautiful painting sounds like.” I believe that’s an apt description. More specifically, I describe my music as authentic hip-hop, because it’s real.

My content addresse genuine issues I encounter. I’m an adult (I’m much closer to 30 than I am to 20) so I make music for grown ups. I actually get up and go to work every morning. In the evening, I come home and spend time with my wife and daughter (unless of course I’m on the road). I’m a follower of Jesus Christ. My music reflects all of that, and if you find those things boring, you probably won’t like what I rap about.

In terms of my sound, my music blends the music I heard as a child, yet still rings true of hip-hop. By way of comparisons, imagine if Jay-Z and Lauryn Hill had a love child, raised him in the church and only let him listen to gospel and the classiscs of soul. That person would make music that sounds like mine. Just listen, and you’ll know all you need to . . .

Q. What formal training or previous experience do any of the members have?
A. As a smaller child I received classical training in the violin and piano. I didn’t appreciate it then, so I stopped as a teenager. As a result, I don’t play any more.

Q. Are you working w/ a producer on your upcoming album?
A. Yes, I am working with David P. Stevens to put this album together. He’s an extraordinary musician and composer.

Q. Who would you say has been the biggest influence on the bands sound or that you have used as inspiration for your music?
A. It’s difficult to pinpoint one person or group, particularly within rap, because I did not listen to much rap until my teenage years. My parents’ introduction to rap music came from the musings of 2 Live Crew. Naturally they forbid rap in their house, so I drifted towards their collections of the classics of soul as a small child: Marvin, Aretha, James, Bob, Stevie, Michael, you name them. Additionally, my parents also ensured that I learned to play the violin and piano at a young age, so by the time I actually encountered rap, my musical stylings were more influenced by Mozart than Mos Def.

Once I started listening to rap, I initially hung off every word of any emcee that said something that demonstrated skill. Some of those who would prove influential included ‘Pac, Jay, Nas, Big, The Roots, Outkast and Common.

Later, one of the more instrumental influences just so happens to be three great friends of mine that I went to college with—The Remnant. They taught me how to balance lyrical dexterity with relatability. In essence, they showed me how to be myself and not compromise my message.

Q.What advice would you give to others starting out?
A. Make sure this you know this is what you are supposed to do. One of the foremost advantages of the Information Age is that artists can disseminate their music more broadly and more easily, hence consumers are inudated with more music than ever before. Consequently, there is an enormous amount of awful music out, and there is no need for others to contribute to it.

Q. Where can people go to learn more about you and hear your music?
A. Anyone interested in learning more about my music may do so by visiting my site: www.paintedred.net, or by visiting my electronic press kit. You may also read my thoughts on some of the compelling issues of our day at my blog, Kind of Red. I am also on Facebook and Myspace. Lastly, I regularly send out an electronic newsletter with updates about my music. All those interested in receiving it should send an e-mail to contact@paintedred.net, and I will have them added to the e-mail list.

Q. If you could play anywhere in the world or with anyone you wanted where and who would it be with?
A. I would love to do a show on every inhabited continent, and venture into any country that would have me, but I have a particular affinity for Ghana (where my father is from), France (I studied French in high school and college), India (I love the culture), China (it’s China) and Australia (arguably one of the coolest places on the planet). I’d love to share the stage with Stevie Wonder, Lauryn Hill, Norah Jones, India.Arie and Israel Houghtin.

Q. What has been your greatest experience so far either individually or as a whole?
A. This year’s been a blessing. I - AJ&DBS


"2010 John Lennon Songwriting Competition Session 1 Grand Prize Winner (Hip-Hop Category) Survey"

1. Who wrote the music, the lyrics, etc?

With regard to the authorship of Have Plenty feat. Tomeka Carroll, I wrote the lyrics, my wife, Rashida Welbeck, wrote the chorus, and Tomeka Caroll wrote the outro she sings at the conclusion of the song. David Liciaga of 3-Fifths Multi-Media-www.3-fifths.com composed and produced the original instrumentation, and David P. Stevens of Sanctifly Music Group, LLC added additional arrangements and production to the composition.

2. What are your backgrounds and influences?

Ironically, I did not begin listening to rap until my early teenage years, primarily because my parents’ introduction to rap music came from the musings of 2 Live Crew. Naturally they forbid rap in their house, so I drifted towards their collections of the classics of soul as a small child: Marvin, Aretha, James, Bob, Stevie, Michael, you name them. Additionally, my parents also ensured that I learned to play the violin and piano at a young age, so by the time I actually encountered rap, my musical stylings were more influenced by Bach than ‘Pac, more Mozart than Mos Def.

Once I started listening to rap, I initially hung off every word of any emcee that said something that demonstrated skill. For example, Talib Kweli is one of those rare artists that never ceases to make me say, “Wow.” Eventually others would prove influential (e.g. ‘Pac’s versatility, Jay’s wit, Nas’ lyricism, Big’s delivery, The Roots’ chemistry, Common’s perspective, Outkast’s artistry, etc.).

Later, one of the more instrumental influences in shaping the music I make and helping me find my voice as an artist just so happens to be three great friends of mine that I went to college with—The Remnant. They taught me how to balance lyrical dexterity with relatability. In essence, they showed me how to be myself and not compromise my message. They helped me learn how not to lose sight of me when presenting the message.


3. How was the song recorded? What equipment did you use? Who is singing?

We began recording Have Plenty in the spring of 2009 at Sanctifly Studios’ prior location in Bryn Mawr, PA. We began by recording my vocals over the original instrumental written and produced by David Liciaga of 3-Fifths Multimedia. At the time of the initial recording, I had written a different chorus. I wanted Tomeka Carroll to sing it because we had collaborated previously, and I believed her voice would offer a beautiful compliment to the composition already in place.

My wife heard my preliminary recordings after one of my sessions, and wrote what is now the chorus. After hearing what she wrote, I leaned towards using what I originally wrote for the chorus, until I came to my senses and realized what my wife wrote was a better fit (I’m so glad I listened to her!). We later flew Tomeka Carroll in from Richmond, VA, and taught her the chorus on our way to the studio. She sang it, and my wife, along with a close friend of ours (Karena Sheppard) accompanied Tomeka with background vocals.

A couple of months after that session, Sanctifly Studios moved to its Philadelphia location, and I scheduled a session to add live instrumentation and perfect my vocal performance. David P. Stevens of Sanctifly Music Group wrote additional arrangements, and subsequently added live instrumentation on the acoustic guitar, electric guitar and electric bass. We also contacted Wardell “dELLpHoNics” Pearson, Jr. to add live drumming to help embellish the composition.

4. How did you hear about the Contest?

I learned of the John Lennon Songwriting Contest from Sonicbids. I have received notification for the Contest for years, but finally decided to exercise some prudence and enter this year.

5. What inspired the creation of your song?

There is a scripture in the Bible that reads, “Not that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content.” The next verse goes on to say, “I know both how to be abased, and I know how to abound: every where and in all things I am instructed both to be full and to be hungry, both to abound and to suffer need.” Those two scriptures (Philippians 4:11-12) essentially sums up the concept of Have Plenty.

Of the songs that will complete my upcoming album, Have Plenty is one I wrote more recently. Many who hear it now will more than likely will remark on how easily one may say, “I have plenty” with a new wife, new daughter, new home, new degree and new job. Nevertheless, I tend to remind such people that I wrote much of this song not too long after I was sleeping on the floor of my little apartment in Philadelphia.

The concept came to me as I sat in that little apartment and noticed how sparsely furnished it was. I had begun imagining where I could soon place new furniture and artwork when I remembered how a short while before I simply prayed to find a place to sleep, any place other than my car. It was a few days after I - John Lennon Songwriting Competition


"Hip-Hop Stardom 101 Red Baron feature (pages 20-21, 28)"

1. Tell us about where [you’re] from and how long you[have] been doing music?
I start off my song Southern Comfort (Hue I Am) by saying, “I was born by the river/Where the vehicle of choice was a ‘Lac or Chevy pickup/And the side of the track you were at is how that differed . . .” Basically, I was born in Memphis grew up outside of Atlanta and now I’m holding down Philly. I’ve been making music since I was in high school.

2. Tell us about yourself and what company you represent.
I am just a guy with a gift that wants to be used of God to get His Word out to His people, and if you would just listen, you would know all that you need to . . .

I represent Sanctifly Music Group, LLC. We’re a Philadelphia-based production company that specializes in the authorship, recording, editing, release, distribution, sale, performance, and representation of recording artists’ work and the artists themselves. Our aim is to create timeless music that does not compromise our message.

3. What was the real turning point in your career?
This year’s been a blessing. I received some big compliments from key figures in the industry (e.g. EPMD, Dj Scratch, Lenny S (VP of A&R at Def Jam) and Mtv Correspondent Sway), received the Grand Prize in the Hip-Hop Category of Session 1 of the 2010 John Lennon Songwriting Competition, participated in some notable music industry showcases and received more radioplay, etc. Nevertheless, one of the more important moments in my career came early.

In the fall of 2002, I participated in Clark Atlanta’s Homecoming Gospel Concert. I happened to close the concert. On that afternoon I did my song called, As in the Days of Noe. It’s based on a scripture (Matthew 24:37) where Jesus compared His second coming to the days of Noe (Noah).

The concert took place on beautiful fall afternoon; there wasn’t a cloud in the sky. As I finished my song, I glanced out of the window, and began seeing storm clouds forming outside. Shortly after I finished with the final line, “Because looking in the sky, it looks like rain to me,” the clouds seemed to burst, and the area had begun to receive a torrential downpour. The rain fell with such force that we all had to wait indoors for the rain to cease. From that day forward, I knew this is what I am supposed to do.

4. How would you describe your music and style?
The producer I work with said my music is “what a beautiful painting sounds like.” I believe that is an apt description. More specifically, I describe my music as authentic, because it’s real.

I talk about genuine issues I encounter. I’m an adult (I’m much closer to 30 than I am to 20) so I make music for grown ups. I actually get up and go to work every morning. In the evening, I come home and spend time with my wife and daughter (unless of course I’m on the road). I’m a follower of Jesus Christ. My music reflects all of that, and if you find those things boring, you probably won’t like what I rap about. In terms of my sound, my music blends the music I heard as a child, yet still rings true of hip-hop. Just listen, and you’ll know all you need to . . .

5. Are you working on any mixtapes, singles [or] albums currently?
I am presently nearing the release of my second album, entitled, Shades of Grace. The album is the natural progression of my debut in terms of content and instrumentation. The actual content tackles some of the more compelling issues of our day—conversion, the intersection of race and faith, overzealous religious fervor, unity of mankind, the search for love, satisfaction and purpose—all neatly packaged into great music.

The music itself includes a deft fusion of jazz, blues, soul and rock, but keeps its foundation in hip-hop. Hip-hop as a genre has lost a sense of its compositional element, and too often rappers and their audiences have grown satisfied with monotonous melodies and looped drum patterns. That significantly diminishes the aesthetic appeal of the music, at least in my eyes. This album will push the genre more towards making music again. It will be available on iTunes, Amazon, Napster, Myspace Music, Walmart Music Downloads, Zune and Cdbaby. You can find the lead single, Have Plenty (winner of the Grand Prize Winner in the Hip-Hop Category of the 2010 John Lennon Songwriting Competition) on iTunes right now.

6. What artists inspired you when you were younger?
Ironically, I didn’t begin listening to rap until my early teenage years, because my parents’ introduction to rap music came from the musings of 2 Live Crew. Naturally they forbid rap in their house, so I drifted towards their collections of the classics of soul as a small child: Marvin, Aretha, James, Bob, Stevie, Michael, you name them. Additionally, my parents also ensured that I learned to play the violin and piano at a young age, so by the time I actually encountered rap, my musical stylings were more influenced by Mozart than Mos Def.

Once I started lis - Hip-Hop Stardom 101


Discography

Paint the Town Red (2005)
Shades of Grace (2011)
No City for Young Men (2017)
You may access Timothy Welbeck's discography here: https://timothywelbeck.bandcamp.com/
You may access lyrics and annotations for Timothy Welbeck's lyrics here: https://genius.com/artists/Timothy-welbeck-formerly-known-as-red-baron

Photos

Bio

Timothy Welbeck represents, literally and figuratively. He is an emcee, attorney and educator who has crafted a stirring brand of music that is thought-provoking and relevant, honest and life-changing. He has garnered high compliments from hip-hop legends (EPMD, DJ Scratch), industry tastemakers (Mtv Correspondent Sway) and record executives (VP of A&R at Def Jam, Lenny S), in addition to having won the Grand Prize in the Hip-Hop Category for the 2010 John Lennon Songwriting Competition, and shared the stage with the likes of Janelle Monae, EPMD, Immortal Technique, Dead Prez, Jasiri X, et al. Timothy  also instructs Hip-Hop and Black Culture at Temple University. All of which has made him one of the emerging voices in hip-hop.

Born in the bedrock of blues music, reared in the home of R&B, and classically trained in violin and piano, it would seem Timothy was destined to make music. His music fuses the blues, jazz, soul, R&B and rock, yet still rings true of hip-hop.

Timothy found his voice as a musician while a student at Morehouse College, where he graduated in 2004. Shortly after graduating, he released his critically acclaimed debut, "Paint the Town Red." In the spring of 2011, he followed that with his critically acclaimed sophomore album, entitled, "Shades of Grace."

Timothy has performed in various venues: colleges and universities, national conferences, churches, rehabilitation centers, detention centers, bars, clubs, and even a grocery store. Moreover, his material has been featured on an official mixtape alongside material from some of the more prominent names in hip-hop (e.g. Jay-Z, Kanye West, Will.I.Am, Lil' Wayne, T.I., Drake, Nikki Minaj, Rick Ross, etal). The forums have changed; the response has not.

Amid a time where most contemporary artists spin tales of lustful acts, violence, bling-bling dreams, etc., Timothy's content and potent lyrics set him apart. His music focuses on his faith in Christ and fulfilling his role as a husband, father, attorney and educator. Quite simply, his music is what a beautiful painting sounds like. Just listen, you'll know all you need to...


Band Members