Tish Lyndsey
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Tish Lyndsey

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2010 | INDIE

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | INDIE
Established on Jan, 2010
Solo Pop Indie

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Aug
10
Tish Lyndsey @ Wild Ginger

Franklin, Tennessee, USA

Franklin, Tennessee, USA

Jul
28
Tish Lyndsey @ The Factory at Franklin

Franklin, Tennessee, USA

Franklin, Tennessee, USA

Jun
06
Tish Lyndsey @ The Jazz Kitchen

Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


You may not know the name Tish Lyndsey, but she's on course to be a leading light in the Indianapolis music community.

In addition to her fresh interpretations of jazz, pop and soul, Lyndsey has placed social activism at the forefront of her work.

She's also the current guest on the "Off the Record" video series. Click http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070301/VIDEO03/303010002/0/MULTIMEDIA
to catch an interview segment and an exclusive performance of "Unfinished Song."

For a behind-the-scenes report, visit my IndyStar.com blog.

- indystar.com


You may not know the name Tish Lyndsey, but she's on course to be a leading light in the Indianapolis music community.

In addition to her fresh interpretations of jazz, pop and soul, Lyndsey has placed social activism at the forefront of her work.

She's also the current guest on the "Off the Record" video series. Click http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070301/VIDEO03/303010002/0/MULTIMEDIA
to catch an interview segment and an exclusive performance of "Unfinished Song."

For a behind-the-scenes report, visit my IndyStar.com blog.

- indystar.com


It’s not easy to quantify Tish Lyndsey’s musical style; I once described her as a Billie Holliday-style torch singer, which is accurate but doesn’t even begin to explain her range.

“I’m not really sure I fit into anything here,” Lyndsey says. “I’m not a jazz artist, I wouldn’t call myself R&B; I’m not sure I’d call it rock.”

A brief look at some of her musical influences bears this out: Lauryn Hill, Stevie Wonder, James Taylor, Faith No More, Steely Dan and Blondie. Oh yes, Blondie. “I just love Debbie Harry; she’s my idol,” Lyndsey says. “I’m all over the place. I love Natalie Maines from the Dixie Chicks as much as I love Stevie Wonder.”

What is certain about Lyndsey is that she’s a full-blown entertainer, not content to do any show where she’s giving it less than her all, whether it’s to a full house or six people. “When I’m performing, I like to do what I like to see,” Lyndsey says. “I want to connect with the audience; I want people to feel what I’m feeling.”

Along with a topnotch backing band — David Hammes on keys, Poncho Hedrick on bass and Jerry Gates on drums — she’ll be bringing this approach to her shows this weekend. An approach, she hopes, will kick-start innovation.

“I’m from Detroit, which is a big, crazy music city,” she says. “Here, I get the feeling you kind of have to dig to find the good stuff, but I have noticed over the last year that people are kind of wanting change and demanding change.”

As musical genres blend together, people’s interests fall into a wider range. Call it the iPod theory of genre deconstruction. “People like a hodgepodge,” Lyndsey says. “So you get [musicians] who are popular because people like a little bit of everything and don’t want to listen to the standard. I think, finally, America is a melting pot. I can’t wait to see where it goes. I’m going to be right there on the train.”

- www.nuvo.net


Others may have already discovered Tish Lyndsey at The Jazz Kitchen or Rock Lobster or the Madame Walker Theatre. They might have even caught her opening for Tom Petty or Christine Aguilera.

My Tish Lyndsey awakening happened just the other day, in Indiana Black Expo's music lounge. Actress Millicent Wright, over at the Indiana Repertory Theatre's booth, told me I should stop in there to hear some solid talent.

Wright was right.



There, with no stage lighting and with a sound system best described as "challenging," was the Tish Lyndsey Project lead by her soulful seen-it/been-hurt-by-it/moving-forward I-am-here-and-I-matter voice. And those hands: Twirling, twisting, discovering her face and her microphone and her hips and throwing down her tambourine in righteous anger.
—————————————————————
MEDIA: Listen to Tish Lyndsey's "In the Spotlight"
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Lyndsey is more than just an enigmatic performer (you might see the influences of Stevie Nicks, Billie Holiday and others, but the special ingredient is herself) but also a solid songwriter. Visit ibj.comand click on A&E to give a listen to the sexy/knowing "In the Spotlight" and you'll know why I'm awaiting announcement of her in-the-works recording and her next set of gigs. You can find more info at tishlyndsey.com.
http://www.ibj.com/html/detail_page.asp?content=03357

- Indianapolis Business Journal


I'd been hearing about a new singer/songwriter called 'Tish Lyndsey' for the last few months. Unimpressed by the current musical landscape here in town, I have to admit, I went to catch her show with low expectations and a chip on my shoulder. Within one verse, Tish Lyndsey changed all that. Accompanied by only a keyboard player, Lyndsey took the crowd back in time and gave us a glimpse of the future - all in a 45 minute set. She channels old Hollywood with her glamorous stage presence, and her voice wouldn't be out of place in a 40's juke joint. She also has a bohemian type quality that instantly reminded me of a young Stevie Nicks - a wild mane of waves, flowing dress, and bare feet. Her songwriting though is so original, and melodies so unexpected that she could never be considered a 'throwback artist'.
Lyndsey's voice is husky and rich, her phrasing deliberate, methodical. Tish Lyndsey is a tiny, little thing; doesn't stand over 5ft; but when she sings the words, "I'm too much woman for so little man", you do not doubt her. And though her natural sex appeal absolutely pours onto the stage, she has such a genuinely sweet way with the audience that she seems like a new friend; warm and approachable.
I expect great things in the future for this young lady, and I am excited again about the local music scene. I understand now why people have been talking about this Tish Lyndsey. I haven't stopped since Friday night.
www.myspace.com/tishlyndsey
- Mo-town Weekly bloghttp://journals.aol.com/motownmusicwkly/Show-review---Tish-Lyndsey-/


The last time we caught up with Katie Trotta, she was a solo act: one woman and her keyboard in coffeehouses and cafes, writing and performing with maturity significantly beyond her years — 19 going on 35. These days she’s no longer a solo act. With a three-piece band backing her and now age 21, she can actually stick around in the bars she plays in.

The band brings a remarkable richness and depth to her already considerable abilities. Her songwriting has mined deeper veins of inner intimacy, similar to the 1970s singer/poets who were first beginning to learn how to drive rock rhythms and add explosive energy to their messages. Trotta’s neither an angry young woman nor a world-weary sage, but she displays the cautious optimism of one who expects the world out there to grow to be better than it is but who knows it’s just as likely to let her down. Her lyrics virtually dare you not to be one of the ones who mess things up.

Steven Cooley followed in a bit of a twist on Trotta’s set. He normally plays with a band but illness relegated it to just him and his keyboard. Cooley’s keyboard skills stem from 1970s “Bennie-and-the-Jets” Elton — equal parts fluid and pounding, while his voice is that of the bar crooner, the wet grind of smoke and cigarettes. His songs displayed a raw, primal sound, speaking of harsh experiences both past and yet to come — early Billy Joel by way of Joe Cocker.

Tish Lyndsey closed out the night with a set drawn from the glory days of R&B — a smoky, sultry set of torch songs worthy of Billie Holliday. Though the hour was late and the crowd thinning, Lyndsey delivered every song like a full-on showstopper. It was the first I’ve heard of her, but not, I expect, the last.

- www.nuvo.net


NOW AND NEXT
April 2010 / Issue 124

The April Interview – Tish Lyndsey

Nashville based singer-songwriter Tish Lyndsey is one to watch – and love. Recently placing a top spot in the annual John Lennon songwriting contest and performing a series of high-profile gigs on Music Row, she has grabbed the attention of music followers and industry insiders. With all of the buzz, one might expect an arms-length ‘artist’ type brewing. To the contrary. Tish Lyndsey is a girl to root for; down to earth, unassuming – and with her frankness about personal heartbreak, she could easily pass for a country singer. But Tish Lyndsey is no victim… or one to be labeled. We sat down with her to find out what and who makes her tick. Boy do we love what we found. Introducing Tish Lyndsey. You can thank us later.


N&N:
What’s the meaning behind your upcoming CD’s title, GhostWritten

TL:
Over the last two years, I’ve really looked at how my past has affected my current life. My childhood – everyone’s childhood – is like a ghost constantly haunting us, making us do the same stupid stuff over and over again! The CD was written by that spirit or idea.

N&N:
The songs I’ve heard so far on the CD are darker than your last project. They’re gorgeous, definitely full of emotion. What was so monumental about the last couple of years?


TL:
A lot of life changes. Family stuff, love stuff. Don’t laugh, but I really fell in love for the first time in my adult life. More importantly, I really got my heart broken for the first time. After it happened, there was a period that I couldn’t listen to music, I didn’t want to write music, I just didn’t care about anything but my broken heart. I was restless and didn’t want to be in the same place, so I packed up and moved to Nashville. And it was scary, but awesome. I didn’t know anyone and I didn’t have any friends, so I had a lot of time to sit and think. I remembered that when I was young and dealing with a pretty sucky childhood, I would run away all of the time thinking I could run away from my sadness. Here I was this grown up running away again when one man I’d known for 3 months let me down. It was just crazy. That triggered this obsession with understanding how we never really change from being a kid. We cover it up, but we don’t really change. I didn’t learn how to deal with disappointment as a kid, so I’d never let myself open up to people as an adult. When I did and then got hurt, I was ten years old again crying for my family, but running away from home.

N&N:
Wow. That’s deep. And I get it.

TL:
(Laughs) I’m really not that heavy normally. Sheesh! Let’s go get a drink!

N&N: My kind of girl!
It’s very interesting. You don’t take yourself too seriously, although I suspect you really could. Like I said, your music has a pretty dark tone and touches on some pretty serious subjects. You, in person, though are like a ray of sunshine. I didn’t expect that.

TL:
Thank you! I guess I express the bad emotions in song because I’d much prefer to be happy in real life.


continues
N&N: It shows. You do have some beautiful love songs on the CD also so there’s a great depth.

TL: Good, thank you. Yeah, I wrote my first love song a couple of summers ago and it felt good to express that. And heartbreak is good, too. I mean, when you love and lose someone you always have that little ache in your chest. Always. But I think carrying around a little pain keeps you grateful and humble. God knows in this superficial business a little humility ain’t a bad thing!

N&N: True! That leads me to the next question. You’re obviously very attractive. The staff and I were talking about how we could see you getting endorsements from makeup/skin care companies, things like that down the road. Is it a struggle or even a consideration looking the way you do, and still being taken seriously as a musician?

TL: Thank you for the compliment first off. Here’s the thing. I can’t let myself think about that stuff or I’ll go crazy. Obviously it’s nice that people don’t think I’m a hag, but some are going to. I just can’t worry about it either way. My focus is always making sure people leave my shows thinking, “She writes great songs”. I think that once people get to know my music and my heart, they’ll have no choice but to think of me as a serious musician, because that I do take seriously and hopefully it shows.

N&N: Well said. Tell me about your musical influences. You have a really unique style. Who are some of your musical heroes?

TL: I grew up loving Fleetwood Mac, The Doors, Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra, all the old rat pack stuff. Frank was so hot even as an 80 year old man. He had this unbelievable swagger. Billie had it, too in her own way. I try and emulate that as a performer. I’m a dork though, so it doesn’t quite come across as cool, just unique, as you say.

N&N: I disagree completely! - Now & Next


Episode 1706 – Tuesday, February 20 at 7:30 PM, repeats Saturday, February 24 at 6:30 PM

Stepping Up, Standing Out
Our first trip begins in your imagination. Picture a bright red rose in the middle of a field of sunflowers. Picture a unicorn running with a herd of wild horses.

Then, answer this:
it's not hard to stand out in a crowd, is it, if you're determined to be someone who's completely different from every one else around you. And so it is with the subject of our first story. Tish Lyndsey is a unique singer who hopes to make it big while staying close to her roots in Indianapolis. So, how do you make the brass on either coast sit up and take notice when you're in the Midwest? You do it by being one-of-a-kind.
Producer: Vincent Manganello-http://www.wfyi.org/acrossIndiana.asp#archive


- PBS


Episode 1706 – Tuesday, February 20 at 7:30 PM, repeats Saturday, February 24 at 6:30 PM

Stepping Up, Standing Out
Our first trip begins in your imagination. Picture a bright red rose in the middle of a field of sunflowers. Picture a unicorn running with a herd of wild horses.

Then, answer this:
it's not hard to stand out in a crowd, is it, if you're determined to be someone who's completely different from every one else around you. And so it is with the subject of our first story. Tish Lyndsey is a unique singer who hopes to make it big while staying close to her roots in Indianapolis. So, how do you make the brass on either coast sit up and take notice when you're in the Midwest? You do it by being one-of-a-kind.
Producer: Vincent Manganello-http://www.wfyi.org/acrossIndiana.asp#archive


- PBS


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Bio

Whatever IT is, Tish Lyndseys got it. You notice when she walks into a room. When she sits down at the piano to sing, you get it. Her voice is smoky and sweet. Its rich, soulful, and at times playful - the perfect instrument to melt over her poignant words. Her lyrics are introspective, stylish, and sometimes brazen. A self-taught pianist & singer-songwriter; Lyndsey blends rock, jazz, and rhythm & blues into a mixture you cant wait to sip after a long day. Its a sound that draws from the past, but couldn't be any more relevant and fresh today.

Tish Lyndsey grew up in the Detroit area with her jazz-singer Mother. Often as a child, she would go to work with her Mother, sometimes singing background. She loved the glamour of jazz music, but was also entranced with the energy and excitement of rock greats like The Doors, Fleetwood Mac, and Blondie. I saw Debbie Harry on TV when I was about 6, and I thought she was the most amazing thing Id ever seen. I dont know that I knew what cool meant at 6, but I knew I wanted to be just like her when I grew up. I still do!

As an adolescent, she started writing songs by constructing melodies from her huge collection of poems. I was always writing, Tish recalls. I had an extreme amount of teen angst, and writing was the only way I knew how to deal with it all. As an adult, I still find that I have those angsty times. So writing has been a good pal over the years.

Tish has spent recent years honing her skills as a captivating stage performer, playing across the country and attracting a very loyal fan following. Her presence on the stage is, in a word, bewitching. Comparisons have ranged from Stevie Nicks, Billie Holiday to her musical idol, Jim Morrison from The Doors. "When I play, I never really think about what I'm doing visually. I just want to sing without passing out from stage fright", Tish says with a self-effacing smirk. "It's funny though, before every gig I always write a 'J' on my wrist to remind me of Morrison. He was apparently super shy but you wouldn't know it from watching him perform. So I guess I try to channel that when I'm onstage. Can't go wrong with Jimmy, right?" She pauses, thinks for minute and then sadly says "Except for, well... forget Paris". It's then you realize why you can't take your eyes off of her. She is completely engaged - always.

Tish Lyndsey's music is the same. Her songs are honest, moody and old-fashion-romantic without being gimmicky. Her voice is obviously powerful, but the way she sticks to the melody without a lot of vocal gymnastics shows the same quiet confidence she has in person. When speaking with Tish, she has a strange way of being very warm and sweet but otherworldly at the same time. She is open and gracious, but you can't help thinking she knows something you never will. Simply put, Tish Lyndsey is an artist. "There have been many times that I wished I hadn't been made wanting to make music the way I do. It's unappreciated and there's no guarantee of success the way that most people measure success". She continues slowly, "Someone who didn't know me once asked what I would do if my singing career didn't work out. I never spoke to them again. Music is not something I do. It's just how I was born."

Band Members