Tosh1
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Tosh1

Boston, Massachusetts, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2007 | SELF

Boston, Massachusetts, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2007
Band Alternative Reggae

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Peter Tosh's groundbreaking achievements in taking reggae to the mainstream are remarkable: A founding member of legendary Jamaican super group The Wailers (alongside Bob Marley and Bunny Wailer in 1962), Tosh co-wrote the group's timeless global anthem "Get Up Stand Up;" opened up for the Rolling Stones' on their "Some Girls" tour; was the first reggae artist to play "Saturday Night Live;" had one of MTV's earliest reggae videos; and won a Best Reggae Album Grammy. And yet, to most people, Tosh's career accomplishments are nearly forgotten by all but roots reggae's most ardent followers.

Through the diligence of his children and former manager Herbie Miller, however, Tosh's contributions are beginning to be recognized. For example, he recently received one of Jamaica's highest distinctions: The Order of Merit which was bestowed upon the deceased singer at an official government ceremony on Oct. 15 (Heroes Day, a national holiday) 25 years after he was murdered at his Kingston home on September 11, 1987, at age 42.

"I noticed that honors were given to artists far less deserving than Peter, explained Miller who managed Tosh from 1976-1981, "so six years ago I began writing articles about him in the Jamaican newspapers so he would be remembered." Miller spearheaded the award campaign sending his writings to Omar Davies, a former Minister of Culture who began the lobbying process inside Jamaica's parliament, which led to the 2012 designation.

Tosh was always a provocative singer/songwriter and in his lyrics was an unrelenting crusader for the legalization of marijuana, the dissolution of South Africa's Apartheid regime and for injustice everywhere. "Peter was vilified by politicians and endured brutal beatings by police because he spoke such truth," says Miller, now the director of the Jamaica Music Museum in Kingston, "so we congratulate those who saw the necessity of honoring him now."



The Toshes: Dave, Steve, Niambe (holding her father's Order of Merit). Andrew, Michelle. Kneeling is Tosh 1. (Photograph: Peter Simon; courtesy of The Peter Tosh Estate)


One of Tosh's 10 children, daughter Niambe McIntosh, Administrator of the Peter Tosh estate, accepted the award on behalf of the entire family. "This award could not have happened earlier," offered McIntosh, a Boston-based teacher. "We gained control of the estate three years ago; people we had trusted in the music business pulled the family in different directions but now we are unified and educated about what we should be doing."

The Peter Tosh estate partnered with businessman Kingsley Cooper, Chairman of the Entertainment and Advisory board in Jamaica's Ministry of Tourism and Entertainment, for a commemorative concert on Oct. 18th in Kingston. More than 1,000 patrons crammed into Cooper's Studio 38, an outdoor venue with a capacity of 600, for the Tosh tribute, which included performances by Tosh's sons Andrew Tosh and Tosh1 and harmony trio The Tamlins, who toured and recorded with Tosh.

The estate also collaborated with the University of the West Indies for a Peter Tosh symposium osan Oct. 19, which would have been Tosh's 68th birthday.

On Feb. 27 in association with Jamaica's IRIE (107.5) FM, they will present the third annual Peter Tosh memorial concert in Westmoreland, the birthplace of Winston Hubert McIntosh (a.k.a. Peter Tosh).

The estate recently launched a Tosh merchandise line and entered into a licensing deal with California based Reef Sandals for a new sandal, The Stash, while pursuing other initiatives to cultivate awareness without compromising Tosh's firebrand identity.
Read more at http://www.billboard.biz/bbbiz/industry/legal-and-management/branding-the-firebrand-how-peter-tosh-s-1008041592.story#2P47AapoXJlvKEHF.99
- Billboard - Patricia Meschino


"My father was a prophet, and I am carrying his message forward!" exclaims Jawara McIntosh. It takes some real cajones to say that one's pop was in direct communication with the divine. But if anyone has the pedigree to back up the claim, it has to be McIntosh—aka Tosh1—aka the youngest son of reggae icon Peter Tosh.

Born in Jamaica, Tosh1 left the island in the sun for the cold clime of Boston at the age of 5. While he absorbed America's hip hop, Tosh1 held fast to his Jamaican roots, meticulously studying his father's music, beliefs and explanations of the material world.

Some decade into his career, Tosh1, who specializes in a unique combination of roots reggae, dancehall and American hip hop, infuses his American experiences into his Jamaican heritage. While Peter Tosh was known for making bold proclamations about how the universe functions, while at Northeastern University, Tosh1 studied economics to empirical support his father's claims.

"In economics, I learned both truth and how lies are promoted through the current economic system," Tosh1 says. "I confirmed what my father stated. During this time, I started listening to my fathers style heavily. I had grown mature enough to absorb the message from his music. This is where I found my calling."

While Tosh1 pays tribute to his father in his live act, he doesn't feel that his father overshadows his own work, nor does he feel the need to actively distance himself from Peter Tosh.

"I am one with my father," he says. "There's a tradition that needs to be respected. There's a current resistance to sweep his work under a rug. People rarely mention Peter Tosh, and it's my duty to keep his word alive—it's my duty to keep his mind alive."

It's true that Peter Tosh is certainly named less frequently than other Jamaican superstars. But if Peter Tosh was so great, then why isn't his music featured on every radio station?

Tosh1 believes that the broadcasters make it no secret that they are trying to suppress the message because of tPeter Tosh's fiery politics and harsh social commentary. "It's openly recognized by those in the music industry why Peter Tosh isn't played. This man was an icon who inspired reggae artists. He did songs with the Rolling Stones! This man is not some johnny-come-lately!"

Tosh1 expounds that the attempt at silencing his father is nothing new. "This is a man that suffered brutalization for his message. He was almost killed by police for his political stance. This is the reason that we must carry his message forward."

Not only did Peter Tosh suffer for his message, but he was also murdered in an incident that has yet to be explained. While random deaths happen all the time, Tosh1 holds firm that "heavenly Father has a purpose for everything."

If so, then that must mean that his father's death happened for a reason. Surprisingly, Tosh1 not only agrees that his father's mysterious death had a purpose, but that it sums up the entire existence of one of reggae's greatest singers as well as Tosh1's own career, "I believe that a lot of great prophets have suffered ... they have suffered unreasonable, unnatural things. But in the end, we will all know and we will know all. I believe that he died for a truth and that is the only thing worth dying for. It's a battle that I'm fighting every single day." - John Gentile




“On Monday (12-3-12), at the House of Blues (Boston), there is a benefit extravaganza for the film featuring “Folk Revolution” stars Tom Rush, Livingston Taylor, Jonathan Edwards and “Spider” John Koerner, and “Rock Revolution” heroes Billy Squier, members of Boston, and The Uptown Horns. Additional performers include Danny Klein of The J. Geils Band, Peter Case, Jon-Pousette Dart, Kate Taylor, Willie “Loco” Alexander, The Fools, Sandy MacDonald, Johnny A., Tosh1, Barbara Holliday, members of both Duke & the Drivers and Barry & the Remains. In addition to performing, James Montgomery is serving as musical director for the evening’s festivities. Charlie “Master Blaster” Daniels, original concert emcee at the legendary Boston Tea Party, which stood on the location of the House of Blues, will host the event. ”
The Boston Herald - The Boston Herald
- Boston Herald




“On Monday (12-3-12), at the House of Blues (Boston), there is a benefit extravaganza for the film featuring “Folk Revolution” stars Tom Rush, Livingston Taylor, Jonathan Edwards and “Spider” John Koerner, and “Rock Revolution” heroes Billy Squier, members of Boston, and The Uptown Horns. Additional performers include Danny Klein of The J. Geils Band, Peter Case, Jon-Pousette Dart, Kate Taylor, Willie “Loco” Alexander, The Fools, Sandy MacDonald, Johnny A., Tosh1, Barbara Holliday, members of both Duke & the Drivers and Barry & the Remains. In addition to performing, James Montgomery is serving as musical director for the evening’s festivities. Charlie “Master Blaster” Daniels, original concert emcee at the legendary Boston Tea Party, which stood on the location of the House of Blues, will host the event. ”
The Boston Herald - The Boston Herald
- Boston Herald



"My father was a prophet, and I am carrying his message forward!" exclaims Jawara McIntosh. It takes some real cajones to say that one's pop was in direct communication with the divine. But if anyone has the pedigree to back up the claim, it has to be McIntosh—aka Tosh1—aka the youngest son of reggae icon Peter Tosh.

Born in Jamaica, Tosh1 left the island in the sun for the cold clime of Boston at the age of 5. While he absorbed America's hip hop, Tosh1 held fast to his Jamaican roots, meticulously studying his father's music, beliefs and explanations of the material world.

Some decade into his career, Tosh1, who specializes in a unique combination of roots reggae, dancehall and American hip hop, infuses his American experiences into his Jamaican heritage. While Peter Tosh was known for making bold proclamations about how the universe functions, while at Northeastern University, Tosh1 studied economics to empirical support his father's claims.

"In economics, I learned both truth and how lies are promoted through the current economic system," Tosh1 says. "I confirmed what my father stated. During this time, I started listening to my fathers style heavily. I had grown mature enough to absorb the message from his music. This is where I found my calling."

While Tosh1 pays tribute to his father in his live act, he doesn't feel that his father overshadows his own work, nor does he feel the need to actively distance himself from Peter Tosh.

"I am one with my father," he says. "There's a tradition that needs to be respected. There's a current resistance to sweep his work under a rug. People rarely mention Peter Tosh, and it's my duty to keep his word alive—it's my duty to keep his mind alive."

It's true that Peter Tosh is certainly named less frequently than other Jamaican superstars. But if Peter Tosh was so great, then why isn't his music featured on every radio station?

Tosh1 believes that the broadcasters make it no secret that they are trying to suppress the message because of tPeter Tosh's fiery politics and harsh social commentary. "It's openly recognized by those in the music industry why Peter Tosh isn't played. This man was an icon who inspired reggae artists. He did songs with the Rolling Stones! This man is not some johnny-come-lately!"

Tosh1 expounds that the attempt at silencing his father is nothing new. "This is a man that suffered brutalization for his message. He was almost killed by police for his political stance. This is the reason that we must carry his message forward."

Not only did Peter Tosh suffer for his message, but he was also murdered in an incident that has yet to be explained. While random deaths happen all the time, Tosh1 holds firm that "heavenly Father has a purpose for everything."

If so, then that must mean that his father's death happened for a reason. Surprisingly, Tosh1 not only agrees that his father's mysterious death had a purpose, but that it sums up the entire existence of one of reggae's greatest singers as well as Tosh1's own career, "I believe that a lot of great prophets have suffered ... they have suffered unreasonable, unnatural things. But in the end, we will all know and we will know all. I believe that he died for a truth and that is the only thing worth dying for. It's a battle that I'm fighting
- John Gentile


Tosh 1 tribute to a legend

Jawara McIntosh aka Tosh 1 will release his debut album next year. His current tour is a tribute to his father, Peter Tosh who co-founded the Wailing Wailers with Bob Marley.
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By Monisha Martins - Maple Ridge News
Published: July 06, 2010 4:00 PM
Updated: July 06, 2010 4:37 PM

When Jawara McIntosh, aka Tosh 1, is on stage, he is one with father. The son of reggae superstar Peter Tosh channels his father’s fire into the mic.

“I feel his spirit in me,” says Tosh 1, who was seven when his father was shot and killed in 1987.

“My father had a plan for me.”

Born in Kingston, Jamaica in 1980, Tosh 1 moved to Boston in 1985.

It was where Tosh 1 was introduced to rap and hip-hop, the flow and flavour of LL Cool J, Public Enemy, Ice Cube and Run DMC.

“That was when music was real,” says Tosh 1, who started mixing the sounds of reggae with loops and samples of hip-hop in high school.

He has a love-hate relationship with the genre and believes many of its artists have gone astray, seduced by major record deals, fast cars and expensive clothes.

“The same revolutionary spirit that once inspired me has been transformed into everything it once detested,” says the economics major.

In 2000, Tosh 1 decided to record a couple of tracks in studio, creating a hybrid that blended urban sounds but still stayed true to the tenets of reggae and its messages of social change, activism and spirituality.

“It was like second nature, like magic,” says Tosh 1.

“People just fell in love with it.”

Tosh 1 calls himself a revolutionary artist, a impetus to right wrongs.

“I give people food for thought,” explains Tosh 1.

“It’s about waking people up. I am going to expose the system for what it is. We have to be more conscious of our life here on earth and stop complaining.”

Tosh 1 has since opened for some of the biggest names in the music business, performing with the likes of Sizzla, Gregory Isaacs, Shabba Ranks, Damien Marley, and also Performed live with Sinead O’Conner backed by Sly and Robbie and Heavy Weight Dub Champion.

His current tour is billed as a tribute to Peter Tosh, but audiences can expect to hear several songs from his debut album Babylon Burning, slated for release in spring 2011.

Backed by the Dis-n-Dat band, he says what was once a crazy dream is now beginning to manifest into reality.

“ I am witnessing the power of music. You never know where life is going to take you, you just let the heavenly father guide.”

• Tosh 1 will be headlining the Caribbean Festival on Sunday at Memorial Peace Park. He’s on stage at 8 p.m. The festival runs Saturday and Sunday on 224th Street in Maple Ridge. For more visit

carribbeanfest.ca.
- Monisha Martin - Maple Ridge news


Discography

Get Up Stand Up
Babylon Burning
Wicked Ago Bun
You Can't Blame The Youth

Photos

Bio

TOSH1 BIO

Tosh 1, the son of the late great Reggae icon Winston Hubert McIntosh a.k.a. Peter Tosh, was born in Kingston, Jamaica. At the tender age of five he moved to the states; into what would be his life long home in Boston, Massachusetts. And although unknown at the time to him, it was like destiny that young Tosh moved to Boston... Where he would first encounter hip-hop. He immediately took to pioneers of hip-hop like Public Enemy, Kool Moe Dee, N.W.A., L.L. Cool J, and others. Virtually hypnotized by albums like Public Enemy It Takes a Nation of Millions, Ice Cubes Amerikas Most Wanted, and L.L. Cool J's Mama Said Knock You Out, in conjunction with other ground breaking works, he quickly developed a love and a passion for the art of rap. 

At the age of seven, the time of his fathers untimely death is when young Tosh first picked up a pen and began to write. Haunted by the murder of his father and continuously perplexed by the unanswered questions surrounding this tragic event, young Tosh desperately sought an outlet in which to discharge his frustration. 

Tosh1's personal taste in music became influenced by the rhythms and lyrics of his uncle Bunny Wailer, Bob Marley and his father Peter Tosh. He was inspired and moved by the hard-hitting cultural message of foundation reggae. As Tosh 1 grew older and more in tune with his roots, the fire that burned deep within compelled him to carry on the Legacy of his father as well as establish his own. In time he would become completely absorbed by the spiritual messages behind his father's words. With his first remake of "You Can't blame the youths" he proved to himself and fan's that he was ready to awaken the spirit of his Father and deliver the message to his generation. After many years of training and honing his lyrical abilities, Tosh 1 a economics major has truly become a master at his craft and humbly seeks to take his music to a higher level. Tosh 1 states "My mission is to deliver a message of Truth without compromise in the language I am most familiar with; the language of the struggle. With his powerful singing voice and lyrical generalship Tosh 1 displays a versatility that is unmatched amazingly to fans of the reggae and
rap world.

At Tosh1's first official live concerts at the Paradise Rock club in Boston, a venue his father once graced over a decade ago, and at the Hut Tin Roof on the Island of Martha's Vineyard, performing as a virtual unknown, a hyper-energetic Tosh 1 managed to stir audiences into an amazing frenzy. The son of Peter Tosh displayed his unparalleled lyrical talent and remarkable versatility as he covered his fathers songs beautifully while seamlessly intertwining his signature brand of revolutionary lyrics. His impression was impossible for onlookers to deny his ability. In 2005 Tosh 1 opened for some of the biggest names in the business. He uniquely graced the stage with Sizzla, Gregory Isaac, Shabba Ranks, Damian Marley, and performed live with Sinead OConner backed by Sly & Robbie, toured with Heavy Weight Dub Champion. He has also recorded with the son of the late great Dennis Emmanuel Brown, Daniel Brown and is looking forward to doing more collaborations. In August of 2006, Tosh 1 touched down in the Far East, performing along side legendary roots artist Horace Andy, resurrecting vintage classics like "Mark of the Beast" and "Vampire", once again displaying his incomparable versatility. In December of 2007, Tosh also shared a stage with reggae superstar Jah Cure in front of a sold out crowd in Antigua. 2009, Tosh1 has toured several States, backed by The Dis N Dat Band, performed with The Original Wailers Band, covering songs like Get Up Stand Up Stand Up & Exodus.Tosh1 performed  at major events  such as Life Fest 2010, held in Jamaica, where he and Bunny Wailer joined together on stage and put on a encore performance! In 2011 Tosh1 touched down in Europe for a tour performing at the African Music Festival in Emmendigen, Germany, and also at the Foundation Reggae Festival in La Coruna Spain. In 2012 Tosh1 hit the mid-west and west coast. He is now currently working diligently on his first album, he is working with  the Legendary Marley Marl on a Legalize it Remix, Boston Based Chronic on Get Up Stand up which is now available on ITUNES. Tosh1 will be performing at the Freedom Rally in Boston, an event that happens every year in the Heart of Boston for the Liberation and Decriminalization of Cannabis. Be on the lookout as Tosh1 takes the world by storm!


Band Members