Trailer Radio
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Trailer Radio

New York City, New York, United States | INDIE

New York City, New York, United States | INDIE
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Moonshine Martini country cabaret singing superstar Shannon Brown fronts an all-star band of great New York county players. This band of bad-asses is called Trailer Radio, and the concocted musical cocktail tastes great, packs a punch, and will kick you off your barstool and onto the dance floor.

Brown has one of the strongest country voices on the scene. Whether she is hitting the wailing high tones of “Boll Weevil” (a fabulous rendition of The Chalks tune), gritting her teeth through her signature growl in “11:59” (a killer blues-style romp written by local crooner and guitar shredder David Weiss), or bringing a tear to your eye during “Streets of Savannah” (written by bassist Joe Ongie) or the Tom Petty classic “Southern Accents”, Brown’s Trailer Radio would be as comfortable in a run down honky-tonk at 2 in the morning as they would be sharing a stage at the Grand Ole Opry. With Miss Brown’s classic showmanship and Trailer Radio’s musicality, they can elevate any audience to their energy level.

One of the many strengths of this debut is Brown’s and the band’s ability to marry a wide variety of original and cover tunes into one cohesive album. The song choices (6 of the 10 songs were written by folks directly involved with the project) are varied in style, showing the depth of Trailer Radio’s musicianship and ability. Whether riding a fine line between classic country, doo-wop, blues, rock, or even traces of Brown’s cabaret style, this album is all country. Killer harmonies adorn classics “Jack Daniels” (Ray Stevens) and “He’s a Six” (written by Risa Mickenberg and album producer Joel Shelton). Crisp guitar and steel by Weiss and Mike Dvorkin define these unique tunes. And with Kenny Soule pulling double-duty as drummer and sound engineer, the entire project was truly a team effort.

Give Trailer Radio one listen and you’ll find the songs making their way into your head for days to come. - BrooklynCountry.com


Moonshine Martini country cabaret singing superstar Shannon Brown fronts an all-star band of great New York county players. This band of bad-asses is called Trailer Radio, and the concocted musical cocktail tastes great, packs a punch, and will kick you off your barstool and onto the dance floor.

Brown has one of the strongest country voices on the scene. Whether she is hitting the wailing high tones of “Boll Weevil” (a fabulous rendition of The Chalks tune), gritting her teeth through her signature growl in “11:59” (a killer blues-style romp written by local crooner and guitar shredder David Weiss), or bringing a tear to your eye during “Streets of Savannah” (written by bassist Joe Ongie) or the Tom Petty classic “Southern Accents”, Brown’s Trailer Radio would be as comfortable in a run down honky-tonk at 2 in the morning as they would be sharing a stage at the Grand Ole Opry. With Miss Brown’s classic showmanship and Trailer Radio’s musicality, they can elevate any audience to their energy level.

One of the many strengths of this debut is Brown’s and the band’s ability to marry a wide variety of original and cover tunes into one cohesive album. The song choices (6 of the 10 songs were written by folks directly involved with the project) are varied in style, showing the depth of Trailer Radio’s musicianship and ability. Whether riding a fine line between classic country, doo-wop, blues, rock, or even traces of Brown’s cabaret style, this album is all country. Killer harmonies adorn classics “Jack Daniels” (Ray Stevens) and “He’s a Six” (written by Risa Mickenberg and album producer Joel Shelton). Crisp guitar and steel by Weiss and Mike Dvorkin define these unique tunes. And with Kenny Soule pulling double-duty as drummer and sound engineer, the entire project was truly a team effort.

Give Trailer Radio one listen and you’ll find the songs making their way into your head for days to come. - BrooklynCountry.com


If classic country music from the 60s and 70s with a comedic edge is your thing, you’ll love Trailer Radio. Just speaking for the music, their new album is excellent: the rhythm section of bassist Joe Ongie and drummer Kenny Soule swings, and the band’s two guitarists David Weiss and Mike Dvorkin are an encyclopedia of smartly chosen C&W and soul licks. Not all the songs here are funny, but the ones that are really hit the spot.

If country radio still played country music, the album’s opening track, Football Widow would be a monster hit. It sounds like something Tom T. Hall might have written for somebody like, say, Lynn Anderson, about 40 years ago. Musically, it’s a throwback to the Bakersfield sound of ten years before that, with upbeat honkytonk lead guitar intertwined with pedal steel. Frontwoman Shannon Brown’s bright twangy delivery makes it clear that she won’t accept defeat – and as the song goes on, she gets even. The second track, A Little Too Old and a Lot Too Ugly is cruel, and hilarious, and spot-on: it’s an anthem for any woman who’s had to fend off old Viagroid geezers in bars. It’s also got some sweetly multitracked 12-string and acoustic guitar, too.

Boll Weevil is a surreal, twisted Texas shuffle as Buck Owens might have done it; Southern Accents, a slow soul-infused ballad with more of those juicy, tremoloing, artfully layered guitar parts. With its Del Shannon style 50s rock vibe, He’s a Six is a thoughtful number about settling – and wine goggles – with some memorably surfy baritone-style guitar. The band follows that with Like a Train Left the Tramp, a joyously bouncy honkytonk kissoff song: “I took everything he had except his old guitar and his amp and I left him like a train left the tramp.”

Streets of Savannah is a detour into classic 60s soul music, pulsing along on a mellow Hendrix-influenced groove. I’m Not Leaving I’m Just Looking proves they’re just as good at western swing, then they rock out with the Stevie Ray Vaughan-style 11:59, Brown leaving no doubt that she’s had it up to here. The album winds up with Jack Daniels, a Stonesy rock song that explores the aftermath of overdoing it one too many times. How genuinely ironic that some of the best real country music around is being made in New York City. Trailer Radio’s next gig is on Jan 17 at 8 PM at the comfortable, laid-back Shrine in Harlem. - New York Music Daily


If classic country music from the 60s and 70s with a comedic edge is your thing, you’ll love Trailer Radio. Just speaking for the music, their new album is excellent: the rhythm section of bassist Joe Ongie and drummer Kenny Soule swings, and the band’s two guitarists David Weiss and Mike Dvorkin are an encyclopedia of smartly chosen C&W and soul licks. Not all the songs here are funny, but the ones that are really hit the spot.

If country radio still played country music, the album’s opening track, Football Widow would be a monster hit. It sounds like something Tom T. Hall might have written for somebody like, say, Lynn Anderson, about 40 years ago. Musically, it’s a throwback to the Bakersfield sound of ten years before that, with upbeat honkytonk lead guitar intertwined with pedal steel. Frontwoman Shannon Brown’s bright twangy delivery makes it clear that she won’t accept defeat – and as the song goes on, she gets even. The second track, A Little Too Old and a Lot Too Ugly is cruel, and hilarious, and spot-on: it’s an anthem for any woman who’s had to fend off old Viagroid geezers in bars. It’s also got some sweetly multitracked 12-string and acoustic guitar, too.

Boll Weevil is a surreal, twisted Texas shuffle as Buck Owens might have done it; Southern Accents, a slow soul-infused ballad with more of those juicy, tremoloing, artfully layered guitar parts. With its Del Shannon style 50s rock vibe, He’s a Six is a thoughtful number about settling – and wine goggles – with some memorably surfy baritone-style guitar. The band follows that with Like a Train Left the Tramp, a joyously bouncy honkytonk kissoff song: “I took everything he had except his old guitar and his amp and I left him like a train left the tramp.”

Streets of Savannah is a detour into classic 60s soul music, pulsing along on a mellow Hendrix-influenced groove. I’m Not Leaving I’m Just Looking proves they’re just as good at western swing, then they rock out with the Stevie Ray Vaughan-style 11:59, Brown leaving no doubt that she’s had it up to here. The album winds up with Jack Daniels, a Stonesy rock song that explores the aftermath of overdoing it one too many times. How genuinely ironic that some of the best real country music around is being made in New York City. Trailer Radio’s next gig is on Jan 17 at 8 PM at the comfortable, laid-back Shrine in Harlem. - New York Music Daily


Trailer Radio’sfirst album has a different theme that of good old fashioned hometown rockin’. Shannon Brown, the band’s enigmatic lead singer who appears on the sleeve as a sort of redneck soccer mom has a belting vocal and a crew of deadly shit kicking musicians. I’ve said it here before but this band produces some of the funniest and punchiest country music in Brooklyn. ‘I'm not leaving, I’m just Lookin’' expounds on the joys of window shopping:



“Us ladies like our men/ in tight fittin’ faded denim/ it’s a sight for wandering eyes.”



Sitting down squarely and heavily on the dreary banjo muddling of our Williamsburg hipster neighbors, Shannon and the boys make no apologies for their songs about unfaithful husbands, getting old and bar room flirting. They blast it out like they just don’t care (because they don’t). I wish all country radio sounded this good. - No Depression


Trailer Radio’sfirst album has a different theme that of good old fashioned hometown rockin’. Shannon Brown, the band’s enigmatic lead singer who appears on the sleeve as a sort of redneck soccer mom has a belting vocal and a crew of deadly shit kicking musicians. I’ve said it here before but this band produces some of the funniest and punchiest country music in Brooklyn. ‘I'm not leaving, I’m just Lookin’' expounds on the joys of window shopping:



“Us ladies like our men/ in tight fittin’ faded denim/ it’s a sight for wandering eyes.”



Sitting down squarely and heavily on the dreary banjo muddling of our Williamsburg hipster neighbors, Shannon and the boys make no apologies for their songs about unfaithful husbands, getting old and bar room flirting. They blast it out like they just don’t care (because they don’t). I wish all country radio sounded this good. - No Depression


Is NYC ready for the Country? If Trailer Radio’s new CD (self-titled) is any indication, then the Big Apple is about to get a whole lot twangier. A new underground scene is emerging and Trailer Radio is leading the charge. Their new album has a fresh sound that celebrates the hillbilly way of life in songs delivered with backhanded-backwoods humor, lively arrangements and quirky licks that complement Shannon Brown’s strong vocals and straight-up country sass.

The eclectic band features a bitchin’ group of musicians who have worked with artists like Elton John, Levon Helm, The Lonesome Praire Dogs, and even Lou Rawls. They include David Weiss and Mike Dvorkin on smokin’ guitar, Joel Shelton on bass, and Kenny Soule on drums. Shelton produced the new CD and there is no glossy overproduction here – it is crisp, clean and oh so good. (He and Weiss contributed most of the original material). Shannon Brown is the reigning Queen of the White Trash Court, shining strong with expert delivery and pitch-perfect lead vocals.

New York may be her home now, but Brown originally hails from West Virginia. I’m quite proud that my home state can claim her as she’s a whoop-assfull of talent. She has a background in theater, and after appearing in a cabaret production featuring all country music, she was bitten hard by the Twang bug. She teamed up with some veteran musicians on the New York circuit, and a few short months later they headed into the studio for their debut album.

The result is one hell of a record. Musically, the tracks roll through the influences of Buck Owens, Buddy Holly, Del Shannon, Tom Petty and even a bit of the Rolling Stones, as they weave into melodies that are distinctly original and definitely C-O-U-N-T-R-Y.

Channeling a mixture of Ray Stevens eye-winking wit & Loretta Lynn tell-it-like-it-is lyrics, Brown packs a punch on their first single release,” A Little Too Old (And A Lot Too Ugly)” as well as on the tracks “Football Widow” and my personal favorite, “He’s a Six.” She’s brazen AND she’s funny. How can you not love that? And if “Boll Weevil” ain’t country, I’ll kiss your ass. Feed the family redneck style…

“when you serve it hot, you can’t taste the buckshot

Boll Weevil’s on the table whether you like it or not.”

Brown transitions from rebel rousing and ballsy to sentimental and sultry on the standout tracks “Streets of Savannah” and Tom Petty’s “Southern Accents.” No doubt the former West Virginian relates to the sentiment in the latter. All the songs on the album are solid and delivered with conviction and lots of energy. I’m bettin’ they put on one hell of a live show.

All in all, in this album you get grit, wit and country heart. Trailer Radio out of NYC could teach a few Nashvillians what Country Music is all about. Uh huh. Git ya some.

Check ‘em out at www.trailerradio.com, or on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/trailerradio

~ Richard Diehn - Outlaw Magazine


Is NYC ready for the Country? If Trailer Radio’s new CD (self-titled) is any indication, then the Big Apple is about to get a whole lot twangier. A new underground scene is emerging and Trailer Radio is leading the charge. Their new album has a fresh sound that celebrates the hillbilly way of life in songs delivered with backhanded-backwoods humor, lively arrangements and quirky licks that complement Shannon Brown’s strong vocals and straight-up country sass.

The eclectic band features a bitchin’ group of musicians who have worked with artists like Elton John, Levon Helm, The Lonesome Praire Dogs, and even Lou Rawls. They include David Weiss and Mike Dvorkin on smokin’ guitar, Joel Shelton on bass, and Kenny Soule on drums. Shelton produced the new CD and there is no glossy overproduction here – it is crisp, clean and oh so good. (He and Weiss contributed most of the original material). Shannon Brown is the reigning Queen of the White Trash Court, shining strong with expert delivery and pitch-perfect lead vocals.

New York may be her home now, but Brown originally hails from West Virginia. I’m quite proud that my home state can claim her as she’s a whoop-assfull of talent. She has a background in theater, and after appearing in a cabaret production featuring all country music, she was bitten hard by the Twang bug. She teamed up with some veteran musicians on the New York circuit, and a few short months later they headed into the studio for their debut album.

The result is one hell of a record. Musically, the tracks roll through the influences of Buck Owens, Buddy Holly, Del Shannon, Tom Petty and even a bit of the Rolling Stones, as they weave into melodies that are distinctly original and definitely C-O-U-N-T-R-Y.

Channeling a mixture of Ray Stevens eye-winking wit & Loretta Lynn tell-it-like-it-is lyrics, Brown packs a punch on their first single release,” A Little Too Old (And A Lot Too Ugly)” as well as on the tracks “Football Widow” and my personal favorite, “He’s a Six.” She’s brazen AND she’s funny. How can you not love that? And if “Boll Weevil” ain’t country, I’ll kiss your ass. Feed the family redneck style…

“when you serve it hot, you can’t taste the buckshot

Boll Weevil’s on the table whether you like it or not.”

Brown transitions from rebel rousing and ballsy to sentimental and sultry on the standout tracks “Streets of Savannah” and Tom Petty’s “Southern Accents.” No doubt the former West Virginian relates to the sentiment in the latter. All the songs on the album are solid and delivered with conviction and lots of energy. I’m bettin’ they put on one hell of a live show.

All in all, in this album you get grit, wit and country heart. Trailer Radio out of NYC could teach a few Nashvillians what Country Music is all about. Uh huh. Git ya some.

Check ‘em out at www.trailerradio.com, or on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/trailerradio

~ Richard Diehn - Outlaw Magazine


Discography

Trailer Radio Self-Titled Debut Album released January 17, 2012 by Moonshine Martini Records. Streaming tracks are available at www.trailerradio.com/press.shtml.

Photos

Bio

Official website: http://www.trailerradio.com

Trailer Radio jumped onto the New York City scene faster than a redneck on a Nascar Ticket. The 5-piece group of accomplished musicians has garnered a reputation for witty lyrics, lively arrangements, and blazing guitar licks. In little more than a year Trailer Radio had spread its metro-twang around the NYC tri-state area and served up a self-titled debut album.

Trailer Radio is led by West Virginia coal-field native, Shannon Brown, who (as you may guess) spent some time living in a trailer. Shannon explains:

"Because of the mountains in WV we could only pick up one radio station. They played an eclectic mix of country, rock, and blues with a bunch of other stuff mixed in, which is what Trailer Radio plays today. You could also call in to buy a hunting dog or sell your guns on the air, but that's another story."

After moving to NYC, Shannon met guitarist/vocalist David Weiss (Levon Helm’s Midnight Ramble, Carlos Guitarlos), and his writing partner Joel Shelton (Elton John, Jesus H. Christ). The pair had written some as-yet unperformed country songs including "Football Widow" and "A Little Too Old (And A Lot Too Ugly)", a song about the harsh realities of being an aging musician. These songs, along with Weiss' blues number, "11:59", laid the foundation for Trailer Radio's debut album, which Shelton produced in 2011.

Mike Dvorkin (Lonesome Prairie Dogs, Tammy Faye Starlight) joined the band on guitar. Dvorkin’s and Weiss' highly complementary guitar approaches give Shannon's vocals a warm and cohesive backing from which to launch her soaring vocals. Joe Ongie (Minnie Driver, Aimee Mann) joined Trailer Radio on bass and brought two songs to the table: the sentimental "Streets of Savannah” and "I'm Not Leavin', I'm Just Lookin'" a song about a woman who likes to flirt, over her boyfriend's objections. East coast music veteran Kenny Soule (Papa Chubby, Mary McBride) rounds out Trailer Radio's rhythm section on drums and background vocals.

Trailer Radio, with its new car scent still intact, is hell bent on wailing and twanging its way into the hearts of millions.