Tribe 11

Tribe 11

BandRockMetal

"Tribe 11's material is diverse, shifting from straight-ahead rock to pieces with electronic space and world music elements with ease... [It] is reminiscent of albums from a time when bands were not afraid to experiment or stretch beyond the expected borders of their sound." Bill Knispel

Band Press

Bill Knispel – Progscape.com

Ontario's Tribe 11 merges a wide variety of musical styles on their full-length debut release, Six Degrees of Desperation. Even a cursory listen will uncover elements of classic rock and metal merged with a more modern rock sensibility; comparisons to bands such as Led Zeppelin and Queens of the Stone Age (from the standpoint of aggressive electric blues-based rock) as well as Pink Floyd or Radiohead (textured ambience and electronics), while valid, don't really do the band justice.

Above and beyond the comparisons listed above, other fair touchpoints might include bands like Janes Addiction, who might have come closest to recreating the mix of light, shade, and power that typified Led Zeppelin's best output. Tribe 11's material is diverse, shifting from straight-ahead rock to pieces with electronic space and world music elements with ease. Six Degrees of Desperation is reminiscent of albums from a time when bands were not afraid to experiment or stretch beyond the expected borders of their sound...when a band like Black Sabbath could include a piano ballad like "Changes" on an album between tracks like "Supernaut" and "Tomorrow's Dream."

"Bulldozer," the album's fourth track, is a grungy, dirty piece...a mid-tempo electric blues with appropriately organic keyboard treatments and a sleazy guitar solo that could have been placed on a 1970's Aerosmith album without sounding out of place. Steven Webster's vocals alternate between an almost sneering delivery and a broken down bluesy desperation. A completely different vibe is heard on "Jonah's Butterfly," which opens the album with a tribal/eastern feel, keening female vocals and an Arabesque tempo creating a dreamlike track. Burbling synth textures help build the track into a solid opener and one of the most impressive tracks on the release.

"Epitaph for Johnny Unknown" opens with an understated piano line (courtesy of Gary Breit) and heavily electronically treated vocals. Gentle percussion and strummed acoustic guitar gradually give way to a full kit and phased electric guitar, while Tom Lewis contributes a sweet, warm bass part that pulses, heartbeat-like, underneath. Multiple harmonized vocals add richness to the mix without becoming muddy or flat.

The album closes with "No Answer," which begins intriguingly with nearly a minute of musique concrete/found sound before shifting into a slinky bass/drum groove and rich overdriven guitar. The vocals take on an almost chant-like delivery, while keyboards range from dark organ tones to digital sweeps. While "Jonah's Butterfly" opened things by showing off variety in mood, "No Answer" closes things out with a kick in the posterior.

Tribe 11's mantra seems to be diversity in everything. While some might fault Six Degrees of Desperation for being so variable in style, it's a refreshing change of pace in a time where songs and styles are so cookie cutter that one can easily move lyrics from one song to another without changing the song at all. Six Degrees of Desperation is an impressive debut album.

Richard Bell – Rock Nation Radio

It may sound trite but the saying "All Killer, no filler" applies to this CD. Let's talk tunes. Singer/Writer Steven Webster has written 10 wonderful highly melodic vignettes. The arrangements are well thought out perfectly executed. The lyrics are thoughtful, enticing and personal without being at all pretentious. Steven Webster's complaint about recorded works is that nobody makes "Albums" anymore. Everyone is shooting for the elusive hit single. That is true for the most part. Tribe 11 has succeeded where others have failed as the listener is treated to a journey of sorts. The tunes are varied in style and never remain in one strict genre long but are all definitely rock music. Honestly there is not one song on the CD that I don't like.

Tony Bates – Highlands 100.7 FM Australia

A great post punk/rock album that shows that these guys have not sold out to the mainstream. With just the right amount of METAL, this album could go far.