Trip Poppies
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Trip Poppies

Federal, New South Wales, Australia | SELF

Federal, New South Wales, Australia | SELF
Band Pop Adult Contemporary

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"The Trip Poppies have produced a veritable forest of an album filled with a multitude of sonic creatures!"

Still Living in the Garden of Eden – Trip Poppies
The Trip Poppies have produced a veritable forest of an album filled with a multitude of sonic creatures. The cover art gives a clue to the music – some dense and complex foliage populated with some jungle folk reaching and looking out. Turnover the cover and we get a rainbow, kombi van, cup of tea and a flying pig and my listening stage has been set.
The 12 songs on the album traverse a range of styles and textures. I hear influences like Zappa, Steely Dan, Sly and the Family Stone, Beach Boys, and some pre-Ziggy Bowie. The instrumentation is complex but generally the arrangements and mix handle the sonic riches well. Regular textures such as vocals, guitars, keyboards, bass and drums are augmented by percussion, flute, trumpets, string sounds, synths and field recordings. Sometimes the foreground seems cluttered, for example there are multiple instruments soloing in a somewhat unrelated way. However I really appreciated the variations in texture within songs.
Highlights are Greg Samuelson’s very sweet ‘Paralysed Again’, a strong song well complemented by a supportive arrangement featuring strings and trumpet. Ditto Samuelson and Dez Hoy’s, ‘Rainbow Café’, which grows from acoustic guitar, rhodes and vocals to a packed anthemic singalong with flute and distorted guitar. But the standout track for me is ‘Nocturnal in the Brain’. The subtle lead vocal treatment really makes the track hang together and Dan Brown’s bass part is a wonderful rollicking 3 bar phrase (see the transcription – and before you tell me you can’t play a low C on the bass ask Dan how he did it, or if indeed it is a low C! – 5 string bass maybe?). This is a great example of how things don’t always have to happen in 4 bar phrases and a great exercise for practicing hammer-ons on the bass. Use the open strings where possible - it goes at about 135bpm.
- Village Journal


"The Trip Poppies have produced a veritable forest of an album filled with a multitude of sonic creatures!"

Still Living in the Garden of Eden – Trip Poppies
The Trip Poppies have produced a veritable forest of an album filled with a multitude of sonic creatures. The cover art gives a clue to the music – some dense and complex foliage populated with some jungle folk reaching and looking out. Turnover the cover and we get a rainbow, kombi van, cup of tea and a flying pig and my listening stage has been set.
The 12 songs on the album traverse a range of styles and textures. I hear influences like Zappa, Steely Dan, Sly and the Family Stone, Beach Boys, and some pre-Ziggy Bowie. The instrumentation is complex but generally the arrangements and mix handle the sonic riches well. Regular textures such as vocals, guitars, keyboards, bass and drums are augmented by percussion, flute, trumpets, string sounds, synths and field recordings. Sometimes the foreground seems cluttered, for example there are multiple instruments soloing in a somewhat unrelated way. However I really appreciated the variations in texture within songs.
Highlights are Greg Samuelson’s very sweet ‘Paralysed Again’, a strong song well complemented by a supportive arrangement featuring strings and trumpet. Ditto Samuelson and Dez Hoy’s, ‘Rainbow Café’, which grows from acoustic guitar, rhodes and vocals to a packed anthemic singalong with flute and distorted guitar. But the standout track for me is ‘Nocturnal in the Brain’. The subtle lead vocal treatment really makes the track hang together and Dan Brown’s bass part is a wonderful rollicking 3 bar phrase (see the transcription – and before you tell me you can’t play a low C on the bass ask Dan how he did it, or if indeed it is a low C! – 5 string bass maybe?). This is a great example of how things don’t always have to happen in 4 bar phrases and a great exercise for practicing hammer-ons on the bass. Use the open strings where possible - it goes at about 135bpm.
- Village Journal


Discography

Band members have had their previous music played on radio, and as backing music in TV and radio commercials. Our debut album "Still Living in the Garden of Eden" was released in 2010 and has had some radio airplay here in Australia, as well as on a range of internet stations round the world. The EP 'Magic Wheel' has been released online, and will be formally released in November 2012.

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Bio

The Trip Poppies are an Australian studio band who just love writing and recording fresh original music. We formed in 2008 and in 2010 produced an original and eclectic debut album called "Still Living in the Garden of Eden" (some sample trax are included in this EPK). In 2012, we completed the EP 'Magic Wheel', all tracks of which are uploaded here.

The track "Everything's Beautiful" off the debut album won best Adult Contemporary song at the 2009 Dolphin Awards. Also, "We See the Birds Land" also won a runner up placing in the 2011 international Song of the Year song contest.

The Trip Poppies are Dez Paul and Cary Kembla - writers, producers and sometime vocalists. We have been assisted by a wonderful cast of our friends and talented musicians Sonia Leeson and Andy Jans Brown (vocals), Dan Brown (bass/keys); Toby Davies, Matt Guliford and Dave Stuart (guitars, Dave with some vox); and Jamie Pattugalan on drums and percussion. The fine Sam Bartlett does our engineering at Meridian Receiver studios in Dorroughby NSW.

Our sound is eclectic, from folk rock to hard retro rock to soulful ballads, influenced by acts like The Flaming Lips, Neil Young, The Rolling Stones, David Bowie, Steely Dan, Simon and Garfunkel to name a few.

We hope you enjoy listening to our music as much as we enjoy making it. XXXTrip Poppies