Trips and Falls
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Trips and Falls

Montréal, Quebec, Canada | INDIE

Montréal, Quebec, Canada | INDIE
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"Trips and Falls: People Have to Be Told"

Managing Trips and Falls, Preventing Trips and Falls, Avoid Trips and Falls, How to Reduce Trips and Falls… a cursory googling and it appears the whole world’s trying to bring this under-the-radar but ensconced-in-our-hearts Montreal mob down. Consider this review a counter volley: superb debut He Was Such a Quiet Boy was woefully underappreciated, and People Have to Be Told manages to better it.

Opener I’ll Do The Dishes, You Do The Laundry evidences their ear for a good song title, but they’ve more than wit to recommend them. This Is All Going To End Badly is a late stage highlight thanks to the delicious interplay between Jacob Romero’s inimitable croon and Ashleigh Delaye’s lush backing vocals, but picking favourites is impossible. They bob and weave around expectations, but their quirks are never extraneous; they’re too blooming smart for that. Take the album’s message to heart, kids: tell your friends. [Chris Buckle] - The Skinny


"Sophomore effort from the Quebecois guitar-poppers"

People Have to Be Told is the second album from Quebec based guitar pop outfit Trips and Falls. Building on the spooky promise of last year's He Was Such a Quiet Boy, Trips and Fall's new record is a more consistent and polished product.

In his cover letter to The List, Edinburgh-based Matthew Young, creator of Song, By Toad Records made a very accurate sum-up when he wrote, 'Its not as weird as the last one, but I still bloody love it!'

From the punchy, warm and amusingly named domesticity-themed opening track 'I'll Do The Dishes, You Do the Laundry' to the melancholy yet beautiful duet in 'This is All Going to End Badly', the album flits between hope to despair like rays of sun poking through a stormy skyline. When hazy guitar riffs and thumping bases lines at times threaten to overwhelm, strong and steady vocals hold everything in place. One of the few downsides to the album is its brevity, with a running time of just over half an hour. However, with the pace in which the band is banging out records, we hopefully won't wait too long until the next one. - The List


"Secrets and Sleeptalking: People Have to Be Told Reviewed"

I first learned of Montreal group Trips and Falls via a random browse through Song by Toad Records, the offshoot of the Song by Toad blog. The core of the band began with Jacob Romero and Paul Gareau with added vocals from Ashleigh Delaye. Gareau has now been replaced with Ian Langohr, and it seems as though Ashleigh Delaye has a more prominent place in the band line-up. The song that originally gripped me with its shambolic bittersweetness was “Prelude to a Shark Attack” from their 2009 debut album He Was Such a Quiet Boy. The record contained other intriguing song titles and premises like “Breaking Up with My Mormon Missionaries” and “And in Real Life He Wears Corduroy Pants,” and the music veered from an offbeat melancholy to a playful acoustic sound that flirted around the greyer edges of twee. The music could be cinematic in some areas while claustrophobic in others; music box glockenspiel was pitted against noises like malfunctioning technology. In many ways, it seemed like the perfect soundtrack to a mumblecore film. Earlier this year, I was happy to hear that Trips and Falls had produced a sophomore album, People Have to Be Told. Overall, the record feels like an anxiety dream with plenty of relentless, accelerating guitars and drums, and patches of woozy reverb. A motif of secrets recurs whether they’re hidden or exposed, making for a furtive atmosphere with bursts of volatility when the restraint seems to be too much.

Romero’s vocal style is much like The Weakerthans’ John K. Samson, while the music tends to utilize the off-kilter unexpectedness of artists like Simon Bookish and the ambling sinister sound of Timber Timbre. The album begins with “I’ll Do the Dishes, You Do the Laundry,” which swings from ethereal boy-girl duet to harsh dissonance. The second track,”Good People Are Always So Sure They’re Right,” recalls the detached, macabre storytelling of songwriters like frYars. Romero sings of a murdered woman, and through the course of the lackadaisical melody and blood stains on the floor, you discover that she is buried at sunset. Her murderer is eventually executed when exposed by his loquacious tendencies, and the song ends in shredding guitars, which speed up and explode like maniacal laughter. The next song, “I Learned Sunday Morning, on a Wednesday,” is a melodic release of tension with a bouncy romp of a rhythm and fuzzy guitars; it’s a bit of a disorienting jig through reckless, amoral abandon: “There’s no use in trying to scare me, ’cause you know I’m already dead.”

The album takes a delightfully creepy turn once more as Romero’s vocals delve into a grittier, lower register for “Is That My Soul That Calls Upon My Name?” It hints at dark desires and urges, which need to be suppressed under some quasi-religious sense of morality and guilt. The frantic song menaces with pulsing guitars and the dry rattle of snare, circling and circling whilst the narrator debates the unforgivable temptations, which are never named. Delaye joins back in for the stop-start musical dialogue of “Marginally More Than Mildly Annoying.” As she and Romero verbally spar about the state of the relationship, the music dashes about, lunging, feinting, side-stepping. It’s a fun track that sounds like the equivalent to running up and down stairs in a romantic farce. They return to a sparser arrangement with the resigned beat of “That is a Big Door!” The breathy duet feels like the tired frustration of inertia, the inability to understand and to move someone else.

Another duet ensues for the beautiful acoustic ballad, “This is All Going to End Badly.” The vocals push and pull in vulnerable harmony as though seeking reassurance and skirting emotional sabotage. The lyrics ache with a yearning to trust oneself as much as to trust another. The music goes to a dimmer, more distorted place for “Why Should Now Be Normal?” The grungy guitars provide a rumbling dreamscape accented by winks of glockenspiel. “I could tell you everything you want to hear…it’s better if you stay inside.” The album concludes with “That’s What She Said,” a shimmering, hazy duet that sounds haunted. It begins with the cryptic line “I know you better than you think you do/And the only way you’ll get out of this is if you give in.” Ending in a gentle, interwoven vocal round, much like the one in “Prelude to a Shark Attack,” the song is like a heavenly lullaby, but also unsettling. As their vocal lines overlap and repeat, the lyric “The stories that I know would put you to sleep” mesmerizes.

I find the lyrical content on this album to be vaguer than on the debut, and there’s less of the twee naiveté, but some playfulness remains in the song narratives, albeit an often macabre playfulness. The cardboard sleeve of the album displays multiple overlapping silhouettes of people, all of them with one hand to their mouth as though telling a secret; however, there are two people in the centre facing each other, holding each other’s face rather t - From a High Horse


"Thanks for Sharing! (April 6, 2010)"

Song, By Toad is more than just a great music blog, it’s also a great record label. Over the last few years, Matthew Young has parlayed his ability to suss out great new music into a thriving and diverse roster of artists on his hand-picked label. While many of the artists on Song, By Toad from Edinburgh or Scotland in general, Matthew isn’t afraid to branch out and pounce on something great from the other side of the Atlantic.
So when he first heard the music of Montreal’s Trips and Falls, he knew he was listening to a good thing. He waited a not-so requisite six months before offering to release the music on his label, a period during which no one else seemed keen on doing so. “Strange, creepy guitar music” is as apt a description as I could think of (lifted right from the press release I should point out) especially when you’re talking about “You Should Really Get Yours”, one of the nine tracks on He Was Such A Quiet Boy. It’s sounds as if you’re listening to a warped vinyl record of traditional children’s lullabies played at the wrong speed on a karaoke machine. Despite that description, it all amazingly works. It’s the most out-there moment on the record, and is followed by a beautiful string-adorned song called “Prelude to a Shark Attack” that acts as the perfect counter-point to the quirkiness that came before it. “…Shark Attack” is the album’s standout track for me, and a must-hear (you can hear it on their Myspace page).
- www.quickbeforeitmelts.com (Quick Before It Melts)


"Album Review (11 April 2010)"

Trips and Falls hail from Montreal, and became the latest Song, By Toad Records signing at the end of last year. After a six month wait, their début album 'He Was Such A Quiet Boy' came out on my 18th birthday, March 22, 2010. As is so frequent with the Scottish label, a long-standing favourite of mine, the band play music which is as strangely compelling as it is odd-sounding, this time featuring at times directionless vocals set loosely over clanking semi-ambient sounds. For me, the band strike a more organic similarity to High Places in vocal style - displaying mild twee elements above the mist of psychedelic brass sections. But despite all of this, structure is retained into something vaguely catchy, into cold-hearted pop songs whose chilling nature will come back to haunt you.

The band's myspace page begins to expose the secrets of their sonic unpredictability. They label themselves progressive/bluegrass/pop and Jacob Romero plays an ambiguous set of 'various instruments' as well as vocals and guitar. Ian Langohr contributes percussion. Backing vocals, shakers, bass and keys are shared between Ashleigh Delaye and Amanda Caron - who incidentally also play 'Estrogen'. But the band certainly don't allow themselves to be limited by such a standard set-up.

The two tracks which I am allowed to share are two of the denser arrangements, the strangeness of the titles is far more representative of what Trips and Falls are really like. Drawing elements from psychedelic pop bands in the vein of High Places, as well as an eery, and perhaps oversimplified similarity to Ben Gibbard in vocal delivery, Trips and Falls are as ambiguous as their band name. Almost progressive changes in tempo appear designed to pre-occupy rather than confuse, and the background sound-pallete remains as creepy and impersonal as Menomena's or indeed Brighton band Esben & The Witch's eccentric arrangements. If my aim has been achieved, you'll be intrigued enough to press play/download.
- This Music Wins (thismusicwins.blogspot.com)


"Song, By Toad (13 April 2010)"

This might actually have been my favourite album of 2009. The trouble was that it was a self-release, which we were in the process of re-jigging a little and re-releasing on Song, by Toad Records, so I didn’t really want to include it in its initial form.
I don’t want to give you the hard sell, so you can read my intial review here. This is a new version though, re-sequenced, re-mastered and with a few songs clipped out. I honestly love this record – it’s strange and a little creepy and yet in a sense it is probably best thought of as a pop record I think. The songs themselves are absolutely packed with riffs and hooks and all that pop stuff, it’s just all somewhat, well… peculiar I guess. And I love it.
Initial reviews have been *ahem* flooding in. Well sort of. We’ve had some really nice ones in The Skinny, Quick Before it Melts and This Music Wins, which I really appreciate. The real peach, though, came by email from Nicola who has been a massive support to this label in general, and was intending to review it for The List. She was somehow thwarted due to administrational gremlins unfortunately, but she emailed me this, and I really wish you read more reviews like this in actual magazines:
“Anecdotally, I do have some feedback though. It has been, without a doubt, THE hit album in our house this year. This is predominantly due to the fact that my wee girl (two-and-a-half) utterly loves the opening track. (By which I mean it’s on almost every morning by half seven, and we’re all up dancing). I was tempted to mail you to let you know that at a recent family gathering there were octogenarians up on the floor to the Chills / country strains of Trips & Falls but, you know, babies and pensioners are maybe not yr demographic… (There were plenty of us inbetweeners loving it too, right enough…)”
So there you have it. If you ever have children and pensioners you want to see on the same dancefloor (actually, that sounds dangerous, how are there so few fatalities at weddings?) then this is your baby.
Anyhow, I love this, it is now available to buy and I really hope you’ll enjoy it as well. There’s a video for And in Real Life He Wears Corduroy Pants at the bottom of the page as well – it’s an all-out multi-media PR blitz!
- songbytoad.com


"He Was Such a Quiet Boy (Review)"

I would honestly descibe as being as good a debut as I've heard since I heard Pissing on Bonfires/Kissing With Tongues for the first time.

Jacob's voice is simply lovely, and for the most part he delivers simple pop songs, tinged with a little wistfulness and bordering on twee. It's not that simple though, because half of this album takes that model and subverts it, to the point that some of the songs are downright bizarre. You Should Really Get Yours is superb, and so far from being a pop song it's silly. It works well within the context of the album though, because the whole record shifts on this spectrum, back and forth from the disturbing to the gentle, and this song sets a marker at the far end of the scale.

Even the sweeter tunes on here often have a certain faux-naivety that is mildly unsettling. Sometimes it's the flat, impassive vocals, like the smile of a scary child's toy, sometimes the slightly too crackly rumble of a guitar, sometimes the skittery, off-beat drumming.

Basically, there is a five-song passage in the middle of this record, from In Real Life He Wears Corduroy Pants through to Prelude to a Shark Attack, that is utterly, spell-bindingly brilliant. After that, the variation tails off a little and although there are still some truly excellent songs, I get the impression a couple could happily be trimmed, resulting in a tight, near perfect record from a group I have never heard mention of before or since. It is worth noting, of course, that there could be some very good reasons for how this album has been put together, and I really could just be treading on toes it's not my place to tread on.

Irrespective of this little whinge, He Was Such a Quiet Boy is a superb album, and I strongly urge you to go and buy one immediately. - Matthew James Young (Song, by Toad blog)


"Folk Radio UK Review (14 April 2010)"

Trips and Falls are a new band to Frukie who have just released their album: He Was Such a Quiet Boy on Song, by Toad Records. Describing them is no easy task. There was some struggling with filling out the press release due to a lack of detail provided by the band. That’s not always a bad thing of course, in this case it sort of adds to the curiosity factor that the band have which seems to works in their favour.
They are described as:
Gentle and spooky guitar pop, alternately sadly sweet and disturbingly arrhythmic
The album is one of the more unusual albums I’ve heard in some time but it has bucket loads of variety and that word ‘alternately’ mentioned above should be in bold.
There are some great uplifting guitar rifts throughout the album which balance out downtempo parts nicely. They allow a lot of freedom, though not freeform, within each track which can have a range of moods from catchy rifts to downbeat singing and some manic driven keyboards (How Do You Do) which initially catch you by surprise but then beckon you back for more. You get the opposite spectrum on We Were Like Strangers Today which ventures close to sweetened Indie Pop in places.
So just when you are feeling comfortable with what to expect they throw in something normal sounding likeAnd in Real Life He Wears Corduroy Pants. Very nice vocals and ambient sounding keyboards…almost too normal…nothing like the first two…do you get the picture now? You just cannot pin this album down. There is an undertone of menace or is it spookiness to a lot of the album. Anyone remember Thinguma*jigSaw? They described themselves as Splatterfolk, well Trips and Falls come pretty close to it in places, especially on You Should Really Get Yours. There is an underlying horror but it’s a bit like a freakshow…you can’t help but look. There is so much going on on this album and I can see why they trimmed it down from 15 tracks to 9. There is a balance between interesting and overwhelming and the balance sounds about right now.
My top favourite is Prelude to a Shark Attack:
The album is a bit of a swaying trip with a hint of cabaret like playfulness which, combined with the unexpected and daring make this album something special.
I’m hooked! This will definately appeal to many Frukie Channel listeners.
- www.folkradio.co.uk (Folk Radio UK)


"HeroHill Quick Review (August 20, 2009)"

This Montreal band emailed a while ago about a record – He Was Such a Quiet Boy – they recorded a while before that (2008). The tracks appear unassuming, letting you dictate the emotions and time you spend with them at first, but over time they begin to consume you.

I honestly don’t know what it is about these songs – Jacob’s voice? The eerie vibe that creeps into the mix? The harmonies? The interesting background clanks and textures? The quirky, fragmented change of pace they throw into How Do You Do? - but whatever that is, it grabs a hold of me like a vice grip.

Whenever youI find myself letting the songs play over and over again, equally confused and impressed with their tormented soul and unconventional beauty. Trips & Falls is working on a new record, and I for one am excited about the possibilities that implies.
- www.herohill.com


"The Skinny (Review, March 2010)"

Trips and Falls are full of surprises. Prelude to a Shark Attack, for
example, sounds nothing like the Jaws theme; instead, it’s a moving
Ballboy-esque sob-serenade. Male and female voices take turns to
acquiesce to the dreams of the other: he’s willing to run away with
her; she promises to one day settle down. When their voices combine
it’s stirring; when they start to simultaneously sing opposing plans,
it’s heartbreaking. A song so smart in form and so devastatingly
beautiful in content is rare, and alone would be enough to recommend
the Montreal quartet. But it’s only a slither of this record’s wonders:
from the dizzy spin of And In Real Life He Wears Corduroy Pants’
off-kilter melody to You Should Really Get Yours’ sinister threats,
they excel. Their woozy experiments sound like a band that decided to
play their instruments backwards and blindfolded and discovered it
worked.
- www.theskinny.co.uk


"Is this music? (Review, 19 April 2010)"

Press releases tend to vanish once placed into my tender care. It’s not that I don’t bother to read them, or even, at times appreciate them, it’s just that they tend to disappear without leaving a trace or bidding as much as a fond farewell. Perhaps that’s a good thing. It’s good to come to things from a fresh perspective, to not be manipulated however subconsciously by being told that A are influenced by D, G, X and sound like K and Y and so forth.
This time though, the press release from Song, By Toad Records heralding the release of Trips And Falls album is sitting in front of me. Like the rather splendid and curious album it arrived with, it gives little or nothing away. The aura of vagueness is both charmingly oblique and beguiling, opening with a single line of description that is both terse and to the point and pinpoint accurate, simply stating: “Gentle and spooky guitar pop, alternately sadly sweet and disturbingly arrhythmic.”
From the opening song, ‘How Do You Do…’ right through to the album closer ‘Damaged Goods’, He Was Such A Quiet Boy lives up to this description and so much more. ‘How Do You Do…’ initially sounds glacial and impenetrable but it’s a seriously infectious song. It continually morphs all over the place making it an awkward devil to pin down. The sound is otherworldly and awkward with eerie guitars and a fluid percussive feel snaking down some strange avenues and footpaths.
‘We Were Like Strangers Today’ is a just as awkward and sweet. It all kicks off with a nagging guitar line, thunderous drums and a xylophone, building up and dropping off then increasing in momentum and velocity. It’s a disconcerting, destabilising but thrilling experience with coolly bittersweet interplay between the male and female singers. At times the song is subdued and spacey, at other points it’s frantic and furious, buzzing around like a swarm of seriously irritated bees before crashing into an ominous, moody climax.
‘And In Real Life He Wears Corduroy Pants’ is, well, to put it simply, gorgeously epic with its sweeping strings and rich vocal augmented by a choir of angelic, almost disembodied keyboards and voices. The middle section drops to just some muted electronics with Jacob Romero’s voice to the fore as he sings of feelings of connection and disconnection:
Another city down
And another on the horizon
But you’ve been here before
You’ve always been so charming
And they’ll always welcome you with open arms
And open minds and open doors.

In the same section the tone becomes less optimistic:
You could give in
But you never will
So elusive and caring
You keep them company in silence
Oh and how they don’t like that silence.
It’s a warm, strange, beautiful song, full of minute details yet all encompassing in its scope.
‘Breaking Up With My Mormon Missionaries’ draws you in with its nervy fractured sound, switching in tempo and focus, moving seamlessly between the male and female vocals, distorted electronics, honeyed strings and held together by a breathtaking and bruising rhythm section. It has a hypnotic mood to it, drawing you intimately in to it’s sense of drama. ‘You Should Really Get Yours’ has a strange, wonky sound. A de-tuned guitar, snatches of music box melodies and a looping, meandering rhythm giving it a discordant unsettling feel tempered by flashes of prettiness.
‘Prelude To A Shark Attack’ (how I love those song titles) has a gorgeous, gentle beginning, initially just guitar, cello and dueting voices. It’s a lovely song, delicate in places with its cool, sensuous textures of sounds rising and falling. The female singer strikes a note of optimism while Romero sounds full of doubt and fear, torn between running away and settling down in couplets such as ‘I see hard times ahead / I never really see that happy ending’ before the voices merge together in a delightful manner as both protagonists shift their positions to come full circle on their original stances. ‘Memoirs Of A Martyr’ has a dreamy atmospheric feel. Initially drifting along in a murky groove but full of tiny, seismic shifts in mood until it develops an intense feeling and sound, at times gentle, at others ferocious but always elegant and enchanting.
The penultimate song ‘Thanks For Sharing’ begins with a percussive electronic pulse and intertwined vocals before shifting to a warmer, fuller sound with guitar and strings. It’s a sweet, odd song with an uplifting ending topped off by a devastatingly effective a cappella female vocal. ‘Damaged Goods’ is an evocative, sparse slow song for the main part, lifted in passages by the addition of strings. With its muted, underwater guitar sound and Romero’s vocal at its most world weary and reflective as he sings ‘It doesn’t really matter / You weren’t speaking to me anyway’. As album closers go it’s pretty downbeat but poised and elegiac and eerily beautiful.
He Was Such A Quiet Boy is an intriguing and charming record. Initially, it sounded a little cold and awkwar - http://www.isthismusic.com


"Folk Radio UK Review (14 April 2010)"

Trips and Falls are a new band to Frukie who have just released their album: He Was Such a Quiet Boy on Song, by Toad Records. Describing them is no easy task. There was some struggling with filling out the press release due to a lack of detail provided by the band. That’s not always a bad thing of course, in this case it sort of adds to the curiosity factor that the band have which seems to works in their favour.
They are described as:
Gentle and spooky guitar pop, alternately sadly sweet and disturbingly arrhythmic
The album is one of the more unusual albums I’ve heard in some time but it has bucket loads of variety and that word ‘alternately’ mentioned above should be in bold.
There are some great uplifting guitar rifts throughout the album which balance out downtempo parts nicely. They allow a lot of freedom, though not freeform, within each track which can have a range of moods from catchy rifts to downbeat singing and some manic driven keyboards (How Do You Do) which initially catch you by surprise but then beckon you back for more. You get the opposite spectrum on We Were Like Strangers Today which ventures close to sweetened Indie Pop in places.
So just when you are feeling comfortable with what to expect they throw in something normal sounding likeAnd in Real Life He Wears Corduroy Pants. Very nice vocals and ambient sounding keyboards…almost too normal…nothing like the first two…do you get the picture now? You just cannot pin this album down. There is an undertone of menace or is it spookiness to a lot of the album. Anyone remember Thinguma*jigSaw? They described themselves as Splatterfolk, well Trips and Falls come pretty close to it in places, especially on You Should Really Get Yours. There is an underlying horror but it’s a bit like a freakshow…you can’t help but look. There is so much going on on this album and I can see why they trimmed it down from 15 tracks to 9. There is a balance between interesting and overwhelming and the balance sounds about right now.
My top favourite is Prelude to a Shark Attack:
The album is a bit of a swaying trip with a hint of cabaret like playfulness which, combined with the unexpected and daring make this album something special.
I’m hooked! This will definately appeal to many Frukie Channel listeners.
- www.folkradio.co.uk (Folk Radio UK)


"Sweeping the Nation (22 April 2010)"

Enjoy the Trips
Although from Montreal, Trips And Falls are going through Edinburgh's Song By Toad (two mp3s via that link as well as purchase details), who seem like they're on the verge of a big year even if the gig-goers of Leicester don't know it yet (they handle Meursault, and one day we'll tell you how much we lost on that magnificent night when we put them on with Stairs To Korea. Anyway, Trips And Falls)

It's hard to put a handle on what it is they do - their chief listed influences are Sweep the Leg Johnny, The Smiths, Sonic Youth, Calexico and Charles Mingus, none of which are much help. The band they immediately remind us of, one we've written about a fair bit on here, are Mitchell Museum, taking apart pop melodies, slowing them down, generally screwing around with them, then soldering them back into place to see what might happen. This does make it sound we're fixating on the Scottish connection but there's elements of Ballboy in here too, the twinkling, misleadingly easygoing music backing Jacob Romero's forlorn tales of humanity going not so much wrong as just odd. "Creepy", the press release prefers, and the dense production detail ensures there's plenty going on in the background. And in the foreground on You Should Really Get Yours, which sounds like Stump played backwards.
- www.sweepingthenation.blogspot.com


"Nightlife Magazine (Review March 2010)"

File this new discovery under
quirky and cool. This happy-go-lucky band of Montrealers
self-released this album all on their own last year, but what we
behold is the official re-issue courtesy of a promising Scottish
upstart label. The members of Trips and Falls trade off vocals
around lead-man Jacob Romero's simple and honest baritone~ while
sharing bags of instruments in a musical game of pitch and catch.
They brandish their minimal and lean indie-Ieaning keyboardfriendly
pop as badges of honour, with a head·smart approach to
songwriting. - Nightlife Magazine


"Sweeping the Nation (22 April 2010)"

Enjoy the Trips
Although from Montreal, Trips And Falls are going through Edinburgh's Song By Toad (two mp3s via that link as well as purchase details), who seem like they're on the verge of a big year even if the gig-goers of Leicester don't know it yet (they handle Meursault, and one day we'll tell you how much we lost on that magnificent night when we put them on with Stairs To Korea. Anyway, Trips And Falls)

It's hard to put a handle on what it is they do - their chief listed influences are Sweep the Leg Johnny, The Smiths, Sonic Youth, Calexico and Charles Mingus, none of which are much help. The band they immediately remind us of, one we've written about a fair bit on here, are Mitchell Museum, taking apart pop melodies, slowing them down, generally screwing around with them, then soldering them back into place to see what might happen. This does make it sound we're fixating on the Scottish connection but there's elements of Ballboy in here too, the twinkling, misleadingly easygoing music backing Jacob Romero's forlorn tales of humanity going not so much wrong as just odd. "Creepy", the press release prefers, and the dense production detail ensures there's plenty going on in the background. And in the foreground on You Should Really Get Yours, which sounds like Stump played backwards.
- www.sweepingthenation.blogspot.com


Discography

Releases:

He Was Such a Quiet Boy (2010, Song, By Toad Records)

People Have to Be Told (2011, Song, By Toad Records)

The Inevitable Consequences of Your Stupid Behavior (2013, Song, By Toad Records)

Photos

Bio

Trips and Falls is mainly the project of Jacob Romero. That band was formed in Montréal, Québec during the fall of 2007 by he and drummer Paul Gareau. ­The band’s songs touch on topics ranging from heartbreak (or fear of heartbreak) to the dangers of temptation, including recently released detainees of Limbo and men who wear corduroy pants. In 2009 they were signed to Song, By Toad Records, based in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Trips and Falls has been described as “gentle and spooky guitar pop, alternately sadly sweet and disturbingly arrhythmic.” Eerie vibes, background clanks and textures permeate the songs that run the gamut from straightforward pop to prog, to just plain odd. The songs are formed from elements such as experimental guitar and bass, bright keys, off-kilter drums, and pensive vocals.

Since releasing albums through Song, By Toad Records, Trips and Falls have gained a European audience, with album singles being played on the BBC6 shows Introducing and Freak Zone. UK based blog The Skinny described their music as “smart in form and devastatingly beautiful in content.” Attention has also been garnered on homeground with plays on CBC radio as well as local Montréal stations and podcasts.

The band is currently releasing their third album entitled, The Inevitable Consequences of Your Stupid Behavior. The album is the work of Ian Langohr on drums (replacing Paul Gareau), Ashleigh Delaye on bass, Jacob Romero on various instruments and vocals, and help from additional instrumentalists including; Rachel Therrien (Vic Vogel), Ari Swan (Little Scream), Julie Richard (Orkestar Kriminel), Marc St. Louis (Valleys) and Chris Rudmin.