Breez Evahflowin and Dirt E. Dutch
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Breez Evahflowin and Dirt E. Dutch

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What makes a record stand out? Usually it's the beats or rhymes that the producer and emcee respectively created, but sometimes a producer and emcee combine together and deliver an album, the type of record rappers are rarely known for. Perhaps it's because rappers don't do entire albums with one beat maker or maybe it's just because rap today has become a land of club singles and ring tones.


Whatever it is, Breez Evahflowin and Dirt E. Dutch have combined to form Troublemakers and if their self-titled first effort is any indication, they intend to cause even more problems for an industry that is already in trouble.

Knowing little about producer Dirt E. Dutch, his style is reminiscent of an era of classic producers utilizing drums that knock and samples that any good crate digger would be remiss not to add to his list of records to look for.

The rhyming half of Troublemakers, Breez Evahflowin, has been a staple of the NY underground for years as both a solo emcee and member of the unbeatable -- and missing in action -- collective Stronghold. Probably better known for guest verses and a 12-inch or two, here we get to finally see Breez stretch out and try some different styles and really show us why he hasn't given up on a career in this crazy industry: dude has skills.

Attacking the industry and those who challenge hip-hop's relevancy on "No Room for Growth," we see Breez team up with L.I.F.E. Long. The two emcees' chemistry is perfect and rather than it feeling like a competition of who can spit harder, it feels more natural and they try to build off each other.

Throughout the record, Dutch splices in audio clips from, I'm assuming, a combination of films, TV shows and records. These audio clips add to the content of Breez's rhymes and make it feel like a cohesive set of tracks rather than 12 random songs.

This album will satisfy that desire for some banging hip-hop while we wait for the industry to get back in gear and deliver some heat but, unfortunately, it may get forgotten by the end of 2008, and that would be a shame. Do what you have to to find this project, if for no other reason than to hear one emcee and one producer rock together in the vein of that traditional hip-hop sound.
Posted by .. Will Johnsen at February 1, 2008 4:05 p.m. - SPI Seattle


How does a legendary MC step up his game and do something next level over a full decade after first wowing crowds? For Stronghold’s Breez Evahflowin the equation was simple, link up with one of his neighboring state’s hottest up and coming producers, Dirt E. Dutch. In January the duo released an album under the name Troublemakers (Breez Evahflowin and Dirt E. Dutch Are Troublemakers) and I caught up with both of them at their album release party at Cousin Larry’s in Danbury, CT. How did NYC’s Breez Evahflowin meet CT’s Dirt E. Dutch? I was wondering the same thing myself which is why I sat down with them to find out how they linked up, why their teaming works so well, and exactly what kind of trouble they’re causing.

Adam Bernard: Before you two first met what did you know of each other?
Dirt E. Dutch: My first memory of Breez is back in the day, pre 2K, when he would call in to Hot 97 and steal the segment every time. I was car swapping for Avis back then and always listening to the radio while driving up and down I-95. Then later came MTV’s Direct Effect when he had achieved battle champ status.
Breez Evahflowin: I had checked out a couple of Dutch’s IndieFeed Hip-Hop episodes a few years back and had to subscribe. The selection was mega tight and I was diggin the back story on all of the artists. It was respectful and being an artist I appreciated it.

Adam Bernard: So how did you two go from appreciating each other’s work to meeting up and creating something together?
Dirt E. Dutch: Breez hit me with an email giving me props for the IndieFeed playlist. He said he listened to the show while he did his artwork. The dude is a sick artist in case you didn’t know. He laced up the Troublemakers album art. I sweat it because he made me look cock diesel. Like my name was H.R. Buff N Stuff.
Breez Evahflowin: Yeah, well we had to look menacing and what not. (laughs) Dutch sent me the mp3 to “Don’t Be Afraid” and I was like this dude is official with it. There’s an art to sampling and beat making. I get over two dozen beat offers a month but the first couple of tracks Dutch sent really stood out. We never met face to face for the first year we worked together. It was all Google mail and Fetch.

Adam Bernard: Why did you choose Troublemakers as your name? What kind of trouble are you causing and for whom are you causing it?
Breez Evahflowin: There was a weight to the project that felt heavy, like trouble. Dutch actually came up with the name and I instantly approved as the visuals started to fill my mind.
Dirt E. Dutch: I knew the name would be appropriate because with our music we’re causing trouble on several levels. We’re taking it to the industry fakes in songs like “Trouble Anthem” and “Don’t Be Afraid.” We try to help expose the underlying evil that corrupts today’s society in “Killhumanati.” We even come at our fellow emcees and producers that aren’t holding their own weight on “Repo Men.”

Adam Bernard: Dutch, what’s different about working with Breez as compared to the other artists you’ve worked with, and who else are you currently producing for?
Dirt E. Dutch: Breez is just a natural. Period. What separates Breez from most emcees is not only his syllable play, in every song, but he’s saying something. You’ll never hear a Breez verse and say “awe, he ain’t sayin shit.” He cares about his craft and it shows. Right now I have another duo I’m in with Hawl Digg from CT called Workforce. We’ve been rocking live shows on the local circuit for about three years now. Our first officially distributed CD is coming soon. You’ll also hear a new album very soon on the Little Ax label from Rising Sun Quest out of Waterbury, CT, with production from myself and Sketch Tha Cataclysm. Ant Farm Affiliates all day.

Adam Bernard: How do you think your respective fan bases will respond to this? Do you feel you share a fan base already?
Breez Evahflowin: I’m more concerned with Dutch’s fan base than my own. I’ve learned from rockin’ with Soulive in the past that as dope of a lyricist as you might be you’re always directly connected to what you say. It’s a lot easier for people to appreciate a beat over a verse. The soundscape Dutch put together was amazing. I tried my best not to over do it and let each track show just as much instrument as voice.
Dirt E. Dutch: I know that a lot of my IndieFeed fans are fans of Breez and Stronghold. I’ve even gotten a few five star reviews on iTunes that have mentioned Breez’s name. So far we’ve gotten a great response across the board. We just need to reach more ears now and eventually eyes when we drop the video for “Don’t Be Afraid” later this month. Arjen Noordeman is the producer for that. He’s giving it some real eye popping animation and effects.

Adam Bernard: Sounds dope. One last question; when you look at the underground scene that you’re involved in what do you feel artists are doing right and where do you think there is some room for improvement?
Dirt E. Du - RapReviews.com - Adam Bernard


What makes a record stand out? Usually it's the beats or rhymes that the producer and emcee respectively created, but sometimes a producer and emcee combine together and deliver an album, the type of record rappers are rarely known for. Perhaps it's because rappers don't do entire albums with one beat maker or maybe it's just because rap today has become a land of club singles and ring tones.


Whatever it is, Breez Evahflowin and Dirt E. Dutch have combined to form Troublemakers and if their self-titled first effort is any indication, they intend to cause even more problems for an industry that is already in trouble.

Knowing little about producer Dirt E. Dutch, his style is reminiscent of an era of classic producers utilizing drums that knock and samples that any good crate digger would be remiss not to add to his list of records to look for.

The rhyming half of Troublemakers, Breez Evahflowin, has been a staple of the NY underground for years as both a solo emcee and member of the unbeatable -- and missing in action -- collective Stronghold. Probably better known for guest verses and a 12-inch or two, here we get to finally see Breez stretch out and try some different styles and really show us why he hasn't given up on a career in this crazy industry: dude has skills.

Attacking the industry and those who challenge hip-hop's relevancy on "No Room for Growth," we see Breez team up with L.I.F.E. Long. The two emcees' chemistry is perfect and rather than it feeling like a competition of who can spit harder, it feels more natural and they try to build off each other.

Throughout the record, Dutch splices in audio clips from, I'm assuming, a combination of films, TV shows and records. These audio clips add to the content of Breez's rhymes and make it feel like a cohesive set of tracks rather than 12 random songs.

This album will satisfy that desire for some banging hip-hop while we wait for the industry to get back in gear and deliver some heat but, unfortunately, it may get forgotten by the end of 2008, and that would be a shame. Do what you have to to find this project, if for no other reason than to hear one emcee and one producer rock together in the vein of that traditional hip-hop sound.
Posted by .. Will Johnsen at February 1, 2008 4:05 p.m. - SPI Seattle


I haven't heard from this guy in a while, but I'm glad he's back! The ever talented Breez Evahflowin' has teamed up with producer Dirt E. Dutch to deliver (at least to my knowledge) the first new music from Breez in years! The CD, which isn't available in most stores, is another classic example of a sleeper. Virtually no promotion or marketing behind this, but the final product is dope. Check it out. - UndergroundHipHop.com


I haven't heard from this guy in a while, but I'm glad he's back! The ever talented Breez Evahflowin' has teamed up with producer Dirt E. Dutch to deliver (at least to my knowledge) the first new music from Breez in years! The CD, which isn't available in most stores, is another classic example of a sleeper. Virtually no promotion or marketing behind this, but the final product is dope. Check it out. - UndergroundHipHop.com


Discography

Breez Evahflowin & Dirt E Dutch are Troublemakers, 2008, Little Ax Media

FLY EP , 2003, JustBe Records
Detonator Records Vol1, 2001 Detonator Records
Pro-Files, 2000, Detonator Records

Photos

Bio

Appearances/Accolades :

Troublemakers Album peaks at #2 CMJ Hip Hop Top 40. March 2008

Breez Various Highlights
- Holds down the Title for a record setting 6 weeks on the Viacom Direct Effects program, setting off the first of Viacom's now famous MC battles. '01
- Recorded the title track for Microsoft's XBOX basketball game "Inside Drive 2003"
- Won the first ever 'Late Night with Carson Daly' MC Battle on NBC '03
- The main feature in the Source magazine's Independents day column. '01
- Performed for the X-games on ESPN during a freestyle bike exhibition '02
- Wins the "EOW challenge" MC competition finals in front of a capacity crowd at BB Kings restaurant/club in Times Square NY. '02
- Won the Blaze National MC battle becoming Grand Champ. '99
- Recorded title track to EA Sports "March Madness 2000" video game.
- One of the first of 3 hip-hop artists to ever perform at the Hemp Fest in Boston for a crowd of over 60,000 people. '00
Tours
- European tour with Akrobatik & Mr.Lif (Germany, Switzerland, Holland, Austria & the Chzeck Republic 03),
- Headlines East Coast Tour ( FL, GA, NC, VA, PA, NY, MA & SC, 03)
- Detonator Records Volume 1 Tour (17 cities, 02)

BIO:

Let's take a sec to think back, to 1980 Connecticut, and young Eric Bassriel received his first piece of vinyl for his little blue plastic record player: Kurtis Blow's single, The Brakes. Being from a low-income interracial household in a predominantly black neighborhood, the little mixed up white/Indonesian boy finally had a song he could understand and relate to. Simultaneously, in Uptown Manhattan, a young Enrique Dasilva is sitting up late with his tape recorder pressed up against the speakers because the 8 track doesn't record, fighting sleep for the music that will get him through another day of school in worn out sneakers. Since then they've both held the art of hip hop closer than anyone or anything else.

After years of being in beat-box crews, emceeing and ultimately music production, Eric Bassriel became known as the Dirt E. Dutchman. Enrique Dasilva went on to be known as Breez Evahflowin. With a sole focus on the art of emceeing, Breez dominated the local battle circuit in the mid to late 1990's.

The Dutchman eventually ended up host and content manager for IndieFeed Hip Hop which is currently the most popular hip hop podcast on iTunes. His goal at IndieFeed is simple, promote independent hip hop labels and artists that respect the art and make good music. It was through this process that he came across a Breez Evahflowin track feat. Immortal Technique which led to a phone interview which led to trouble!

Troublemakers, a collaborative effort between Dutch and Breez is to hip hop what hand crafted woodwork is to Ikea. It's a personal yet accessible statement on how music can shape a man's life and cultural views. The album features 12 quality tracks surrounded by colorful sound bites serving as a harsh narrative to the reality ridden rhythms. A virtual soundtrack to a non-existent movie, the Troublemakers LP takes a mature approach to covering various topics: politics, relationships, loss, and good times. The lead single, Don't be afraid, is carried by a soulful hook and the verbal warnings of the current cost of fame. The video, slated for December, boasts a mixture of cutting edge animation and eye popping visuals. Spot dates and tours will begin winter of 07 into spring of 08 while, Breez and Dutch break ground on TM2. The little boys from the east are still enthralled by hip hop music, and still holding it closer than anyone or anything else.