Urban Fetch
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Urban Fetch

Purchase, New York, United States | SELF

Purchase, New York, United States | SELF
Band Rock Alternative

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This CD from an up-and-coming band, Urban Fetch, was something that I enjoyed listening to. Think Weezer meets Billy Joel and that’s what you get from listening to the album, “Everything's About to Change”. The tracks are catchy with the impassioned lead vocals coupled with the classy touch of the piano and more modern beats. … Particularly I really dug the tracks [One Sad Winter Night, Away From Here and The A Room Jam]. [The A Room Jam], the interlude, reminded me of jazz-inspired medley of relaxation, assuagement, and just plain fun. - Malachi Bailey of Newsday


We all know today’s musical landscape is dominated by musicians who are just as likely to release a record as advertise for Pepsi or Taco Bell. In a corporate-controlled atmosphere such as this, the consumer must look to up-and-coming bands to find something unique and free from outside influence.
Enter Daniel Golub, senior studio composition major, and his brainchild, Urban Fetch. This four-piece band is releasing a self-produced album entitled “Everything’s About to Change,” this month. Golub composed all the music on their upcoming album and he cites Ben Folds and Elliot Smith as major influences on his songwriting.
The sound of Urban Fetch defies reliance on any singular source of musical inspiration. This is seen through the wailing, Santana-esque guitar solos of lead guitarist and former Purchase student, Jim Cobb. When combined with the staccato percussion of Josh Mankes, the throbbing bass of Evan Lieberman and Golub’s impressive piano work and gritty voice, Urban Fetch seems destined to find its place within the music scene.
Urban Fetch was formed after Golub released a solo album entitled “I Remember These Roads,” during his freshman year. Wanting to offer a live experience, Golub recruited bassist Lieberman and drummer Mankes to form the original line-up. After first forming, guitarist Cobb was added to offer a new dimension to Golub’s musical vision. The band has existed in its current form for over a year and a half.
“I write whatever feels good,” said Golub.
Whatever feels good seems to range from the sweeping melodies and harmonies of “The Answer” to the almost Latin flavor of “The A Room Jam.” The short but sweet “Nicotine & Ritalin” is easily relatable for a generation of ADD slackers. Golub nearly screams for the chorus, “I’m running on nicotine and Ritalin and I can’t sleep well anymore.”
Although this music could be considered pop, it contains the uncompromising artistic vision and musical talent that many mainstream acts lack. - Zachary Shea of The Purchase Brick


On Urban Fetch’s 2008 release, Songs with No Names, Purchase resident Danny Golub knocks out chords on the piano with a steadiness that makes you feel like you’re marching along in a half-emo, half-frat-boy parade; heart in one hand, beer in the other. Urban Fetch has the sound of a band that’s coalesced, and one that knows just what kind of songwriting it wants to accomplish, which is gear-changing rock with big nods to Ben Folds, and the late-Elliott Smith.

All the songs on the album are lighting-short, which works well, since the band treats song-writing like a structural blitzkrieg. That doesn’t mean that all their songs are up-tempo. Quite the opposite: They like to mix and match slow and fast songs. The reason I say they have a blitzkrieg style is because they seem to get right down to business: They don’t dally on their way to the bridge, or the chorus, or to another bridge, or to another chorus. You get the point. It’s a sign of fine, deliberate song-crafting. They don’t quite have the melodic skills of the Beach Boys, or even Ben Folds, but they’ve got the right idea.

Golub’s piano chords are the defining force behind Urban Fetch’s sound: when he’s manic and jitterbugging across the keys, the songs pop. When he’s feeling upset over some relationship issues, the tone slips into sullen balladry. The band’s backing vocals and tastefully distorted electric guitars add a fullness to their sound: without those elements, Urban Fetch would definitely feel too sparse, and you might get a little tired of Golub’s vocal melodies (often shouted but still intelligible) and straightforward piano arrangements.

The vocals are solid, but the lyricism is lacking. Good lyrics aren’t always about telling a story -- they can be evocative rather than detail-oriented -- but Golub’s verses seem much too vague. There are all of these songs about failed relationships and angst, but we’re left wanting to know more. There’s just too much “I,” “you,” “me,” and not enough suggestive metaphors and details. Urban Fetch’s songs don’t have to be goofy, like those of Ben Folds, but I’d like to hear some lyrics that get me thinking, and stand out from all the others.
However, there are also songs like “Track 7,” which develop more of a complete sense of identity (the track names didn’t load in my iTunes -- or is that the gag of Songs with No Names?):
“Got your new car, cell phone, fax machine
doesn’t matter, though.
You got your good friends, bad friends, boyfriends
thought you were bulletproof.”
The song caught my attention from the start, mainly because it got away from the “I’m doing something,” “You’re doing something” sort of lyrical mindset. The verses stay interesting as the song progresses:
“There was fire, danger, killing.
Watched the whole thing. Saw it all.
I hoped that you would keep your eyes shut,
but you left them open, and you figured it out.”
Then the song makes an about-face and breaks into a bouncing, swinging interlude before transitioning back into the chorus. Listening to the song is a good time, all in all, and it hints at the fun that the band must have playing live. I haven’t seen them yet, but they will be at The Journal News’ Beer and Food Festival tomorrow, so you’ll have a chance then. If you’re thinking that this is just a shameless plug for the festival, listen to the band yourself. It’ll be a chance to join that frat/emo parade I mentioned above (unless you’re all frat/emo paraded-out), with no shortage of beers in hand. - LoHud.com


At its best, music can inspire great epiphanies.

The "Aha!" moment for songwriter Danny Golub hit when his camp counselor played a cassette tape of Ben Folds banging away on the piano, more than a decade ago.

"The first time I realized I could play rock music on the piano ..." Golub says before trailing off.

Well?

"It made me want to write," he says, as though the answer were obvious.

Now he writes and records for his band Urban Fetch, which is based in Purchase.

Last week, Golub, a 22-year-old graduate student at Purchase College who lives in Greenwich, took a break from his writing schedule to perform some tunes for "The Listening Room," a new concert series produced by LoHud.com. (Visit www.lohud.com/listeningroom to check it out.)

The frontman showcased three tracks from the group's upcoming album, which is due out this winter and is called "Songs With No Names."

Befitting the title, the songs are identified only by number.

This system of labeling -or not labeling - may recall the songs Dave Matthews tagged in a similar way. But cast the similarity aside. It apparently had nothing to do with Golub's motivation.

"I wrote the first song and I named it 'Number One,' not thinking of writing a whole album with no names," he says. "But when it came down to it, I was like, naming songs has kind of gotten cliche. You know, you pick the first two lines of the chorus and you name it after that. And for me, I didn't really want to give people anything other than the music."

The music on the upcoming disc could be described as an evolution of sound, starting off with a gentle string and percussion track and growing with each song into more of a hard-hitting compilation.

It was an evolution the writer didn't entirely anticipate.

"When I originally started the album, I thought I was going to write a nice, soft album with lots of strings, but it turned into another rock album," Golub says. "I wanted to have all the songs transition from one to the next ... and it just seemed to lead me into harder songs."

That should bring few complaints from Urban Fetch fans, who have grown accustomed to the group's dramatic flavorings.

And while Urban Fetch surely will continue to morph in its exploration of musical voice, the band is enjoying its place in the region's rock 'n' roll scene.

At least for now.

"I think that we've gone through so many changes as a band, being a jam band and then somewhere in between a jam band and a rock band, and then we've sort of settled in to where we are now, which I think is much more characterizable than we used to be," Golub says. "I don't think we're as eclectic as we used to be, and I think that's a good thing." - LoHud.com


A potential diamond in the rough in this year’s lineup, Urban Fetch has the capability to surprise. Powered by singer/pianist Danny Golub’s mighty vocals, the band performs delightfully complex rock ditties while staying accessible at the same time. Look no further than the band’s latest album, “Songs With No Names,” where it twists and turns through quirky changes, all while keeping the hooks in check.

http://projects.mcall.com/musikfest-2009/performer/273/ - http://projects.mcall.com/musikfest-2009/performer/273/


Taking influence from various Jam Bands and talented singer songwriters from today's era, the guys of Urban Fetch have conglomerated a unique sound that is tranquil and at the same time powerful. Released in the fall of 2006, this Self-titled record showcases the bands talent and songwriting ability to the fullest. Filled with gut busting melodies and fiery guitar solos, the disc is nothing short of great.

Danny Golub, frontman of the group, boasts his staggering voice throughout the album, providing the right amount of emotion any fan searches for when purchasing music. The melodies on the album are accompanied by some eye-opening guitar work from Jim Cobb, providing solos for as long as minutes at a time in tracks like "No Turning Back". The lyrics, while nothing we haven't seen before, speak of everyday life and can be relative to anyone which is a positive thing. The production on the disc is also pretty good, which is promising because it was produced by the band themselves, and is always a good skill to have when in the music business.

Overall the seven track offering is quite a record, especially coming from young aspiring musicians just trying to get their foot in the door. In a culture saturated with fake imposter's and teeny bopping fad clinging girls, Urban Fetch provides a humble and honest sound that anyone from 15 to 50 can enjoy and anyone with any sense of relaxation in their body can unwind to. With the summer months approaching and school/work ending, this review comes in time for the members of TAD to give this record a listen and just have fun.

The band has a new full length album due out this fall and is tentatively entitled Songs With No Names. Visit Urban Fetch's official MySpace page right here [www.myspace.com/urbanfetch] to give the guys a listen and order their record. - The Artist District.com


Taking influence from various Jam Bands and talented singer songwriters from today's era, the guys of Urban Fetch have conglomerated a unique sound that is tranquil and at the same time powerful. Released in the fall of 2006, this Self-titled record showcases the bands talent and songwriting ability to the fullest. Filled with gut busting melodies and fiery guitar solos, the disc is nothing short of great.

Danny Golub, frontman of the group, boasts his staggering voice throughout the album, providing the right amount of emotion any fan searches for when purchasing music. The melodies on the album are accompanied by some eye-opening guitar work from Jim Cobb, providing solos for as long as minutes at a time in tracks like "No Turning Back". The lyrics, while nothing we haven't seen before, speak of everyday life and can be relative to anyone which is a positive thing. The production on the disc is also pretty good, which is promising because it was produced by the band themselves, and is always a good skill to have when in the music business.

Overall the seven track offering is quite a record, especially coming from young aspiring musicians just trying to get their foot in the door. In a culture saturated with fake imposter's and teeny bopping fad clinging girls, Urban Fetch provides a humble and honest sound that anyone from 15 to 50 can enjoy and anyone with any sense of relaxation in their body can unwind to. With the summer months approaching and school/work ending, this review comes in time for the members of TAD to give this record a listen and just have fun.

The band has a new full length album due out this fall and is tentatively entitled Songs With No Names. Visit Urban Fetch's official MySpace page right here [www.myspace.com/urbanfetch] to give the guys a listen and order their record. - The Artist District.com


Discography

"So Alive" [EP] -Fall 2009
"Songs With No Names" [LP] - 2008
"Urban Fetch" [EP] - 2006
"Everything's About to Change" [Sampler w/ Live Tracks] - 2005
"Everything's About to Change" [LP] - 2005

Photos

Bio

Urban Fetch is an awesome melody driven piano rock band based out of Westchester County, NY. Led by powerful vocals, and enforced by groovin' beats, Urban Fetch is on a mission to spread good vibes through their music, making their shows a guaranteed great time for all.