Victoria Canal
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Victoria Canal

New York City, NY | Established. Jan 01, 2013 | INDIE

New York City, NY | INDIE
Established on Jan, 2013
Solo Pop Soul

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Mar
11
Victoria Canal @ Spiritual Living Center Atlanta

Atlanta, Georgia, United States

Atlanta, Georgia, United States

Feb
06
Victoria Canal @ Amplyfi

Los Angeles, California, United States

Los Angeles, California, United States

Jan
31
Victoria Canal @ Eddie's Attic

Decatur, Georgia, United States

Decatur, Georgia, United States

Music

Press


There’s something quite special about Victoria Canal. An aura of gentle beauty surrounds her. When she sings, it affects you deeply, and you experience life on a level that you never even imagined existed. She has a gift and her gossamer melodies can transform you, make you strive to be better.

On January 29, Victoria released her debut EP, Into the Pull. It was a project she recorded in Jan Smith Studios with Grammy-nominated producer “Mama” Jan Smith (Usher, Justin Bieber) along with Jesse Owen Astin and Demond Mickens. The stirring video for her lead-off single, “Unclear,” has already surpassed 100 thousand views. Just last Friday, Canal released her second single from Into the Pull, and today, AXS is proud to offer the exclusive premiere of Victoria’s latest video, “City Shoes.”

The song is a delicate water color of heartache and passion that swirls about with all the grace and elegance of a ballet.

“‘City Shoes’ is about moments that you can’t get back,” Victoria revealed. “Moments of peace, like resting your head on someone’s chest and just falling asleep together.”

Canal told AXS that when a relationship ends, no matter what else was going on or what led up to the parting, it’s those quiet moments that you tend to hold on to. That’s what you miss, and leaving those behind is what makes a breakup so very hard.

The subject matter that Victoria sings so eloquently about is her touchstone to those fond memories. “It was a pair of shoes that reminded me of those moments, they got me through the entire relationship.”

“When I showed my grandma the video for ‘City Shoes,’ she said, ‘Victoria, you need to write a happy song sometimes. I want to see you smile.’ But I was like, ‘Grandma, it’s not artistic to be happy. You have to be solemn,’” she laughed.

Although her art is poignant, Victoria is anything but. She is a vibrant teen with a bright mind and a compassionate spirit who draws her inspiration from a blend of her own life and other people’s stories. However, “in terms of this EP,” she confessed, “it’s all diary.”

“I’m so excited for people to see this new video,” Victoria expressed. “I learned some classical waltz choreography for it and it’s just really cool! I’m very proud. I’m also very thankful for my parents’ support because I couldn’t have done this without them.”

Victoria is a songwriter, a musician, and a vocalist. The touching video for “City Shoes” proves that she is also a captivating dancer. Her talent seems limitless and her drive, unstoppable. 2016 is going to see the rise of a remarkable new star because there’s something quite special about Victoria Canal. - AXS (Allen Foster)


Victoria Canal, a promising pop singer/songwriter based in Atlanta, GA, who is just 17, has won the SongwriterUniverse “Best Song Of The Month” Contest for February, for her song “Unclear.” This song is included on her debut solo EP called Into The Pull, which she released independently last month (January 2016).

“Unclear” is a contemporary pop song which provides a terrific showcase for Canal’s impressive vocal performance and her songwriting. After a short intro, Canal’s vocals emerge, and she displays a rich, expressive voice which sounds as compelling as many older, more famous artists. “Unclear” also has an appealing melody, which lifts higher in the chorus. This recording was expertly produced by Jesse Owen Astin & Demond Mickens, with Jan Smith serving as executive producer. Smith is a prominent, celebrity vocal coach in Atlanta, who has worked with Justin Bieber, Usher and Drake.

Canal was born in Munich, Germany, and she has lived in many countries including Spain, China, Japan and Dubai, due to her father’s extensive travel for business. She began to play piano when she was six, and she started writing songs when she was 11. Canal has been inspired by listening to such favorite artists as John Mayer, Bon Iver, Stevie Wonder and classic rock artists.

It was in 2015 that Canal wrote and recorded the songs for her new EP. She explains her thoughts when she wrote “Unclear.” “I was at my house in Madrid (where she lived at the time), and I was thinking of what the future would hold for me. ‘Unclear’ is a song about not wanting to grow up and make decisions yet. It’s about how ultimately, it doesn’t matter how much you worry about the future. All you can do to control it, is to work hard and be passionate.”

In addition to recording her EP, Canal has been active performing live shows. “I grew up performing a lot—doing shows is one of my favorite parts,” she said, “I mostly play solo shows. I did an open mic tour last year, and it gave me a good chance to get exposure. I played shows going up the East Coast, starting in Atlanta and then traveling up to New York.” She has also performed at such famous venues as the Apollo Theater in New York and the Roxy Theatre in Los Angeles.

Canal has filmed an excellent video for “Unclear,” which was produced and directed by Zack Arias in Atlanta. She has also just released her second single from her EP, called “City Shoes,” and she’s filmed a video of this song, too.

Currently, Canal is spending time working on her music in Nashville and Los Angeles, and writing new songs. Still just a senior in high school, she will be deciding which college she’ll be attending, while continuing to pursue her music career. - SongwriterUniverse.com


Victoria Canal is the embodiment of why we do what we do here at Wordkrapht. Artists like her need to seen and heard. At just 17, Canal has already released her first EP, filled with so much soul and emotion that it’s bound to make you take notice. These songs you will hear on Into The Pull will not only inspire you, they will blow you away. After our first taste of her music a few months back, we couldn’t wait to sit down and have a proper chat with this up and coming artist. She told us all about what went into making Into The Pull, how many countries she’s traveled to and why she likes Twitter as a social media outlet best.

Read the interview below, and then of course go buy the album which available to purchase on itunes, or for streaming spotify .

*Editor’s note: The interview took place before Canal’s EP premiere show, which took place on Feburary 6th.

Hi and welcome to Wordkrapht Victoria! Tell the readers just a little bit about yourself:

Thanks for having me! Well, I’m a 17-year-old singer/songwriter from Spain. I’ve grown up living all over the world—I was born in Munich and have lived in Shanghai, Tokyo, Amsterdam, Dubai, Barcelona, and more since. Travel, songwriting, and food are my three main passions—I was born to live on the road, write music, and try new things. I got into music mostly due to my American grandma, who taught piano for a long time. I would listen to her at four or five years old and eventually would sit up on the stool with her, deciphering melodies and rhythms. My favorite part of the day growing up would be sitting in the car, because that’d be when I’d listen to what my parents or brothers would put on the radio. It was always a vast pool of music—from Queen to Nelly to Maroon 5 to Claude Debussy to Jason Mraz… I mean, the list could go on forever. I’ve always gravitated towards smart music—lyrically, melodically, interpretively… just saying something artistically. I think that’s what I’ve always tried to incorporate into my lyrics and melodies… something that really sticks and makes the listener feel all the feels.

Into the Pull is your new EP. Walk us through the process of recording it. What was the biggest lesson you learned while recording?

Originally, I had written a song called “Little Girl” (the fifth song on the EP) while at Berklee College of Music a couple of years back and brought it to the producers of the record (Jan Smith, Jesse Owen Astin, and Demond Mickens). It was a piano ballad written as an ode to people who have lost their innocence far before they should have. I wrote it to remind myself how important support for youth is, and how important their future is to protect. We went in and came out with this raw, beautiful track with soaring strings and just went from there to the other tracks. I’d say each track is an experience on its own—”Unclear” is about wanting to procrastinate on growing up. “Wolves” is about fitting in (or really, not fitting in at all). “City Shoes” takes me back to a place of peace with someone I can never experience that with again. “Not Afraid” is a letter I wish had been written to me by that same someone. Each track took around a year to really nurture and develop to get to a place where I heard them saying what I wanted them to say. So I guess that’s really what I learned while recording this project—substance is important to me, and that as a songwriter, I let my songs marinate in my subconscious until they’re as ready as they’ll ever be. I also learned how excited I am to keep making music. Each time I make a record, I want it to be significantly better and more evolved than the last—that’s all I can hope for.

Social media can help new artists connect with people, new fans and old friends from across the globe. Of all the ones you use which have you found to be the most beneficial and why?

I was actually just thinking about this this morning, so it’s funny you ask. I thought about how in fifth grade, I got assigned a pen-pal in class (someone who I believe lived in Minnesota, and I was living in Madrid) and loved talking about my life to her and listening to her stories—taking interest in getting to know each other from afar. When used right, social media has that incredible potential: I essentially have thousands of unique pen-pals, all whom take interest in what I’m up to and like to share what they’re up to. How cool is that? As someone who’s always traveling, that’s such an awesome thought to me. To answer the question, I’d say Twitter is the most fun to communicate on. It’s witty, short, and quick—I can share lyrics, jokes, ideas, cool videos, and hear fans’ opinions or thoughts in return, which I always find fun. It’s just the most interactive. I also love Snapchat because it’s kind of like a live feed with no pressure on the fan to be there in that moment. As a fan myself, it’s satisfying to feel involved in whatever an idol of mine is doing.

February 6th is your first ever show in LA. What can those to attend expect to see and hear?

Yes!! I am so excited to be performing there for the first time. People can expect a stripped down, piano-cello arrangement of several of the songs off the EP and a couple of newbies! There are also four other amazing bands playing that night.

What songs are in heavy rotation at the Canal household?

Gosh, that’s always a hard question. I listen to everything, all the time, so I’m always afraid of leaving something out. Right now I’m staying with my grandparents and they had a Best of Dean Martin CD on when I went downstairs this morning. When I study I either like to throw on a Pandora playlist (like an Emeli Sandé or Kodaline one) or listen to constant main influences like Matt Corby, John Mayer, Coldplay, Gavin DeGraw, Ben Howard, Tori Kelly, Bon Iver, Sam Smith… the most magical thing about music is that there’s so much. I usually gravitate towards subdued, melodically-driven and melancholy songs; but there are always the Justin Timberlake/Michael Jackson/D’Angelo kind of days. Currently I’m kind of obsessed with Alessia Cara. She’s one of the only bigger names I could actually imagine myself hanging out with and enjoying myself.

Okay, here’s the short answer to the question: right at this exact moment, I’m re-listening to Justified by the classic Justin Timberlake and In the Lonely Hour by Sam Smith. I love to study albums, one at a time, and get as into the brain of the artist as I can. It really helps as a songwriter and expressive person in general. These two are exceptional, exceptional bodies of work.

Parting words for the readers of Wordkrapht?

Go get my EP, Into the Pull! Listen on Spotify! Tweet me about it! I’ll be gooey and part with a quote I may or may not have just googled:

“Everyone has a plan, until they get punched in the face.” - Mike Tyson - WordKrapht


Victoria Canal is a name you are going to want to remember. Seventeen year old Canal has already received numerous accolades allowing her to follow in some very famous footsteps. Her new EP Into The Pull was released on Jan 29 and has an inspirational message of overcoming adversity.

Check out our interview with her!

1. Your EP Into The Pull came out in January, What has the response been like from fans considering it has a very inspirational story of overcoming adversity?

The response has been great so far! I think the most popular comment I’ve gotten about the EP has been that fans have discovered who I was because of it and have related a lot to Unclear and City Shoes (the two singles). Alessia Cara also tweeted it out saying she thought it was beautiful, which I thought was awesome! It’s so comforting to get that validation from other artists.

2. You grew up living in many different countries, how has that inspired your musical sound and work ethic?

I definitely think traveling has defined my sources of inspiration. Music is the only universal language, to me—well, that, and hugs. My need and desire for human connection and warmth has greatly increased because of my travels. I think it’s only encouraged me to find ways to melodically tell stories that express emotion in both unique and universally understood ways.

3. What three records you could not live without listening too?

Continuum by John Mayer, Number 1’s by Stevie Wonder, and of course, Thriller by Michael Jackson. Bonus (one of my new favorites): In the Lonely Hour by Sam Smith.

4. You give back to numerous nonprofits, how are you using your music to bring focus to them?

I always try to incorporate substance into my music. Off the EP, the two songs that really maintain that are “Wolves” and “Little Girl,” “Wolves” addresses insecurity and sense of identity, reaching out to people that perhaps feel really unsure of themselves; “Little Girl” is an ode to young people that have suffered through experiences that made them lose their innocence far before they were meant to, or generally don’t see hope in their own future. Outside of the music is where I think I have more control on how I can contribute to my surroundings—hosting benefit concerts and raising awareness to my viewers online is a huge priority for me. As an artist with a voice, that’s my obligation and responsibility, after all.

5. You have performed at some incredibly famous venues, what is your favorite memory so far from your career when it comes to performing?

To be honest, my EP release show last week was my favorite experience! It was the first time hundreds of people had gathered exclusively to listen to my music and appreciate what I’ve worked so hard on, which I found so humbling and rewarding. It only made me realize how much I crave getting on the road and making every night a special one, whether it be opening for a bigger, more established act or doing smaller shows on my own. Any time I’m in front of an audience that likes what they’re hearing (and wants to hear more) is my favorite type of performance experience.

6. Do you plan on attending college and studying music or are your plans just set on touring and furthering your career in music?

That’s a difficult question, and one I’ve been asking myself for the majority of my senior year. I’m a person that likes to plan out her life in her spare time—by one year, five years, ten years, and even the whole nine yards. What I’ve discovered as I’ve gotten older, though, is that it’s kind of useless to “plan” that way. It’s great to dream and work as hard as you possibly can to get closer to that dream—but there’s no use in worrying. So to answer your question, I’ve applied to college (my top picks are music business and performance programs) just to keep my options open; all the while, I’m hyper-focused on seeing how I can keep progressing as an artist and see which way turns out to be the one that was meant for me. It’s up to time to decide—I’m done worrying about it!!

7. What piece of advice do you have for anyone struggling to find their own voice in life?

Art, to me, is the most powerful expression anyone has immediate access to. Even without an audience to show it to, expressing yourself through visual, theatrical, or musical ways can help you find your voice and identity in a truly powerful way. Taking the time to figure yourself out by making art! That way you’ll find out how you want to express yourself and find your voice in every other way, too. - StageRightSecrets.com


I was lucky enough to chat with 17-year-old, Victoria Canal. This soulful pop singer’s debut EP, Into the Pull, is out now! Her powerful lyrics are inspired by the emotions and experiences of life. To me, her music is unlike any other. If you have listened to her songs, it is easy to be compelled by the messages each song provides. Check out the interview here!

What age did you discover you had been gifted with these talents?
I grew up watching my grandmother play classical music on the piano. I was always drawn to the melody and the rhythm. I started classically training when I was six years old. Clips of home videos can be found in my music video, Unclear, where I am seen playing the piano at such a young age. By the age of 10-11, I started listening to contemporary and classic rock music like U2 and Queen. This is really when I decided that I wanted to turn my dreams into reality.

When you are not playing the piano, what instrument is your favorite to play?
Although I grew up playing the piano, I would have to say the electric guitar. I love writing and making music to it. I also enjoy playing the trumpet.

If you had to choose a song that means most to you, which one would it be and why?
It is not out yet, but I just finished writing a song called, “I Have Never Loved.” This one has to be my favorite so far. It is dedicated to my brother. I believe human connection is important, and I want him to know that I will always love him the best that I can no matter what.

What has the experience been like for you?
This experience has been so amazing for me. I am so grateful that I can make music around school. I always imagined being on a stage with lights and loud music… now that is real. I get to do what I had always dreamed of doing. I am so passionate about writing and making music, and I am so thankful for the opportunities I have been given.

What is your favorite part about performing for benefit concerts and just performing in general?
I would have to say that one of my favorite parts is just performing live. Being on stage doing what I love, especially for a good cause, is so satisfying to me. I would also say the hugs afterwards. When I can touch someone with my lyrics, there is really no greater feeling.

What is something you enjoy doing for fun in your free time?
Growing up in Asia really influenced my desire to play ping pong. My dad and I really enjoy playing in our free time, and it is definitely a bonding experience for the both of us. It was very accessible, and it really taught me how to focus. Plus, it was just fun pass time.

What is your favorite country and why?
Out of all the countries I have resided in and visited… My favorite place is wherever I am living. I love Amsterdam, Barcelona, London, and Tokyo, but I really just love any place when I am with my family. My favorite part of traveling would be the experiences. I keep two notebooks with me. One is a “Who Are You” notebook where I write down my thoughts and feelings. The other is a notebook strictly for songwriting. I take these with me wherever I go and wherever I am living.

If you couldn’t already tell, Victoria is a genuine person and performer. Her music will continue making a difference in the lives of her listeners. We appreciate you and your hard work Victoria! Rock that stage, and keep being you. - PopHeartstv.com


The first thing you hear is promise. It ascends into skies eternally Springlike, because that’s where youth lives, always renewing, forever golden. Victoria Canal is a singer and songwriter who lives now in Atlanta, and she’s just released her debut EP Into The Pull, five songs long and designed to make your heart swell – with possibility, with hopeful melodies and with the energy of creation above all. Thankfully she took a break from reading Jane Eyre to speak with us about the making of her EP, her international upbringing and her dreams for the future. She was absolutely charming and eloquent. She’s bound for something special. So read on, and catch the first glimpse of a future supernova as it crackles and sparks…

What is your first musical memory, and do you think it relates in any way to the songs you write now?

My first musical memory is probably watching home videos of me when I was three or four years old, sitting with my grandmother who was a piano teacher. What I remember musically first was listening to “Man in the Mirror” by Michael Jackson and playing it out by ear on the piano. I must have been like seven or eight years old when I was starting to learn to play the piano. That was really when I discovered what music was to me consciously, and I realized that writing was a really fascinating thing and it all seemed to be unattainable – like a whole other universe – and I think that was when I started getting closer and closer to what it was to be a musician.

It sounds like you realized pretty early on that you had an aptitude for music.

It was more like my parents realized for me that I had an aptitude! They always saw that I had innate rhythm and a sense of melody, and when we listened to music in the car I would bounce up and down and enjoy myself always when music was on. The earliest I could talk was when I started to sing, and that was really when my grandma introduced me to instruments and piano. I started taking classical lessons at six years old, and from then on music has just been a really instrumental (no pun intended) part of my growth as a person.

So are your parents musical people?

Well, my mom is very artistically inclined and she actually studied architecture and is an incredible visual artist. My dad is not an artist at all – he studied chemical engineering and is in business management now. But it really came from my American grandmother and my brother especially. Growing up I would listen to a lot of what he listened to. My parents as well listened to a lot of classic rock, from what I remember, as well as opera. Then growing up when I was in lower school I would listen to NSYNC and Backstreet Boys because that’s what all my brothers were listening to. So yeah, my background in music has been really varied – it’s just been whatever is melodically enticing and engaging.

So I’m understanding that you started really early with formal training – you said it was classical training when you were six. Was that on the piano with your grandma?

It wasn’t with my grandma – we’re too stubborn to work together. When I lived in Spain I started taking lessons from my piano teacher there as well as classical voice. It wasn’t really until I was eleven that I really started legitimately writing songs and delving into contemporary music on my own.

How did you decide what five songs would be on the EP?

It actually came together really smoothly. I think it was almost up to the producer I was working with, Jan Smith. In her studio I just started playing this song for her – it’s actually the last song on the EP. It’s called “Little Girl”, and we went in and recorded that first, and it kind of just went from there. I started playing her all my songs, and one by one we picked the ones that were my favorites and her favorites and it came together and resulted in a nice, solid five songs.

The production of these songs sounds so layered and full and lush. Did you have most of the musical ideas in your head before you recorded them, or did they grow over time?

I definitely cannot take credit for how incredible the production is on them. That was really up to the producers in the studio. I wish I had that skill and it’s something I’m definitely planning on focusing on in the next couple of years, to really home in on the production side. When I wrote the songs, I basically imagined more rhythm than just playing them on the keys or the ukulele or guitar, and went into the studio with a really open mind because I really wanted it to be a collaboration between me and the producers. I like strings, so I knew I wanted to include those on at least a couple of tracks, and I also wanted piano to be a part of the sound. Other than that, I really left it up to our time in the studio together to come up with what we liked most and what best fit the emotion and the message of the songs.

How much editing do you do – getting rid of ideas or changing them – before you feel like a song is finished?

Usually it takes me a pretty long time. When I write I usually get most if not all of the song down and done, and then I leave it for a little bit to kind of marinate and think about it a little bit. After I’ve given it a bit of time, I go back and I make changes lyrically or melodically. One of the things I’ve found is that after playing it live a lot, without me even really being able to tell, it’ll transform. If I record my first performance of a song, like “Unclear” let’s say, the way I perform it now –there’s a huge difference stylistically, and there are things that change little by little. So I definitely think when it comes to recording the songs I want to have performed those songs for quite a while to know what I like – to bring out more in the song.

It’s like a living thing that’s growing.

Exactly. I have to let it cultivate itself and grow a little bit, and I have to get comfortable with it. It’s kind of like a relationship – before I legitimize it by recording it, I need it to settle for a bit.


Little Moments Matter: Meet Victoria Canal

The first thing you hear is promise. It ascends into skies eternally Springlike, because that’s where youth lives, always renewing, forever golden. Victoria Canal is a singer and songwriter who lives now in Atlanta, and she’s just released her debut EP Into The Pull, five songs long and designed to make your heart swell – with possibility, with hopeful melodies and with the energy of creation above all. Thankfully she took a break from reading Jane Eyre to speak with us about the making of her EP, her international upbringing and her dreams for the future. She was absolutely charming and eloquent. She’s bound for something special. So read on, and catch the first glimpse of a future supernova as it crackles and sparks…
image

(Photo by Zack Arias)

What is your first musical memory, and do you think it relates in any way to the songs you write now?

My first musical memory is probably watching home videos of me when I was three or four years old, sitting with my grandmother who was a piano teacher. What I remember musically first was listening to “Man in the Mirror” by Michael Jackson and playing it out by ear on the piano. I must have been like seven or eight years old when I was starting to learn to play the piano. That was really when I discovered what music was to me consciously, and I realized that writing was a really fascinating thing and it all seemed to be unattainable – like a whole other universe – and I think that was when I started getting closer and closer to what it was to be a musician.

It sounds like you realized pretty early on that you had an aptitude for music.

It was more like my parents realized for me that I had an aptitude! They always saw that I had innate rhythm and a sense of melody, and when we listened to music in the car I would bounce up and down and enjoy myself always when music was on. The earliest I could talk was when I started to sing, and that was really when my grandma introduced me to instruments and piano. I started taking classical lessons at six years old, and from then on music has just been a really instrumental (no pun intended) part of my growth as a person.

So are your parents musical people?

Well, my mom is very artistically inclined and she actually studied architecture and is an incredible visual artist. My dad is not an artist at all – he studied chemical engineering and is in business management now. But it really came from my American grandmother and my brother especially. Growing up I would listen to a lot of what he listened to. My parents as well listened to a lot of classic rock, from what I remember, as well as opera. Then growing up when I was in lower school I would listen to NSYNC and Backstreet Boys because that’s what all my brothers were listening to. So yeah, my background in music has been really varied – it’s just been whatever is melodically enticing and engaging.

So I’m understanding that you started really early with formal training – you said it was classical training when you were six. Was that on the piano with your grandma?

It wasn’t with my grandma – we’re too stubborn to work together. When I lived in Spain I started taking lessons from my piano teacher there as well as classical voice. It wasn’t really until I was eleven that I really started legitimately writing songs and delving into contemporary music on my own.

How did you decide what five songs would be on the EP?

It actually came together really smoothly. I think it was almost up to the producer I was working with, Jan Smith. In her studio I just started playing this song for her – it’s actually the last song on the EP. It’s called “Little Girl”, and we went in and recorded that first, and it kind of just went from there. I started playing her all my songs, and one by one we picked the ones that were my favorites and her favorites and it came together and resulted in a nice, solid five songs.
image

(Photo by Zack Arias)

The production of these songs sounds so layered and full and lush. Did you have most of the musical ideas in your head before you recorded them, or did they grow over time?

I definitely cannot take credit for how incredible the production is on them. That was really up to the producers in the studio. I wish I had that skill and it’s something I’m definitely planning on focusing on in the next couple of years, to really home in on the production side. When I wrote the songs, I basically imagined more rhythm than just playing them on the keys or the ukulele or guitar, and went into the studio with a really open mind because I really wanted it to be a collaboration between me and the producers. I like strings, so I knew I wanted to include those on at least a couple of tracks, and I also wanted piano to be a part of the sound. Other than that, I really left it up to our time in the studio together to come up with what we liked most and what best fit the emotion and the message of the songs.

How much editing do you do – getting rid of ideas or changing them – before you feel like a song is finished?

Usually it takes me a pretty long time. When I write I usually get most if not all of the song down and done, and then I leave it for a little bit to kind of marinate and think about it a little bit. After I’ve given it a bit of time, I go back and I make changes lyrically or melodically. One of the things I’ve found is that after playing it live a lot, without me even really being able to tell, it’ll transform. If I record my first performance of a song, like “Unclear” let’s say, the way I perform it now –there’s a huge difference stylistically, and there are things that change little by little. So I definitely think when it comes to recording the songs I want to have performed those songs for quite a while to know what I like – to bring out more in the song.

It’s like a living thing that’s growing.

Exactly. I have to let it cultivate itself and grow a little bit, and I have to get comfortable with it. It’s kind of like a relationship – before I legitimize it by recording it, I need it to settle for a bit.

The video for “Unclear” is very, very beautiful. How did you develop the visuals so that they reflected the song so well?

Well, getting into it I knew I wanted it to have a nostalgic element, and I didn’t know how to elaborate on that. So when it came to making it, we had an entirely different idea and concept for the video up until the day before. The day before the creative co-director called me and said, “Hey I don’t think we’re going in the right direction. I think we need to do something that is attainable and still relatable and that people will find more visually realistic.” So we talked it over and I talked about the emotions that the song gave me, and the fact that I wrote it while on my bed in my bedroom, just doodling on the ukulele – trying to forget all my worries and just trying to stop growing up.

At this point in my life, I’m trying to figure out what my purpose is and where I’m supposed to go from here. I’m finishing high school and figuring out whether I should go to college immediately and what I should do and what life is going to bring me and can I really predict that kind of stuff? You really kind of have to go with your gut and do what you love, and that was really the inspiration for the song – the existential questions, the big questions.

If you could collaborate with one other songwriter, who would it be?

Like, biggest dream ever?

Why not? We love big dreams.

Okay cool – I’ll just say it. I think opening for John Mayer on tour would be my biggest dream.

What is it about him?

John Mayer is really why I’m in music. My brother was one of my main musical “sources” because he listened to everything, but he really was an avid John Mayer fan. I became one because of that, and as I grew up musically, I started appreciating him on more than just a superficial level. I discovered him before I thought anything about boys, and I’m not obsessed with John Mayer because he’s cute. I’m obsessed with him because he is an incredible musician and songwriter and an artist with a lot of integrity. I’ve always just listened to him and observed his songwriting, and I’ve been told that my songwriting is clearly influenced by him. He’s just one of my main idols, and I think interacting with him in any way musically would be a dream come true. He’s a legend to me.

What advice would you give to songwriters who are just starting out about how to develop their artistic voice?

I’ll give them some advice I’m trying to give myself right now. One is that I’ve always been in so much of a rush, and I think I have to be in less of a rush and really enjoy what I’m doing. So I would say to any young, especially female singers: don’t feel like you have to be a big deal when you’re 17. You have time to get there and just do what you love – if it’s being on the road, interacting with passionate musicians, or being behind the scenes or writing for other artists. Whatever you like to do, there’s plenty of time and you don’t have to be 17, 18, 19 and already have had a big, successful career. I think there’s plenty of time and that’s what I need to remind myself of more.

The other piece of advice I would give is that a lot of people are obsessed with huge moments that impress people, or somehow validate what they are doing. I think that the little moments matter just as much, and whatever you want to get good at, whatever you are passionate about, you have to take it step by step and that’s really what’s going to make it worthwhile. Know that each step that you seek, you’re taking actively in the direction that you want to end up in – as a human being and as an artist.

It sounds like you’ve done a lot of traveling. What has that done for you as a developing artist and songwriter?

I was born in Munich, Germany and then I was in several parts of Asia and the Middle East and Europe, and never actually in the United States until this past year to pursue music full time. I think it has helped me gain perspective in a way that a lot of people my age don’t get to do. I think I look at things – maybe this might be a curse more than a blessing – but I look at things in a much more nostalgic way. I miss people a lot more because I say goodbye a lot more. I’ve heard from other people that travel makes them less attached because they’re saying goodbye so much, but it has the opposite effect on me.

I think that’s definitely affected my songwriting. I’m a very emotional person. I feel all the emotions very, very strongly and appreciate people so much. That comes from having traveled and seeing how many different kinds of people there are all over the world, and how much each of them adds to their surroundings and to their community. I think people are really beautiful and I’ve been able to learn that through seeing all different kinds.

Do you have a favorite place you’ve been so far?

Barcelona is a favorite for me and also London – anywhere that my family is. My Cuban grandparents live in Barcelona, and whenever I’m there I feel like I’m home. I don’t know London very well, but my brothers live there so I feel like I’m home when I’m there. My parents just moved to Amsterdam, so when I’m there I feel at home. So it’s really anyplace that my family is that I feel most at home and feel like that’s my favorite place.

What are some of your favorite things to do when you’re not working on music?

Family is a big deal because I don’t get to see them often. I love TV – Friends is a classic, and I like New Girl, Scandal and How To Get Away With Murder. Jane the Virgin is my most-recent favorite.

I love sleeping and I love food, but just recently I’ve gone vegan, so that’s going to be a challenge and a big adventure. I love books – and ping pong! I’m not a very sporty person, but when it comes to ping pong, I will beat you. (laughing) There’s a guarantee. I grew up playing it in Shanghai and Tokyo and it was a big part of my day.

…and finally, what are some of your favorite songs? Surely there’s some John Mayer in there…

Yeah, (laughing). “Stop This Train” and “Slow Dancing in a Burning Room” are two of my favorites by him. “Cavalier” by James Vincent McMorrow. I love “Re: Stacks” by Bon Iver, and I just recently discovered Kevin Garret. “Refuse” has a beautiful, beautiful piano and he plays really well live. I think when it comes to music, I obsess over artists and their entire work rather than songs in particular. That’s the way that I love exploring music – through the artist and their entire catalog.

It’s like reading whole book instead of just one chapter.

Exactly. What I discovered with the new Coldplay album or the Adele album or even Justin Bieber is that I like buying them and then taking them on a walk through a park and listening to the entire thing, maybe twice or three times, to see why they put it in that order. Or I can imagine in my situation what the inspiration was for that song. I think I’m pretty analytical about it, but also very emotional, which makes me feel like it’s a good way for a person to feel connected to something – whether it be that artist or the person they’re imagining, that artist is telling them they are not alone or that they understand.

Just today Ms. Canal released her “City Shoes” single, and you can do yourself an immense favor either by downloading it and her Into The Pull EP from iTunes or streaming it on Spotify. - The Autumn Roses


Last Wednesday, Victoria Canal released the incredibly powerful video to her single “Unclear.” The lyrics eloquently express that feeling of being unsure, that precise moment when you stop to question your future and wonder what the end of the race is going to hold for you. In a scene that is easily one of the Internet’s most poignant 11 seconds ever, Victoria confesses, “I don’t know if I’m meant to do music sometimes, but I certainly hope so.”

“I had no idea that first scene would ever be included, but when I saw it in the video, I knew it belonged there as a completely vulnerable and naked side of me,” the artist revealed in a recent press announcement.

Victoria’s song and video seem to have encapsulated the sentiments of the world as the independently produced work has already received nearly 50 thousand views. With her fearlessly honest confessions coupled with her stunning artistry and miraculous spirit, the release of her EP Into the Pull on January 29 just might make the 17-year-old artist a contender for “Inspirational Woman of the Year” in a number of outlets.

The video for “Unclear” depicts a questioning Victoria nestled safe within her magical blanket fort. The sheets become a window to the past as the singer relives precious moments of her childhood. The genuine beauty of her soul radiates from within and is clearly evident in her compassionate eyes as the camera moves in to capture an absolutely stunning and intimate performance.

Reflecting upon the completed work, Victoria noted, “It changes my mind about time. I kind of want to embrace it because I see how much change and evolvement it can bring, without me even noticing that it’s happening.”

Currently based in Atlanta, Victoria has also lived in Munich, Shanghai, Tokyo, Barcelona, and Dubai. Her bio reports that, “The influence of traveling and experiencing many cultures has shaped her music as well as her personality.” She is also an active supporter of the LGBTQ community and is active in representing victims of oppression and abuse.” - AXS/Allen Foster


Atlanta is a city where artists come to get their start. Sometimes they even come from the other side of the world, like Victoria Canal.

For “City Lights,” Nancy Hoddinott sat down with the Spanish-born singer, pianist and ukulele player, who turns 17 years old on Tuesday, to find out why she chose Atlanta.

Canal's been touring the East Coast and mid-Atlantic states this summer, and is eager to perform around Atlanta this month.
Victoria Canal, right, with WABE's Nancy Hoddinott on the singer's studio visit.
Credit Luke Putney / For WABE

“The more intimate I’m able to get with an audience, in terms of vulnerability and songwriting, is a gift for me,” Canal said. “And hopefully it’s a gift for them too, to be able to carve a minute out of their day and receive what I’m trying to give to them.”

Canal talked about using music as a form of activism. She’s partnering “Little Girl,” a song she wrote about child sex trafficking with an organization working to address the issue.

She also performed an original song, “Sailing Blue,” with her ukulele in the studio.

Canal will be appearing in the Atlanta area later this week: At the Alpharetta Food Truck Alley on Thursday, at the Variety Playhouse on Friday and at the Unity North Church in East Cobb on Sunday. - WABE 90.1 FM


Lush and serene, lined with silk and abundant with promise, “Unclear” is the newest single from Atlanta, Georgia-based singer and songwriter Victoria Canal, the first she’s shared from her debut EP. It’s poised, stylish and it sounds like the beginning of something a lot of people will love a great deal and without reserve.

Into the Pull is the title of her genuinely-beautiful forthcoming 5-song EP, released on January 29th of next year. In the meantime you can stream this heartwarming single on Spotify and hear more from her on her Soundcloud page. - The Autumn Roses


I first meet Victoria Canal in the ladies’ restroom. The Atlanta teen singer-songwriter is sitting on the carpeted floor, humming and strumming a ukulele while resting her head against the wall. Her ukulele case is under the sink, along with a bright red pick. Although we’re just three feet away from each other, she does not notice me. Her full attention is on the melody she’s humming. After a few seconds, she realizes I’m in the room and I quickly apologize for walking in on her practice. “No it’s OK,” she explains. “I’m sorry. I just wanted to go somewhere to practice before I have to perform.”

A fusion of acoustic, soul, pop, and R&B, Victoria Canal is destined to be heard across every niche of popular music. She combines infectious rhythms with compelling melodies and then adds incredibly poetic lyrics that any teen can relate to because we are all going through similar struggles. The result — well, it’s all up to your own personal interpretation. For example, in her song “Little Girl,” Canal speaks of being in the wrong place: “Little girl what are you doing here? It’s not a place for you to play. I’ve seen people die here.”

The John Mayer enthusiast first got her start in music as a toddler. “I remember figuring out how to play Michael Jackson’s ‘Man In The Mirror’ and trying to harmonize with it,” says Canal during her VOX press conference at VOX Media Cafe this summer. She began vocal, piano and trumpet lessons at age six and has since learned the ukulele.

Victoria received two scholarships to the world-renowned University of Berkley School of Music Program, though she barely grazed the minimum age of 14. Now 16, she explains, ”It helped create a lot of confidence for me. To be surrounded by people who love music just as much as I do was a beautiful thing.”

Throughout her 16 years, the singer has lived a nomadic lifestyle. Born in Munich, Germany, Victoria has lived in Dubai, Spain, China, and Japan. She currently resides in Smyrna, Georgia. Canal works with Jan Smith, a vocal coach, and manager. Smith is best known for coaching singing superstars like Usher and Justin Bieber. Canal recently ended her Open Mic Tour and is working on her debut album. You can find her music on SoundCloud and YouTube.

What makes Victoria different as a singer-songwriter is that she is one of us, a teenager, but more importantly, a person. But because she writes, records and performs her own material, more people can hear her thoughts. She is not consumed by the superficial factors of fame. She does not conform to the social norms around her. Her identity does not rest in the fact that she’s met Justin Bieber or that she works with one of the most famous vocal coaches in America. She is a musician with concrete morals that cannot be manipulated, which is something we all long for.

Since she is so easy to converse with, I ask her if she’s afraid of being victimized by the music industry. Victoria tells me confidently, “No, if it ever came to that, I’d fight back.” Just a few minutes into the conversation, and I can tell that she truly believes in music and in the healing powers it can have on the listener as well as the performer. She is completely invested in her music. Victoria Canal is a true musician worth listening to. - VOX Atlanta


It’s impossible to pinpoint the exact moment when adolescence turns into adulthood. Maybe it’s a convergence of emotions and experiences, a meeting place for infatuation, pain, intrepidity and the loss of innocence. Whatever it is, it’s this ineffable combination of nostalgia and epiphany that 17-year-old songwriter Victoria Canal has captured on her debut EP, Into the Pull. Over five tracks of the purist soulful pop she explores what it is like to be sucked inside the whirring chaos of emotion and experience that is life.

Rather than run from this chaos, Canal has grabbed hold of the magical maelstrom. Even her writing style embraces this uncertainty. Each song is born from experimenting with an unfamiliar sound or instrument. Rather than sticking with the piano that she has grown up playing, she will pick up a guitar, bass, ukulele or even a loop station and through experimentation and discovery a flash of inspiration will strike.

Now based in Atlanta, GA, Canal has also lived in Munich, Shanghai, Tokyo, Barcelona and Dubai. The influence of travelling has shaped her music as well as her personality, allowing her to see the world’s cultural melting pot in all its rich glory. She was also born without her right forearm due to amniotic band syndrome and this has allowed her to give a voice to people who might not traditionally become performers and has added an additional layer of empathy to her emotional spectrum. - Skope


The UNDSCVRD:MUSIC team recently came across 17-year-old Victoria Canal, a Spanish-American singer-songwriter based in Atlanta. Victoria dreams her music will one day take her around the world.

How did you first come to start doing music?

VC: Music has always run in the family, my American grandmother was a classical piano teacher and my Cuban great-grandmother was an opera singer. I was introduced to piano at six-years-old by my grandmother, and soon after I began lessons in both piano and voice – since then, my love for music has grown.

Why did music initially appeal to you?

VC: I chose to be a musician because nothing else could possibly make me as satisfied or as fulfilled – it’s my passion. I approach my career as the opportunity to pursue my passion!

I chose to be a musician because nothing else could possibly make me as satisfied or as fulfilled

What’s been your most memorable experience?

VC: It would have to be when I stayed on a small boat with my family and sailed around Seychelles. I have never seen clearer stars during the night and I will definitely never forget that moment of utter peace and admiration towards the universe.

Where’s the best place your music has taken you?

VC: I have two personal spaces that my music has taken me that I have fallen absolutely mad for: the recording studio, and the stage.

Bringing my songs to life with incredibly talented engineers, and then hitting the stage with those same songs for any one who wants to hear them, is the most joyful and raw moment and I’m thankful for the experience.

Do you have any guilty pleasures?

VC: S’mores would be the first on the list, followed by: Pizza, Justin Bieber’s christmas album, couch potato-ing, watching the F.R.I.E.N.D.S. episodes one-too-many times (or like 28-too-many) and watching people on the metro and imagine exactly what it’s like to live their lives.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years time?

VC: I’d like to see myself having evolved a lot from who and where I am now – not only musically or entrepreneurially but also spiritually.

As long as I continue to have a strong foundation of close, trustworthy friends and family and am able to wake up every day happy with what I’ve done and what I’m about to do, I’ll be content with where these next five years will have taken me and wouldn’t be able to ask for anything else! Those are my thoughts on it anyway. - Mind My Platform


HOMETOWN: Madrid, Spain

CURRENT LOCATION: Atlanta, Georgia

AMBITIONS: Go on a world tour, release hit albums, write for other artists, get a university education, start a nonprofit foundation and education foundation, spend an extended period of time at sea, beat the record for most s’mores eaten in an hour

TURN-OFFS: Close-mindedness, non-food-lovers, defeatist perspective, cockiness

TURN-ONS: Smiles, humor, guitar player, inspired and curious about life, loves music and art more than anything, friendly

DREAM GIG: Opening for John Mayer on tour

FAVORITE LYRIC: “So scared of getting older, I’m only good at being young // so I play the numbers game to find a way to say my life has just begun.”

CRAZIEST PERSON I KNOW: Mama Jan (vocal coach of Usher, Justin Bieber, Drake, the Band Perry, and countless others)

SONG I WISH I WROTE: “I Don’t Wanna Be” – Gavin DeGraw

5 PEOPLE I’D MOST LIKE TO HAVE DINNER WITH: John Mayer, Ellen DeGeneres, Chris Gardner, Berry Gordy, John Montagu (the guy who invented the sandwich)

MY FAVORITE CONCERT EXPERIENCE: James Vincent McMorrow

I WROTE THIS SONG…To express my unending urge to figure out what life is supposed to turn out like before it actually happens. - American Songwriter


Victoria Canal has unveiled the opening track from her forthcoming debut EP, Into The Pull, and MAGNET has a free download of it for you today. “Unclear” is an incredibly professional-sounding track for a 17-year-old’s debut, crisp and patient, self-assured pop. Check it out below, and make sure to keep an eye out for Into The Pull, which comes out January 29. - Magnet


Yesterday, Victoria Canal released the first single from her upcoming debut EP, Into the Pull. “Unclear” is the beautiful reflection of the soul of a gentle artist who has a deep yearning for answers. The song is a heartfelt plea for confirmation that when the young singer gets to the end of her long race, it will be everything she’s ever hoped it would be.

Victoria’s lyrics crackle with a thought-provoking curiosity as they dare to ponder what lies beyond. Her comforting vocals hum with the serene elegance of natural grace. She makes an impact that lingers, offering the exquisite musical refinement of peers such as Vanessa Carlton, Ellie Goulding, or Birdy.

And that artistry has not gone unnoticed. In fact, her work had such promise, that it drew the attention of Justin Bieber and Usher’s vocal coach, Mama Jan Smith, to work with the rising star on her debut EP. “It’s a rare and wonderful privilege to be on the front end of discovering artists who I believe will have great impact on the future of music and how the industry perceives talent,” Smith stated in a recent press release. “Victoria Canal is an exceptional singer and songwriter, but more importantly, she is a most unique individual with a story that needs to be heard. I, for one, am listening.”

Although Victoria is currently based out of Atlanta, the teen has lived in Munich, Shanghai, Tokyo, Barcelona, and Dubai. She studied music in Barcelona and has performed at such acclaimed venues as the Apollo Theater in New York, the Troxy in London, the Berklee Performance Center in Boston, and the World Cafe Live in Philadelphia. In 2015, she was one of six Young Arts National Finalists as a singer/songwriter and, in 2014, she won the Eddie’s Attic bi-annual “Songwriter Shootout.”

A champion of the oppressed and abused, this remarkable young woman boldly serves as a voice for minorities and people who have had to grow up faster than they should have. “Little Girl,” one of the songs on her upcoming EP, deals with human trafficking while, according to her bio, “Wolves” deals with “trusting the wrong people to try to fit in, struggling with self-confidence, and questioning sexuality.”

Due to a condition called Amniotic Band Syndrome, Victoria was born without her right forearm. “People find this inspiring, but it is secondary to the music and artistry of what I do,” Canal expressed in an announcement to the press. “I have the confidence and the position to give a voice to people who wouldn’t ‘traditionally’ become performers.”

The complete track list for Into the Pull is as follows: “Unclear,” “Wolves (The Other Side),” “City Shoes,” “Not Afraid,” and “Little Girl.”

On December 7, Victoria will perform at the 3rd Annual SERV Ball at the Biltmore Ballrooms in Atlanta. SERVE International is an organization dedicated to “giving people the opportunity to make a difference.” According to the online event description, the “3rd Annual SERV Ball is an Orange Tie Affair benefiting the non-profit organization, SERV International. The event will include entertainment from Spain’s very own Victoria Canal, as well as Chinua Hawk & Friends Christmas Concert. There will also be a Silent Auction in which over 100 amazing items and experiences will be available.” - AXS/Allen Foster


Wordkrapht is beyond proud and excited to introduce you to Victoria Canal . A singer-songwriter out of Atlanta, Canal is striving to be a voice for those who may not have one. With her soon to be released debut EP Into The Pull, she is hoping to bring to light “themes of marginalization and discrimination toward social groups that struggle to find a voice in society.”

Victoria Canal is just seventeen years old, and is already facing the world with a compassion and kindness that is otherwise severely lacking. The last track on her EP, “Little Girl” is about human trafficking and victims of domestic abuse who have had to grow up faster than they should have. The track is a beautiful ballad, heart-wrenching and uplifting simultaneously. Canal’s vocals are filled with soul and sorrow, and can’t be justified until you listen. From her travels all over the world, to her own struggles, Canal does not have the same outlook and perspective as your typical seventeen year old.

Speaking of struggles, she was born without her right fore-arm due to a condition called Amniotic Band Syndrome, and plays a multitude of instruments. When talking about the adversity she’s faced, she’s see’s things a bit differently.

“People find this inspiring, but it is secondary to the music and artistry of what I do,” says Canal. “I have the confidence and the position to give a voice to people who wouldn’t ‘traditionally’ become performers.”

Do yourself a favor and take a listen now to Victoria Canal’s first single, “Unclear”. If that doesn’t blow you away take a peek at the live performance of “Little Girl”. Both are just below. Don’t leave this page until you press play!

Into The Pull will be released in January, check back soon for the review. - WordKrapht


"It's a rare and wonderful privilege to be on the front end of discovering artists who I believe will have great impact on the future of music and how the industry perceives talent. Victoria Canal is an exceptional singer and songwriter, but more importantly, she is a most unique individual with a story that needs to be heard. I, for one, am listening."
Mama Jan, Owner
Jan Smith Studios, Inc.
Homegirl Entertainment, LLC - "Mama J" Jan Smith


Victoria Canal is all of 14, ready to take the 
music industry by storm — and can’t imagine why the fuss over a missing limb -

Pianist, vocalist, trumpeter, guitarist, songwriter, music producer and photography enthusiast — Victoria Canal is a lot of things, but disabled is not one of them.

The Spanish-American student was born with a missing arm as a result of amniotic banding in the womb, a congenital disorder that is said to affect approximately one in 1,200 babies. But get on the subject and she is so superbly nonchalant, she’s almost dismissive. That’s because she doesn’t quite see herself as ‘missing’ anything. “I don’t consider what I have a disability just because I’ve never known it any other way,” the teenager explains, cheerfully. “Sure, I had to crawl a different way; I actually learnt to walk really quickly because I used just my legs, instead of arms and legs. But it’s never really affected me in any way… I can’t jump rope and I can’t do the monkey bar but… that’s about it,” she grins.

It’s a get-on-with-it attitude that’s taken her through much of her 14-year-old life — both as an aspiring musician and a third-culture kid, having to move countries often, from Germany to Spain, China, Japan and finally Dubai, in February last year.

But where most would take a missing limb as a definite reason not to explore the arts, Victoria believed it “all the more reason” that she should. “What I love in life are challenges,” she says. “If you don’t have a challenge, you don’t change. And that’s part of the reason that I love music so much — because it challenges me.”

There’s magic in music, she believes — “like being able to feel what [musician] John Mayer says through his songs on the guitar” — and nothing to stop her pursuing her own musical dreams. Victoria’s earliest music memory is of listening to Michael Jackson’s Man in the Mirror, aged about four or five. “That’s the first time I actually sat down at the piano and played it out by ear,” she recalls. “Ever since then I’ve been training to play by ear and learning songs with chord tabs.”

Victoria began receiving training in piano and opera singing at the age of six. She has about five years of experience with the trumpet while the guitar has been a more recent interest.
- See more at: http://www.khaleejtimes.com/wknd/wknd_article.asp?xfile=/data/wkndtopstoriesnew/2013/June/wkndtopstoriesnew_June1.xml&section=wkndtopstories#sthash.wrvICOLt.dpuf - Khaleej Times


While most teenagers will be heading off on holiday with their families or enjoying plenty of downtime with their friends this July, the 14-year old Victoria Canal has very different plans.

“I’ll be concentrating on learning, this summer,” says the budding singer-songwriter. “I was the only student to have been given a scholarship to attending Berklee College of Music in the United States and I’ll complete a full semester from the college curriculum.”

A 9th grade international baccalaureate student at GEMS World Academy in Dubai, Canal’s musical epiphany happened when she was just 6 years old.

“I had been playing the piano since I was 4 and one day I heard Michael Jackson’s song Man in the Mirror,” she says. “I thought it was something entirely new and I wanted to play it by ear. So that’s when I knew.”

Canal was born with one fully functioning arm, amniotic band syndrome having restricted blood-supply to the other in the womb. Far from stifling her ambitions of becoming a successful pianist, it served to strengthen her resolve.

“I play with both hands,” she says. “When I started having piano lessons, my teacher taught me how to play left-handed and had planned my future around left-handed pieces. I’m very grateful my mum encouraged me to use both hands instead, because when I eventually did, it worked to my advantage.”

With many public concerts to her name, most recently at Dubai’s Bo House cafe, Canal has learnt how to field questions about her unique style of playing.

“Little kids always ask: ‘What happened to your arm?’” she says. “I just explain that it happened at birth. Most adults are polite and respectful. If they ask, I’m perfectly fine with that. When I tell them, they say: ‘Oh, I’m sorry,’ and I’ll say: ‘There’s no reason to be sorry, I’m perfectly fine and don’t feel any different.’”

Canal credits her positive attitude and self-confidence to her parents and one other musical mentor.

“His name is Matthew Langridge,” she says. “He’s my teacher at school and he’s also my guitarist at gigs. He has really helped me to advance a lot.”

Advancement for Canal has now reached the point where she’s laying down a demo track with the Dubai-based producers JR Studios. The hope is that her collection of eight sample songs will one day land on the desk of an influential record producer.

“The songs are my genre, meaning it’s a love album, very calm, soothing like a lullaby,” she says. “I’d consider myself successful as long as I’m enjoying what I’m doing and there are many people I’d like to work with in the future. People who share the same passion for music and songwriting such as John Mayer, Jason Mraz and Ed Sheeran, for example.”

There’s no denying that Canal is a well-grounded young lady with her eye on the prize. She’s also acutely PR savvy, having secured herself prime-time performance slots on TV channels from Dubai One to MBC1.

Despite a taste of regional fame, the teenager is mindful of not pushing her professional plans too hard, too fast.

“I’m always thinking about my career and what comes next,” she says, “but I want to take the opportunities that come along in my stride. University is on the cards for me and I may even study business and law before exploring my music. There’s still time.”

After Canal completes her five-week music course in Boston next month, she’ll be heading to Barcelona to perform at a music –festival.

When it comes to how her parents are handling requests for foreign travel and study sabbaticals, Canal admits she owes them a debt of gratitude.

“It’s always been my family’s way to travel around the world,” she says. “My father works very hard and has a great job which means he’s able to help us with all these opportunities and avenues we want to take. My mother and father are willing to fund all that. They really do a very good job of investing in our futures.” - The National


Through the grace of serendipity, host Savino was given a copy of a recorded song called “Unclear” by Victoria Canal. Hear on this episode, seventeen-year old, destined for stardom Victoria Canal’s interview weaved in and out of each of her original five songs from her newly released EP Into the Pull. Perhaps this show more than any illustrates the Savino Veritas motto, “I may be joking, but I’m never kidding” as the light-hearted banter bridging gaps of generations and gender reveals the poignant details of this young artist who entered life with no right arm but all the passion in the world. Despite her disability, she can grab and hold any audience. Enjoy. - Thomas Savino/SRN One


Discography

"Into the Pull" 5 song EP

Produced, Recorded, Engineered, Programmed, and Edited by: "Mama Jan" Smith, Jesse Owen Astin, Demond Mickens at Jan Smith Studios, Atlanta, GA,  for Homegirl Entertainment, LLC, and Mama J Music, LLC.

Drums Recorded by: Gerry Hansen, Creekside Studio, Lawrenceville, GA
Additional Programming by: Emile Ghantous  (“Unclear” only)
Mixed by: Shawn Grove

Mastered by: Steve Rawls, Real-2-Reel Studios, Jonesboro, GA

Lead Vocals by: Victoria Canal
Background Vocals by: Jan Smith, Adam McKnight, Tann Smith, Victoria Canal, Jesse Owen Astin
Acoustic Guitars, Ukelele by: Jan Smith with Victoria Canal
Piano by: Victoria Canal, Demond Mickens
Organ by: Demond Mickens
Electric Guitars by: Jesse Owen Astin
Nashville and Nylon String Guitars by: Peter Vogl
Pedal Steel Guitar: Michael Westbrook (Wolves, Not Afraid)
Cello by: Okorie Johnson
Bass Guitar by: Demond Mickens
Drums and Percussion by: Gerry Hansen
Strings, Percussion, and Keyboard programming by: Jan Smith, Jesse Owen Astin, Demond Mickens
Additional Programming by: Emile Ghantous (“Unclear” only)

All songs written by: Victoria Canal.
All songs arranged by: Victoria Canal with Jan Smith, Jesse Owen Astin, and Demond Mickens

©2015LuckyClaraMusic
All Rights reserved

Photos

Bio

It’s impossible to pinpoint the exact moment when adolescence turns into adulthood. Maybe it’s a convergence of emotions and experiences, a meeting place for infatuation, pain, intrepidity and the loss of innocence. Whatever it is, it’s this ineffable combination of nostalgia and epiphany that 19-year-old songwriter Victoria Canal has captured with her music, using her soulful pop songs to explore what it is like to be sucked inside the whirring chaos of emotion and experience that is life.

Now based in New York City, she has also lived in Atlanta, Barcelona, Amsterdam and Madrid, Munich, Shanghai, Tokyo, Dubai, and London (which she still considers to be her true home). The influence of this perpetual traveling has shaped her music as well as her personality, allowing her to see the world’s cultural melting pot in all its rich glory. Born without her right forearm, due to amniotic band syndrome, it was a childhood moment in……. which gave her the confidence to pursue a career in performance. As a large group of people crowded around her, curious to know about her arm and to bless her with hugs, Canal’s initial sense of embarrassment soon gave way to a wave of excitement and possibility.

Having begun songwriting at the age of 11, Canal juggles her time between her music career and studies. As well as high school online, her education has included two full-tuition scholarships to the Berklee College of Music’s 5-week summer programme.  In 2014 she won the acclaimed Eddie’s Attic bi-annual Songwriter Shootout, following in the footsteps of her hero John Mayer. Though this balancing act is tough it’s one that is clearly paying off.

An artist who gives a voice to those who might not traditionally become performers, Canal also regularly stages benefit concerts for the causes she believes in such as SERV, AIS and t-oigo. She is also an active supporter of the LGBTQ community as well as representing victims of oppression and abuse.  As someone who tries to find a reason to be happy in every situation she wants everyone to enjoy the beauty of life in a fair world.

These experiences, hopes and fears can be heard Unclear, the lead tack from her debut EP Into the Pull. The juxtaposition between the dreamlike production and deeply personal lyrics, questioning her purpose in life, adds a layer of mystery to the message within.  Unclear was recorded in Jan Smith Studios with Grammy nominated producer “Mama” Jan Smith (Usher, Drake) and her team, Jesse Owen Astin and Demond Mickens (additional programming from LA-based producer Emile Ghantous). Her nostalgic sound teases glimpses of influences like John Mayer, Alicia Keys, Sam Smith and Al Green whilst always remaining unique to its creator.

Canal’s music should be turned up loud and enjoyed at full volume. There’s poetry in the melody and depth in the lyrics, and lovers of classic pop music will want to hear what this gifted young talent has to say.


Band Members