Virgins Family Band
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Virgins Family Band

Durham, North Carolina, United States | SELF

Durham, North Carolina, United States | SELF
Band Rock Jazz

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This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Jun
20
Virgins Family Band @ The Cave

Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

May
17
Virgins Family Band @ Satellite Bar and Lounge

Wilmington, NC, None, USA

Wilmington, NC, None, USA

Apr
27
Virgins Family Band @ The Cats Cradle

Carrboro, North Carolina, USA

Carrboro, North Carolina, USA

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Music

Press


Virgins Family Band are one of the most surprising acts to come from the Triangle in recent memory. As I was scouring the web for local shows I found the Baobab double album release show with Virgins Family Band and knew that I'd be in for a treat. However, when I first listened to Honeylion there was a visceral reaction that I wasn't expecting. Their sweet harmonies and unpredictable melodies make each listen through an experience in which you can peel back new layers and find new moments in this music to connect with. Ranging from frenetic soul to jazzy indie rock, Virgins Family Band have a sound unlike any other band in the state. It's one of those bands where you can genuinely start to realize the depth of the Carolina talent pool, because seemingly from out of nowhere I've grown incredibly attached to this band.

Honeylion is as strong a statement that any band can wish to make with a debut, they've crafted a sound that's entirely unique and filled with melodic masterpieces. Tracks like the album's opener, "Moon Breath" display the dynamic breadth displayed within this 8-track album. Powerful rhythms drive these tunes, and they're capable of changing direction on a dime and delivering a brand new addictive melody that's filled with adventurous originality. The best part about Honeylion though is that it always leaves you guessing, Virgins Family Band combine elements from jazz and pop music in a way that creates an inviting yet still complex soundscape that's filled with gorgeous musical moments that create for an invigorating listening experience. The entire album is packed with fantastic musical endeavors, from the croons of "Eyes Like Troubled Dreams" to the shiver-inducing shouts that close the album in "Lily Molusco", Virgins Family Band display a mastery of dynamics and pacing.

Honeylion feels like a truly cohesive piece of work, it's difficult to not listen to this all the way through as each track beckons the listener to continue on. The flow of Honeylion is as smooth as the title implies, this release is filled with seamless transitions and brilliant resolve. Honeylion soundtracks my winter days and will soon do the same for my spring, mostly because it's a ubiquitous piece of music that truly feels timeless. Honeylion has given Virgins Family Band my complete attention. They're one of the most talented acts I've seen from North Carolina in years and I take great pride in being able to debut their first full-length. Check out the Bottom String Session I filmed with the band below and purchase their album Honeylion on Bandcamp - The Bottom String


Virgins Family Band are one of the most surprising acts to come from the Triangle in recent memory. As I was scouring the web for local shows I found the Baobab double album release show with Virgins Family Band and knew that I'd be in for a treat. However, when I first listened to Honeylion there was a visceral reaction that I wasn't expecting. Their sweet harmonies and unpredictable melodies make each listen through an experience in which you can peel back new layers and find new moments in this music to connect with. Ranging from frenetic soul to jazzy indie rock, Virgins Family Band have a sound unlike any other band in the state. It's one of those bands where you can genuinely start to realize the depth of the Carolina talent pool, because seemingly from out of nowhere I've grown incredibly attached to this band.

Honeylion is as strong a statement that any band can wish to make with a debut, they've crafted a sound that's entirely unique and filled with melodic masterpieces. Tracks like the album's opener, "Moon Breath" display the dynamic breadth displayed within this 8-track album. Powerful rhythms drive these tunes, and they're capable of changing direction on a dime and delivering a brand new addictive melody that's filled with adventurous originality. The best part about Honeylion though is that it always leaves you guessing, Virgins Family Band combine elements from jazz and pop music in a way that creates an inviting yet still complex soundscape that's filled with gorgeous musical moments that create for an invigorating listening experience. The entire album is packed with fantastic musical endeavors, from the croons of "Eyes Like Troubled Dreams" to the shiver-inducing shouts that close the album in "Lily Molusco", Virgins Family Band display a mastery of dynamics and pacing.

Honeylion feels like a truly cohesive piece of work, it's difficult to not listen to this all the way through as each track beckons the listener to continue on. The flow of Honeylion is as smooth as the title implies, this release is filled with seamless transitions and brilliant resolve. Honeylion soundtracks my winter days and will soon do the same for my spring, mostly because it's a ubiquitous piece of music that truly feels timeless. Honeylion has given Virgins Family Band my complete attention. They're one of the most talented acts I've seen from North Carolina in years and I take great pride in being able to debut their first full-length. Check out the Bottom String Session I filmed with the band below and purchase their album Honeylion on Bandcamp - The Bottom String


On Friday, February 22, Local 506 hosted Virgins Family Band, Baobab and…a puppet show?!

Yes, you read that right; before Baobab performed, and then again before Virgins Family Band, there were puppet shows.

“The puppet show was like….professional,” said sophomore Charlie Shelton. “It was impressive because it wasn’t like three first-graders behind the screen having a blast with some cutouts. There was an actual puppeteer behind there doing a great job with all that they had.”

Although she had trouble seeing it, sophomore Rachel Atkinson agreed. “It was sick.”

Baobab and Virgins Family Band each played with the puppet show, and then launched into the rest of the show.

Virgins Family Band, who is based in Chapel Hill, performed a high-energy show. The show marked the release of their incredible new album, Honeylion, and they dedicated most of their performance to songs from this album.

They didn’t disappoint fans of their first album, RGB, and performed many songs from this album (released when the band was just called Virgins).

Sophomore Seth Rose highlighted lead singer Saman Khoujinian as the best part. “[He] put an exorbitant amount of energy into the performance and made a legitimate effort to connect with the audience.”

Khoujinian’s energy really was special. He poured emotion into every song he sung, and loved every minute of performing. Khoujinian wanted to infect the audience with his mood; he wanted them to have a great time because he was having a great time.

Opener Baobab, from Durham, was equally great. Although the audience was not as familiar with their electronic-folk music, Baobab kept their show interesting with choices from their past three albums (which you can find all on Bandcamp).

Another standout moment of the show was when members of the Virgins Family Band wore their Honeylion costumes while performing.

“The whole theme they had going of the Honeylion and his pals was awesome,” said sophomore Jay Putnam.

Virgins Family Band took the Honeylion, which is on the cover of their new album, and his friends and brought them to life on stage (check out their page to see the artwork). This unique touch amplified the show to an experience. It’s not everyday you see a concert with someone dancing around wearing a lion head.

“I have never really seen anything like that for any local band,” Putnam continued. “It’s interesting they have made that into something that you can easily associate with the group and their live shows.”

One of the greatest things about Virgins Family Band though is that you can’t figure out what type of music they play. Are they folk? Electronic? Or… maybe a little experimental? It’s hard to narrow down, but that makes it even more intriguing.

“They can’t be pinpointed to a certain genre, and they don’t want to be,” said Shelton. “They don’t want association with anything that can limit them, they just want to play music and be authentic about it.”

The Virgins Family Band concert was definitely an experience. When a concert combines puppets, Honeylions and excellent music, what more could you want? Check out our review on Honeylion to get a sense of their new album. - Resound Magazine


On Friday, February 22, Local 506 hosted Virgins Family Band, Baobab and…a puppet show?!

Yes, you read that right; before Baobab performed, and then again before Virgins Family Band, there were puppet shows.

“The puppet show was like….professional,” said sophomore Charlie Shelton. “It was impressive because it wasn’t like three first-graders behind the screen having a blast with some cutouts. There was an actual puppeteer behind there doing a great job with all that they had.”

Although she had trouble seeing it, sophomore Rachel Atkinson agreed. “It was sick.”

Baobab and Virgins Family Band each played with the puppet show, and then launched into the rest of the show.

Virgins Family Band, who is based in Chapel Hill, performed a high-energy show. The show marked the release of their incredible new album, Honeylion, and they dedicated most of their performance to songs from this album.

They didn’t disappoint fans of their first album, RGB, and performed many songs from this album (released when the band was just called Virgins).

Sophomore Seth Rose highlighted lead singer Saman Khoujinian as the best part. “[He] put an exorbitant amount of energy into the performance and made a legitimate effort to connect with the audience.”

Khoujinian’s energy really was special. He poured emotion into every song he sung, and loved every minute of performing. Khoujinian wanted to infect the audience with his mood; he wanted them to have a great time because he was having a great time.

Opener Baobab, from Durham, was equally great. Although the audience was not as familiar with their electronic-folk music, Baobab kept their show interesting with choices from their past three albums (which you can find all on Bandcamp).

Another standout moment of the show was when members of the Virgins Family Band wore their Honeylion costumes while performing.

“The whole theme they had going of the Honeylion and his pals was awesome,” said sophomore Jay Putnam.

Virgins Family Band took the Honeylion, which is on the cover of their new album, and his friends and brought them to life on stage (check out their page to see the artwork). This unique touch amplified the show to an experience. It’s not everyday you see a concert with someone dancing around wearing a lion head.

“I have never really seen anything like that for any local band,” Putnam continued. “It’s interesting they have made that into something that you can easily associate with the group and their live shows.”

One of the greatest things about Virgins Family Band though is that you can’t figure out what type of music they play. Are they folk? Electronic? Or… maybe a little experimental? It’s hard to narrow down, but that makes it even more intriguing.

“They can’t be pinpointed to a certain genre, and they don’t want to be,” said Shelton. “They don’t want association with anything that can limit them, they just want to play music and be authentic about it.”

The Virgins Family Band concert was definitely an experience. When a concert combines puppets, Honeylions and excellent music, what more could you want? Check out our review on Honeylion to get a sense of their new album. - Resound Magazine


Virgins Family Band’s members are young, many still students at UNC.

But you wouldn’t know that by listening to their new album, Honeylion. Boasting a mixture of everything from smooth jazz to upbeat pop, the new album sounds like it’s the product of musical maturity cultivated from many years of playing together.

“Moon Breath” starts the album off in a lazy haze. Harmonizing vocals and a soft, cascading electric guitar slowly build into a brash mixture of jam-band rock and pop. By the end of the song, the guitars, synth and drums die off and segue into the next song, “Well Aware.” With rolling drums and the bass vamping with funk flair, it naturally picks up on the previous song’s vibe.

Guitarist and vocalist Saman Khoujinian’s crisp voice in “Eyes Like Troubled Dreams” alternates between jazzy falsetto and breathy low notes with amazing smoothness while “Temper” hints at Latin jazz, featuring warm guitar chords and vibrant percussion rhythms. But until the sixth track, “Needs,” nearly all of the songs share a similar vibe: smooth vocals with harmonies, punchy, mellow guitar and intricate drum rhythms. It grows slightly tiring and elicits curiosity about what else this talented band can do.
However, “Needs” quells the curiosity. It’s hauntingly slow. The electric guitar is quiet, barely topping the sound of a whisper. Khoujinian’s voice echoes like he’s singing in an empty warehouse, similar to the vocal style of Robin Pecknold of the Fleet Foxes.

“Lily Molusco” closes the album. It starts off slow and folksy, with acoustic guitar, harmonizing vocals and sparse percussion. By the end of the song, Khoujinian breaks his mellow vocal style and is yelling over power chords with an intensity found nowhere else on the album.

Then, the song fades out, ending Honeylion as softly as it started. But it’s a fitting ending, capturing the dynamic peaks and troughs of one of Chapel Hill’s best bands.

Dive verdict: ????? - The Daily Tar Heel


Virgins Family Band’s members are young, many still students at UNC.

But you wouldn’t know that by listening to their new album, Honeylion. Boasting a mixture of everything from smooth jazz to upbeat pop, the new album sounds like it’s the product of musical maturity cultivated from many years of playing together.

“Moon Breath” starts the album off in a lazy haze. Harmonizing vocals and a soft, cascading electric guitar slowly build into a brash mixture of jam-band rock and pop. By the end of the song, the guitars, synth and drums die off and segue into the next song, “Well Aware.” With rolling drums and the bass vamping with funk flair, it naturally picks up on the previous song’s vibe.

Guitarist and vocalist Saman Khoujinian’s crisp voice in “Eyes Like Troubled Dreams” alternates between jazzy falsetto and breathy low notes with amazing smoothness while “Temper” hints at Latin jazz, featuring warm guitar chords and vibrant percussion rhythms. But until the sixth track, “Needs,” nearly all of the songs share a similar vibe: smooth vocals with harmonies, punchy, mellow guitar and intricate drum rhythms. It grows slightly tiring and elicits curiosity about what else this talented band can do.
However, “Needs” quells the curiosity. It’s hauntingly slow. The electric guitar is quiet, barely topping the sound of a whisper. Khoujinian’s voice echoes like he’s singing in an empty warehouse, similar to the vocal style of Robin Pecknold of the Fleet Foxes.

“Lily Molusco” closes the album. It starts off slow and folksy, with acoustic guitar, harmonizing vocals and sparse percussion. By the end of the song, Khoujinian breaks his mellow vocal style and is yelling over power chords with an intensity found nowhere else on the album.

Then, the song fades out, ending Honeylion as softly as it started. But it’s a fitting ending, capturing the dynamic peaks and troughs of one of Chapel Hill’s best bands.

Dive verdict: ????? - The Daily Tar Heel


There is something to be said for young fresh-faced bands who present musical styling’s that sound steeped in years of experience and practice. Undoubtedly, this is the case with Chapel Hill, North Carolina’s Virgins Family Band who in their short career have been around the bend a few times. Indeed, the quintet has managed to cover more ground than a lot of bands their age, having opened for Plants and Animals, selling out their home town’s 250-head capacity venue as well as having taken on the very respectable and green task of embarking on three separate bike tours (under their former name Virgins) that spanned Florida, Georgia and half of North Carolina. An arduous but hella unique endeavor if I ever heard one.

Virgins Family Band’s second album titled Honeylion is surprisingly polished and pleasant on the ears, offering a fresh style that veers into indie-rock, jazz and faux-folk territory while not fully committing to either. The opening track “Moon Breath” is an interesting one, moving through what at first sounds almost like late 50’s rock balladry with a jazz twist before finally collapsing into an organ laden electro-weird warm pile of sound. “Well Aware” comes from a left field jazzed-up standpoint as well, featuring some sweet beats from drummer Phil Hamilton. And It probably should go without saying that vocalist Saman Khoujinian is standout, reaching some seriously modest heights while the rest of band gently coaxes the best out of each other. This to me is what makes a good band even better, is to be able to work with one another’s strong points and to compliment them without overshadowing, something that is sometimes lacking in strong vocalist fronted bands where the voice is forefront and the rest is just a vehicle. Not so with Virgins Family Band.

Serving up a little something extra in sound and delivery really works to Virgins Family Band’s advantage. They’re jazzy smooth without sounding typically jazzy smooth, experimental and indie rock surprising without being inaccessible, and above all, super talented. A band and album well worth keeping an ear to the ground for.

~ Nathan Pike

Website: http://virginsfamilyband.com/

Bandcamp: http://virginsfamilyband.bandcamp.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/virginsfamilyband

Tags: Experimental, North Carolina, rock/jazz/folk fused goodness - allwhatsrock


There is something to be said for young fresh-faced bands who present musical styling’s that sound steeped in years of experience and practice. Undoubtedly, this is the case with Chapel Hill, North Carolina’s Virgins Family Band who in their short career have been around the bend a few times. Indeed, the quintet has managed to cover more ground than a lot of bands their age, having opened for Plants and Animals, selling out their home town’s 250-head capacity venue as well as having taken on the very respectable and green task of embarking on three separate bike tours (under their former name Virgins) that spanned Florida, Georgia and half of North Carolina. An arduous but hella unique endeavor if I ever heard one.

Virgins Family Band’s second album titled Honeylion is surprisingly polished and pleasant on the ears, offering a fresh style that veers into indie-rock, jazz and faux-folk territory while not fully committing to either. The opening track “Moon Breath” is an interesting one, moving through what at first sounds almost like late 50’s rock balladry with a jazz twist before finally collapsing into an organ laden electro-weird warm pile of sound. “Well Aware” comes from a left field jazzed-up standpoint as well, featuring some sweet beats from drummer Phil Hamilton. And It probably should go without saying that vocalist Saman Khoujinian is standout, reaching some seriously modest heights while the rest of band gently coaxes the best out of each other. This to me is what makes a good band even better, is to be able to work with one another’s strong points and to compliment them without overshadowing, something that is sometimes lacking in strong vocalist fronted bands where the voice is forefront and the rest is just a vehicle. Not so with Virgins Family Band.

Serving up a little something extra in sound and delivery really works to Virgins Family Band’s advantage. They’re jazzy smooth without sounding typically jazzy smooth, experimental and indie rock surprising without being inaccessible, and above all, super talented. A band and album well worth keeping an ear to the ground for.

~ Nathan Pike

Website: http://virginsfamilyband.com/

Bandcamp: http://virginsfamilyband.bandcamp.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/virginsfamilyband

Tags: Experimental, North Carolina, rock/jazz/folk fused goodness - allwhatsrock


In Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Virgins Family Band is making a name for themselves. Going on 3 bicycle tours spanning Florida, Georgia, and half of North Carolina all occurring under their previous band name, VIRGINS, Virgins Family Band has become known within the Indie rock sphere. Their album, Honeylion, set to be released on February 8 is a surreal adventure experiment.

The opener, "Moon Breath," is a slickly produced vibe that takes it cue from the lead singer of the band, Saman Khoujinian and the other band members who encompass Virgins Family Band. "Well Aware," follows suit but is not as abrasive.

On "Temper," Virgins Family Band pull in an island-jazz rhythm that results in one of the best tracks on the cd. "It's Unreal," encompasses an acousic melody that is picturesque in its presentation and relaxing. "Farah," echoes a reverie of sorts with band members, Gabriel Anderson and Phil Hamilton on the drums, Patrick Terrell on the Bass Guitar, Nate Dierk on the guitar and Gabriel Reynolds on the keyboard.

Virgins Family Band create a pièce de résistance with this song making it clear that they have a plethora of talent to offer the rock world. "Lily Molusco," is the closer on Honeylion and is radio friendly in a sense that one may find in the near future on a triple A station playlist.

Honeylion is quite a formation of sounds created in the studio from Virgins Family Band. It goes without saying that they are unshakable as an indie rock powerhouse.

Final Grade: A

For more information on Virgins Family Band visit these:

http://virginsfamilyband.bandcamp.com
http://facebook.com/virginsfamilyband
http://twitter.com/virginsFB - The Examiner


In Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Virgins Family Band is making a name for themselves. Going on 3 bicycle tours spanning Florida, Georgia, and half of North Carolina all occurring under their previous band name, VIRGINS, Virgins Family Band has become known within the Indie rock sphere. Their album, Honeylion, set to be released on February 8 is a surreal adventure experiment.

The opener, "Moon Breath," is a slickly produced vibe that takes it cue from the lead singer of the band, Saman Khoujinian and the other band members who encompass Virgins Family Band. "Well Aware," follows suit but is not as abrasive.

On "Temper," Virgins Family Band pull in an island-jazz rhythm that results in one of the best tracks on the cd. "It's Unreal," encompasses an acousic melody that is picturesque in its presentation and relaxing. "Farah," echoes a reverie of sorts with band members, Gabriel Anderson and Phil Hamilton on the drums, Patrick Terrell on the Bass Guitar, Nate Dierk on the guitar and Gabriel Reynolds on the keyboard.

Virgins Family Band create a pièce de résistance with this song making it clear that they have a plethora of talent to offer the rock world. "Lily Molusco," is the closer on Honeylion and is radio friendly in a sense that one may find in the near future on a triple A station playlist.

Honeylion is quite a formation of sounds created in the studio from Virgins Family Band. It goes without saying that they are unshakable as an indie rock powerhouse.

Final Grade: A

For more information on Virgins Family Band visit these:

http://virginsfamilyband.bandcamp.com
http://facebook.com/virginsfamilyband
http://twitter.com/virginsFB - The Examiner


“Red Green Blue” is a powerful introduction into VIRGINS' ten track album, RGB , created by Saman Khoujinian and Gabriel Anderson during their US bike tour in July of 2011. This album falls nothing short of satisfying. I do not know what inspired the two so much, but the fruit of their inventiveness is pretty sweet. RGB is a surfeit of chilling vocal harmonies similar to Seryn, Grizzly Bear, Local Natives, and Alex Ebert. A minute and a half into “Red Green Blue,” there is a transition into a small build that ends with a quick electric guitar riff and a fuzzy recording of a person singing. These artists, currently residing in North Carolina, know how to create an album with a mean punch. I was taken aback no more than fifteen seconds into their first track.

The end of “Red Green Blue” on this album blends right into “Dolphin” very gracefully. “Dolphins” is infused with emotion and genuineness. The song is short and upbeat, filled with a chorus of captivating "ooh"s. I don’t know what is wooing me more, the angelic vocals, or the enchanting guitar melodies.

On the other hand, “Quiet friends” threw off my groove for a bit because part of the song sounds way too much like “Ring of Fire.” So similar that it freaks me out until it morphs into a Greek sounding song. “Quiet Friends” is the track that makes the album a little weird, but in the best of ways (…apart from sounding like “Ring of Fire”). The vocals are enchanting again, especially when played in conjunction with the classical-sounding acoustic guitar.

“Evergreen Hideaway” is a pleasant transition out of “Quiet Friends.” It’s calm, simple, and beautiful. The echo and tremolo in his voice is what makes the song… along with the vibrant guitar playing. The modest use of “ooh”’s followed by haunting vocal harmonies makes this simple, yet subtly dynamic song especially powerful.

The almost theatric and perspicuously dynamic, “Aqua is a Great Color” is great display of the raw talent of the artists; it is straightforward. The intricacies are so well executed that the birdlike harmonies sound effortless. The vocals could lift you off the ground; this song needs no transitions. The first time I listened to this track, I felt that the build up two minutes into the song sounded too forced. And I felt that if I were seeing them live, I would be really upset but the disjunction between the calm serenades into what felt like yelling in the college courtyard-type build up. I felt it a little too sing-alongy towards the end of the song when they go up a key, but the more I listened to this track, the more it grew on me and the transitions actually seemed appropriate.

“Don’t Worry About Wrinkles” is another great song. It is catchy and really lovely. It is hard to appreciate this track as much as it should be because it is sandwiched right in the middle of a fabulous album. It's kind of a funny sing-alongy song that creates a well-executed disjuncture between “Aqua is a Great Color” and “Silo”.

The album takes another unexpected turn with “Silo,” which begins as a classical style acoustic that melds into a indie folk singer-songwriter song. The vocals are much different than the rest of the album, but still so lovely.

Preceding “Silo” is “Seeking”, which is more of a two minute long jazzy interlude than a song of its own, but still a significant piece. It switches into “Walking Cat”, which is another interlude of a song. “Walking Cat” is even more beautiful than “Seeking” in my opinion, not to downplay “Seeking.” It brings the album back the Local Natives sound (with a classical feel), which is what I think the album is intended to sound like and has drawn the most comparisons to.

And to cap off all of the whole album, the final song: “Rest(outro)” is a calm and eases you out of shock from the overwhelming beauty into a fulfilled torpor.

That is all. This album is superb. VIRGINS’ talent is captivating and the vocal harmonies make me feel like I’m in love. The album is up on Bandcamp to download at any price you’d like. It is worth whatever you’ve got. - Inyourspeakers


“Red Green Blue” is a powerful introduction into VIRGINS' ten track album, RGB , created by Saman Khoujinian and Gabriel Anderson during their US bike tour in July of 2011. This album falls nothing short of satisfying. I do not know what inspired the two so much, but the fruit of their inventiveness is pretty sweet. RGB is a surfeit of chilling vocal harmonies similar to Seryn, Grizzly Bear, Local Natives, and Alex Ebert. A minute and a half into “Red Green Blue,” there is a transition into a small build that ends with a quick electric guitar riff and a fuzzy recording of a person singing. These artists, currently residing in North Carolina, know how to create an album with a mean punch. I was taken aback no more than fifteen seconds into their first track.

The end of “Red Green Blue” on this album blends right into “Dolphin” very gracefully. “Dolphins” is infused with emotion and genuineness. The song is short and upbeat, filled with a chorus of captivating "ooh"s. I don’t know what is wooing me more, the angelic vocals, or the enchanting guitar melodies.

On the other hand, “Quiet friends” threw off my groove for a bit because part of the song sounds way too much like “Ring of Fire.” So similar that it freaks me out until it morphs into a Greek sounding song. “Quiet Friends” is the track that makes the album a little weird, but in the best of ways (…apart from sounding like “Ring of Fire”). The vocals are enchanting again, especially when played in conjunction with the classical-sounding acoustic guitar.

“Evergreen Hideaway” is a pleasant transition out of “Quiet Friends.” It’s calm, simple, and beautiful. The echo and tremolo in his voice is what makes the song… along with the vibrant guitar playing. The modest use of “ooh”’s followed by haunting vocal harmonies makes this simple, yet subtly dynamic song especially powerful.

The almost theatric and perspicuously dynamic, “Aqua is a Great Color” is great display of the raw talent of the artists; it is straightforward. The intricacies are so well executed that the birdlike harmonies sound effortless. The vocals could lift you off the ground; this song needs no transitions. The first time I listened to this track, I felt that the build up two minutes into the song sounded too forced. And I felt that if I were seeing them live, I would be really upset but the disjunction between the calm serenades into what felt like yelling in the college courtyard-type build up. I felt it a little too sing-alongy towards the end of the song when they go up a key, but the more I listened to this track, the more it grew on me and the transitions actually seemed appropriate.

“Don’t Worry About Wrinkles” is another great song. It is catchy and really lovely. It is hard to appreciate this track as much as it should be because it is sandwiched right in the middle of a fabulous album. It's kind of a funny sing-alongy song that creates a well-executed disjuncture between “Aqua is a Great Color” and “Silo”.

The album takes another unexpected turn with “Silo,” which begins as a classical style acoustic that melds into a indie folk singer-songwriter song. The vocals are much different than the rest of the album, but still so lovely.

Preceding “Silo” is “Seeking”, which is more of a two minute long jazzy interlude than a song of its own, but still a significant piece. It switches into “Walking Cat”, which is another interlude of a song. “Walking Cat” is even more beautiful than “Seeking” in my opinion, not to downplay “Seeking.” It brings the album back the Local Natives sound (with a classical feel), which is what I think the album is intended to sound like and has drawn the most comparisons to.

And to cap off all of the whole album, the final song: “Rest(outro)” is a calm and eases you out of shock from the overwhelming beauty into a fulfilled torpor.

That is all. This album is superb. VIRGINS’ talent is captivating and the vocal harmonies make me feel like I’m in love. The album is up on Bandcamp to download at any price you’d like. It is worth whatever you’ve got. - Inyourspeakers


Musical duo Virgins sounds more like a traveling group of gypsy troubadours than it does a two-man indie something-or-other operation out of Miami. Their hometown conjures up images of gaudy clubs filled with siliconed bimbos, overpaid athletes, and trust fund babie,s but Virgins' music seems as though it would be more comfortable in an episode of Portlandia.

From the beginning, members Saman Khoujinian and Gabriel Anderson have kept the process hands on and organic. They stepped onto the scene in November of 2011 with the self-recorded debut album RGB and staged their first tour with nothing but a pair of bicycles, duffel bags, and instruments strapped to their backs. The album has a surprisingly full sound for being only a two-man show, and this is probably owed in large part to both smart production and musical contributions from a long list of friends.

Collaboration is a cornerstone of what Virgins is all about. Khoujinian and Anderson are two of the four founders of Group Mentality, “an ongoing project that cultivates the communal approach to the creative process through art, music, and other means.”

There is a free-spirited vibe to the album, undulating unexpectedly between different sounds and styles even within a given song. Some critics have found this disconcerting but we at Inyourspeakers rather enjoy a good bit of experimentation and musical alacrity in a new artist. The simple backbone of acoustic guitar, djembe, and tambourines as well as a meld of clear male and female vocal harmonization gives it an innocent, '70s folksy feel at times. It is saved from cheesiness by ambient background instrumentals and recorded samplings that give it a modern edge. The vocals often slip into a Devendra Banhart style of pleasingly shaky, lilting strangeness while tracks like “Evergreen Hideaway,” exhibit an impressive range of vocal stylings.

The overall effect of the album is both deep and carefree. RGB is a lovely and impressive initial product and although we love the concept of bicycling musicians, we hope that Virgins finds a faster way to spread their exciting sound to waiting fans around the country.

Listen and download the album here. The “Name Your Price” option makes this musical treat a steal. - Inyourspeakers


Musical duo Virgins sounds more like a traveling group of gypsy troubadours than it does a two-man indie something-or-other operation out of Miami. Their hometown conjures up images of gaudy clubs filled with siliconed bimbos, overpaid athletes, and trust fund babie,s but Virgins' music seems as though it would be more comfortable in an episode of Portlandia.

From the beginning, members Saman Khoujinian and Gabriel Anderson have kept the process hands on and organic. They stepped onto the scene in November of 2011 with the self-recorded debut album RGB and staged their first tour with nothing but a pair of bicycles, duffel bags, and instruments strapped to their backs. The album has a surprisingly full sound for being only a two-man show, and this is probably owed in large part to both smart production and musical contributions from a long list of friends.

Collaboration is a cornerstone of what Virgins is all about. Khoujinian and Anderson are two of the four founders of Group Mentality, “an ongoing project that cultivates the communal approach to the creative process through art, music, and other means.”

There is a free-spirited vibe to the album, undulating unexpectedly between different sounds and styles even within a given song. Some critics have found this disconcerting but we at Inyourspeakers rather enjoy a good bit of experimentation and musical alacrity in a new artist. The simple backbone of acoustic guitar, djembe, and tambourines as well as a meld of clear male and female vocal harmonization gives it an innocent, '70s folksy feel at times. It is saved from cheesiness by ambient background instrumentals and recorded samplings that give it a modern edge. The vocals often slip into a Devendra Banhart style of pleasingly shaky, lilting strangeness while tracks like “Evergreen Hideaway,” exhibit an impressive range of vocal stylings.

The overall effect of the album is both deep and carefree. RGB is a lovely and impressive initial product and although we love the concept of bicycling musicians, we hope that Virgins finds a faster way to spread their exciting sound to waiting fans around the country.

Listen and download the album here. The “Name Your Price” option makes this musical treat a steal. - Inyourspeakers


"In Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Virgins Family Band is making a name for themselves. Going on 3 bicycle tours spanning Florida, Georgia, and half of North Carolina all occurring under their previous band name, VIRGINS, Virgins Family Band has become known within the Indie rock sphere. Their album, Honeylion, set to be released on February 8 is a surreal adventure experiment..." - Examiner


"In Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Virgins Family Band is making a name for themselves. Going on 3 bicycle tours spanning Florida, Georgia, and half of North Carolina all occurring under their previous band name, VIRGINS, Virgins Family Band has become known within the Indie rock sphere. Their album, Honeylion, set to be released on February 8 is a surreal adventure experiment..." - Examiner


"...The new release from Virgins Family Band, entitled ‘Honeylion’ is perfect for any setting. This is music that can thrive in the smallest of clubs as well as the biggest of arenas. If you’re into Jazz, Indie, Pop or just damn sexy music, buy this album. Buy it now." - Monolith-Sound


"...The new release from Virgins Family Band, entitled ‘Honeylion’ is perfect for any setting. This is music that can thrive in the smallest of clubs as well as the biggest of arenas. If you’re into Jazz, Indie, Pop or just damn sexy music, buy this album. Buy it now." - Monolith-Sound


"...Honeylion is about as enjoyable as a name like Honeylion would lead you to suspect. It’s a very solid contribution from these southeastern up-and-comers and if it’s any sign of what they can expand on and accomplish in the future, we certainly look forward to the furthered career of Virgins Family Band." - Under The Gun Review


"...Honeylion is about as enjoyable as a name like Honeylion would lead you to suspect. It’s a very solid contribution from these southeastern up-and-comers and if it’s any sign of what they can expand on and accomplish in the future, we certainly look forward to the furthered career of Virgins Family Band." - Under The Gun Review


Discography

Honeylion - LP
Temper/Moon Breath - 7"
RGB - Debut LP

Photos

Bio

Saman and Gabe first met in Miami, Florida as seniors in high school in 2009. After a couple of bedroom EPs that year, they had to split up for college. Saman went to North Carolina while Gabe stayed in Florida. They both played in different bands during their first 2 years in college, but after sending musical ideas back and forth throughout the beginning of 2011 (which ultimately resulted in their debut album as VIRGINS and the first of three bicycle tours to date), Gabe decided to move up to North Carolina so that he and Saman could commit themselves to music together. Virgins Family Band came together in its current formation after a series of shows that involved a changing cast of musicians and friends, with Saman and Gabe always at the core. The current lineup came together with the addition of Patrick Terrell on bass, Nate Dierk on electric guitar and aux percussion, and Phil Hamilton on second drumkit. Gabriel Reynolds played organ in the band for a couple of months, but left after an at-capacity hometown show at the Local 506 and after the upcoming record, Honeylion, was done being recorded at Nightsound Studios in Carrboro, NC. Just over one year after, RGB, Virgins Family Band is looking forward to a busy 2013; the release of Honeylion on February 8th, upcoming tours in the Southeast, and playing festivals across North Carolina.