Voice Of Addiction
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Voice Of Addiction

Chicago, Illinois, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2004 | INDIE | AFM

Chicago, Illinois, United States | INDIE | AFM
Established on Jan, 2004
Band Rock Punk

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Jun
16
Voice Of Addiction @ Westside Bowl

Youngstown, Ohio, United States

Youngstown, Ohio, United States

Jun
15
Voice Of Addiction @ Bless This Mess

Akron, Ohio, United States

Akron, Ohio, United States

Jun
14
Voice Of Addiction @ Gooski's

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

Jun
13
Voice Of Addiction @ Space Pauls

Rochester, New York, United States

Rochester, New York, United States

Jun
12
Voice Of Addiction @ Pauly's Hotel

Albany, New York, United States

Albany, New York, United States

Jun
11
Voice Of Addiction @ Gibson's Restaurant

Poughkeepsie, New York, United States

Poughkeepsie, New York, United States

Jun
10
Voice Of Addiction @ Charlie's Kitchen

Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Jun
09
Voice Of Addiction @ El Cortez

East Williamsburg, New York, United States

East Williamsburg, New York, United States

Jun
08
Voice Of Addiction @ Otto's Shrunken Head

Manhattan, New York, United States

Manhattan, New York, United States

Jun
07
Voice Of Addiction @ Connie's Ric Rac

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Jun
06
Voice Of Addiction @ Slash Run

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Jun
05
Voice Of Addiction @ McCormack's Irish Pub

Richmond, Virginia, United States

Richmond, Virginia, United States

Jun
04
Voice Of Addiction @ The Milestone Club

Charlotte, North Carolina, United States

Charlotte, North Carolina, United States

Jun
03
Voice Of Addiction @ Sweetwater LIVE

Duluth, Georgia, United States

Duluth, Georgia, United States

Jun
02
Voice Of Addiction @ Copper Top Bar & Grill

Huntsville, Alabama, United States

Huntsville, Alabama, United States

Jun
01
Voice Of Addiction @ The Cobra

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

May
31
Voice Of Addiction @ The Burl

Lexington, Kentucky, United States

Lexington, Kentucky, United States

May
30
Voice Of Addiction @ East Coast Tour 5/30-6/15

Tottenville, New York, United States

Tottenville, New York, United States

May
30
Voice Of Addiction @ The Southgate House Revival

Newport, Kentucky, United States

Newport, Kentucky, United States

Apr
20
Voice Of Addiction @ O'Neill's Pub

Lombard, Illinois, United States

Lombard, Illinois, United States

Mar
23
Voice Of Addiction @ Southern Tour 2/28-3/23

Austin, Texas, United States

Austin, Texas, United States

Mar
23
Voice Of Addiction @ Melody Inn

Indianapolis, Indiana, United States

Indianapolis, Indiana, United States

Mar
22
Voice Of Addiction @ Magnolia Bar

Louisville, Kentucky, United States

Louisville, Kentucky, United States

Mar
21
Voice Of Addiction @ The Birdhouse

Knoxville, Tennessee, United States

Knoxville, Tennessee, United States

Mar
20
Voice Of Addiction @ Trollingwood Taproom & Brewery

Greenville, North Carolina, United States

Greenville, North Carolina, United States

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


To be honest, when I received Chicago band Voice of Addiction’s “Re-evolution” in the mail to review, everything about it made me think it was going to be a 2000’s-era style straight edge hardcore record – the album art, the band name, to an extent the lyrics, etc. That kind of shit bores me, so I was delightfully surprised when I popped it in and found it instead to be some good old fashioned rockabilly-tinged melodic punk rock. Voice of Addiction describe themselves as “politically charged punk/rock/ska” and I would have to agree with that statement to the hilt. Staunchly anti-capitalism and simultaneously concerned with global injustice, they effortlessly blend the ferocity and speed of 80’s punk with the finer (and non-annoying) points of ska and the flair and swagger of rockabilly, but with results that defy the generic and what you might come to expect with music in this vein. There are even some surprising elements of crossover metal, modern hardcore and alterna-rock that gives the record quite a bit of versatility. “Re-evolution” is fun and heartening, without sacrificing the seriousness, aggressiveness and urgency of their call-to-arms message.

The record begins with introductory track “Broken Bones and Broken Homes,” a title that immediately gives you a sense of Voice of Addiction’s lyrics and motivation for playing their brand of in-your-face rock ‘n’ roll. They are here to protest and make some noise, albeit some pretty toe-tapping noise. The song is definitely the most rockabilly-influenced out of all of them, but spins it with a modern heavy punk rock twist that is refreshing to hear outside of traditionalist throwback bands. It’s bouncy and fun, but without enough fire and oi-influenced shout-alongs to keep any anti-establishment 77 purist pumped to dismantle oppression and dance concurrently. Songs like “Got Your Number” and “The Walls” subscribe to a more stripped-down punk sound, with a driving bass line rooting beneath some snotty solos, hard-as-nails riffing and fuming shouting. Also, as a notorious hater of ska, I appreciate Voice of Addiction’s apparent talent for giving skank parts some attitude and balls.

My favorite track on the record, however, is definitely the fourth track, “Right! Now!” which I would choose as the song to recommend to anyone who is curious about Voice of Addiction’s sound. The song in a sense defines the band perfectly, as it displays not only their burning and critical message/lyrical content to a T, but also exhibits their extreme flexibility in songwriting that somehow lacks any sort of lackadaisical nature. The tune delves itself into punk, metal and even indie rock, jumping between vocalist/bassist Ian’s gruff warble into big riffs, ripping solos, lightning-fast progressions and noisy melodic indie-esque chords. All in all, if you’re into some traditional political unrest-fueled punk rock that unapologetically digs into some fresh new earth, pick this up.
- Stereo Killer


Voice Of Addiction are newer act on local Chicago, Illinois and USA punk/post punk/underground scene. " Re-evolution" is a band's first offering, and group has received some positive reactions from national press. In its own way, a young musicians from band tries to establish old punk ethos and psychology. I can not say that thay are influental by the British wave, cos' its approach are more orientire to 80's/90's period and also influences from USA acts from mentioned era are clearlier, but they have also offered own views. Their music comphrises elements of punk/rock and ska, but melodic traces are evident in practically each track from album. A members from band also shares evident performing enthusiashm, and one hidden
optimistic message passed through present materials. A closing track " Martyr" could be a favourable one.
- Blokner Reviews


Illinois band Voice of Addiction has encapsulated energy, poeticism and overall their clear and evident message to the masses with their album Re-evolution. This trio is made up of post-90s punk/ska poster children with a lot to say.

Broken Bones and Broken Homes is the opening track on Re-evolution. Its punk rhythms and highly energetic vocals give this song a Clash meets Sublime kind of vibe.

Got Your Number, the second track, is once again jam-packed with energy - this time Voice of Addiction throws in some 80s hair-metal guitar and dissonant harmonies.

The Walls is a highly politically-charged tune detailing corporate greed, taxes and government cover-ups. This song shouts in the face of government and process.

Right Now continues with a message of plastic buildings and the turmoils of living in a society spoon-fed by mass media and controlled by money.

Grease the Wheel is a much more laid back song. Kind of a breath of fresh air after such emotionally abundant tracks that came before. With a reggae back beat, this tune has a “why can’t we all just get along” message.

The final track, Martyr, polishes off this album with another reggae track that evolves into a dark rock tune and then back again.

At first listen, you wouldn’t expect Voice of Addiction to have such a "tree-hugger" message, but they do - and they pull it off great. For all you hippies out there who just can’t stand jam bands, check out Voice of Addiction and their album Re-evolution.

4 out of 5 stars
- Swift Reviews


Packed with more style changes than a Victoria’s Secret fashion show, Chicago’s Voice Of Addiction have unleashed their heavy fueled, ska-punk sound on Re-evolution. This is a heavy, grunge-infused record, unique in sound and style offering a refreshing take on modern rock.

The alum opens with the heavy tune, Broken Bones and Broken Homes. A hard rocking track that is always evolving, Broken Bones… is a great introduction to Voice of Addiction. Their sound is unlike any heard before, a delicate blend of several types of rock and roll. Voice of Addiction showcase that range on Re-Evolution.

The best song on the disc is The Walls, which has lead singer Ian Tomele’s vocal range starting in the high and progressing to a low growling, before resuming the high range again. With spectacular bass solo, heavy drums, and the perfect rhythmic blend from guitar, The Walls is a song that will have fists pumping and feet stomping. This is old fashioned, kick in the balls, give me some more, rock and roll. This song must sound amazing in its live format.

While The Walls was heavy on bass and showed Ian Tomele’s vocal ability and bass playing prowess, Right Now opens with a guitar riff that gives Jeff Walschon the spotlight. Filled with more tempo changes that define Voice of Addiction’s style, Right Now is a slower, groove inspired number packed with jam moments that would make some dead-heads envious. The song explodes from there into a hardcore rocker’s dream. That’s VOA showing their ability to turn on a dime in the middle of a song. It works well for them and enhances their music, bringing it to the next level with power and force.

Re-evolution offers a perfect taste of Voice of Addiction that leaves the listener wanting more. That is something any solid record should do. Voice of Addiction has captured an exceptional, hard rocking, punk, blues, metal sound that is worth listening to. If you haven’t heard this band, do yourself a favor and check out their latest album, Re-evolution. It’s worth the time and the effort to hear some ass-kicking rock and roll that is such a rarity anymore.
Ryo’s Rating: 7.5 (out of 10) - Rock and Roll Guru


Voice Of Addiction come from Illinois and have compiled a bouquet of colorful tunes for us (sometimes I just do not come from these formulations Musikantenstadl away). but in fact has something for themselves, as the band blends different styles of gay, without even beginning to occur as bad here (I think anyway). And why? "Broken Bones and Broken Homes" is the relatively conventional opener, which is a mixture of punk and rock and come off pretty impulsive. Singer Ian has a strong voice, but always sounds to me as if he had a slightly Eastern European accent. No idea why, never find a mention and Ian sounds as a name not necessarily socialist. Could have done well to do with my ears. But ultimately, no matter, since it is no disadvantage. Voice Of Addiction consistently sound like they would a revolution in the hearts and this will also start. Then one brings always a time of continued elements of ska and reggae and mixes it with the brutality of punk and the versatility of the "regular" rock music. Sometimes this activity is reminiscent of Fugazi funny, my wife hears the Queens Of The Stone Age and the Foo Fighters have probably left their traces. As yet only a large fortune is missing, the accuracy is the ability to say, this energy and undoubted talent to transform into coherent songs. All are not on "Re-evolution" represents tracks badly, but they can miss this special thingy that makes an ordinary song from a passionate anthem. The closest is the already mentioned opener up to this quality standard, the other songs are good, but not exactly outstanding. But this is ultimately quite different happened. A decent performance, you can definitely attest to the band, which would be found on 'Ner Richter scale 1-10, with a stable 6.5 again. - Crossover


Politically-charged punk outfit Voice of Addiction self-admittedly have no intention of putting their addiction themed lyrical subject matter up against a wall and taking a look at it. Instead, they’d rather just crash through the wall. That approach to making music is none the more apparent than on their latest release Re-evolution, six-tracks of agro aural assault earmarked with intermittent Ska swagger.
“Broken Bones and Broken Homes” sets the pace with jangle electric that gives way to a full Punk onslaught of staccato stop-and-go guitar and percussion. The gruff growl lyrical delivery of Ian Tomele is reminiscent of Lucifuge-era Danzig with a bit less twang. “The Walls” opens in vintage Clash manner only to give way to their ubiquitous Ska break with a molten metal middle. Weighing in as the longest track on the album (6:07) Walls allows V.O.A. a myriad of tempo changes and shows the breadth of style and speeds at their disposal. “Right! Now!” features agro-guitar work, which again gives way to multiple time changes, differing lyrical deliveries and another Ska break at about the halfway mark. Returning to the source, the track wraps nicely with the sonic barrage from the opening notes.
Before you chalk this heavy hitter up as six-tracks of raw emotion, it is important to note that V.O.A is comprised of three musicians classically trained in their craft. Combine that with their aforementioned emotion and relentless passion for music and the result is a double threat outfit made up of more gusto than glam. The pure Punk facets meld nicely with the intertwined Ska elements and V.O.A. prove, loudly, that they have equal command of both styles. This writer smells early era Buzzcocks moxie and The Ernies Ska grooves.
by Chris West - Skope Magazine


Politically-charged punk outfit Voice of Addiction self-admittedly have no intention of putting their addiction themed lyrical subject matter up against a wall and taking a look at it. Instead, they’d rather just crash through the wall. That approach to making music is none the more apparent than on their latest release Re-evolution, six-tracks of agro aural assault earmarked with intermittent Ska swagger.
“Broken Bones and Broken Homes” sets the pace with jangle electric that gives way to a full Punk onslaught of staccato stop-and-go guitar and percussion. The gruff growl lyrical delivery of Ian Tomele is reminiscent of Lucifuge-era Danzig with a bit less twang. “The Walls” opens in vintage Clash manner only to give way to their ubiquitous Ska break with a molten metal middle. Weighing in as the longest track on the album (6:07) Walls allows V.O.A. a myriad of tempo changes and shows the breadth of style and speeds at their disposal. “Right! Now!” features agro-guitar work, which again gives way to multiple time changes, differing lyrical deliveries and another Ska break at about the halfway mark. Returning to the source, the track wraps nicely with the sonic barrage from the opening notes.
Before you chalk this heavy hitter up as six-tracks of raw emotion, it is important to note that V.O.A is comprised of three musicians classically trained in their craft. Combine that with their aforementioned emotion and relentless passion for music and the result is a double threat outfit made up of more gusto than glam. The pure Punk facets meld nicely with the intertwined Ska elements and V.O.A. prove, loudly, that they have equal command of both styles. This writer smells early era Buzzcocks moxie and The Ernies Ska grooves.
by Chris West - Skope Magazine


1) What motivated you to become a band and how did you get started?
We have all three been in many bands previous to Voice Of Addiction. Jeff and I had been playing together in bands since we were 13. He moved to Chicago 2 years prior to me and ended up randomly having Rob as one of his roommates in the Columbia dorms. When I decided to move to Chicago they were over the dorms and six of us got a house in one of the neighborhoods. This was the first time I had met Rob, and it was as a roommate. We lived together for 3 1/2 years but V.O.A. wasn't officially formed till a couple years after I moved to Chicago. Rob was our first and also is our present drummer, with 3 others attempting to replace him in our intermission. We have reached our pinnacle and have come full circle with the new album "Re-evolution." With Rob's return on drums and our reunion also with producer Scott Fritz, this proves to be the best release to date. We all lived, breathed, drank, and evolved together before we even were a band. It's that connection which enables us to keep
pushing, and striving for the next horizon.
2) Tell us a little bit about your music.
There is definitely three different personalities at work here. We all grew up in different music genre schools. I was always into the punk rock and hardcore scene, Rob grew up on metal, while Jeff was a little crunchier. When we started playing together as a band we were all over the place. If you were lucky enough to grab our first full-length(which is no longer offered except by special request) it doesn't even sound like the same band from song to song. But hey, we were all in college, just having fun and playing what we wanted. It was over the next two EP's (while on hiatus with Rob) that we developed our current sound. It wasn't until we needed a drummer to fill in that we asked Rob to help us out, and heard what we were missing. He plays his kit harder then most anyone, and this drove our style a notch further on the new record. We decided to center this record on him, start at the basement and work up much like a house. I have a big ska and old school punk influence in my
bass lines. Jeff has the wailing, distorted rock tone on his guitar. I have always been a big believer that if someone is listening to you you should have something worth-while to say. I try to bring up political and social issues, while still remaining broad enough for it to be felt by the greatest number of people.
3) There are mixed feelings within the music industry about new Internet technologies. How do you see the future of the music industry? How do you see these technologies affecting your music?
I am assuming that your mainly talking about being to download music from online, instead of heading to your local record shop. I have to admit, I used to love rummaging through piles of albums, looking for that piece of gold that someone hasn't seen yet. A lot of smaller record stores are struggling these days if not already out of business because of this. I think they will always exist, but as larger corporate record stores move in, it gets even harder for the little guy. Now the question comes up of people sharing music and such online. A lot of bands are against this but I differ. We personally put everything onlline ourselves for free download. This hasn't hurt us at all. People tend to appreciate the gesture. As long as you include some great artwork and cool packaging people still buy the cds. (look at radiohead recently as a great example) Also if you are like me, you would prefer the cd quality over the lossy mp3's that are thrown around everywhere. I use the mp3 as a
preview for if I want to purchase their album. I have also noticed when you offer the songs for free, people are more apt to purchase other merchandise, and all that does is help you promote your band with people putting stickers on their car, wearing your shirts, patches, buttons etc. The internet is revolutionizing the music industry, but the grassroots will always remain, especially at live shows. The only people this really effects is bands that don't play out a lot, and the ones at the top of the food chain in the music industry.
4) What is one positive thing and one negative thing you have learned about the music business through your experiences? As with most musicians I think, the negative just seems to keep piling up while little light is seen. The music business is an unfortunate neccessity though and must be understood and used in order to be successful. I will be the first to admit how daunting this can be. I new nothing about music business a few years ago, but with perseverance have managed to learn enough and stay afloat. So one negative thing is it is a business, which has nothing to do with creativity. One positive is you actually can achieve some of your goals by working with the right people, and relationships can actually be made, kept and evolve through the right avenues.
5) What advice can you giv - LooseyLucy's Headquarters


In tune and on task. Voice Of Addiction comes together like clock work. Even in practice they never miss a beat. A collection of collaborators cleaning house with stainless track after stainless track. Each member vital to the post punk three way which has occured. They are in bed with everybody and soon their swinging sounds will seduce your ears too. They are one of Chicago's more political bands trying to make a change. Check out what they have to say.
- Wassup! Magazine


By Angie Rentmeester

Special to BV Mag

Chicago—Punk music has always had a reputation from the public as having controversial lyrics and a sometimes-rebellious behavior. In a way, Voice of Addiction, a politically-charged punk-rock band are not much different, they like to use bold lyrics so that people everywhere are able to open up their eyes and take a look around at what is happening.

In 2003, V.O.A.—Ian Tomele (lead singer and bass), Jeff Walschon (back up vocals and guitar) and Steve Gregg (drums)—started making music. Tomele and Walschon shared with BV Mag their views on their music and what their future plans are.


AR: What made you guys decide to get really political with your music?

V.O.A.: It wasn't a conscious decision; it just came out of us naturally. If we are going to be playing and performing music we think we should talk and sing about everyday issues that effect all of us, not just how my girlfriend dumped me throw a pity party for me type of music that has become so popular as of late. As a band our main goal is to provoke thought and shed light on subjects that are often ignored. There has been a major trend toward suppression of free thought as of late. We are hoping to counterbalance this to a point where free thought expression is no longer just an idea, but has manifested itself into something tangible that we can all relate to.


AR: Would you ever consider changing your music to more mainstream to gain more popularity?

V.O.A.: As a band we are constantly progressing, if you listen to our full-length it sounds completely different than our EP. If you listen to the EP to our newer material we have again progressed toward something. Also Steve joined the Band in January, since we are a three-piece this is a big change in our song writing and structuring of songs. I think progression of a band is natural and needs to keep happening in order to keep the band healthy and alive. However, I would never change our sound because a record company or so forth wanted me to. We do this because we have fun on stage, if we didn't play music that we wanted to that made us happy to play what would be the point.


AR: Where would you like to see the band at 5 years from now?

V.O.A.: We are primarily a live band, this is where we shine. I would love to take VOA beyond North America by this time and not only hit Europe but be able to play across the globe.



What’s next for the V.O.A.? They’ll be in the studio next month with their new drummer Steve Gregg to record a new EP that will be ready for distribution by the end of the summer when they head out on their East Coast Tour with Friendly Fire from Quebec.

- Boheme Verite Magazine


Hey, blogspot readers, time to work off those extra holiday pounds with Voice Of Addiction! Forget health guru Richard Simmons ...this local band will definitely get you in shape sweatin' to their punk rock sound. Recently they had The Mutiny crowd jumpin' and jivin' to the music as well as screaming for more. SouthSide does not remember the last time when she danced so hard after seeing one set.

VOA was loud and fast. They had the type of punk music which got the blood going from beginning to end. Lots of wild guitar riffs and angst to blast your ears away. There were times when this reviewer thought the riffs and percussion rhythms were off beat. Yet, she quickly learned that the mesh of confusion was what this band wanted ...sometimes. It drove them to perform wildly all over the stage and in the audience ...strumming faster and furiously. Thus it did start pockets of moshing and fan dancing near the front of the stage. Whew - it's exhausting while trying to keep up with VOA.

One interesting note Southside noticed about this band was their sound wasn't purely straight punk rock. She heard a wide variety of combinations such as reggae/ska to metal and classic guitar rock. There was also a bit of garage/grunge in their songs which kept the music energizingly fresh. Heads everywhere were banging to the fast rhythms. SouthSide suggests listening to their Empty Bottle - an excellent song to forget about your problems. She enjoyed the downtempo taken during the chorus while the lyrics were sung hurriedly as if someone was anxious or frustrated. Fans during the performance were encouraged to drink since most songs were labeled as VOA's drinking songs. Yet, this reviewer got the feeling that all the songs were drinking songs.

Besides the rockin' music, this band also provided some comedic relief and funnies between songs. While performing, VOA had their wild moments on stage that kept everyone busy at dancing or joining in the antics with them. Watch out for that final song, blogspot readers! Everyone, including the band, went out of control during System Control ..but it's all good to have a mini riot to blow off some of that mall shopping steam. This was what they're all about - letting loose and having a good time. SouthSide highly recommends checking out Voice Of Addiction at their next performance. - Southside on the Town


Rage rock may not be the most common way to get a message across, but if it's done right it stands a damn good chance of doing just that. Chicago's Voice of Addiction takes their powerful melodic and rhythmic wall of sound and interjects common issues of the day; the combination of the music and the message is meant not only to open eyes but open minds as well. It may sound like an attempt to start a revolution and the band has no problem with that, but the purpose in the music is awareness that maybe the wheel needs to be dismantled, not reinvented. The band-vox/bassist Ian, guitarist Jeff and drummer Andy-has a persevering mantra; you'll hear it in the music and their message. I'm not a PhD of knowledge when it comes to punk and ska, but I do know excellent progressions and dramatic starts-and-stops in a bands' music when I hear it. And I hear the message too.
- Local Vertical


I spent an hour on air on Artist First Radio Network talkin about myself, the band, chicago, touring, playing music, and politics and spinnin tracks off of our new album "Re-evolution"
check it out at: (copy and paste in browser)

http://66.49.193.35/ArtistFirst_Special_2009-05-19_Voice_Of_Addiction.mp3
- Artist First radio Network


Chicago trio Voice Of Addiction is a band that gives a fuck. Their EP Re-evolution is about unhip subjects like Broken Homes and Broken Bones and the CIA The Walls.

If you want people to listen to politically charged lyrics, you better use a rhythm that makes they wantna dance pumping their fists in the air. Enter The Clash inspired punk ska and you are half way there. Too bad that singer is Ian Tomele no match for the lamented Joe Strummer. Kudos for trying so hard, though. - Here Comes the Flood(Norway)


Voice Of Addiction is a politically charged Chicago based band that has a powerful message to spread. The band does not shine away from speaking about the state of affairs around our world. What makes them even more fantastic is their highly energetic and raw presence. The band's rock, punk and ska style are a perfect combination for what the band is all about. I recently spent some time online speaking with Vocal and Bassist Ian Tomele who was more than willing to share some insights on the band. Enjoy!

Isaac: Ian, please take a moment to elaborate on who you are and your upbringing.

Ian JohnnyX: I was born and raised in Cleveland Ohio. I had a big family in a lower middle class situation. In fact, to this day, all my brothers and sisters remain the closest people to me. I only attended high school for 2 months. I had to drop out and help out once my Dad got sick. When I was twenty-one, I moved to Chicago to broaden my horizons and attend college. 2 years ago; I graduated with Bachelor in the Arts from Columbia double majoring in Music (instrumental performance) and Audio (live sound engineering).

Isaac: Please take a moment to introduce the members of Voice of Addition and how the band originally was formed.

Ian JohnnyX: We have been a band for over four years, almost five years. Jeff (guitar) and me have been in several bands together for about 14 years now (Both 27). He moved to Chicago two years before me; we are both originally from Cleveland Ohio. We recently just got a new drummer, Andy Petty. Our old drummer had to go the family route and couldn't keep up with the band. Andy works at a recording studio here in Chicago and used to play in a ska band "Once Again" back in Michigan before he moved here.

Isaac: Was there any one musician that spoke to your heart so profoundly, you were inspired to do your own thing?

Ian JohnnyX: There was lots of influences and people that inspired me in my formative years, and not just musicians. If I had to pick one though, it would be Ian Mackaye. With Minor Threat, he showed me the energy of hardcore punk that dominated me in my teens. And then with Fugazi, [he] pushed the punk limitations to a growingly stagnant scene at the time. The biggest influence he had on me though was instilling the D!i!Y! Ethic into me. From building his own 7 inch sleeves to running a record label out of his parents basement (still has that address), he showed that we don't have to pay somebody to do these things for us that we can do ourselves.

Isaac: I read your bio that you are the politically charged Chicago based band. How did you come up with the idea that you wanted to tackle some of the hot current topics through your music?

Ian JohnnyX: To be honest, I didn't really come up with the idea; it is just the writing that naturally comes out of me. I have done several writings on politics, community, art and so forth. It is something that I believe effects us all at the most ground level in everyday life. And also something that not enough people are talking about. Yea, I can talk about my love life, my car and my troubles. But, I think talking about what causes these troubles and keep us in a rut is more important.

Isaac: What do you think makes your band stand out against the rest of the bands out there in the music industry? What is the main reason why should people listen to your music?

Ian JohnnyX: When it comes down to it, we are not really trying to be a band but rather the catalyst. We stand for what we believe in and encourage others to do the same. Start your own band! Zine! Create something that can't be taken away! We are all about community. And by that I mean people helping people. We start at the barest grass-roots level; on the stage and in the studio with my two best friends and me. There is nothing that can't be accomplished when people work together. And this is well known. Much has been done to separate people and point out the differences.

Isaac: Out of your entire song collection that you've written thus far, which song(s) would you say is/are the most personal/meaningful to you?

Ian JohnnyX: There was a song off our first album I wrote about my Dad called "End of Days." This song means a lot to me although we don't play it anymore. On more recent stuff, I would say "Grease the Wheel." We put this song on our first EP and I remember when I wrote it I thought I had written the best song in the world! In fact, on the last album "Re-evolution" when tracking we had extra time and decided to redo this song. It's all about not perpetuating the things that you disagree with.

Isaac: How far into the creation of a song do you share any of it with anyone? Who would you play it for? Would it be a chorus, a verse and chorus, or a complete song?

Ian Johnnyx: My songs and my writing is self-less. I have been known to pick up a guitar and just make a song on the spot, whether a couple people are around or a crowd. Also I believe this is - Junior's Cave Magazine


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Bio

Voice Of Addiction are politically charged and socially conscious Chicago based punk-rockers. V.o.A. has been around since 2004 doing over 1,300 shows across North America. Having 7 official releases & independently selling over 8,000 physical copies (as well as being involved in countless compilations, and digital sales) these boys have proven they are a force to be reckoned with. V.o.A. has been featured in the video games skateboard party 1, 2, & 3 as well as snowboard party 1 & 2. And a feature length documentary entitled "Punk Band" is out now in all major outlets.


Band Members