Walking Man
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Walking Man

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Walking Man "Out in the Streets"

Want to hear something cool? This song, “Out in the Street” by Walking Man took me through a variety of opinions: I disliked it in the first few syllables (reminded me of Thom Yorke in a bad way), wanted to hate it during the first verse but kept listening, and was conquered by the big, hollow guitar riff at about :37 in the track. The song is one of a pair released this April; their repertoire includes acapella spirituals and dreamy electronic-influenced numbers. They are good enough at being weird to make me like them. They hit The Basement this Thursday, Oct. 10th with The Tendoor and Colin Schiller and the Reactions. –Terra James-Jura - The Deli Magazine - Nashville


Walking Man "Out in the Streets"

Want to hear something cool? This song, “Out in the Street” by Walking Man took me through a variety of opinions: I disliked it in the first few syllables (reminded me of Thom Yorke in a bad way), wanted to hate it during the first verse but kept listening, and was conquered by the big, hollow guitar riff at about :37 in the track. The song is one of a pair released this April; their repertoire includes acapella spirituals and dreamy electronic-influenced numbers. They are good enough at being weird to make me like them. They hit The Basement this Thursday, Oct. 10th with The Tendoor and Colin Schiller and the Reactions. –Terra James-Jura - The Deli Magazine - Nashville


Walking Man
Nashville Scene Critic's Pick …

Bringing together seemingly disparate influences and making what’s old new again — these trends are the beating heart of contemporary indie music. Of course, an equal love of klezmer and disco may help your jams stand out from the pack, but are they worth hearing more than once? We’ve enjoyed seeing local sometimes-duo/sometimes-quartet Walking Man bring their serious vocal and instrumental chops to bear on indie-pop soundscapes that are dramatic but never saccharine, while taking cues from a refreshing variety of historically significant American traditions: “Roots music” for these guys means blending Appalachian melodies, Cherokee folklore and field hollers, sometimes in the same tune. Most importantly, the songs stand on their own, without catering to any fad we’ve heard of. Tonight is Walking Man’s last hometown gig before they head to the CMJ Festival and the bright lights of New York City, so here’s hoping they won’t be just our little secret anymore.
—STEPHEN TRAGESER - Nashville Scene


Walking Man
Nashville Scene Critic's Pick …

Bringing together seemingly disparate influences and making what’s old new again — these trends are the beating heart of contemporary indie music. Of course, an equal love of klezmer and disco may help your jams stand out from the pack, but are they worth hearing more than once? We’ve enjoyed seeing local sometimes-duo/sometimes-quartet Walking Man bring their serious vocal and instrumental chops to bear on indie-pop soundscapes that are dramatic but never saccharine, while taking cues from a refreshing variety of historically significant American traditions: “Roots music” for these guys means blending Appalachian melodies, Cherokee folklore and field hollers, sometimes in the same tune. Most importantly, the songs stand on their own, without catering to any fad we’ve heard of. Tonight is Walking Man’s last hometown gig before they head to the CMJ Festival and the bright lights of New York City, so here’s hoping they won’t be just our little secret anymore.
—STEPHEN TRAGESER - Nashville Scene


Walking Man isn’t easy to peg, but that’s good news for us. The duo references obscure folklore and the back alleys of the soul where superstition is made flesh in the fires of belief. Oh, and gentle giant James Taylor too. They display a deep affinity for the blues and its antecedents — field hollers, work songs and fife-and-drum music virtually ignored by the general public until canonized by Moses Asch and the Lomaxes — then blend them elegantly with African-inspired polyrhythmic electronic grooves, as in “Maybel,” the opening cut from their new EP. A perfect left-field pairing comes courtesy of All Them Witches, whose 2012 debut Our Mother Electricity covers the stoner-psych map from the Delta to the desert and back, delivering thick riffs alongside nimble slide guitar and piano runs that call down the banshees. In their second outing this week, Black Tooth Records’ electro-psych garage-blasters Chrome Pony open the evening’s festivities.
—STEPHEN TRAGESER - Nashville Scene


Walking Man isn’t easy to peg, but that’s good news for us. The duo references obscure folklore and the back alleys of the soul where superstition is made flesh in the fires of belief. Oh, and gentle giant James Taylor too. They display a deep affinity for the blues and its antecedents — field hollers, work songs and fife-and-drum music virtually ignored by the general public until canonized by Moses Asch and the Lomaxes — then blend them elegantly with African-inspired polyrhythmic electronic grooves, as in “Maybel,” the opening cut from their new EP. A perfect left-field pairing comes courtesy of All Them Witches, whose 2012 debut Our Mother Electricity covers the stoner-psych map from the Delta to the desert and back, delivering thick riffs alongside nimble slide guitar and piano runs that call down the banshees. In their second outing this week, Black Tooth Records’ electro-psych garage-blasters Chrome Pony open the evening’s festivities.
—STEPHEN TRAGESER - Nashville Scene


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

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