Washington Mile
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Washington Mile

Everett, Washington, United States

Everett, Washington, United States
Band Folk Rock

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"Album Review"

Seattle’s Washington Mile is starting to create a small buzz in the indie music blogosphere, and rightfully so with their unique blend of classic rock, folk and blues that draw upon everyone from Creedence Clearwater Revival to Bon Iver and Blind Willie Johnson. Their debut album, Simple Hearts, is a fresh collection of songs that takes the best sounds of the past and makes them sound familiar and contemporary all in the same listen. Produced by Jonathan Warman (Mt. St. Helens Vietnam Band, The Globes, Fences, Hey Marseilles), Washington Mile’s eclectic sound features clever arrangements, catchy melodies, and lush harmonies and is well worth checking out. – Written by JFelton - Record Dept.


"Album Review"

My first spin of Washington Mile’s new album Simple Hearts brought to mind so many musical influences that it was hard to pin down. I heard echos of Fleet Foxes in their beautiful and spacious harmonies in songs like “Tune of the 49th”, touches of Rolling Stones’ Let it Bleed in the stripped down acoustic tracks like “Wishin’ Well” and “Have Mercy”, hints of Cold War Kids manic sounds in songs like “Purdy Waters”, a few pinches of Prince (yes, that Prince) in “The Rain is Coming”, all rounded out by Bruce Springsteen and The Killers.

And if that all sounds like it would be a mixed bag of musical confusion, I assure you…it’s not.

Even now, after a few more listens, I’m still not sure how to classify them (that’s not a bad thing). But there’s one thing I know: I like them. A lot.

This is good music for sitting out on the patio on a summer day and dropping a few cold ones. The album is well-paced and the music is lively, interesting, and fun. It’s also an album that provides satisfaction if you take the time to sit and listen to what the guys have to say.

Explorations of the post-modern ennui are found in Tune of the 49th’s refrain, “It’s on this day I was reborn. Well I’m a man of simple taste. Love my woman. Love my state. The mystery expressed in our thought. Oh, to be everything I’m not. And we try our best to make some sense.”

As are explorations of the tension between faith and modern existence in Father, Father’s chorus: “Oh Father, Father can you hear me? This is my emergency call. I’m no thief, and I’m not saint but would you please listen as I fall.”

Bottom line, Simple Hearts, is a great album that is interesting enough to give you something new each listen and straightforward enough to be part of your regular rotation.

You can order the CD online at CD Baby. P.S. I’m not getting a dime for it. I just think you should listen. - http://www.thejakers.com/music/review-washington-miles-simple-hearts


"Album Review"

When you roll over to Washington Mile’s MySpace there is quite an abundance of information. I checked it out and there was promises that their music would make you want to do everything from get up and dance to chill out and relax. There was also a list of influences that ranged from Bon Iver to Blind Willie Johnson. So naturally I was expecting quite the variety when listening to this album, and it was totally delivered.

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Their new album, Simple Hearts, starts out with a mellow tone on a short song filled with “oohs” but with a soulful tone then you are plunged into a fast paced dance hall number. And this is basically how the album rolls out slow to fast, no warning just boom. But there seems to be a definite method to this madness, there is a subtle balance of the pace, there will be a stretch of very mellow, chilled out songs, and right when you are winding down into the mood, the album will pick up and you are nice and riled again. It is cool because it was a total surprise, but at the same time this isn’t an album, as a whole, I would specifically think of to influence a certain mood, because of that change. Does that make sense?

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When it comes to the list of influences I could definitely dig it. There were definitely tracks on the album that I got a Bon Iver, soft and isolated feel, and at the same time there were tracks that were definite throw backs to the days of Blind Willie Johnson with a special twang, especially on Have Mercy. I would even be so bold to suggest that I hear a little Bright Eyes similarities, you know, when Conor Oberst went through his country phase.

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So basically I gauged the album like this: I would say this album was pretty country, and I used that blanketed genre term loosely, because I felt a little of everything under that umbrella term. There was a little bluegrass, some folk, a little blues, and some rockabilly. This album was all across the board, if there is one thing that could not be said about this album is that everything “sounds the same.” I really dig that. Some of the tracks weren’t my style but at the same time it was no big deal because the next track would be a whole new sound but still on the same level.

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All in all I would say this album was bueno. I dug it. You should check it out. - Seattle Subsonic


Discography

Simple Hearts (April 2010)

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Bio

Since its formation in the fall of 2009, Washington Mile has been stretching the sounds of rock and roll into unique, captivating tunes. With major influences like Creedence Clearwater Revival, Bon Iver, and Blind Willie Johnson, it is no wonder that Washington Mile produces an eclectic sound, featuring original songs complete with an oh-so-familiar feel, yet have never been heard. Washington Mile captures their heart-stopping harmonies and fresh folk-rock sound in the form of their debut album, SIMPLE HEARTS. Produced by Jonathan Warman, who has also worked with other Seattle acts such as Mt. St. Helens Vietnam Band, The Globes, Fences and Hey Marseilles, SIMPLE HEARTS delivers a delicious dose of hand-clapping, foot-stomping sounds, exquisitely balanced with creative and soulful lyrics.

Capturing the honesty of Washington Mile, SIMPLE HEARTS is enhanced by guest performances by members of Hey Marseilles, as well as other close friends, which results in a rich collection of sweet sounding melodies. Jason Martin of Starflyer 59, who has also worked with bands like Cold War Kids, Page France, and Cotton Jones, completed the mastering of the album. Artwork and design credit go to a promising Sam Owens, whose accomplishments can also be seen through his work with Cold War Kids and Dustin Kensrue.

Set to release on April 9, 2010, SIMPLE HEARTS guarantees to be both poignant and propelling. Whether the album makes you want to get up and dance or tune out and relax, SIMPLE HEARTS will be a permanent addition to any play list dedicated to both inventive and impassioned sounds.