The Watters
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The Watters

Austin, Texas, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2009 | SELF

Austin, Texas, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2009
Band Rock Americana

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Dec
20
The Watters @ Stubb's BBQ

Austin, Texas, United States

Austin, Texas, United States

Nov
19
The Watters @ One-2-One Bar

Austin, Texas, United States

Austin, Texas, United States

Nov
02
The Watters @ Geraldine's

Austin, Texas, United States

Austin, Texas, United States

Music

Press


Six-piece Austin soul band The Watters will be dropping their full length record Great Unknown on July 1. While the album has plenty of great cuts, its title track deserves as much notice as possible. Fronted by guitarists and vocalists Daniel and Jenna Watters, the band mates grew up together in Sedona, Arizona. They began playing music together after getting the chance to sing at their high school graduation. Once they became friends and eventually got married, they settled down in Nashville before making the move to Austin last year.

Previously known as The Oak Creek Band, The Watters release music that feeds the soul. With “Great Unknown” we are introduced to the duo’s impeccable harmonies and the song’s bright horn section played by Golden Dawn Arkestra members Zumbi Richards (trombone) and Joe Woullard (baritone sax). Both musicians give the song a jazz influence as well as a vibrancy we want to hear more of, making “Great Unknown” an electric and colorful track.

The Watters will have an album release show for Great Unknown at The Parish on July 2 starting at 8 p.m. The Halfways, and Kev Bev Collins and the Woodland Creatures will also be performing. The party will be all ages and will be $7 in advance and $10 the day of the show. - Austin.com


I'm a bit tired of beef stew.

For those readers who don't follow my twitter account, if you ask me, my beef stew is legendary.

My love of beef stew is bordering on religiosity. Far more beef stew has passed its way into my innards than is likely healthy.

Not just the canned slop, which is delicious, but I also cook beef stew at home. Over the years, my bland and tasteless beef stew has been transformed into a miso/gravy/chicken broth based culinary cluster bomb of something or other.

Heavy Metal is kind of like beef stew for me as well. My love is legendary. My devotion is epic. However, there are times when we just don't all feel like worshiping Satan and we need a break.


The Watters
Our principals, Jenna and Daniel Watters both sing and play guitar.

They switch off lead vocals in a beautiful and timeless way.

The vocals are strong, powerful, and have a retro feeling, but the lyrics do not, well at least not all of the time.

This album, recorded mostly live, is peopled with no less than nine people.

Seriously?

That's almost as many people as Spinal Tap had in their band during their entire fictional career!

The songs owe as much to blues greats as they do country and western legends. Lyrically, this is an interesting album. Lines like Your kiss is an apocalypse will remain in mind for many hours to come after words.

Frankly, I'm not entirely certain what kind of music this is. This is one of those times when we should remember what Duke Ellington "said," there are only two kinds of music: Good and Bad.

This music is very, very good.

Release: 7/1/16
Genre: Pop
Label: DIY - Glacially Musical


About the track, Daniel Watters has this to say:

“DNA” touches on many different topics, so much so that at one point a drummer friend in Nashville came to his own conclusion that DNA stands for Do Not Ask. Generally though, this song screams against being a corporate guinea pig. I tried to compare the seductive associations used by mainstream corporations that make us believe cars and computers are “sexy” to that of a “perfect” human being. It’s hard not to long for that perfection in things. Electronic music has perfect time and pitch. Photos can be manipulated to be “flawless”. Almost every almond in the country is grown in California. However, the veneer of perfection is a dangerous one. Our imperfections and differences make us stronger as a society and as a people.

[RELATED: Catch more exclusive track and video premieres from Performer Magazine.]

ABOUT THE WATTERS
Imagine Fleetwood Mac, Tedeschi Trucks Band and Rilo Kiley merging into one dynamic supergroup, and you will start to get an idea of The Watters unique Americana/Soul sound. Daniel and Jenna Watters, schoolmates turned band mates turned soul mates, share lead vocals and guitar in the group along side their 5-piece band. The Watters originated as The Oak Creek Band in 2009, named for the area where Daniel and Jenna grew up near Sedona, AZ. The ensemble was based out of Denver and then Nashville until relocating to Austin, Texas in 2015.

The Watters
The Watters

Daniel and Jenna have been playing music together for 12 years, writing together for 8 years and have worked on six albums together. They have toured extensively throughout the country and sold out the first pressing of their self-titled EP in less than one year. The Watters have garnered a devoted fan base through their high-energy performances, well-crafted songwriting, stirring vocals and road-weathered musicianship. Their songs are webbed in a world of truth and wonder with a timeless spirit.

The Watters recorded their forthcoming album Great Unknown at Cacophony Recorders studio in Austin, Texas in December, which will be released on July 1st, 2016. - Performer Magazine


There’s an old saying you may have heard: “I wasn’t born in Texas but I got here as fast as I could!” Such is the case with Daniel and Jenna Watters, who together are The Watters, an exciting new soul group based out of Austin. Though the two go all the way back to high school when they first sang together in Sedona, Arizona, they are now about to release their debut album, Great Unknown, on July 1st. Before making the pilgrimage to the “Live Music Capital of the World”, Daniel and Jenna Waters spent time in Denver, Colorado and Nashville, Tennessee, often touring as The Oak Creek Band. But it was in Austin where they were pushed to take their sound into a new territory rooted in soul music yet offering strong elements of Americana and indie rock. As any smart musicians do to take advantage of being around so many other talented artists, Daniel and Jenna enlisted the help of some of Austin’s finest locals to contribute.

The Watters recorded Great Unknown at Cacophony Recorders in Austin, Texas in January 2016. It features an array of Austin’s best musicians including Trevor Nealon of Band of Heathens, Joe Woullard and Zumbi Richards of Golden Dawn Arkestra and Erik Hokkanan. The nine musicians (including a three piece horn section) are featured throughout the entire album. The original session was recorded live to tape to capture the live sound that distinguishes The Watters, before horns and vocals were overdubbed a month later.

Offering his own take on the process, Daniel Watters says, “The recording process for Great Unknown was very organic. We did the original sessions live to tape with the 5-piece rhythm section (piano, guitar, bass, drums vocals). We did two follow up sessions a month later, one for the horns which were tracked live together and one for lead vocals. The studio we tracked at was a great environment because it was a huge, open room with giant glass windows that looked out over the Colorado River. We spent a lot of time on the patio listening to music while we basked in the beauty of the river, which gave the sessions a smooth flow.”

Clearly, the duo was onto something special as The Watters are currently the Austin Music Foundation‘s artist of the month. Today you can hear an exclusive sneak peek of Great Unknown right here on Glide Magazine. The 10 songs on the album are thick and soulful, at times reminiscent of groups like the Tedeschi-Trucks Band, Fleetwood Mac, and even a similar spunk to contemporaries like Lake Street Dive. Ultimately, the tunes on Great Unknown are as fun to dance along to as they are to jam in the background while sipping wine with friends on a summer night. This is feel-good music, and we all need a little more of that these days. - Glide Magazine


After six releases under a different name, Jenna and Daniel Watters hit the reset button and planned a move to California in 2015 only to end up in Austin instead. Now, after writing and recording their debut LP under their new band name The Watters, they’re ready to make their impact on the city. The Daily Texan spoke to Jenna and Daniel about changing their band name, deciding to stay in Austin, and recording the new album, Great Unknown.
The Daily Texan: Before you formed The Watters, you guys toured as The Oak Creek Band for several albums. Any specific reason you chose to go by another name?
Jenna Watters: When we started that band about seven years ago in Denver, we toured and played under that name. When we went to Nashville, the band was split up, and once we moved to Austin we decided to change our name. We were also shoehorned into a specific genre with that name, Oak Creek. People always thought we were a bluegrass band, and we got tired of explaining that we were a high energy rock band.
DT: The plan was originally to go to California, but you ended up staying in Austin. Why?
JW: When we were leaving Nashville with all of our stuff, we were planning on going straight to California, but one of my good friends had just moved to Austin, so I thought to come down and take an extra day trip to see her. When we got here, we were amazed and wondered why we didn’t live here. So we spent the week here checking out places and made the decision to not move to California and stay in Austin.
DT: What was it that pulled you in during that visit?
JW: The music scene was definitely a factor. When we first got here, our friend took us to the Continental Club, and there was definitely a certain energy here. We love a lot of other things about the city, but music was the main motivation to stay.
DT: For your new album, you recorded live to tape. Was that an important factor for you?
Daniel Watters: Definitely, we’ve done a bunch of records before this with overdubbing and such. For years, people have been telling us that they love seeing us live, and they would always tell us our records didn’t have that same energy. So we tried to capture that in this record a bit. Instead of creating a sound with this one, we wanted to capture a sound. We had everything ready and just went into the studio and threw it down.
DT: So it didn’t take too long to record the album then?
DW: Not really, there were around three days when we did all of the rhythm live, and then a month later, we got the horns and vocals shortly after. So about eight or nine days total over a month and a half.
DT: What’s the importance of “the great unknown” to the band?
DW: We lived in numerous different cities playing music to a lot of random people. You never really know where you’re going to end up or what’s going to happen. You just have to dive into the uncertain and enjoy whatever the outcome may be. With something like the move, it turned out it was a good move for us. Doors have opened for us, and we’ve had a great time here.
DT: Why are you hosting such a large album release show on July 2 at the Mohawk?
DW: We’ve been building up to this release show for a while now, getting this band together and putting on a spectacle. It’s 10 years in the making, and it’s going to be super special for us. And it’s in the best-selling room in Austin, so it should be great. - The Daily Texan


Our third exclusive this week is Bad Dream, the second single by The Watters, who describe themselves as an “Americana/soul” band and who are based in Austin, Texas. The single is taken from their forthcoming album Great Unknown, which is out on 1 July.

The Watters feature six members (plus a three-piece horn section on the album), but are based around a nucleus of Daniel and Jenna Watters, former high school sweethearts from Arizona who used to be known as The Oak Creek Band and who were previously based in first Denver and then Nashville. The duo relocated to Austin and changed their band name in February last year. Great Unknown will be the sixth album that Daniel and Jenna have recorded in 12 years of playing together.

Jenna says of the song: “Bad Dream was written while I was dealing with some crazy insomnia when we lived in Nashville. Nashville was a little hard on me… I wanted to try to make our dream of music work there but I felt intimidated and emotionally drained instead. It ties into the overall theme of the Great Unknown, because when you make big leaps in life you don’t always know how it’s going to turn out. But the good thing is, you did it and fought through it and learned from it, and when you move on from it, it feels like it was all just a bad dream.”

The hype sheet compares this one to Fleetwood Mac, Tedeschi Trucks Band and Rilo Kiley, but see what you think… - Songwriting Magazine


Daniel and Jenna Watters went to rival grade schools in Sedona, Arizona. Her dad was his coach in high school sports. She dated the bass player in his high school band.

Then came graduation, where the pair sang together for the first time.

“It was kind of after that we wondered why we had not been playing music together longer,” Jenna said in a phone interview last week.

×
“There was definitely magic from that moment,” Daniel said. “We knew we needed to do something.”

As he went off to college in Los Angeles and she backpacked through Europe, the pair would exchange songs through email. Later they moved to Denver, performing as The Oak Creek Band, and attempting to match the folk styles popular at the time.

“We were trying to be of the times,” Daniel said. “Because we were a duo, we were trying to be more acoustic-y.”

Then they moved to Nashville. While most associated with country music, it was in the music city they found their horns. It was like a memory, taking Daniel back to the ska bands of and Jenna to the gospel and R&B influences of their respective and intertwined youths.

“Horns have kind of always been a part of all of us,” Daniel said.

Now, the married “schoolmates turned band mates turned soul mates,” as described in their bio,” are known as The Watters, both personally and professionally. They are based out of Austin and embarking on their first major tour in support of their first soul-tinged album “Great Unknown.”

They’ve stopped trying to be “acoustic-y” when playing as a duo, or as they will this Friday at the Filling Station with a six-piece band.

“We’re pretty high-energy human beings,” Daniel said. “Now the shows are very much high energy. There’s still an Americana folk groove, but it’s more like funk, I would say. Funk soul.”

The added horn element has been really helpful for Jenna, who said she is really able to connect with songs, and has received a confidence boost on stage. Now, the shows flow better and the couple is able to connect more.


“I sing some,” Daniel said. “She sings some. We harmonize on others. It’s very much a conversation.”

The Watters have also started writing more together, and are already looking toward a future album as they hone their sound.

“Our music is kind of all over the place,” said Jenna. “It’s pretty eclectic. It’s not just a soul show through and through. It’s not just going to be Americana.”

The Watters perform at the Filling Station in Bozeman on Friday, Aug. 26. Tickets are $7 at the door.

For more information, visit www.wearethewatters.com. - Bozeman Daily Chronicle


The Watters began their story outside of Austin, Texas. Married couple Jenna and Daniel Watters were originally in The Oak Creek Band, beginning in 2009. They toured the country, keeping a home base in Denver for about four and a half years, then in Nashville for about two years. In 2015, they moved their band to Austin, where they changed their group name to The Watters.

This Americana/Soul group was specifically attracted to our city, due to its welcoming nature and supportive environment for the arts. This past Saturday, the band celebrated their debut album release of “The Great Unknown” with an Austin crowd at The Parish.

“We feel so welcome here, and it’s a good feeling,” Jenna Watters shared. “We’re not going to be leaving anytime soon. We just love it!”

Watters said the band members wanted to change their name to The Watters after previous members went their separate ways. The original name also gave the impression of a folk or bluegrass combo. Instead, the group wanted to recognize the louder, more energetic sound they create when performing live as a nine-piece ensemble. At their CD release event, the band definitely had more a rock feel when they included a horn section and covered a mad version of Led Zeppelin’s “What Is and What Should Never Be.”

“I think live, we just love that energy of rocking out,” Jenna Watters explained. “It’s just so much more fun, and we’re able to master the sound that we’ve been wanting, finally.”

While this is a debut release under The Watters name, Jenna and Daniel Watters have previous experience with albums under The Oak Creek Band. Their prior collaborations have shaped their music into what it is now. Some of the best Austin musicians are featured on “The Great Unknown” album, including Joe Woullard of Golden Dawn Arkestra and Hardproof, Zumbi Richards of Golden Dawn Arkestra, Trevor Nealon of Band of Heathens, and Erik Hokkanan.

“The whole album is about diving into the unknown in life,” Jenna Watters added, “whether it be the kind of job you’re going to have, the people you’re going to surround yourself with, trusting your guts, following your instinct and speaking truth. A lot of those songs are about speaking truth, what’s right and what is real in the world.”

The 10-song LP is available in CD and digital formats. For more information, visit wearethewatters.com. - Austinot


Primarily comprised of its creative masterminds and founding members Daniel and Jenna Watters, Austin, TX-based indie soul act The Watters can trace their origins to when the band’s founding members met as children. As the story goes, they first met while playing on the same pee wee football team in Sedona, AZ that Jenna’s father coached — although they did attend rival grade schools. The duo eventually went to high school together and at that point, began a collaboration that can trace its origins to when the duo performed together at their high school graduation and then fell in love; in fact, they’ve performed together for over 12 years, written together for over 8 and have recorded 6 albums together while in the Denver, CO then Nashville, TN-based nationally touring act The Oak Creek Band.

Now writing and performing together as The Watters, the duo’s forthcoming debut effort Great Unknown was influenced by Daniel and Jenna’s own personal experience. As Daniel Watters explains in press notes: “The concept of the Great Unknown came to us while we were in transition between Nashville and Austin. We were living in Sedona, AZ with my folks for three months having left Nashville and had no idea where we were moving to. Our bassist was going to move to California and so were we, but we happened to stop in Austin on our way back and fell in love. We were so torn on what to do, but we trusted our instincts and made the hard decision to leave our musical brother and start a new life in Austin. The Great Unknown is [about] the power of intuition and the beauty in uncertainty. Instead of finding fear in the unknown, I find it easier to see the beauty and opportunity in the unknown. Our move to Austin was a complete leap of faith, but a year later we are very happy here and feel an overwhelming support system here.”

Recorded at Cacophony Recorders, Great Unknown features some of the Austin, TX area’s best and most renowned musicians including Band of Heathens‘ Trevor Nealon, Golden Dawn Arkestra‘s Joe Woullard and Zumbi Richards and Erik Hokkanan and was recorded live to tape to best capture the band’s live sound. Album title track and first single “Great Unknown” has the band pairing Muscle Shoals soul with 70s AM rock — a soulful horn arrangement and Jenna Watters’ effortlessly soulful vocals are paired with jangling guitars and gently propulsive drumming, along with a careful and deliberate attention to craft. Lyrically, the song focuses on two very different things -taking a big chance on your dreams with the hope that things will come out in your favor but also on something that people often forget, sometimes you can’t fight the tide; things will sort themselves out in their own time and in their own way even your own dreams. - Joy of Violent Movement


Changing the name of your band can be a huge decision. What were some of the reasons you decided to move on from “The Oak Creek Band” to “The Watters”?
“Oak Creek” always pin-holed us into a specific genre; people assumed we were a Bluegrass or Country band, so we kind of got sick of explaining that we were a high energy rock band. Mostly though, we changed it because we had moved to a new city and had to start the band over from scratch, so a fresh start with a new name seemed like a good idea. It was an incredibly hard decision to make and it was hard to start over with no new material to show people, but a year later we feel really good about our decision.

You relocated to Austin just over a year ago. What about the Austin music scene stuck out to you when you first arrived?
People love and support live music out here! More so than any other city we’ve lived in. The musicians here are so helpful as far as helping each other get noticed and going to each other’s shows; Its a community that shares it’s gifts. We love the camaraderie!

Your new record “Great Unknown” features a wide variety of musicians who play in other Austin based bands. How did you come about collaborating with them and what was that experience like?
Most of the musicians were just people we met, or musicians we were blown away by. Random circumstances, I.e. co-workers/craigslist/at shows. Daniel went to the Pecan St. Festival when we first moved here and ran into Trevor Nealon (Band Of Heathens key player), who we had happened to play with in LA a few years back. We love him and are so grateful to have him and all the players on board. Trevor recommended Erik Hokkanen to play fiddle on our song, “Bad Dream”. It was fun having him in the studio (and he’s such a pro he was in and out in a snap!). Daniel met Joe Woullard (Hard Proof, Golden Dawn, Chilantro Boom Box, Black Joe Lewis) the first week we were in town during SXSW, but only reconnected many months later. Everything seemed destined to happen.

How did you get involved with the Austin Music Foundation?
Our good friend and old roommate, Kyla (who dates our drummer) volunteered at AMF for a little bit, and scheduled us to get in to talk with Alex Vallejo. Alex was super helpful and guided us into our new image and name. We loved getting to pick his brain a bit about the music scene here in Austin and hear his great stories. We feel honored to be named artist of the month, we have ya’ll to thank for your guidance.

What advice or information have you gotten from AMF that you’ve been able to apply to your band?
Learning about the right and wrong times to release a single/album and when to go on the road. With AMF’s guidance, we promoted the creation of a new name, a brand new album, a new website, new merch and everything in between in a about a year.

Where do you wish to take The Watters and when people see you live, what do you wish people to take away from the show?
Next thing on the agenda is to buy an RV so we can keep touring around the country, comfortably and somewhat affordably (and bring our furry kids with us!). But Austin is home, and we are so happy to be here. Our next show is our album release at the Parish on July 2nd. We have been working towards this for the past year and a half and what we ultimately want the people to take away from our show is a surge of energetic enjoyment, and a deep sense of love and community. But we mostly just wanna rock out - Austin Music Foundation


07 Only the Lonely - The Watters (from the album Great Unknown) - The Watters feel the feelings as they reach for spirit in “Only the Lonely”. The tune is from the duo’s recent release, Great Unknown, which backs husband and wife team on their debut with a nine-piece band. - Alternate Root


Intelligent, appealing rock with good writing and attractive vocals can still be found, but it definitely seems to have gone out of fashion on the commercial music pop scene, where robotic vocals and monumentally dumb lyrics are the norm. There are quite a few retro band carrying on the melodic pop tradition, many of them harkening back to a specific time periods and readily showing their source of influence. This week, we have the debut full-length album by a group that also specializes in well-written, high quality attractive rock and pop with an excellent male/female vocal pair. They call themselves The Oak Creek Band, and their new CD is titled XI, not for the number of previous albums, of which there were only some shorter-length EPs, but presumably for the number of songs on the new recording.

The group is co-led by Jenna and Daniel Watters, and their story has a lot of charm: They met in middle school and knew each other through high school, but the first time they actually sang together was for their high school graduation in Sedona, Arizona. After that experience, they began performing as a folk duo whenever they could, which was not very often, due to their distance between them and their respective schools. But they eventually decided to take the plunge as a permanent musical partnership and moved to Denver. They formed a five-piece band revolving around Jenna and Daniels' vocal harmonies and the founding duo's musical association blossomed into marriage. The band toured extensively in the Southwest in 2011 and 2012. Earlier this year, the Watterses and bassist Steve Rogers moved to Nashville and began work on what would become their new CD XI.

Some critics who are quoted in the band's publicity material draw a parallel to late 1970s rock along the lines of Fleetwood Mac of that period, but The Oak Creek Band has a bit more of a folk component to their music, while they still can rock out and frequently can get into an appealing rhythmic groove. The vocals are one of the band's big strengths, with the Watterses taking turns on the lead vocals and often doing harmonies. Their material is largely variations on love songs, but is well-crafted both musically and lyrically. The CD has a number of additional players who may make up the touring band, including Trent Armstrong on drums, and keyboard players Alex Kamm and Adam Grace. The album also features some pedal steel -- it was recorded in Nashville, after all -- plus banjo and a bunch of backing vocalists.

The CD starts off with one of its best tracks, especially lyrically, a song called Pixelated. It's a good example of Jenna Watters' appealing vocals. <<>>

Jenna's husband Daniel Watters does the lead vocal on the following track, Same Old Story, which has a bit of a soul-influenced groove to it. The lyrics are an appealing take on the classic theme of being apart from one's lover....

- George Graham


Intelligent, appealing rock with good writing and attractive vocals can still be found, but it definitely seems to have gone out of fashion on the commercial music pop scene, where robotic vocals and monumentally dumb lyrics are the norm. There are quite a few retro band carrying on the melodic pop tradition, many of them harkening back to a specific time periods and readily showing their source of influence. This week, we have the debut full-length album by a group that also specializes in well-written, high quality attractive rock and pop with an excellent male/female vocal pair. They call themselves The Oak Creek Band, and their new CD is titled XI, not for the number of previous albums, of which there were only some shorter-length EPs, but presumably for the number of songs on the new recording.

The group is co-led by Jenna and Daniel Watters, and their story has a lot of charm: They met in middle school and knew each other through high school, but the first time they actually sang together was for their high school graduation in Sedona, Arizona. After that experience, they began performing as a folk duo whenever they could, which was not very often, due to their distance between them and their respective schools. But they eventually decided to take the plunge as a permanent musical partnership and moved to Denver. They formed a five-piece band revolving around Jenna and Daniels' vocal harmonies and the founding duo's musical association blossomed into marriage. The band toured extensively in the Southwest in 2011 and 2012. Earlier this year, the Watterses and bassist Steve Rogers moved to Nashville and began work on what would become their new CD XI.

Some critics who are quoted in the band's publicity material draw a parallel to late 1970s rock along the lines of Fleetwood Mac of that period, but The Oak Creek Band has a bit more of a folk component to their music, while they still can rock out and frequently can get into an appealing rhythmic groove. The vocals are one of the band's big strengths, with the Watterses taking turns on the lead vocals and often doing harmonies. Their material is largely variations on love songs, but is well-crafted both musically and lyrically. The CD has a number of additional players who may make up the touring band, including Trent Armstrong on drums, and keyboard players Alex Kamm and Adam Grace. The album also features some pedal steel -- it was recorded in Nashville, after all -- plus banjo and a bunch of backing vocalists.

The CD starts off with one of its best tracks, especially lyrically, a song called Pixelated. It's a good example of Jenna Watters' appealing vocals. <<>>

Jenna's husband Daniel Watters does the lead vocal on the following track, Same Old Story, which has a bit of a soul-influenced groove to it. The lyrics are an appealing take on the classic theme of being apart from one's lover....

- George Graham


"Based on the crowd size and their connection to the music, The Oak Creek Band was who people came out to see. The band’s name evokes thoughts of country and roots rock, and although there were bits of both, it was not in the rowdy or rough and tumble way I had envisioned. What I heard was more refined late seventies rock that at times reminded me of mainstream Fleetwood Mac. Their music also had a transcendental feel, and hints of new age spirituality. I love surprises, and this was a sound that had an identity all its own. The harmony filled vocals were laced with pop and soul, and the lyrics were thoughtfully meaningful. This band seems to want to connect with fans on a deeper level, and the fans seemed to want to reciprocate. The Oak Creek Band’s music is highly energetic, especially when their indie rock side comes out, but it is also surprisingly soothing."
- Brian Turk, Listen Up Denver (Mar 08, 2012) - Listen-Up Denver!


"I was expecting The Oak Creek Band to be a contemporary indie folk band, but their performance incorporated a range of styles. They managed to present the wide range of music in a coherent performance package that came off as a polished showcase of their versatility rather than a jumble of songs that hinted at a lack of identity. The Oak Creek Band definitely has a hold of their identity, even if that identity isn't something that can be easily categorized.. understands how to craft and deliver melody driven music through strong lead vocal work from Jenna and Daniel...understand the dynamic between each other and the personality that each of their voices contain. Jenna Watters has a powerful, deep-reaching soulful voice that brings oomph to the bands sound when necessary, while Daniel Watters has an emotive yet earnest sound that brings about a more introspective sound. The sometimes alternating lead and sometimes co-vocal dynamic of these two provide the framework of the band."
Peter Washington - Concerted Effort Blog - Concerted Effort Blog


"Their whimsical sound moved people out of their seats and onto the floor. The music has an old charm and a timeless allure. The Oak Creek Band writes beautiful songs with telling lyrics. Their music is a window into their lives and their beauty and love exudes from the stage. As the singers look into each other’s eyes, a spark of hope glows. Their soulful performance feels personal, as if they are singing for this specific audience, to each person there. The music’s bluesy sound with a touch of twang is the right mix for those who are not fond of country music, but love folksy tunes. When the band covered Led Zeppelin’s What is and What Should Never Be, the crowd went crazy. This song showed off the true vocal power of the lead singer, Jenna Watters. Hearing this song in the middle of their soft and flowing set was a blast to the face — in a good way. After more original songs with their signature sound, the band closed with “Oh Darling” by the Beatles."
Laura Thompson - The Lumberjack - The Lumberjack


A Sedona band had a homecoming Oct. 18, playing the Sedona Performing Arts Center for students of Sedona Red Rock High School.

The Oak Creek Band is fronted by two SRRHS alumni, Daniel Watters and Jenna Cunningham. Make that Jenna Watters now, as the former classmates, longtime friends and current bandmates got married Sept. 10 at Indian Gardens Park in Oak Creek Canyon.

The band’s tour served as a working honeymoon. They worked their way from San Francisco to San Diego before turning east to Phoenix, Flagstaff and Sedona.

The Oak Creek Band plays an eclectic mix of alternative, indie rock and folk with heavily lyrical lines, but also has songs that dip into funk and border on bluegrass.

The band played for Sedona Red Rock High School’s fifth period in a concert set up by humanities teacher Karyl Goldsmith.

“It was a lot better response than we were anticipating,” Jenna Watters said. “I remember that we used to heckle all the acts that came through. But we got a good response.”

Watters said the band has heard a lot of positive feedback from the students via social networking sites like Facebook.

Backing the Watterses in The Oak Creek Band are Steve Rogers on bass, Seth Evans on accordion, banjo, keyboard and vocals, and former Sedona resident Paul Morris on guitar and keyboard.

The band has about six drummers who sit in until they find a permanent player. Former Sedona resident Adam Wolin had played with the band in California. Sedona drummer Lou Moretti has most recently joined the tour for its final Colorado portion.

The band is effectively home now, but playing gigs in the mountainous Colorado towns of Vail, Breckenridge and Telluride.

The Oak Creek Band played the old SRRHS auditorium in 2006, years before the Sedona Performing Arts Center was built. Jenna Watters said the new performance hall has better acoustics and visual aesthetics.

“I would love to see an orchestra in there,” she said. “They should get the bigger acts that come through to play there.”

Jenna and Daniel Watters have a long history in Sedona’s music scene.

Daniel Watters started playing music as soon as he got his hands on a guitar around age 10. He studied jazz and composed jazz arrangements in high school, and twice played in the Arizona All-State Jazz Band and the annual Sedona Jazz on the Rocks Festival.

At the same time, he was the front man and lyricist of several local rock and ska bands.

Jenna Watters has been singing all her life, beginning in church. When she was a junior in high school, she quit the basketball team to perform in the SRRHS production of the musical “Bye Bye, Birdie.”

The two were friends throughout high school but had never performed together. They were asked to sing together for their graduation ceremony in 2005, and chose to perform Simon & Garfunkel’s 1970 classic “Bridge Over Troubled Water.” Daniel Watters played the inaugural GumptionFest arts festival a month later with Morris’ band Liquid Theory. Watters also recorded his first solo album “The All Day Dreamer’s LP” in Richard Salem’s studio and released it in Sedona.

Daniel Watters said he and Jenna hung out over the summer before heading off to college, she to Arizona State University in Tempe and he to Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. She said she and Daniel kind of pursued music together half-heartedly, performing together a few times during that summer.

Jenna Watters left college after a year and traveled Europe. During her sojourn, she and Daniel Watters began to write music long distance via correspondence.

Jenna Watters returned to states and moved to Denver. She said after Daniel graduated from Loyola Marymount, he wanted to live in the same state so they could continue collaborating musically, so he joined her in Denver.

The pair soon formed a band, finding their bandmates via Craigslist. In terms of a name, Oak Creek was a big part of their lives, and the name stuck, she said.

Jenna Watters said they soon moved in together as platonic friends, living as roommates for months before they began dating. They started getting romantically involved slowly, Jenna Watters said.

“We didn’t want a relationship to interfere with us creatively or professionally,” she said. “But we listened to our hearts.”

The pair continued to play, perform and tour together as their relationship continued to strengthen. In September, the Watters tied the knot and hit the road again.

“After getting married, after writing and being creative together, it’s a sweeter thing than we expected,” Jenna Watters said.

The band has returned to the Sedona area often, most recently playing in a tour gig at a West Sedona bar on Sept. 23 and the Love4Amanda fundraiser in July. The concert benefitted Amanda Coughlin, a 20-year-old SRRHS alumna recently diagnosed with cancer. Jenna Watters said the Cunningham and Coughlin families have been longtime friends.

The Oak Creek Band just started to record - Red Rock News


A Sedona band had a homecoming Oct. 18, playing the Sedona Performing Arts Center for students of Sedona Red Rock High School.

The Oak Creek Band is fronted by two SRRHS alumni, Daniel Watters and Jenna Cunningham. Make that Jenna Watters now, as the former classmates, longtime friends and current bandmates got married Sept. 10 at Indian Gardens Park in Oak Creek Canyon.

The band’s tour served as a working honeymoon. They worked their way from San Francisco to San Diego before turning east to Phoenix, Flagstaff and Sedona.

The Oak Creek Band plays an eclectic mix of alternative, indie rock and folk with heavily lyrical lines, but also has songs that dip into funk and border on bluegrass.

The band played for Sedona Red Rock High School’s fifth period in a concert set up by humanities teacher Karyl Goldsmith.

“It was a lot better response than we were anticipating,” Jenna Watters said. “I remember that we used to heckle all the acts that came through. But we got a good response.”

Watters said the band has heard a lot of positive feedback from the students via social networking sites like Facebook.

Backing the Watterses in The Oak Creek Band are Steve Rogers on bass, Seth Evans on accordion, banjo, keyboard and vocals, and former Sedona resident Paul Morris on guitar and keyboard.

The band has about six drummers who sit in until they find a permanent player. Former Sedona resident Adam Wolin had played with the band in California. Sedona drummer Lou Moretti has most recently joined the tour for its final Colorado portion.

The band is effectively home now, but playing gigs in the mountainous Colorado towns of Vail, Breckenridge and Telluride.

The Oak Creek Band played the old SRRHS auditorium in 2006, years before the Sedona Performing Arts Center was built. Jenna Watters said the new performance hall has better acoustics and visual aesthetics.

“I would love to see an orchestra in there,” she said. “They should get the bigger acts that come through to play there.”

Jenna and Daniel Watters have a long history in Sedona’s music scene.

Daniel Watters started playing music as soon as he got his hands on a guitar around age 10. He studied jazz and composed jazz arrangements in high school, and twice played in the Arizona All-State Jazz Band and the annual Sedona Jazz on the Rocks Festival.

At the same time, he was the front man and lyricist of several local rock and ska bands.

Jenna Watters has been singing all her life, beginning in church. When she was a junior in high school, she quit the basketball team to perform in the SRRHS production of the musical “Bye Bye, Birdie.”

The two were friends throughout high school but had never performed together. They were asked to sing together for their graduation ceremony in 2005, and chose to perform Simon & Garfunkel’s 1970 classic “Bridge Over Troubled Water.” Daniel Watters played the inaugural GumptionFest arts festival a month later with Morris’ band Liquid Theory. Watters also recorded his first solo album “The All Day Dreamer’s LP” in Richard Salem’s studio and released it in Sedona.

Daniel Watters said he and Jenna hung out over the summer before heading off to college, she to Arizona State University in Tempe and he to Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. She said she and Daniel kind of pursued music together half-heartedly, performing together a few times during that summer.

Jenna Watters left college after a year and traveled Europe. During her sojourn, she and Daniel Watters began to write music long distance via correspondence.

Jenna Watters returned to states and moved to Denver. She said after Daniel graduated from Loyola Marymount, he wanted to live in the same state so they could continue collaborating musically, so he joined her in Denver.

The pair soon formed a band, finding their bandmates via Craigslist. In terms of a name, Oak Creek was a big part of their lives, and the name stuck, she said.

Jenna Watters said they soon moved in together as platonic friends, living as roommates for months before they began dating. They started getting romantically involved slowly, Jenna Watters said.

“We didn’t want a relationship to interfere with us creatively or professionally,” she said. “But we listened to our hearts.”

The pair continued to play, perform and tour together as their relationship continued to strengthen. In September, the Watters tied the knot and hit the road again.

“After getting married, after writing and being creative together, it’s a sweeter thing than we expected,” Jenna Watters said.

The band has returned to the Sedona area often, most recently playing in a tour gig at a West Sedona bar on Sept. 23 and the Love4Amanda fundraiser in July. The concert benefitted Amanda Coughlin, a 20-year-old SRRHS alumna recently diagnosed with cancer. Jenna Watters said the Cunningham and Coughlin families have been longtime friends.

The Oak Creek Band just started to record - Red Rock News


Young love is tough material to tackle. The radio is filled with artists who are fluent in sex, lust, and hormone-riddled attraction (the latter bringing a certain teen heartthrob to mind)… but not many know how to speak of companionship. On their brand new self-titled EP, The Oak Creek Band demonstrates a deep understanding of what it means to be young, poor, and in love. Perhaps that is because that is the world recently-engaged band members Jenna Cunningham and Daniel Watters have been facing since moving from California and Arizona to Denver, Colorado to fine tune their music. As vocalist Jenna Cunningham sings in the opening track, 1934, “We had our love to keep us warm.”

Through it’s six songs, the EP has it’s share of love and loss. 1934 expresses not only a young, survivalist love (with the kind of lyrics that will make you want spend the day holding your beloved under blankets) but the spoiling of this love when wealth and life become easier. The War, with it’s heartbreaking opening lyrics “We’ve grown tired of lives / we cannot live / with one another / and love we cannot give”, builds to it’s ultimate sentiment “Our love won’t last another day”… an expression that causes the listener to pine for the love expressed in 1934 and We Were Alive.

The EP is based in folk-pop and will undoubtedly appeal to fans of recent Grammy acts Mumford & Sons and Arcade Fire. However, the band doesn’t shy away from opening up into groovy keyboard solos and rock riffs, as seen heavily in the closing song Weight of the World. Vocalists Daniel Watters and Jenna Cunningham compliment each other as well as any him and her act around right now, while bandmates Steve Rogers and Mark Levy show they are perfectly capable of building a well-rounded tune.

The EP is available as a Name-Your-Price download on the acts bandcamp page (http://oakcreekband.bandcamp.com/) and is well worth whatever amount you decide to spend. For those who prefer a hard copy, it can be had for just $8 here: http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/oakcreekband There are much worse things than young love and heartfelt music to spend your money on. - Urban Behavior


There’s a good chance that I’m going to check out the Oak Creek Band in the coming weeks. I’m absolutely sure of that. It’s actually kind of funny how I found this local Denver band–I was searching for Wye Oak tickets. Wye Oak doesn’t come until April but I think listening to Oak Creek’s easy folk tunes will help to pass the time.

While Oak Creek is a Denver band in my book, Daniel Watters and Jenna Cunningham are originally from Sedona, Arizona. Over time, they came together to finally form a band. It wasn’t until they were in Denver that that formed Oak Creek. Their poppy folk sound helped to draw some comparisons to Stars by others and I can hear it a bit. However, I always, rightly or wrongly, associate Stars more closely with Arcade Fire and in this case Oak Creek is the other direction. They are simpler, less sonically indulgent. I think that’s why I enjoy them so much. They are currently recording their first album together. Check out 1934. - 1146 Miles


Poor and in love is a deep vein for singer-songwriter types, and the Oak Creek Band does it particularly well. The opening song on the outfit's debut EP, "1934," is touching and sincere, beautifully sung by Arizona natives Jenna Cunningham and Daniel Watters. The two moved to Denver in July 2009 and formed the band soon after, pulling their rhythm section from local jam outfit Frogs Gone Fishin'. After "1934" closes with the line "We had our love to keep us warm," the record gets a little more gospel and backwoodsy and a little less moving. But still, plenty of promise here. This is a very polished first effort, probably a product of the fact that Watters and Cunningham have been making music together since high school. Here's hoping they keep at it. - Westword


Poor and in love is a deep vein for singer-songwriter types, and the Oak Creek Band does it particularly well. The opening song on the outfit's debut EP, "1934," is touching and sincere, beautifully sung by Arizona natives Jenna Cunningham and Daniel Watters. The two moved to Denver in July 2009 and formed the band soon after, pulling their rhythm section from local jam outfit Frogs Gone Fishin'. After "1934" closes with the line "We had our love to keep us warm," the record gets a little more gospel and backwoodsy and a little less moving. But still, plenty of promise here. This is a very polished first effort, probably a product of the fact that Watters and Cunningham have been making music together since high school. Here's hoping they keep at it. - Westword


Admittedly, the last few weeks have been a whirlwind of tiring excitement. Now, as the school-semester draws to a close, I have found myself holed up with nothing to do except study, write term-papers, and complain about the cold weather (and lack of actual snowfall). Needless to say, I’ve been a bit of a curmudgeon. However, a bit of brightness came across my ears in the form of The Oak Creek Band.

After listening to nothing but gaze-experimental tunes for several months, The Oak Creek Band brought me back to one of my musical joys: folk-inspired singer-songwriter pop. “1934,” the first track off the group’s eponymous EP features a pleasant rolling melody that showcases the talent of singer Jenna Cunningham. “We Were Alive” shifts into a slightly more proggy-90's-sounding style (with a guitar riff that may or may not have been lifted from Weezer’s “El Scorcho”) while “Diving Bell” returns to simple folksy beauty.

Overall, this three track sampling from The Oak Creek Band is a rather strong showing for a group without a long history. In fact, Jenna Cunningham and Daniel Watters only moved to Denver from Arizona in 2009 and have already managed to make a few waves on the local scene. Take a listen to their EP below and be sure to check out their website for updates and show dates. - Something Like Sound


The Watters consider their style to be “American soul rock with a gypsy jazz influence,” a respectably broad and impressively faithful definition. Daniel and Jenna Watters have played music together for over eleven years and have been writing together for eight years, collaborating on six albums together as “The Old Creek Band” while they lived in Denver and Nashville. After relocating to Austin, Texas in February 2015, they changed their name to The Watters and started a new life. Their debut album, Great Unknown (independently released 7/1/2016) captures the physical and emotional experience of that transitional moment.

The Watters © 2016
The Watters © 2016

“The Great Unknown is the power of intuition and the beauty in uncertainty,” explains Daniel Watters. “Instead of finding fear in the unknown, I find it easier to see the beauty and opportunity in the unknown. Our move to Austin was a complete leap of faith, but a year later we are very happy here and feel an overwhelming support system.” Released a little over a year into their new life in Texas, The Watters’ debut is soulfully rich, with intoxicating horns and magnetic warmth. The majority of the record was recorded live, and it features a breathtaking 9-piece backing band throughout.

Life has plenty of risks, but plenty of rewards as well. The Watters is one of those rewards: Their storytelling derives from human experience, with that personal flare that only experience can provide. Songs like “Great Unknown,” about the struggle of finding one’s place in the world, or “Bad Dream,” about dealing with anxiety and life’s stresses, speak to the individual on a level we all can appreciate. Humble, passionate and real, The Watters’ music evokes the beauty of the everyday.

Great Unknown - The Watters
Great Unknown – The Watters

In partnership with LiveSyphon, Atwood Magazine is proud to present The Watters’ performance of “DNA” from their record release show at legendary venue The Parish in Austin. A darker song with a forceful message of individual empowerment and ‘flawed is beautiful’ (“I’m not your test tube baby”), “DNA” highlights the band’s rock elements while demonstrating their high level of synchronization.

Great music comes from bands who know how to let loose while keeping together, and that’s exactly what happens on the latter half of “DNA” as Daniel Watters breaks into a savage guitar solo that finds support from the keyboard and the horn section. The Watters’ energy is palpable, a testament to the musicians’ level of skill. Soul, rock, jazz, whatever – The Watters bask in a fusion of delightful sound and vivid lyricism.

Check out The Watters’ performance of “DNA,” and get to know them better through our exclusive interview below. Great Unknown is available via Bandcamp, Apple Music, and Spotify. The stage is set for Daniel and Jenna Watters, and we cannot wait to see what The Watters do next!

The Watters perform "DNA"
The Watters perform “DNA”

MEET THE WATTERS
ATWOOD MAGAZINE: YOU'VE RECENTLY RELOCATED TO AUSTIN. WHAT SORT OF MUSICAL CLIMATE DOES THE CITY OFFER THAT DIFFERS FROM NASHVILLE OR DENVER? HOW DOES IT UNIQUELY INSPIRE YOU?
The Watters: Nashville was pretty specifically Country music, but it also felt like you had to look and sound a certain way to make it there. Denver had great music, but mostly had a ‘jam band’ vibe to it. We love all the above, but we just didn’t feel connected to the music scene like we do here. Austin is so eclectic with its music scene, but we especially love all the blues, R&B/Soul and brass music here. The musicians here are inspiring to us because even though everyone is super laid back, they also work really hard and gig all the time. And musicians here help each other out with gigs, exposure, etc. as opposed to competing with each other. There is an amazing fan base here too as opposed to Nashville where usually the only people watching your show are your fellow musicians.

DOES THE MOVE TO AUSTIN AND NEW BAND NAME SIGNIFY A MAJOR CHANGE IN YOUR MUSIC? WAS THERE A PRESSING NEED FOR A FRESH START?
The Watters: Honestly, we didn’t realize how much the move to Austin would change everything for us. When we first got here, we still played shows under “Oak Creek Band” (our band for 6 years), but seeing as all our old members were no longer with us and our sound was slowly changing, a band name change seemed appropriate. It’s been so much better for us not having to explain to people that we actually ARE NOT a bluegrass band!

YOU'VE BEEN WRITING MUSIC TOGETHER FOR A LONG TIME. CAN YOU TELL US A BIT ABOUT HOW YOUR MUSIC HAS GROWN INTO WHAT IT IS TODAY?
The Watters: Things haven’t changed too much since we started; we have just been polishing and fine-tuning mostly. Since we moved to Austin we’ve embraced to horn section full time, which is somewhat new. However we’ve had horns on our records since the beginning and embracing them is almost going back to our roots than some of the more Americana stuff we were trying to do in Denver & Nashville. It was almost like we had the formula before we even started and got lost along the way and had to find our way back.

DANIEL, WHEN YOU TALKED ABOUT YOUR ALBUM YOU SAID, “THE GREAT UNKNOWN IS THE POWER OF INTUITION AND THE BEAUTY IN UNCERTAINTY. INSTEAD OF FINDING FEAR IN THE UNKNOWN, I FIND IT EASIER TO SEE THE BEAUTY AND OPPORTUNITY IN THE UNKNOWN.” WHAT SONG OFF THE ALBUM DO YOU THINK REFLECTS THIS SENTIMENT THE MOST?
The Watters: The title track “Great Unknown” talks about the patience needed for one to see that the fruits in life will always come if you just wait for them. “Bright Side” is another that alludes to the beauty in life despite your world being “burned and barren.” Things get tough, but there is always a bright side. It is important to be gracious for what you have and just smile for the little moments in life. Every damn day.

The Watters perform "DNA"
The Watters perform “DNA”

WHAT WAS THE REASONING BEHIND PUTTING TOGETHER A FULL BAND TO PLAY BEHIND YOU? HOW DID YOU CHOOSE THESE MUSICIANS?
The Watters: We spent four years after high school playing duo gigs, so we we officially formed the first real band in 2009… we were sick of playing Simon and Garfunkel songs and were ready to rock! We started as a four piece in Denver. Nashville is actually when we decided to start adding horns to the line-up, and we’ll never go back! We got very lucky when we first got to Austin because we just kept meeting these amazing musicians who introduced us to their other amazing musician friends, and the rest is history. Recently, we’ve been introduced to a handful of guys that went to UT’s school of music and we’re so stoked to be playing with these talented jazz musicians.

YOUR MUSIC IS EXPANSIVE, YOUR FULL BAND HAS A TOTAL OF NINE PEOPLE, AND YOUR LYRICS ARE VERY STRONG. IT’S A HUGE SOUND FOR A GROUP THAT IS MADE OF TWO PEOPLE. WHAT ABOUT THE TWO OF YOU, DO YOU THINK, IS THE MOST IMPORTANT ELEMENT OF THE WATTERS’ IDENTITY? AND HOW DO YOU THINK YOU MANAGE TO RETAIN THE ESSENCE OF YOUR DUO AND CONVEY IT ACCURATELY WHILE STILL MAKING SUCH AN ENORMOUS IMPACT ON YOUR LISTENERS?
The Watters: Jenna and I’s connection is what makes The Watters what it is. We have been singing together for over 11 years and have played countless shows together and it’s our dynamic which sets us apart. However, we don’t really consider ourselves just a duo, as we consider everyone that plays with us is part of our family. When we were “The Oak Creek Band” we used to have different players in all our different band photos and it started to get confusing, so part of the decision to become “The Watters” was that we knew certain players would come and go, but Jenna and I would always remain constant.

WHAT MESSAGE(S) ARE YOU TRYING TO GET ACROSS WITH YOUR MUSIC?
The Watters: That it’s about the music. It’s about feeling and emotion. It about marking time, being within a community or creating and recalling memories. It’s about happiness, sadness, pain, pleasure, love and sorrow anything that sparks inspiration.

YOU CHOSE TO RECORD THE MAJORITY OF YOUR ALBUM LIVE, SO I’M ASSUMING YOU HOLD YOUR LIVE SHOW QUITE DEAR. WHAT DO YOU THINK IS THE MOST STRIKING ASPECT OF IT?
The Watters: Our live energy is certainly what strikes our fans the most, so it has definitely been a quest to capture that. I love Bob Marley’s style of record producing where the band records together, then other overdubs are added to it. I’m not sure we’ve done quite that yet, but each album is a evolving and Great Unknown is our closest yet. The next one might have to go in the complete opposite direction though, and maybe we will capture what we’re going for by accident! ; )

The Watters perform "DNA"
The Watters perform “DNA”

THERE ARE A LOT OF AMBIGUOUS LYRICS HERE: “I’M DISILLUSIONED BY REALITY,” “I’M NOT YOUR TEST TUBE,” “YOUR TEST TUBE IS AN APOCALYPSE,” ETC. CAN YOU COMMENT ON THEM? WHAT MESSAGE/THEME ARE YOU AIMING TO CONVEY IN THEM?
The Watters: Those lyrics all come from the song “DNA” which is a very colloquial song. “DNA” touches on many different topics, so much so that at one point a drummer friend in Nashville came to his own conclusion that DNA stands for Do Not Ask. Generally though, this song screams against being a corporate guinea pig. I tried to compare the seductive associations used by mainstream corporations that make us believe cars and computers are “sexy” to that of a “perfect” human being. It’s hard not to long for that perfection in things. Electronic music has perfect time and pitch. Photos can be manipulated to be “flawless”. Almost every almond in the country is grown in California. However, the veneer of perfection is a dangerous one. Our imperfections and differences make us stronger as a society and as a people.

The veneer of perfection is a dangerous one.
IT’S NOT THAT COMMON TO SEE TWO SUCH STYLES OF DRUM SETS TOGETHER ON STAGE AT ONCE FOR THE SAME PERFORMANCE. WHAT DO YOU BELIEVE YOU ACHIEVE BY THAT COMBINATION?
The Watters: Having the percussion is always a treat, though we don’t always have one every single show. We started having a percussionist play with us during our time is Nashville and we found having someone doing polyrhythms over a simple but grooving rock drums gives it a nice cherry on top. We love the double drummers of Tedeschi Trucks, Allman Brothers, and Grateful Dead, so it’s our take on that without being too extravagant.

DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE LINE/LYRIC? WHAT IS IT AND WHY?
The Watters: From our record? If so, mine (Jenna) is from [album closer] “Bright Side”: “when the fire finally passes and the ashes turn to dust, when my world is burned and barren and my life has come undone, well it’s easy if you let go but it’s hard if you hold on, cause there will always be a bright side as we circle round the sun”. Daniel wrote this when we were driving home to AZ from Nashville. We didn’t know where we were going to move and what was going to happen with our music. I remember being very down about it all, wondering if this was it for us musically, but this song is a reminder that when things seem to fall apart, you’re really being shown that there is a “brighter side” to every situation in life.

DESCRIBE YOUR SOUND IN ONE SENTENCE.
The Watters: Americana Soul Rock with a gypsy jazz influence. - Atwood Magazine


Austin, Texas husband and wife duo The Watters are the 2016 Indie Spoonful "Best Dose of Indie" Award winners. Their latest album, 'Great Unknown,' features a 9-piece band, including a full horn section. Young schoolmates turned band-mates turned soul-mates, the duo have been playing music together for eleven years and have collaborated on six albums, sharing an authentic, amazing musical connection. Influenced by artists such as Fleetwood Mac, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Dr. Dog, My Morning Jacket and The Beatles, The Watters album 'Great Unknown' is soon to be known as - great.

The CD opens with the title track 'Great Unknown' which comes straight out of the gate with a wonderful groove on trumpet, sax and trombone. Jenna's voice enters, subdued and soulful, as she sings the killer first line, "You are pulsing in my marrow." Her voice has a clarity of tone that is striking. Combined with the lower register of Daniels voice, the duo capture an old-school meets new school Americana-folk-rock-soul sound that is unique. The song's message is about letting life unfold as every moment has it's time and place. The chorus has a fantastic, feel-good vibe. "The world as you know it is changing every moment. Time can't be bought or sold. Every single soul, every creature every stone has a place in this great unknown." The Watters know how to write the kind of melodies and hooks that sink in and resonate.

Up next is "Realty" with Daniel taking the leads on vocals. The tune has a funky, melodic guitar riff that nicely ties everything together. The Watters have a great sense of rhythm that hints at 60's soul and jazz. Almost three minutes into the song there's a sweet slide guitar solo. The third track on the album, "Bad Dreams" is my favorite and Jenna shines. "Bad Dreams" opens with a laid back 6/8 groove and a folk-violin solo that has a rich, vaguely Eastern phrasing that is gorgeous. "I twist and I turn holding the wall. It's gonna fall. Building me up, breaking me down, down to the ground. Dreams were forgotten and I'm walking in my sleep." Jenna's delivery is very moving. The recording, production and mix on each cut are very well-done. Another favorite track is "Ebb and Flow." Throughout the album, The Watters present lyrics that reflect and observe with insight and sincerity, making for a poignant impact."The world has a way of giving and taking away. It's a game that we play. The rules are changing everyday..." Their lyrics are not about fear of the unknown, but rather about letting go of control and finding beauty in life's uncertainties.

Sure to be a crowd favorite that will get folks swaying and smiling is the song " Johnny Applesead" sung by Daniel and joined by Jenna on the chorus. This song is completely infectious. The melody is fun and memorable and the guitar and horn solos, as always, are tasteful and spot on musically. "We roll all over the country. Johnny Appleseed. Oh were fresh out of money. Hmmm, we got what we need, yeah." You can't help but want to roll all over the county with them. The last song on the album is "Bright Side." This mellow and beautiful song is a soul-stopping shivers-up your arms kind of song. "There will always be a bright side as we circle round the sun."

In 2015, The Watters left Nashville to relocate to Austin, Texas which took an enormous leap of faith. The duo re-branded from a folk band called "The Oak Creek Band" and changed their name to 'The Watters.' The results of this transition can be heard in 'Great Unknown' which presents the tried and true musicianship of a couple who have played together since high-school. Daniel and Jenna Watters have delivered an exceptional collections of songs with guts and soul, meaning and message, and above all else great musicianship. With 'Great Unknown' The Watters prove what fans have 'known' all along - that their great songwriting and musicianship will always rise and grow whether they are in Nashville, Denver, Austin or any other part of the country because The Watters have a universal appeal that can take them anywhere they want to go. For more information on The Watters, visit their website. - Byron Harris


Having hopped around the country prior to their current Austin abode, husband-and-wife duo the Watters pay tribute to their geographic and musical ventures on a sophomore release. Opener "I Need You" launches their immediately familiar feel-good, big-band, old-school assembly. A sevenpiece setup of bright horns (lent by the Shinyribs crew) and generally groovy aesthetics cushion Jenna Watters' crystal clear vocals, sometimes grasping at soulful Feist. Waxes on love and relocation continue into chipper collab "Soul to Soul," unleashing Daniel Watters' twang-dusted lyrics and bluesy guitar lines. "Set You Free" commits its final half to a gospel organ solo under honeyed, tumbling brass embellishments. The couple largely reins in the sonic inconsistencies of debut Great Unknown, aside from one Disney duet patch working sultry jazz ("Something in the Stars") and a theatrical lull ("Along the Way"). A stormier direction unfolds the three final tracks, Jenna leading thoughtfully somber dives into an odyssey of relationship tumults. Despite the elemental fusion, the collection maps a developmental road stretching ahead for the traversing twosome. - Austin Chronicle


Opening with a swell of horns and a wave of rolling organ, the Watters’ sophomore album plunges headfirst into an ocean of accomplished soul pop. At the helm of the band are married couple Jenna and Daniel Watters, who, whether harmonizing or singing separately, provide rich, earthy vocals that anchor these songs. Behind them is a talented crew of musicians that includes members of Austin mainstays like Band of Heathens, Greyhounds, and Shinyribs. Uplifting and jubilant, The Watters feels immediate and pulses with the energy of a live performance. - Austin Monthly


Discography

The Oak Creek Band EP 2011
The Oak Creek Band- Fingerprints 2012
The Oak Creek Band- XI 2013
The Oak Creek Band- Glorietta EP 2014

The Watters- Great Unknown 2016

The Watters- Self titled 2018



Photos

Bio

   Before they were The Watters, Daniel Watters and Jenna Cunningham were children growing up in the red rocks of Arizona. Their mutual love of music brought them together and in 2005 their journey began when they sang together at their high school graduation. Seven years later they were wed and officially became The Watters. In music and in life, they set out into the great unknown to see where the journey would take them.     

     The Watters have crafted their one of a kind sound by traveling around the country soaking up their habitats.  Having lived in Sedona, Los Angeles, Denver, Nashville and now Austin, their sound is as eclectic as the places they’ve lived. Seamlessly blending Americana, Soul, Rock, Gypsy Jazz and Funk they have been described as “Fleetwood Mac with a horn section.”  Daniel and Jenna have collaborated on seven albums together under various monikers and released their debut record, Great Unknown, as “The Watters” in 2016. They are currently producing their sophomore release, due in early 2018. 
           The Watters have garnered a devoted fan base through their high-energy performances, well-crafted songwriting, stirring vocals and road-weathered musicianship. For The Watters, life and music are one, their journey together being their greatest muse.

Band Members